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The brand name, list of ingredients and description as well. How do you fit all this into a limited space and still make it all look organised and appealing? Well, that’s why we have packaging designers. Akim Melnik, a Packaging Designer from Belarus believes it’s important to keep certain key things in mind to help fulfil the purpose. In a conversation with Creative Gaga, he tells us about his design dogma.

CG: Your designs are mostly focused on branding and packaging. What is your design philosophy that makes you as a brand, stand out?

Akim. To describe the philosophy in words is difficult. It’s like a dream that you’ve had, you remember it, but just cannot describe it. However, there are some things that are always important to be aware of when designing for a product or brand. First is to meet the expectations and preferences of the target audience. Secondly, ergonomics and making sure information on a pack is correctly presented is crucial too. And lastly, you cannot create without knowing what’s already out there. Hence, competent analysis and research of competitive product packaging is a necessary step. Remember, that a good design can sell a bad product, just like a bad design can worsen the selling a good product.

Packaging
NOORBEST HIBISCUS DRINKS
Packaging
NOORBEST HIBISCUS DRINKS

CG: You have designed across a range of products, providing packaging in a variety of shapes. How do put yourself in the brand’s shoes? How do you know a juice bottle should look like a juice bottle and not like an oil bottle?

Akim. Sometimes you have to comply with existing stereotypes, and sometimes deliberately go against them. Much depends on the marketing objectives of our client. The client, brand and brief determine where you must draw the line.

Tea Package Design
Tea Package Design
Helsy Granulated Coffee

CG: Packaging and logo design has to be practical because they serve a purpose that has to be truthful and genuine. How do you balance practicality with creativity?

Akim. The primary function of packaging design is to appeal emotionally. Practicality comes second. Any task can be perceived either as a routine or as an opportunity to show their creativity. Good packaging design is a harmony of creativity and practicality, all done in a contained manner.

Packaging
Silver Probe Vodka Decor Design
Packaging
Silver Probe Vodka Decor Design
Packaging
Indian Instant Coffee Package Design
Packaging
Indian Instant Coffee Package Design

CG: When you started as a design studio, what was the most difficult part? How did you overcome challenges to become so successful? How do you reach out to the world?

Akim. The most difficult part when you’re just beginning is the inexperience and lack of knowledge about principles and techniques of creating high-quality packaging. Like in any other part of life, all these difficulties are overcome by everyday work done with full dedication. Experience is the best teacher and this process of improvement is endless and amazing.

ABC Juices Package Design
Gotovim Vmeste Spices Package Design
ABC Berry Jam Design
Olivia Mix Sunflover And Olive Oil

Published in Issue 22

This issue is dedicated to the talented design graduates who are not just looking to work but seeking experience in order to realise the greater goal of life. The issue features various designers from India and abroad. Kevin Roodhorst from The Netherlands realised his goal so early in life that propelled him to start his career as a designer as young as 13. Ashish Subhash Boyne, a student of Sir JJ Institute of Applied Art realised his dream while studying when he started doing freelance projects, which allow him to express his free thoughts. To name a few talents we have Vivek Nag from Fine Arts from Rachna Sansad Mumbai, Simran Nanda from Pearl Academy New Delhi, Anisha Raj from MAEER MIT Institute of Design Pune, Giby Joseph from Animation and Art School Goa and many more. This issue gives a fresh perspective of talented graduates and their unique approach to design.

 

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The founder of ICD, Itu Chaudhuri, lets out his experience and insight in the field of branding. He expresses what goes into creating effective brands, and the various aspects or elements that play a role in the process.

Brand Identity for Taggd

CG. What is the relationship between the product and the branding? How does the former shape or inspire the latter?

ICD. For some brands, the product’s properties are the heart of the brand. For example, we know Mercedes by their cars, which are a model of stability and Germanic engineered perfection; not by their advertising or showrooms or their F1 Cars (which they do very well). For those brands, branding needs to reflect what’s special about the product, but rarely reflects the product itself. The ‘what’s special’ part, in turn, depends on the category. For more functional products, it’s about a clear benefit from using it (e.g. relieving pain).

Brand identity for thebo

For less functional brands, the benefit may be more in the mind i.e. how it makes people feel, or its ‘values’ (what it encourages its customers to believe in). This is also true for brands, which we know by their advertising more than by the special qualities of the product (e.g. a mobile service like Vodafone or Airtel). But, rarely does the branding show the product itself. If the product is a packaged product that’s never unpacked (think deodorants, or insect repellents, or a fizzy drink), then the branding and the product are practically fused (even when large advertising budgets support the brands).

Branding
Branding
Branding
Eicher Live.

CG. According to you, How and to what extent, does branding impact an audience?

ICD. Every customer knows that they are being manipulated. So, branding works best when it slips under the radar of the customers or escapes their ‘crap detector’. Yet, if the brand seems to admit this while managing to charm the customers, it works. The audience is then willingly helpless to resist. This means that the branding is, in some sense, invisible when it appears to belong or be inevitable as if there was no other way it could have appeared. This requires honesty on the owner’s part and linking the brand to what is true. Despite this, it’s carefully orchestrated. Simply appearing artless won’t do it. Done right, it can succeed in disarming the customer.

Branding
The Almirah.

Branding
The Almirah.

CG. What do you do to ensure that the brand character comes across fully in the final design?

ICD. Personality is the key, and thus cannot be overlooked or sidelined at any stage. It’s a mental model of the brand that describes the brand’s character and attitude, more like a representative, and thus implies its appearance.

Branding
The Wild Stone Code Range.
Brand applications for ‘Hired’.

CG. What do you feel should be proportion, or how much is the need for balance, between minimalism and complexities in a design?

ICD. The point isn’t a balance: it’s more a purposeful imbalance. Different brands need different treatments, so that one may do best in a minimal style, and another with a busy, or even chaotic style. This is a necessary facet that one needs to recognise and remember throughout the process.

Annual Report Design for IDFC.
Branding

CG. What do you feel is an essential part of branding?

ICD. Deep understanding of the client’s truth is fundamental and most essential, but making sure that it’s attractive to their customers is of value, at the same time. If you succeed on the first count and fail on the second, you touch no one. The other way around and the attraction will be skin deep. It very clearly is a case of both or nothing.

Branding
Publication design for Breakthrough.
Branding
The Real Tea Range.

Published in Issue 38

This issue, we try to explore different views from many well-known studio owners and senior designers. While Anthony Lopez of Lopez Design shared tips on what a studio looks for in a designer, Mohar Ray from Codesign highlights the key aspects that play a significant role and make the difference in whether you are hired or not as a promising designer. Also, this issue has an insightful article on ‘Branding with reason and love’ from Itu Chaudhuri, founder ICD (Itu Chaudhuri Design) along with Siddhi Ranade, explaining his tools of story telling through his unique style of illustrations. This issue is a must read for a talented graduate to a branding expert. Order you copy and enjoy reading it!

 

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People are not too fond of throwing things away, and in the recycle-reuse world of today, people find ways to use small little things for their own unique purposes. Whether it’s a tin tea leaves box converted into a pen stand or gift basket used as home decor, designer Anoop Chalil believes it’s all about thinking one step ahead. Below, he outlines key points to help create innovative packaging that helps the product and its consumers.

Packaging for I am Pure
Packaging for I am Pure
Packaging for I am Pure

Experience comes with an Experience

It can be said that packaging design is more about the journey than the final creation from a designer’s point of view. It’s not just interacting with a product, but also with the people and culture behind it. These when combined enhance one as a packaging designer, giving you more insights and in depth knowledge of the skill.

Stationery for Club W
Stationery for Club W
Packaging for Club W

It’s not about doing different things, it’s about doing things differently

Every designer explores their own niche; their own style. And even though at first look, some designs by various designers might look similar, where it may look like identical tools or techniques have been used, a closer look reveals the small differences that make a difference. For instance, it’s easy for many to simply use the align tool in design software to arrange and organize objects. However, a difference can be made by using a grid system and zooming into each object to manually arrange them. Such detailed working style goes on to make a huge impact on the final outcome.

Stationery for Terrace
Packaging for Terrace

What you keep in mind should be kept in your design

The look and feel of the packaging are predominantly dominated by the product. However, simple and minimal designs stand out in a cluttered shelf. Before creating innovative solutions, it is important to keep in mind some simple points to make the journey smooth and obstacle-free. Staying simple and honest is key and so is researching consumers, markets and competition before getting onto designing. Also, packaging designs significantly depend on the type of material being used and hence a good understanding in such areas is crucial as well. Apart from that, product extension and legible typography are some more aspects that must be included in every design.

Packaging for Terrace

It’s not about who’s in the driver’s seat, but what car you’re driving

In the design world, everyone would agree that the clients have the ultimate say. But that does not stop any designer or design from coming through. It’s not easy of course and is a skill that comes with experience and confidence. As a packaging designer, it’s just not enough to simply create packaging that looks good; one needs to always have concrete reasons as to why that is so. Tell the client’s why using well-researched reasons and they will agree with your concept.

Packaging for Aura Cinema

For example, coming up with Tin packaging that could be used as keepsakes by consumers instead of using plastic bottles that the client initially demanded works a lot better to not only add to the designer’s portfolio but to work for the brand as well. Effectiveness is key and this way, designers can have the last word. But this by no means is disregarding opinions of clients. Designers must also be aware that companies spend two to three years researching a product before launching it in the market. Hence, it doesn’t hurt sometimes to try and understand where they’re coming from.

Published in Issue 26

Packaging is the first vital step towards enchanting the audience. Who doesn’t like a cute box or a trendy bottle? With this issue, Creative Gaga lets the cat out of the box to reveal the world of packaging design. Featuring various local and international designers like Petar Pavlov from Macedonia and Brandziac from Russia, Elephant Design and Impprintz from Pune, the issue promises to be a keepsake for many.

 

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Brands face new challenges everyday as consumers become increasingly aware of the social and environmental consequences of the choices they make in the marketplace. One of the biggest shifts in consumer behavior has been with respect to eco-friendliness. Buyers today not only want to make sure that a product (packaging) was manufactured through a green process, but they also demand that the carbon footprint of the entire consumption cycle is minimised.

A 2019 survey of millennial shoppers in the US found that 64% of them are willing to pay more for eco-friendly products and 78% are influenced by a company’s commitment to reducing pollution. This trend is perhaps stronger in India as a report by leading management consultancy firm AT Kearney last year showed consumers in the country are willing to pay more for environmentally friendly or socially-minded brands across categories such as automobiles, apparel, personal care, fresh and packaged foods.

Sustainable Packaging

According to a UN report, we produce about 300 million tonnes of plastic waste every year — that’s nearly equivalent to the weight of the entire human population. More importantly, a lion’s share (almost 42%) of the plastics produced each year goes into packaging. As such, a good starting point for a brand to become eco-conscious is adopting green packaging practices.

Here Shreesh Shankar, founder of Sukkrish AADDS, lists sustainable packaging trends that your brand can choose from:

1. Corrugated Packaging

Packaging - Shreesh Shankar

Packaging Designs by Impprintz Design Studio

Corrugated packaging basically is the brown boxes with streamlined sides you receive from online retailers. They are recyclable since they are made of multiple sheets of paper. With the coronavirus pandemic not showing any signs of abating, e-commerce is set to pick up even in products that shoppers earlier preferred to buy from a brick and mortar store. Get ready to receive a lot of corrugated boxes this year and be prepared to dispatch many if you are brand.

2. Returnable Packaging

Packaging - Shreesh Shankar
Packaging - Shreesh Shankar

Source:Repack

There’s a new R-word in the block — returnability. Returnable packaging will be another consequence of the pandemic-online retail boom that’s happening now. It involves the use of sturdy and reusable material so that the package can be moved up and down the supply chain more than once — thus ensuring an eco-friendly way of returning goods from the consumer’s end.

3. Biodegradable Packaging

Packaging - Shreesh Shankar
Packaging - Shreesh Shankar

Packaging Design byPrompt Design

Styrofoam is one of the most common ways to package electronics and other fragile products. Also known as expanded polystyrene foam, this material is not biodegradable and often finds its way into water bodies where it kills aquatic life forms. Moreover, most Indian towns and cities don’t yet have efficient ways of waste segregation. Given these realities, a brand that uses biodegradable material like cornstarch for packaging could really win the hearts of environmentally conscious customers. Pro tip: Go an extra mile and make your packaging compostable to stay ahead of the curve!

4. Edible Packaging

Packaging - Shreesh Shankar

Source:Evoware

Nature, they say, is a great teacher. Most fruits and vegetables are dual-purpose — both the core and the peel can be consumed in different ways. Taking a cue from this, innovative packaging practices have surfaced to minimise waste. Both the food and the package it is wrapped into can now be eaten. For some motivation: An Indonesian start-up recently manufactured sandwich wrappers from edible seaweed.

5. Go Vegan!

Packaging - Shreesh Shankar

Packaging Design byVisibly Vegan

Yes, you read that right. Petroleum-based inks have been used for printing and packaging for the past fifty years because of their short drying time and cost-effectiveness. However, greener alternatives such as soy and vegetable inks have been around for a while but they may be costlier and slower to dry. But they also have huge upsides — many printers say soy ink is clearer and works better on recycled paper.

6. Smart Packaging

Packaging - Shreesh Shankar

The definition of packaging today has evolved — it’s no more just a container. The advancement of electronics and digital technology has meant that packaging can serve multiple purposes. Basically, smart packaging can help improve the shelf life of a product through moisture control, monitor temperature changes, and storage time.

7. Marie Kondo Your Packaging

Packaging - Shreesh Shankar

Packaging Design by otília erdélyi

Perhaps the biggest pop trend in design in the past couple of years has been the adoption of the Marie Kondo way — to tidy up. Elaborate packaging is wasteful and also time-consuming for the customer. Adopting a minimalistic packaging aesthetic is not only sustainable from the environment’s perspective, but it’s also more appealing to the end-user.

The sustainable packaging market was pegged at $237.74 billion in 2019 by a Mordor Intelligence report. It is expected to grow at a CAGR of 5.7% to 313.93 billion by 2025. This tells us that brands are reading the tea leaves right in adopting sustainable packaging practices. Greenwashing on social media channels isn’t going to cut it with environmentally aware consumers — they demand that brands walk the talk. If you are a business with your eye on the future, you would do well to adopt sustainable packaging today!

Conclusion

It’s important to tell your customer how many times the container can be recycled or how it should be disposed of. The Eco Trends survey quoted at the beginning of the article has a great motivation for communicating green practices to the customer — 76% of millennial shoppers feel positive towards companies who are educating consumers on ways to be eco-friendly.

The sustainable packaging market was pegged at $237.74 billion in 2019 by a Mordor Intelligence report. It is expected to grow at a CAGR of 5.7% to 313.93 billion by 2025. This tells us that brands are reading the tea leaves right in adopting sustainable packaging practices. Greenwashing on social media channels isn’t going to cut it with environmentally aware consumers — they demand that brands walk the talk. If you are a business with your eye on the future, you would do well to adopt sustainable packaging today!

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The dentist is one person no one really fancies. Isn’t that true for most of us, out there? Not many cherish or take delight in the idea of going even for the “routine check-up”. That was considered to be the fundamental problem when coming-up with a whole new campaign for The Tooth Company, a multi-speciality dental care centre in Hyderabad. As a result, NH1 Design, a boutique design studio in Gurgaon, chose a completely new approach–one that would turn out to be more friendly and communicative, on the whole- while spearheading the designing process.

The Challenge

The task wasn’t just to create the brand identity of a dental chain; it was, rather, to bring about a change in the behaviour (and so also psychology and approach) of people towards oral care. “How do we get people to start going to the dentist again?” was the question that was looked at being answered through the new campaign. The base idea or concept, therefore, was to create a brand that brought about a sense of reassurance in people towards dentists, in effort and awareness towards maintaining oral care. What was essentially needed was a brand language that comforted people, so as to replace the fear within them of going to the dentist.

The Essential Logo

Since The Tooth Company follows the ‘Let&’s Talk’ philosophy, communication playing a rather key and vital role in reducing anxiety in the time of toothache, the brand identity composed of quotation marks that form the shape of a tooth, thereby merging teeth care and communication. There’s not much a good, healthy and positive communication cannot solve.

Enhancing the Overall Experience

The Tooth Company aims to reduce patient anxieties through experience design. The minimalist design was thus made to combine with the freshening and renewing vibe of the colour green, purified air, suspended natural aroma, calming music, carefully chosen soothing colours, as well as noise cancellation headphones and eye masks to relax during the treatment.

The Final Solution

In this way, the ambience, look and feel of the place was made to alter the experience of the customer, trying to make a time of ache as less trouble as possible. After all, the way one perceives something is how one experiences it, isn’t it?

Missing Tooth
Alignment
Overlap
Tooth Decay
Chipped
Braces
Implant
Root Canal
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We go through many interesting design projects each day and find them inspiring enough to be shared further. Projects which have the potential to inspire and spark multiple ideas. So, here are few selected branding & packaging projects for this week’s design inspiration, enjoy!

Branding & Packaging - Inspiration - 11
Branding & Packaging - Inspiration - 11
Branding & Packaging - Inspiration - 11

Nocturnals Branding by Karina Sakhnyuk

Branding & Packaging - Inspiration - 11
Branding & Packaging - Inspiration - 11
Branding & Packaging - Inspiration - 11

Forestscaping Identity by Pratyush Gupta

Packaging for Kombuchaz by Ana Moreno

Branding & Packaging - Inspiration - 11
Branding & Packaging - Inspiration - 11

Social Consult Branding by Mohammed Refai

Illustration & Packaging for COLOR CARE. ECO by Anastazi Li

Andres® Personal Branding by Andres Valderrama

Carino Restaurant Branding and Logotype by Shantanu Sharma

Branding & Packaging - Inspiration - 11
Branding & Packaging - Inspiration - 11
Branding & Packaging - Inspiration - 11

LYMO – Branding Proposal by Shibu PG

Branding & Packaging - Inspiration - 11
Branding & Packaging - Inspiration - 11
Branding & Packaging - Inspiration - 11

If you have any of your branding & packaging project or someone else’s, which is equally inspiring for fellow creatives, then share it with us on contribute@creativegaga.com

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It’s not just the design, the elements or the colours in an artwork that blow us away. It’s the concept; a force that resonates from the designer to the audience. Edmundo Moi-Thuk Shung, a graphic designer from The Netherlands, believes cracking a creative concept is the most important step in branding design. He speaks to us to throw more light on his approach.

Branding Design
What are u Doodling

CG: Branding and packaging is a very competitive sphere of design to be working in. What are the principles that dictate your designs?

Edmundo: There are three things that I constantly make sure I am aware of while designing – they have to be unique, meaningful and easy to understand.

Branding Design
Poppy Red Stickerpack

CG: Designs need to be creative and at the same time practical. How do your designs balance both the requirements? What are the challenges you face in day-to-day work? What do you enjoy the most about what you do?

Edmundo: Well, the most important part is to make sure the concept is clear and useful to others. This, for most of the time, also covers the creative part of the whole process. Concentrating on the job is the hardest part for me as I was diagnosed with Attention Deficit Disorder that hinders the thought and concentration process of the mind. I overcome this by doing exercises to clear my mind. You’ve got to figure out your own tricks to overcome whatever it is that distracts you from the job.

Branding Design
Poppy Red Stickerpack

I get the most enjoyment out of concept designing, like doodling in my moleskin and working them out digitally. It’s also refreshing to put your thoughts on paper and work these out.

DIY-HMZ. Some self-branding on various mediums and accessories can help gain exposure in the outside world
MOKKACCINO. These business cards in the shape of coffee cups that can be left behind on the train for travelers to pick up

CG: Branding requires a good understanding of the product/client. How do you then take it forward? Can you take us through your design process?

Edmundo: Once I’ve accepted the assignment, I make sure to gauge the client’s vision by asking them questions to rule out what they expect from me. From then on, I usually make a “plan of approach” that describes the needs, planning and requirements for the assignment. This helps put everything before me so that I can connect the dots through creative ideas and concepts. Afterwards I pitch my ideas to the clients and decide what direction I should take.

MIXWELL. A mix of street and graffiti art, this hiphop styled design uses audio and design supplies to infuse life into a concept
KOFI & AYU. A character getting ready to head a soccer ball, while Ayu the female character wants to check her camera lenses

CG: In your experience, how receptive are brands/clients and audiences to something new? Are people willing to take risks or do you feel they still prefer to play it safe?

Edmundo: The demand in today’s time is to create something that is ‘unusual yet affective’. I guess that means people are willing to take risks as long as the concepts are effective and don’t differ too much from already existing products.

Branding Design
SMOOTHIE POSTER. Designed for The Pepin Press Company the design uses relevant elements to bring together a concept
LOGOS. These logos designed for clients and the artist himself communicate and symbolise unique character for each

CG: You use the Indian symbol of a Yogi in your branding design for Mellow. Can you tell us more about the project and how you arrived at that idea? How do international elements feature in your designs? How do the local audience adapt to something foreign?

Edmundo: It all started with an old sketch of a Yogi which I stumbled upon while going through all of my drawings. The project was a mother’s day gift and I related the element to the fact that she does yoga. That’s when I came up with the idea to make something by myself using an old duffle bag and other stuff lying around my house and created several products out of it. Since Yoga originates from Ancient India, the logo was apt. The project was received well by people with different backgrounds perhaps because our world is getting more multi-cultural.

MELLOW. Symbolism in a logo makes it memorable as this yoga branding suggests
MELLOW. Symbolism in a logo makes it memorable as this yoga branding suggests

CG: Brandings can’t be static. How do you create designs that can be worked upon and taken forward as the brand evolves? How do you give it that flexibility?

Edmundo: I make sure the logo I design isn’t too complicated. Ofcourse a lot depends on the kind of brand and the brief, but I usually give it a visual reference for what the company stands for. It gives it the advantage to become memorable and the ability to evolve easily as the time passes on.

MELLOW BASIC YOGA POSTER. Displaying basic yoga poses, this design also translates onto a scroll that can be used as a handy guide for some yoga practice

Published in Issue 21

They say not to judge a book by its cover. But they also say that exceptions are always there. There’s no doubt, branding and packaging are the faces of any business and product. They decide the way people will receive the brand; whether they will accept it or reject it. To understand and gain more perspective on this much-unsolved mystery, we invited many branding and packaging experts who throw light on the topic.

 

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In such complicated times, it’s all about being simple. Simple is effective when it comes to design, believes Lundgren+Lindqvist, a Swedish design studio. It’s all about saying a lot more with a lot less. Engaging in a conversation, they tell us more on how they create effective and memorable design.

Design
Varvet - Visual Identity, Stationary and Sinages
Varvet - Visual Identity, Stationary and Sinages
Design
Varvet - Visual Identity, Stationary and Sinages

CG: Describe your journey as Lundgren+Lindqvist. What have been your accomplishments?

LL: When we started Lundgren+Lindqvist in 2007, our primary goal was to do what we love and stay afloat doing so. Now our ambition has grown along with our team, but we still want to do the best possible work. Over the years, we have had the opportunity to work with a great number of amazing clients, creating work that we can all be very proud of.



O/O-Brewing Baltic Porter-Packaging Design

CG: Your designs appear simple, effortless and smooth; however that is probably not the case behind the scenes. What all do you have to go through to arrive at the final design outcome?

LL: Simple is hard. Every project starts with a coconut. We use fine grain sandpaper to peel off layer by layer until we expose the core. That’s because we believe in honesty. Achieving that means removing the make-up to expose the bare, naked truth.

Design
Akademi valand photography next to the ocean exhibition catalogue covers

CG: What inspirations are included in your design? How does your background reflected in your designs?

LL: Like most in our line of business, we take an active interest in neighbouring creative fields; such as the arts and architecture. It is hard to judge as to what extent our Scandinavian background has influenced us. Of course, the legacy of great designers and thinkers such as Paul Kjaerholm, Olle Eksell and Alvar Aalto continue to inspire.

O/O - Brewing - Carismatico - Packaging and Visual Identity


O/O-Brewing Bangatan

CG: You work across various mediums. How working on paper differ from working for the digital space?

LL: Paper is definite, in that a printed piece is final. On the other hand, the digital space is an indefinite, organic medium. Both mediums offer unique possibilities. While conscious of this, we try to build each project around a concept and an idea rather than on the media of choice.

Maria Sole - Ferragamo, Visual identity and packaging
Design
Maria Sole - Ferragamo, Visual identity and packaging

CG: Designs have to look amazing and at the same time solve a problem and fulfil a greater purpose. How do you balance your and your client’s views?

LL: A good designer-client relationship is, like any relationship, based on trust. When there is a lack of trust from either side, the outcome will suffer.

Design
Critical Mass Studio Document Holder
Design
Critical Mass Studio Document Holder


Critical Mass Studio Pencils
Critical Mass Studio Poster
Critical Mass Studio The Totebags

CG: The world of design is constantly evolving. How do you keep up with the change?

LL: Although times are indeed changing, certain truths will remain. Our inherent curiosity and thirst for knowledge allows us to stay updated in a very natural, organic way. We visit exhibitions, read and travel a lot. Staying updated is nurturing our interests, which is the fuel we use for our daily (and sometimes nightly) design and development work.

A Sense of Place, Refugees welcome poster book
Design
Recto Verso Mirror


Design
Recto Verso Spread

CG: What other countries would you say are very prominent when it comes to design? What are your views on Indian design? Anything Indian that has caught your eye?

LL: In terms of graphic design, our neighbours Norway and Finland are definitely countries to watch out for as they are challenging those with a traditionally strong graphic design output such as Switzerland, England and the Netherlands. In terms of India, we are shamefully aware of the fact that we know very little about the country’s design scene. Perhaps Creative Gaga Magazine can put an end to our ignorance.

O/O - Brewing - Packaging and Visual Identity
O/O-Brewing-AW-2016-Packaging and Art Direction

Published in Issue 21

Branding With Packaging! They say not to judge a book by its cover. But they also say that exceptions are always there. There’s no doubt, branding and packaging are the faces of any business and product. They decide the way people will receive the brand; whether they will accept it or reject it. To understand and gain more perspective on this much-unsolved mystery, we invited many branding and packaging experts who throw light on the topic.

 

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