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It’s not just the design, the elements or the colours in an artwork that blow us away. It’s the concept; a force that resonates from the designer to the audience. Edmundo Moi-Thuk Shung, a graphic designer from The Netherlands, believes cracking a creative concept is the most important step in branding design. He speaks to us to throw more light on his approach.

Branding Design
What are u Doodling

CG: Branding and packaging is a very competitive sphere of design to be working in. What are the principles that dictate your designs?

Edmundo: There are three things that I constantly make sure I am aware of while designing – they have to be unique, meaningful and easy to understand.

Branding Design
Poppy Red Stickerpack

CG: Designs need to be creative and at the same time practical. How do your designs balance both the requirements? What are the challenges you face in day-to-day work? What do you enjoy the most about what you do?

Edmundo: Well, the most important part is to make sure the concept is clear and useful to others. This, for most of the time, also covers the creative part of the whole process. Concentrating on the job is the hardest part for me as I was diagnosed with Attention Deficit Disorder that hinders the thought and concentration process of the mind. I overcome this by doing exercises to clear my mind. You’ve got to figure out your own tricks to overcome whatever it is that distracts you from the job.

Branding Design
Poppy Red Stickerpack

I get the most enjoyment out of concept designing, like doodling in my moleskin and working them out digitally. It’s also refreshing to put your thoughts on paper and work these out.

DIY-HMZ. Some self-branding on various mediums and accessories can help gain exposure in the outside world
MOKKACCINO. These business cards in the shape of coffee cups that can be left behind on the train for travelers to pick up

CG: Branding requires a good understanding of the product/client. How do you then take it forward? Can you take us through your design process?

Edmundo: Once I’ve accepted the assignment, I make sure to gauge the client’s vision by asking them questions to rule out what they expect from me. From then on, I usually make a “plan of approach” that describes the needs, planning and requirements for the assignment. This helps put everything before me so that I can connect the dots through creative ideas and concepts. Afterwards I pitch my ideas to the clients and decide what direction I should take.

MIXWELL. A mix of street and graffiti art, this hiphop styled design uses audio and design supplies to infuse life into a concept
KOFI & AYU. A character getting ready to head a soccer ball, while Ayu the female character wants to check her camera lenses

CG: In your experience, how receptive are brands/clients and audiences to something new? Are people willing to take risks or do you feel they still prefer to play it safe?

Edmundo: The demand in today’s time is to create something that is ‘unusual yet affective’. I guess that means people are willing to take risks as long as the concepts are effective and don’t differ too much from already existing products.

Branding Design
SMOOTHIE POSTER. Designed for The Pepin Press Company the design uses relevant elements to bring together a concept
LOGOS. These logos designed for clients and the artist himself communicate and symbolise unique character for each

CG: You use the Indian symbol of a Yogi in your branding design for Mellow. Can you tell us more about the project and how you arrived at that idea? How do international elements feature in your designs? How do the local audience adapt to something foreign?

Edmundo: It all started with an old sketch of a Yogi which I stumbled upon while going through all of my drawings. The project was a mother’s day gift and I related the element to the fact that she does yoga. That’s when I came up with the idea to make something by myself using an old duffle bag and other stuff lying around my house and created several products out of it. Since Yoga originates from Ancient India, the logo was apt. The project was received well by people with different backgrounds perhaps because our world is getting more multi-cultural.

MELLOW. Symbolism in a logo makes it memorable as this yoga branding suggests
MELLOW. Symbolism in a logo makes it memorable as this yoga branding suggests

CG: Brandings can’t be static. How do you create designs that can be worked upon and taken forward as the brand evolves? How do you give it that flexibility?

Edmundo: I make sure the logo I design isn’t too complicated. Ofcourse a lot depends on the kind of brand and the brief, but I usually give it a visual reference for what the company stands for. It gives it the advantage to become memorable and the ability to evolve easily as the time passes on.

MELLOW BASIC YOGA POSTER. Displaying basic yoga poses, this design also translates onto a scroll that can be used as a handy guide for some yoga practice

Published in Issue 21

They say not to judge a book by its cover. But they also say that exceptions are always there. There’s no doubt, branding and packaging are the faces of any business and product. They decide the way people will receive the brand; whether they will accept it or reject it. To understand and gain more perspective on this much-unsolved mystery, we invited many branding and packaging experts who throw light on the topic.

 

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Creative Gaga - Issue 49

 

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In such complicated times, it’s all about being simple. Simple is effective when it comes to design, believes Lundgren+Lindqvist, a Swedish design studio. It’s all about saying a lot more with a lot less. Engaging in a conversation, they tell us more on how they create effective and memorable design.

Design
Varvet - Visual Identity, Stationary and Sinages
Varvet - Visual Identity, Stationary and Sinages
Design
Varvet - Visual Identity, Stationary and Sinages

CG: Describe your journey as Lundgren+Lindqvist. What have been your accomplishments?

LL: When we started Lundgren+Lindqvist in 2007, our primary goal was to do what we love and stay afloat doing so. Now our ambition has grown along with our team, but we still want to do the best possible work. Over the years, we have had the opportunity to work with a great number of amazing clients, creating work that we can all be very proud of.



O/O-Brewing Baltic Porter-Packaging Design

CG: Your designs appear simple, effortless and smooth; however that is probably not the case behind the scenes. What all do you have to go through to arrive at the final design outcome?

LL: Simple is hard. Every project starts with a coconut. We use fine grain sandpaper to peel off layer by layer until we expose the core. That’s because we believe in honesty. Achieving that means removing the make-up to expose the bare, naked truth.

Design
Akademi valand photography next to the ocean exhibition catalogue covers

CG: What inspirations are included in your design? How does your background reflected in your designs?

LL: Like most in our line of business, we take an active interest in neighbouring creative fields; such as the arts and architecture. It is hard to judge as to what extent our Scandinavian background has influenced us. Of course, the legacy of great designers and thinkers such as Paul Kjaerholm, Olle Eksell and Alvar Aalto continue to inspire.

O/O - Brewing - Carismatico - Packaging and Visual Identity


O/O-Brewing Bangatan

CG: You work across various mediums. How working on paper differ from working for the digital space?

LL: Paper is definite, in that a printed piece is final. On the other hand, the digital space is an indefinite, organic medium. Both mediums offer unique possibilities. While conscious of this, we try to build each project around a concept and an idea rather than on the media of choice.

Maria Sole - Ferragamo, Visual identity and packaging
Design
Maria Sole - Ferragamo, Visual identity and packaging

CG: Designs have to look amazing and at the same time solve a problem and fulfil a greater purpose. How do you balance your and your client’s views?

LL: A good designer-client relationship is, like any relationship, based on trust. When there is a lack of trust from either side, the outcome will suffer.

Design
Critical Mass Studio Document Holder
Design
Critical Mass Studio Document Holder


Critical Mass Studio Pencils
Critical Mass Studio Poster
Critical Mass Studio The Totebags

CG: The world of design is constantly evolving. How do you keep up with the change?

LL: Although times are indeed changing, certain truths will remain. Our inherent curiosity and thirst for knowledge allows us to stay updated in a very natural, organic way. We visit exhibitions, read and travel a lot. Staying updated is nurturing our interests, which is the fuel we use for our daily (and sometimes nightly) design and development work.

A Sense of Place, Refugees welcome poster book
Design
Recto Verso Mirror


Design
Recto Verso Spread

CG: What other countries would you say are very prominent when it comes to design? What are your views on Indian design? Anything Indian that has caught your eye?

LL: In terms of graphic design, our neighbours Norway and Finland are definitely countries to watch out for as they are challenging those with a traditionally strong graphic design output such as Switzerland, England and the Netherlands. In terms of India, we are shamefully aware of the fact that we know very little about the country’s design scene. Perhaps Creative Gaga Magazine can put an end to our ignorance.

O/O - Brewing - Packaging and Visual Identity
O/O-Brewing-AW-2016-Packaging and Art Direction

Published in Issue 21

Branding With Packaging! They say not to judge a book by its cover. But they also say that exceptions are always there. There’s no doubt, branding and packaging are the faces of any business and product. They decide the way people will receive the brand; whether they will accept it or reject it. To understand and gain more perspective on this much-unsolved mystery, we invited many branding and packaging experts who throw light on the topic.

 

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CURRENT ISSUE
Creative Gaga - Issue 49

 

Frolic brand has become one of the experts in the making of Italian cheese in many different flavors. Since 1993, they are the leading supplier of various kinds of cheese in India. For their new variant of Italian cheese flavour, they approached the team of ‘DesignerPeople’ to come up with a unique packaging for it.

Italian Cheese

• Brief: Italian Cheese is the way forward

A large quantity of milk got wasted on daily basis in North India due to lack of dairy infrastructure. To make the use of that milk, Mr. Girish Juneja, the founder of Frolic, has decided to launch the cheese products in the Italian flavor as it has become trendy these days in India.

Italian Cheese

Challenges: Mindsets need to be changed

The first challenge was to understand the Italian food culture to give a native touch on product packaging in order to get an international look & feel.

But the real challenge was to convince the Indian buyers with an idea of unique cheese and butter, as fresh bocconcini and mozzarella salad cheese are relatively new to Indian market.

Italian Cheese

Solution: The Italian Cheese Flavours for India

With the help of customer insights, Designer People team proposed an eye-catchy and attractive ‘Hexagon’ shaped packaging for the butter.

The shape helped with the natural flexibility and also is convenient for the storage and transport.

As the brand wanted to highlight the ‘process of making Cheese’ being imported from Italy, Designer People included an Italian flag on the pack with the tagline “taste the real Italian flavour” to make it more evident.

Italian Cheese

The wooden texture background has been used to get the feel of a dairy farm, which overall convinces the Indian buyers to buy Folic’s product over the competitor products.

Result:

Successfully launched Folic products into the B2C market, communicating an effective value proposition. Customers well appreciated the packaging through positive feedbacks. Also, there was a gradual increase in B2C market sales along with existing B2B market.

Studio Role:

Package designing, Test Marketing, Positioning, NPD and Innovation, International insights.

Italian Cheese
CURRENT ISSUE
Creative Gaga - Issue 49

 

The brand name, list of ingredients and description as well. How do you fit all this into a limited space and still make it all look organised and appealing? Well, that’s why we have packaging designers. Akim Melnik, a Packaging Designer from Belarus believes it’s important to keep certain key things in mind to help fulfil the purpose. In a conversation with Creative Gaga, he tells us about his design dogma.

Packaging
NOORBEST HIBISCUS DRINKS
Packaging
NOORBEST HIBISCUS DRINKS

CG: Your designs are mostly focused on branding and packaging. What is your design philosophy that makes you as a brand, stand out?

Akin. To describe the philosophy in words is difficult. It’s like a dream that you’ve had, you remember it, but just cannot describe it. However, there are some things that are always important to be aware of when designing for a product or brand. First is to meet the expectations and preferences of the target audience. Secondly, ergonomics and making sure information on a pack is correctly presented is crucial too. And lastly, you cannot create without knowing what’s already out there. Hence, competent analysis and research of competitive product packaging is a necessary step. Remember, that a good design can sell a bad product, just like a bad design can worsen the selling a good product.

Packaging
Silver Probe Vodka Decor Design
Packaging
Silver Probe Vodka Decor Design

CG: You have designed across a range of products, providing packaging in a variety of shapes. How do put yourself in the brand’s shoes? How do you know a juice bottle should look like a juice bottle and not like an oil bottle?

Akin. Sometimes you have to comply with existing stereotypes, and sometimes deliberately go against them. Much depends on the marketing objectives of our client. The client, brand and brief determine where you must draw the line.

Tea Package Design
Tea Package Design
Helsy Granulated Coffee

CG: Packaging and logo design have to be practical because they serve a purpose that has to be truthful and genuine. How do you balance practicality with creativity?

Akin. The primary function of packaging design is to appeal emotionally. Practicality comes second. Any task can be perceived either as a routine or as an opportunity to show their creativity. Good packaging design is a harmony of creativity and practicality, all done in a contained manner.

Packaging
Indian Instant Coffee Package Design
Packaging
Indian Instant Coffee Package Design

CG: When you started as a design studio, what was the most difficult part? How did you overcome challenges to become so successful? How do you reach out to the world?

Akin. The most difficult part when you’re just beginning is the inexperience and lack of knowledge about principles and techniques of creating high-quality packaging. Like in any other part of life, all these difficulties are overcome by everyday work done with full dedication. Experience is the best teacher and this process of improvement is endless and amazing.

ABC Juices Package Design
Gotovim Vmeste Spices Package Design
ABC Berry Jam Design
Olivia Mix Sunflover And Olive Oil

Published in Issue 22

This issue is dedicated to the talented design graduates who are not just looking to work but seeking experience in order to realise the greater goal of life. The issue features various designers from India and abroad. Kevin Roodhorst from The Netherlands realised his goal so early in life that propelled him to start his career as a designer as young as 13. Ashish Subhash Boyne, a student of Sir JJ Institute of Applied Art realised his dream while studying when he started doing freelance projects, which allow him to express his free thoughts. To name a few talents we have Vivek Nag from Fine Arts from Rachna Sansad Mumbai, Simran Nanda from Pearl Academy New Delhi, Anisha Raj from MAEER MIT Institute of Design Pune, Giby Joseph from Animation and Art School Goa and many more. This issue gives a fresh perspective of talented graduates and their unique approach to design.

 

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Creative Gaga - Issue 49

 

As people realise the creative hard work behind beautiful packs, this field is getting innovative. Packaging design plays an important role in the success of any brand or product. The goal of an inspiring packaging design is to turn projects into collectable and saleable items. It has to have strong visual appealing to stand out of the competition.

 

So, we have selected 20 best innovative & inspiring packaging designs, which will not just motivate you to create appealing designs but also give you update on current packaging trends.

1. Pen Packaging

Designed by: Wingyang

2. The Best Tea Time of the Day

Designed by: a.Design

3. Manjoor Estate’s

Inspiring Packaging

Designed by: Isabela Rodrigues

4. Paper Boat

Inspiring Packaging

Designed by: Elephant Design

5. Olio D’oliva

Designed by: Alessia Sistori

6. Topshape

Inspiring Packaging

Designed by: Sweety & Co

7. ACH vegan chocolate/ Limited edition

Designed by: Gintare Marcin

8. Kraftig

Inspiring Packaging

Designed by: Isabela Rodrigues

9. PANGÆA

Source: Behance

10. Packed like Sardines

Designed by: Brandiziac

11. Aphrodite’s

Inspiring Packaging

Designed by: Midday Studio

12. Flour Beverage – Sattu

Inspiring Packaging

Designed by: Vikash Raj

13. Le chocolat des Français

Source: Pinterest

14. Motif Wine

Designed by: EN GARDE

15. Filirea Gi Wine

Inspiring Packaging

Designed by: Christos Zafeiriadis

16. Exotic Coffee Collection

Inspiring Packaging

Designed by: ARTEMOV ARTEL

17. Smoker’s Teeth

Inspiring Packaging

Source: Pinterest

18. ASAP

Inspiring Packaging

Designed by: Elephant Design

19. Pasta Packaging

Designed by: Nikita Konkin

20. Milko

Inspiring Packaging

Designed by: Giovani Flores

CURRENT ISSUE
Creative Gaga - Issue 49

 

Rocklets, a popular brand in the category of chocolate and confectionary in Argentina, wanted to give away headphones as a present with the purchase of Rocklets Easter Eggs. Morphine Motion Graphics created two fun and cool 3D illustrations for the packaging design of the giveaway.

 

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Packaging Design
Packaging Design
Packaging Design
Packaging Design
Packaging Design
Packaging Design

Users are aware of trends, demanding trendy products. Brands succumb to these demands to have a stronger say and a longer stay in the market. Studio Elephant Design has elaborated on this cycle explaining the need of packaging design.

Trends are a reflection of how people behave, how they live and vice versa.

 

One may believe tech-based products like smartphones & AI assistants are changing the way people live. But there is as much change happening in their lives through humble packaging design. In times of extreme actions and judgments, it is believed that design becomes prettier. This actually is happening.

 

There are certain things individuals look for before buying foods, beverages, personal & home care products nowadays:

Packaging Design

1. Tell me a Story?

Story of origin, granny’s recipe, kind of music played to cows… Is it a superfood rediscovered? Was it made the exact same way people made stuff when the world was perfect? They want to know more, not just about the ingredients or the company behind it, but also the hands that made it. They are hungrier for stories than the food they are buying.

2. Small for me Please

Because of longer commutes and increased working hours that blur into socializing, people are looking for things that will help them stretch their days outside of homes. Small portions of handbag-insertables are a rage in colour cosmetics, face masks, wipes, hand sanitizers, and other personal care products for on-the-go use. Spoilt for choice and highly aware of what they consume, people prefer single serves in snacks, meals & beverages.

3. Be Direct

Farm to Face. Grass to Glass. Park to Plate. Yes. That is how people like stuff to reach them. They want it fresh, preferably hand-made, with least processing. Demanding honesty of intent and transparency on the label about what goes in, they like small batches made with care. Lesser the machine intervention, the better it is.

4. Give me an Eye Candy

Packaging is not just for protecting the goods, it needs to give the product a flaunt value, making it Instagram-worthy. Packaging can be an object of desire itself. So the “look” of packaging is as important as what it carries inside.

5. Sustainability Counts

Over engineered packaging is a big no-no. The simple, the better. Is the plastic used easily to recycle? Reduced packaging layers, lesser staple pins, alternative chemical inks & glues, these are things that the sustainability-aware users look for

• Game Changers 

Technology-based enablers are bringing some change too. The biggest change is in the way packaging can enable customization of every consumption experience. Technology & insightful design makes it possible to have small batches, personalized messaging or even controlled release of ingredients. Eg Kolibri (Japan) beverage bottle allows consumers to control the amount of sugar they want in their drink.

Recent advancements in automated packaging lines are not only more efficient, but also adaptive & flexible. They enable personalized packaging with individual names like the Coke cans & bottles from “Share a Coke” campaign.

Packaging Design

• Studio Sampler

Elephant helped develop a brand of Indian ethnic drinks that was based on nostalgia, aptly named “Paper boat”, taking one back to the good old days of childhood when life was simple and full of optimism.

 

Doy packs seemed a more sustainable choice against bottles, cans or cartons. The shape was designed to feel like squeezing a fruit and easy to open cap was inspired by paper boat itself. Graphics were simple and represented an uncomplicated, delightful world.

Packaging Design

The incredible part was that the brand refrained from using mass media for a couple of years. ON-the-shelf packaging did all the talking. And in less than five years, the brand made it to the top position in single-serve beverages, won many awards and also made it to the list of buzziest, most promising brands from India.

 

This is an interesting example because it aligned with all the five reasons for engaging with a brand and was created well in time to be able to ride the wave successfully.

 

For designers & consumers who don’t like to be cookie cutters, personalization and customization possibilities are like a boon. The only limitation would be ideas, which one is hopefully never short of.

Issue 45

Published in Issue 45

When celebrations are all around for the new year, everyone is curious about what this new year will bring. So, the rounds of looking back to the past year and trying to predict the new one starts. We started the same exploration through this issue by reaching various experts for their take on the trends for their respective fields. So, go ahead.

 

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CURRENT ISSUE
Creative Gaga - Issue 49

 

People are not too fond of throwing things away, and in the recycle-reuse world of today, people find ways to use small little things for their own unique purposes. Whether it’s a tin tea leaves box converted into a pen stand or gift basket used as home decor, designer Anoop Chalil believes it’s all about thinking one step ahead. Below, he outlines key points to help create innovative packaging that helps the product and its consumers.

Experience comes with an Experience

It can be said that packaging design is more about the journey than the final creation from a designer’s point of view. It’s not just interacting with a product, but also with the people and culture behind it. These when combined enhance one as a packaging designer, giving you more insights and in depth knowledge of the skill.

It’s not about Doing Different Things, it’s about Doing Things Differently

Every designer explores their own niche; their own style. And even though at first look, some designs by various designers might look similar, where it may look like a identical tools or techniques have been used, a closer look reveals the small differences that make a difference. For instance, it’s easy for many to simply use the align tool in design software to arrange and organize objects. However, a difference can be made by using a grid system and zooming into each object to manually arrange them. Such detailed working style goes on to make a huge impact on the final outcome.

What You Keep in Mind should be Kept in your Design

The look and feel of packaging is predominantly dominated by the product. However, simple and minimal designs stand out in a cluttered shelf. Before creating innovative solutions, it is important to keep in mind some simple points to make the journey smooth and obstacle-free. Staying simple and honest is key and so is researching consumers, markets and competition before getting onto designing. Also, packaging designs significantly depend on the type of material being used and hence a good understanding in such areas is crucial as well. Apart from that, product extension and legible typography are some more aspects that must be included in every design.

It’s not about Who’s in the Driver’s Seat, but What Car you’re Driving

In the design world, everyone would agree that the clients have the ultimate say. But that does not stop any designer or design from coming through. It’s not easy of course and is a skill that comes with experience and confidence. As a packaging designer, it’s just not enough to simply create packaging that looks good; one needs to always have concrete reasons as to why that is so. Tell the client’s why using well-researched reasons and they will agree with your concept.

 

For example, coming up with Tin packaging that could be used as keepsakes by consumers instead of using plastic bottles that the client initially demanded works a lot better to not only add to the designer’s portfolio but to work for the brand as well. Effectiveness is key and this way, designers can have the last word. But this by no means is disregarding opinions of clients. Designers must also be aware that companies spend two to three years researching a product before launching it in the market. Hence, it doesn’t hurt sometimes to try and understand where they’re coming from.

Published in Issue 26

Packaging is the first vital step towards enchanting the audience. Who doesn’t like a cute box or a trendy bottle? With this issue, Creative Gaga lets the cat out of the box to reveal the world of packaging design. Featuring various local and international designers like Petar Pavlov from Macedonia and Brandziac from Russia, Elephant Design and Impprintz from Pune, the issue promises to be a keepsake for many.

 

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CURRENT ISSUE
Creative Gaga - Issue 49

 

At times, we get stuck playing the tug of war between a client and designer so much so that we often forget about the product or brand in focus. Branding and packaging expert, Petar Pavlov from Macedonia makes the product the epicentre of his thoughts and designs to create ideal protection and cover for them-just like our skin.

Packaging Design - Peacoque
Packaging Design - Special Range

CG. You seem to have grasped the true essence of packaging, infusing a brand’s personality and flavour. What has changed in packaging design over the years? How do you make your designs look modern and cutting-edge?

Petar Pavlov. This is a hard one because the goal is not guided by finding modern and cutting-edge solutions, but rather employ what best fits the brand and product. There have been numerous times when I have tried to apply a certain trend and midway have had to return to exploring new solutions because the initial thought didn’t complement the product.

Packaging Design - Doritos
Packaging Design - Doritos secound
Packaging Design - Doritos Third

CG. How has being a packaging designer in Macedonia influenced you as a designer? What local traits do your designs possess? What traits make your designs competitive for the international world?

Petar Pavlov. I have been working in Macedonia and Serbia too, but it’s important to note that location nowadays has nothing to do with the influence. The situation in Macedonia design-wise is not really up there. However, it’s good to see more and more designers pushing boundaries.

Packaging Design - Brush Stroke
Packaging Design - Brush Stroke Label
Packaging Design - Domaine Lepovo Stationery
Packaging Design - Box
Packaging Design - Domaine Lepovo Cork Screw

CG. What is your design process? And how much does the initial idea resemble the end design that the client accept? Do you dictate your designs or is it dictated by the brand and/or client?

Petar Pavlov. I always start with research and the results of such are what dictate the final design. The journey from the first proposal to the end solution is a complicated one and varies from project to project.

 

At times, clients can make critical decisions that result in a final outcome nowhere resembling the initial concept at all. And at times, there are instances where clients agree with your notions and understanding. But ultimately, in this business, it’s the brand that controls everyone, be it the client or the designer.

Packaging Design - Tga Packshot

CG. If you could pick any one brand/product in the world to design some packaging for, what would it be? How do you use your designs to enhance the product experience for the consumer?

Petar Pavlov. I love chocolate, so I guess I would pick Lindt. And to answer the second part of your question, I usually try to find small details that would surprise the consumer and allows them to connect more intimately with the product.

Packaging Design - Tga Collage
Issue 26 - creativegaga

Published in Issue 26

Packaging is the first vital step towards enchanting the audience. Who doesn’t like a cute box or a trendy bottle? With this issue, Creative Gaga lets the cat out of the box to reveal the world of packaging design. Featuring various local and international designers like Petar Pavlov from Macedonia and Brandziac from Russia, Elephant Design and Impprintz from Pune, the issue promises to be a keepsake for many.

 

Order Your Copy!
CURRENT ISSUE
Creative Gaga - Issue 49

 

Showcasing new packaging design trends making their mark this fresh year. Check out all that’s new and all that’s found its way from the past into the present. There’s so much to discover!

Design, design everywhere! There is so much design in this world, today, considering the wide range of applications that it has. No doubt, it has become so much more relevant now than in the past. If you take a good look at it, you realise how design has changed across various mediums in time and taken new shape and perspective.

 

With that in mind, here we highlight some of the new trends that have found their way into the existing design scenario and those that have carried on through generations to come forth even in current times. Take a good look; you never know what it might strike!

01
Flat Design

Flat is in. Something that has been in vogue for a long time now, it continues to remain the ideal way of display, presentation and functionality as well. The classic flat can be seen in various shapes and patterns up to this day. Be it squares or rectangles, the flat is here to stay.

Brandiziac - Packaging
packaging design
startup

02
Minimal Design

Minimal is the new thing to do. Gone are the days of congested, over-informative and heavily loaded design with overwhelming patterns, colours and shapes. Instead, design has grown to become not only smart but so also ‘essential’. That just makes it easier to focus attention on what really matters, doesn’t it? Clear, simple minimal.

Packaging

Designed by
– Łobzowska Studio and Marysia Markowska

Inspiring Packaging

03
The Colors

Bold Colors

“Colour, colour, which colour do you want?” Remember the game? Well, when it comes to current design, the answer is pretty clear and simple – Bold colours. They strike the eye well and stand out in a space filled with so many different shades without much effort. Bold is the new gold, indeed. It does the job and in a striking fashion, that’s hard to miss.

successful packaging
Packaging

Designed by Marco Serena

Packaging

Pastel Colors

Pastel colours are quite contrary to the widespread trend of bold tones and shades. That is one of the reasons they go so well with subtle messages that need to find their way through the clutter of loud designing. It is one way to be heard and seen without creating an unnecessary fuss in a space that is filled with noisy and flashy features.

Packaging

Designed by Creatsy Official

Packaging

Designed by ChocoToy cute


04
Bold Typography

Bold is big and bold is beautiful. It speaks loud and clear, without room for doubt, thus putting across the message in a way that leaves no scope for any kind of distortion or dilution. It has, for this very reason, become so much of a trend to find big and bold typo in bold shades and backgrounds. Look around, it’s everywhere.

packaging design
packaging design
Packaging
Bombay Brasserie - The Indian Culinary Expert

05
Patterns & Shapes

Geometric

Geometry is present in everything. Right from a needle to the very solar system, everything is geometric in nature – something worth considering when it comes to design too. After all, geometry is perfection and can never feel wrong if all is in sync. So also with the design elements, the right geometry never fails.

Packaging

Designed by oraviva! designers

Packaging

Designed by IWANT design

Custom Shapes and Elements

Made to fulfill the need of the hour based on the relevant context of communication, custom shapes and elements such as hand-drawn illustrations give an unmimicable touch to branding. They need not necessarily be symmetric or “perfect” in size and proportion but more a trademark style. What better than an un-mimicable touch, isn’t it!
Inspiring Packaging
Packaging

Designed by Lucas Wakamatsu

Vintage

The term “Vintage” speaks for itself and needs no real explanation. It is synonymous of a strong level of integrity and effect that has lasted the test of time without compromising on its originality. “Vintage” will never be old; it is here to stay for a long time to come if not forever.

Inspiring Packaging
Packaging

Designed by
– Auge Design and Giovanni Stillittano

Packaging

Doodles/ Illustrative

Doodle-doodle on the wall, haven’t we all?  Well, this is a trend that had lasted generations and seems to never get old—’cause doodles are always fun, spontaneous and hence unique, never exactly the same as another. That is why they’ve found their way well in the design culture too and are highly impactful especially with the youth.

Packaging

Designed by Backbone Branding

NH1 - Vada Pav

06
Unusual Materials & Shapes

The unusual never fails to be noticed and make an impression. So also it is when it comes to design – everything from weird shapes to all kinds of materials, the sky is the limit. With the kind of tools available today, it is not difficult to execute that which is not so common. No shape is odd and no material is wrong.

Packaging

Designed by Backbone Branding


07
Holographic Effects

The holographic effect used to be ‘the’ thing to do at one point in time due to its shiny, glittery nature. It is here to stay, though, as it finds it s way into the current design scene. The lure of the vintage never fails to shine even in new times. Holographs would catch our eye on any given day, including today apparently.

Packaging

Designed by Anagrama Studio


08
Gradients in Packaging

Now, here’s something new and definitely worthwhile. One shade just doesn’t seem enough sometimes, so there’s a whole range of it. Just a tone lighter or a shade darker can create and put together a whole series of gradient design. Isn’t that amazing, the entire rainbow is available to put on display!

Inspiring Packaging
Packaging

Designed by Marco Serena

Packaging

Designed by Backbone Branding

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Creative Gaga - Issue 49