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Showcasing new packaging design trends making their mark this fresh year. Check out all that’s new and all that’s found its way from the past into the present. There’s so much to discover!

Design, design everywhere! There is so much design in this world, today, considering the wide range of applications that it has. No doubt, it has become so much more relevant now than in the past. If you take a good look at it, you realise how design has changed across various mediums in time and taken new shape and perspective.

 

With that in mind, here we highlight some of the new trends that have found their way into the existing design scenario and those that have carried on through generations to come forth even in current times. Take a good look; you never know what it might strike!

01
Flat Design

Flat is in. Something that has been in vogue for a long time now, it continues to remain the ideal way of display, presentation and functionality as well. The classic flat can be seen in various shapes and patterns up to this day. Be it squares or rectangles, the flat is here to stay.

Brandiziac - Packaging
packaging design
startup

02
Minimal Design

Minimal is the new thing to do. Gone are the days of congested, over-informative and heavily loaded design with overwhelming patterns, colours and shapes. Instead, design has grown to become not only smart but so also ‘essential’. That just makes it easier to focus attention on what really matters, doesn’t it? Clear, simple minimal.

Packaging

Designed by
– Łobzowska Studio and Marysia Markowska

Inspiring Packaging

03
The Colors

Bold Colors

“Colour, colour, which colour do you want?” Remember the game? Well, when it comes to current design, the answer is pretty clear and simple – Bold colours. They strike the eye well and stand out in a space filled with so many different shades without much effort. Bold is the new gold, indeed. It does the job and in a striking fashion, that’s hard to miss.

successful packaging
Packaging

Designed by Marco Serena

Packaging

Pastel Colors

Pastel colours are quite contrary to the widespread trend of bold tones and shades. That is one of the reasons they go so well with subtle messages that need to find their way through the clutter of loud designing. It is one way to be heard and seen without creating an unnecessary fuss in a space that is filled with noisy and flashy features.

Packaging

Designed by Creatsy Official

Packaging

Designed by ChocoToy cute


04
Bold Typography

Bold is big and bold is beautiful. It speaks loud and clear, without room for doubt, thus putting across the message in a way that leaves no scope for any kind of distortion or dilution. It has, for this very reason, become so much of a trend to find big and bold typo in bold shades and backgrounds. Look around, it’s everywhere.

packaging design
packaging design
Packaging
Bombay Brasserie - The Indian Culinary Expert

05
Patterns & Shapes

Geometric

Geometry is present in everything. Right from a needle to the very solar system, everything is geometric in nature – something worth considering when it comes to design too. After all, geometry is perfection and can never feel wrong if all is in sync. So also with the design elements, the right geometry never fails.

Packaging

Designed by oraviva! designers

Packaging

Designed by IWANT design

Custom Shapes and Elements

Made to fulfill the need of the hour based on the relevant context of communication, custom shapes and elements such as hand-drawn illustrations give an unmimicable touch to branding. They need not necessarily be symmetric or “perfect” in size and proportion but more a trademark style. What better than an un-mimicable touch, isn’t it!
Inspiring Packaging
Packaging

Designed by Lucas Wakamatsu

Vintage

The term “Vintage” speaks for itself and needs no real explanation. It is synonymous of a strong level of integrity and effect that has lasted the test of time without compromising on its originality. “Vintage” will never be old; it is here to stay for a long time to come if not forever.

Inspiring Packaging
Packaging

Designed by
– Auge Design and Giovanni Stillittano

Packaging

Doodles/ Illustrative

Doodle-doodle on the wall, haven’t we all?  Well, this is a trend that had lasted generations and seems to never get old—’cause doodles are always fun, spontaneous and hence unique, never exactly the same as another. That is why they’ve found their way well in the design culture too and are highly impactful especially with the youth.

Packaging

Designed by Backbone Branding

NH1 - Vada Pav

06
Unusual Materials & Shapes

The unusual never fails to be noticed and make an impression. So also it is when it comes to design – everything from weird shapes to all kinds of materials, the sky is the limit. With the kind of tools available today, it is not difficult to execute that which is not so common. No shape is odd and no material is wrong.

Packaging

Designed by Backbone Branding


07
Holographic Effects

The holographic effect used to be ‘the’ thing to do at one point in time due to its shiny, glittery nature. It is here to stay, though, as it finds it s way into the current design scene. The lure of the vintage never fails to shine even in new times. Holographs would catch our eye on any given day, including today apparently.

Packaging

Designed by Anagrama Studio


08
Gradients in Packaging

Now, here’s something new and definitely worthwhile. One shade just doesn’t seem enough sometimes, so there’s a whole range of it. Just a tone lighter or a shade darker can create and put together a whole series of gradient design. Isn’t that amazing, the entire rainbow is available to put on display!

Inspiring Packaging
Packaging

Designed by Marco Serena

Packaging

Designed by Backbone Branding

The 2018 A’ Design Award & Competition mainly ‘aims to highlight the excellent qualifications of best designs, design concepts and design oriented products worldwide in all creative disciplines and industries.’

A’ Design Award and Competition is dedicated to recognising and appreciating some of the best designs and best-designed products across the world, be it in the forms of concept stage, prototype or finished products. The winners of the competition are thereby showcased at the A’ Design Award Gala-Night and Exhibition which is held in Italy.

There is a wide scope of the design award & competitions, featuring 100 varied categories such as

  • Furniture Design,
  • Packaging Design,
  • Lightning Design,
  • Toy Design,
  • Digital Devices Design and so on.

The event and initiative is something that is recognised all over the world and coveted by a lot of varied agencies, designers, innovators and the likes – a global platform with a global audience.

Registrations   are currently open.

 

The deadline for entries is the 28th of February, 2018, (23.59 GMT +1)


The Winners of 2017 A’ Design Award

Category: Furniture, Decorative Items and Homeware Design

1. A chairs by Yi-An Hung, Yestudio

A' Design Award & Competition

Multi-functional chairs that could be modified according to environmental setting and be transformed into a table, chair, bench, box or tube with a simple push and pull methods to change the formation and function of the chairs. The fundamental research thus was put in was mainly in the direction of trying to design a prototype of simple furniture that could act and be used for multiple purposes by just manipulating within its design.

2. Sagano Bamboo Furniture Chair and lamps by Alice Minkina

The project was essentially about finding new possibilities and aesthetic features connected to the use of bamboo and finding some interesting ways of applying it in the form of furniture. Sagano bamboo furniture is thus an innovative eco-friendly furniture set – bamboo is so fast-growing that its life cycle is way shorter than using other trees, therefore making the use of this wood more efficiently.

3. HexBOX File Cabinet by Kemal Yıldırım

The design of the HexBOX was inspired by honey bees and their solidarity, and can be formed by increasing or decreasing the number of boxes and in alternative designs, such as single, triple and sextuple in different width and height dimensions. At the same time, aesthetically, visual differences can be obtained by using different colors and materials in the drawers, which operate with telescopic tracks.


Packaging Design

1.‘Pasta Nikita’ packaging by Nikita Konkin

A' Design Award & Competition
A' Design Award & Competition
A' Design Award & Competition

Using the shapes of pasta strands to create an interesting series of packaging that captures attention on the shelves, Pasta Nikita’s packaging was designed. Trying to connect the food to its lovers by showing the interconnection between the two, the packaging attempts to entice latter.

A' Design Award & Competition
A' Design Award & Competition
A' Design Award & Competition
A' Design Award & Competition
A' Design Award & Competition

Assuming the basic laws of good design i.e. utility, economy and idea, the idea proved key to a rather simple solution – using the international designation of countries which the coffee came from as leitmotif of packaging this series. The main aim was to display the value of the brand and focus on the message and information, keeping it readable, understandable and outstanding.


Architecture, Building and Structure Design Category

1. Punjab Kesari Headquarters Office by Amit Gupta: Britta Knobel Gupta

A' Design Award & Competition
A' Design Award & Competition
A' Design Award & Competition
A' Design Award & Competition

The inspiration was to translate a traditional Indian facade pattern by using digital simulations to create a responsive built form. Designed as a “Fusion” of traditional Indian architecture and contemporary office space, the main objective is to reduce heat gain and optimize facade opening ratio, ensuring no artificial lighting is required on a typical day.

2. Gallery in Kiyosato Villa with Exhibition Space by Satoshi Okada architects

A' Design Award & Competition
A' Design Award & Competition
A' Design Award & Competition
A' Design Award & Competition

The architecture needed to mould itself onto fluctuating social demands, such as the present demographic trends and the decrease of population Japan as elsewhere in the world. The aim thus was to pursue flexibility through innovative structural systems. The first imagery came from the landscape of Kiyosato.

Pune-based design agency, Elephant Design, recently displayed the power of the British Bulldog, Witlinger beer’s powerful mascot, in a re-branding initiative and process for the beverage company. Here is how they did it, as we run through the process behind the whole act.

When Pune-based design agency, Elephant, was approached to bring the powerful brand mascot to life, it did so by means of an upfront, affirmative and assertive new visual representation on the bottle to communicate Witlinger’s truly British personality.

#BlodyBritish - British Bulldog

Witlinger’s Wheat Ale is India’s first wheat beer, unique because of its distinctive sweet orange and coriander flavours, much like Witlinger’s Lager that has a distinctive lemon grass finish and is brewed with British Hops. The British origins of these beverages, and so also the associated touch of the region that can be found in them, is something that cannot be ignored or concealed. It is this very quality that was chiefly used as the foundation or basis of Witlinger’s re-branding initiative, proudly declaring and proclaiming the same to the world without any sense of guilt or restraint through the ‘British Bulldog’, Witlinger’s symbol and mascot.

#BlodyBritish - British Bulldog

The renewed and refined design with ‘British Bulldog’ as a mascot symbolises Witlinger’s true British origins in a fun and honest way, while mainly conveying a message of being bold. In light of this transformation, referring to the brand’s renewed design, Mr. Anuj Kushwah, Managing Director and Founder said, “This is an exciting time for Witlinger as we are showcasing our true identity and characteristics of being very British and honest with what we do i.e. making sincere and honest craft beer. This definitely adds fun in drinking good craft beer with the great bold design.

While many craft beers try to keep their origins vague or unclear, Witlinger decided to be a brand that rather wanted to convey its British roots unapologetically and openly. “We decided to leave the cliched British iconography, and found a true hero in British bulldog! The idea is to bring various facets of the persona to life on align with each of the crafted brews.” said Ashwini Deshpande, Co-founder, Director of Elephant.

#BlodyBritish - British Bulldog

Operating since as long ago as 1989, Elephant is a leading strategic design agency with presence in India and Singapore, engaging clients such as Britannia, MTR, Paper Boat, and the likes. The agency recognized the emblematic power behind this concept, and decided to stick with it through the means and processes of illustration and symbolism, knowing that it would bring about the desired impact and effect on the audience.

Packaging has universal standards and appeal. No matter where you are, the structure, concept and technology remain the same. Brandiziac, a branding agency owned by Artem Shutov in Russia, believes that being different can make all the difference. Here, they unfold some mysteries to help us better understand branding and packaging design and its relevance in today’s world.

Brandiziac - Packaging
Frontal sides of Mask Spirit Wines Collection
Brandiziac - Packaging
Frontal sides of 4 SKU of milk cocktails named “Three cows, two cats” brand

Design packaging using your head over your heart.

Creativity can be of various forms, but in packaging design, and other forms as well, it needs to be channelised and questioned. While designing, there are a few boxes that need to be ticked in order to make a successful artwork. First is individuality, where memorability and uniqueness need to be strived for. Purity and clarity is another key factor. This is where communication needs to be clear and concise so that the consumer understands from the first sight what the product is and what it stands for. Stand out factor is crucial also.

Brandiziac - Packaging
Front side of 3 SKU of the series of fruit & berry punches concept
Brandiziac - Packaging
Cover of the gift package, greeting card
Brandiziac - Packaging
Frontal side of Real Chocolate Package

One of the key roles of packaging is to grab attention. During the course of a project, designers often go to a store and test their designs on the shelves. Lastly, adaptability and practicality need to be incorporated as well. There should always be a sense of continuity for future products for the brand and a user-centric focus.

Brandiziac - Packaging
Light Flight. Marshmallow and Cookies
Brandiziac - Packaging
Light Flight. Marshmallow and Cookies

From sketch to finish.

Every project is new and fresh and like a child needs special and personalised attention. From 20/20, brainstorming and other such creative methodologies, a lot of attention is given to the analysis of works of competitors and peers. Some things are standard though, like a briefing, followed by sketching and then revision of projects etc. Once the client waves the green flag, other resources like photographers, illustrators and artists might be involved.

Cheese in the faces
Brandiziac - Packaging
New Year gift set - Thermo mug, French cocoa and a recipe book
Brandiziac - Packaging
Slavyana Cookware

People go for the colours.

Packaging isn’t solely based on colour- everything is important, like fonts, graphics techniques, and composition. Colour is part of the team, but it’s perhaps one of the characters that people love to look at. It can be noted that it often helps create differentiation and allows for people to choose one product over another.

Redesign of meat products' labels
Redesign of meat products' labels

Used once. Used twice.

Packaging no longer is simply a square box. The shapes have changed and so have the ideologies, post-printing processes, and technologies behind it. New and unusual types of paper and cardboard have emerged bringing about the concept of reuse and recycle. Environmentally friendly packaging is important in today’s world and designers must design around the possibility of reuse.

DOBR BOBR. REDESIGN OF A FAMILY TOY
DOBR BOBR. REDESIGN OF A FAMILY TOY

Published in Issue 26

Packaging is the first vital step towards enchanting the audience. Who doesn’t like a cute box or a trendy bottle? With this issue, Creative Gaga lets the cat out of the box to reveal the world of packaging design. Featuring various local and international designers like Petar Pavlov from Macedonia and Brandziac from Russia, Elephant Design and Impprintz from Pune, the issue promises to be a keepsake for many.

 

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Packaging has been for long an ignored discipline of design. But the trend has changed nowadays, and it is becoming an exciting space for designers to showcase their artistic and innovative skills. Graphic design studio, Impprintz, derives inspiration from the products to add to the experience of the buyer and user. Here, Simran Sahi and Rahul Sureka talk to Creative Gaga about how they successful packaging!

successful packaging
Massage Oil Boxes.

CG: Your designs seem to follow a geometric formula and are pretty systematically arranged. Is that your design style, or does packaging follow a standard formula that clients ask you to apply?

IMP: The idea is to keep things simple yet delightful. With packaging, it’s not an anomaly to face a series of variants within the same product range. Therefore, the challenge lies in creating something different while maintaining a strong cohesive visual family. Another vital element for packaging designers to be mindful of is information architecture which helps buyers navigate systematically through the communication.

successful packaging
Incense Gift Packs.
successful packaging
Incense Gift Packs.

CG: According to you, what makes a successful packaging design? You use a varied sense of bright and attractive motifs. Is that what you feel makes a product stand out on a shelf with other competitive brands?

IMP: The inspiration for packaging is more or less derived from the product and its unique attributes. Packaging design can be successful on various levels and often requires a combination of attributes like its ability to attract, engage and inform. Simultaneously, it must also deliver a tactile experience with the apt choice of material and optimum fabrication, a well-thought-out functionality, and the difference and joy in it. Of course, the well-designed and attractive packaging on the shelf is going to grab your attention.

successful packaging
Pondicherry Collection Incense.
successful packaging
Pondicherry Collection Incense.

CG: How is packaging different in today’s times? Apart from just a pack that people throw away, how do you get your designs to serve a greater purpose? Or is the purpose only to lure people and then packaging design loses its purpose as soon as the product is purchased?

IMP: The primary purpose of any successful packaging is to protect the product. By using vibrant and positive colour schemes, artistic illustrations and imagery and durable materials, packaging can prove to be an informative, enriching and an educative experience even in the process of selling/buying the product.

successful packaging
Indigenous organic boxer shorts.

CG: How is packaging for an incense stick different from say, a bottle? Do you believe it’s the same thought process and concepts that need to be exercised or does packaging design vary from project to project?

IMP: In terms of process, all packaging design projects begin with a similar set of questions and critical analysis, but then they begin to take shape within their own parameters. Each project has its unique requirements, vision, communication, market segment, timelines and fabrication possibilities. What never changes is the spirit to deliver the best; more than what the client asks for.

successful packaging
Special Incense Packs.

CG: And finally, what advice would you give people who want to take up packaging design and make a difference?

IMP: Packaging design is a field in itself. It is a container of creative storytelling where two-dimensional design meets the third dimension. It is important to promote people, products, and concepts that you believe in. Keep trying new methods and ideas; there is always more to learn.

successful packaging
Mason & Co chocolate bars.
successful packaging
Mason & Co chocolate bars.

Published in Issue 26

Packaging is the first vital step towards enchanting the audience. Who doesn’t like a cute box or a trendy bottle? With this issue, Creative Gaga lets the cat out of the box to reveal the world of packaging design. Featuring various local and international designers like Petar Pavlov from Macedonia and Brandziac from Russia, Elephant Design and Impprintz from Pune, the issue promises to be a keepsake for many.

 

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Graphic designer, Itu Chaudhuri, lets out his experience and insight in the field of branding. He expresses what goes into creating effective brands, and the various aspects or elements that play a role in the process.

Branding
The Wild Stone Code Range.

CG. What is the relationship between the product and the branding? How does the former shape or inspire the latter?

IC. For some brands, the product’s properties are the heart of the brand. For example, we know Mercedes by their cars, which are a model of stability and Germanic engineered perfection; not by their advertising or showrooms or their F1 Cars (which they do very well). For those brands, branding needs to reflect what’s special about the product, but rarely reflects the product itself. The ‘what’s special’ part, in turn, depends on the category. For more functional products, it’s about a clear benefit from using it (e.g. relieving pain).

Branding
The Real Tea Range.

For less functional brands, the benefit may be more in the mind i.e. how it makes people feel, or its ‘values’ (what it encourages its customers to believe in). This is also true for brands, which we know by their advertising more than by the special qualities of the product (e.g. a mobile service like Vodafone or Airtel). But, rarely does the branding show the product itself. If the product is a packaged product that’s never unpacked (think deodorants, or insect repellents, or a fizzy drink), then the branding and the product are practically fused (even when large advertising budgets support the brands).

Branding
Branding
Branding
Eicher Live.

CG. According to you, How and to what extent, does branding impact an audience?

IC. Every customer knows that they are being manipulated. So, branding works best when it slips under the radar of the customers or escapes their ‘crap detector’. Yet, if the brand seems to admit this while managing to charm the customers, it works. The audience is then willingly helpless to resist. This means that the branding is, in some sense, invisible when it appears to belong or be inevitable as if there was no other way it could have appeared. This requires honesty on the owner’s part and linking the brand to what is true. Despite this, it’s carefully orchestrated. Simply appearing artless won’t do it. Done right, it can succeed in disarming the customer.

Branding
The Almirah.
Branding
The Almirah.

CG. What do you do to ensure that the brand character comes across fully in the final design?

IC. Personality is the key, and thus cannot be overlooked or sidelined at any stage. It’s a mental model of the brand that describes the brand’s character and attitude, more like a representative, and thus implies its appearance.

Brand applications for ‘Hired’.

CG. What do you feel should be proportion, or how much is the need for balance, between minimalism and complexities in a design?

IC. The point isn’t a balance: it’s more a purposeful imbalance. Different brands need different treatments, so that one may do best in a minimal style, and another with a busy, or even chaotic style. This is a necessary facet that one needs to recognise and remember throughout the process.

Branding
Annual Report Design for IDFC.
Branding
Branding
Branding
Branding
Branding

CG. What do you feel is an essential part of branding?

IC. Deep understanding of the client’s truth is fundamental and most essential, but making sure that it’s attractive to their customers is of value, at the same time. If you succeed on the first count and fail on the second, you touch no one. The other way around, and the attraction will be skin deep. It very clearly is a case of both or nothing.

Branding
Publication design for Breakthrough.

Published in Issue 38

This issue, we try to explore different views from many well-known studio owners and senior designers. While Anthony Lopez of Lopez Design shared tips on what a studio looks for in a designer, Mohar Ray from Codesign highlights the key aspects that play a significant role and make the difference in whether you are hired or not as a promising designer. Also, this issue has an insightful article on ‘Branding with reason and love’ from Itu Chaudhuri, founder ICD (Itu Chaudhuri Design) along with Siddhi Ranade, explaining his tools of story telling through his unique style of illustrations. This issue is a must read for a talented graduate to a branding expert. Order you copy and enjoy reading it!

 

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All of us get excited when we are able to take a step or have a gaze into the past from the vantage point of the present. And, so, there are all sorts and kinds of museums that we find to be existing around the world – museums of war; museums of wildlife, the eminent lives of celebrated leaders; famous personalities, various pre-existing and current tribes, so on and so forth. However, as part of its packaging innovation division, Manjushree Technopack Ltd established a rather unique form of museum in the year 2003 – a museum that showcases the evolution in packaging that has undergone various alterations, revisions and transformations with the shifts in time.

packaging
packaging

A brainchild of Mr.Vimal Kedia, Managing Director at Manjushree Technopack Ltd, the museum is a result of his passion for packaging technology. The range of the collection that has been gathered and put on display over here attracts FMCG packaging experts and layman enthusiasts to study the gradual progression of packaging designs and the changing consumer needs. It thus serves as an essential assortment, one that provides a view into the transition of the selling of goods and ‘consumer behaviour’ through the decades, unto the global desire for more environmentally sustainable packaging that is required as of today.

packaging

Reminding visitors of the times during their childhood, curious collectables from the yesteryears have been put up to be the exhibit in a rather pristine condition. Gramophone records of Lata Mangeshkar, packed in two-colour printed paper board; tin cases of Cadbury Fry chocolate; huge, hot cases with space for hot coal; velvet-lined cutlery kits and lab tool cases; metal body cameras, cased in leather; wood-finish radios – it is all there to find amongst the 2000 items that give you a perspective on the sea of change that has taken place in the world of consumer goods packaging.

packaging
Tin Boxes Parachute Oil, Ponds Powder, Hershey's Cocoa and Tata Cafe
packaging
Radio
packaging

Beginning from wood casing in the 1900s, packaging moved to metal; then to glass, paper, cardboard, and to plastic containers today. And, so it continues to keep changing to be more and better ecological. Today, marketing managers of various top brands visit the museum to understand the legacy of their brands in the years gone by – for instance, the gold-plated spoon offered by Nescafe during its early days of promotion in the Middle East. Now, that kind of a freebie is not something we see anymore, is it!

packaging
Amul and Lactogen Tin boxes
packaging
Cadbury's Tin Box

Packaging has gradually evolved from cardboard boxes or covers to keepsakes. As people realise the creative hard work behind beautiful packs, this hidden space is burgeoning to become a field full of innovation and potential. Isabela Rodrigues, a designer from Brazil, takes us inside the box with her out of the box philosophy.

packaging design
JJ ROYAL PITCH. A clean, clear and modern container design for Indonesia’s purest coffee grains reinforces the enriching experience.
packaging design
CG: Gone are the days where a label was slapped on a plain and ordinary packaging. Your packaging designs make the product look exciting and inviting. What do you try and achieve through your designs?

IR: The goal of packaging design is to turn projects into collectable and saleable items. These ideas translate everything we do and our way to achieve the final result. The objective is to prevent the user from throwing away the packaging and decorate his/ her house with it instead.

packaging design
KRÄFTIG. Packaging resembling real exquisite fruit shapes is employed to showcase this premium Brazilian juice brand. Can’t get more real than this.
packaging design
CG: What is it that excites you most about packaging design? What are the challenges that you face? Do you decide the fate of packaging design, or is someone else in control?

IR: The most exciting aspect of packaging is tactile designing and how it follows a simple function of conserving the product, selling it as well as enchanting the audience. The biggest challenges are the suppliers and the limitations to achieving the result we look for. Frequently, clients that are in product-testing phase need packaging on a small scale. In that case, one has to migrate to simpler solutions that are available in the label/bottle segment. In this way, working to conciliate innovative and beautiful designs within those limitations enhances a designer’s abilities and experience.

packaging design
packaging design
PETIT – NATURAL JUICE. These fun collectable juice packaging was developed especially for children using a tetra pack design in a sustainable manner that can be reused and recycled.
CG: Your designs are clean, minimal and follow a discipline, quite contrary to the Brazilian spirit which is known to be loud and colourful! How has Brazil influenced your designs?

IR: Brazil is renowned for its colours and aesthetics no doubt. However, the objective here is to try to be a studio with a personal and also a global aesthetic. The goal is to fit into each costumer’s reality and identity.

packaging design
JUICE MEDS. This natural fruit juice line that contains vital vitamins uses an interesting health based concept to break through traditional juice packaging designs.
packaging design
GOT MILK? Unique colour combinations are used to make milk a fashionable drink
CG: Packaging design is still an unexplored territory. According to you, what are some of the traits of good packaging? What do you do differently to make your designs stand out?

IR: There certainly is a long way yet to go before packaging design becomes a celebrated design field. There is so much more potential for innovation and creation in this field. A good package must conserve the product, have a structure, sell and enchant too. It’s vital to understand that one can’t do without the others; there’s no use in a beautiful but fragile package or even a rigid one that doesn’t show the concept of the product.

packaging design
LE CHAT. This packaging design for a French brewery showcases how designers can exercise complete freedom by breaking paradigms simply to delight the eyes
packaging design
NELEMAN. Minimalism with a touch of the classic vintage glass bottle makes for an ideal way to showcase chocolate milk for this Dutch company.
packaging design
TIÍLIN CACAO. The design exemplifies the essence of Colombian chocolate making by using traditional Cacao tree visuals to take the user through that very journey.
CG: And now something we’ve been dying to ask- why bottles?

IR: Why not bottles? Nowadays, many people are creating new products by quitting their conventional jobs, and the beverage industry is the one experiencing this the most. Alcoholic or not, this form of packaging is in constant demand.

packaging design
DELÍRIO TROPICAL. This branding and packaging design refreshes the identity of a popular local restaurant known for its natural anDd healthy appeal.
packaging design
FROO.IT. The design presents the fruit drink in a fun manner by using ludic and fashion illustrations to compose the branding and packaging.
packaging design
MANJOOR ESTAT E+NYFW. This fashionable and luxurious bottle design captures the essence of spiced beverages by Manjoor Estate in conjunction with New York Fashion Week.

Published in Issue 26

Packaging is the first vital step towards enchanting the audience. Who doesn’t like a cute box or a trendy bottle? With this issue, Creative Gaga lets the cat out of the box to reveal the world of packaging design. Featuring various local and international designers like Petar Pavlov from Macedonia and Brandziac from Russia, Elephant Design and Impprintz from Pune, the issue promises to be a keepsake for many.

 

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Tasneem Syed and Gauri Arora share their idea of niche, worthy packaging for traditional Punjabi Juttis, a traditional hand-crafted footwear that is very much an intrinsic part of North Indian culture.

Punjabi Jutti

Brief

A Punjabi Jutti is traditional hand-crafted North Indian footwear. Like any other footwear, they are generally presented to customers in simple shoe boxes, or sometimes even in the newspaper. The idea, thus, was to retain their elegance into traditionally authentic packaging, representing the roots they stem from.

Punjabi Jutti

Concept

The packaging of Punjabi Jutti – The sole of Punjab, should be compact and unique, just like the Punjabi Juttis. The hexagonal shape makes it convenient for storage, as it consumes little space, while it is also easily stackable when displaying in stores and transporting in bulk. The box can be used for display, which doubles-up as the packaging. It also comes along with a jute string attached, to make carrying the shoes more convenient.

Punjabi Jutti

Outcome

This is taking a step away from the conventional shoe boxes, and towards enhancing the whole experience of selecting, buying, packing and taking home a pair of Punjabi juttis, making it a memorable one. The transparent lid enables a person to have a look at the design of the jutti inside the box, without having to open it, and even allows the shopkeeper to pull out the desired Punjabi jutti while it is stacked on the shelf.

Punjabi Jutti
client

Published in Issue 37

The issue includes interactions with Preeti Vyas from VGC on ‘How to pitch for clients or retain the existing one’ and Ashish Deshpande from Elephant on ‘Challenges of working with a startup’, along with some best freelancers like Archan Nair, Shreya Shetty and Paul Sandip, sharing their knowledge of working with various clients. Also, Sachin Puthran from Thatzit.com gave a 10-point no-nonsense guide for studios to handle their finances. A must read, if you are planning for the financial year ahead or worried about your handling your money matter, this issue can give you much-needed insight and guide you to a better financial health of your business or freelancing. 

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