1

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Creating a real-life or a reel-life characters is like putting various puzzle pieces together. It’s easy to see someone and say ‘I recognise that person’, but drawing from scratch is a different thing all together. Illustrator and digital artist, Nikhil Shinde, talks more about this less explored form of communication and how it can be made into a powerful tool.

Irfan Khan
Characters - Nikhil Shinde
Sadhu
Characters - Nikhil Shinde
Big Eyes
Characters - Nikhil Shinde
Characters - Nikhil Shinde
Characters - Nikhil Shinde

Surprise the Audience by Giving Them Something Unexpected

The idea of making different types of characters and models with suitable environments is always expected from a digital artist. So why not create them with a twist? Get random by stepping out of the box. Get unexpected by deviating from the initial plan. When the final outcome is not what you thought initially, you’re pretty much on the right track.

characters
THE KARNA

Sisters
Characters - Nikhil Shinde
characters
KAPIL SHARMA
characters
LATE NIGHT CHAT

The Real Deal comes with Unreal Characters

Believe it or not, it’s pretty easy to make a real character. It’s simply about making a replica of an existing person and all it is focusing on getting the right details in place. But fantasy or self-imagined characters demand a lot of time to think about their anatomy, pose, composition etc. Even though there is a stark difference in the creation of both real and non-real characters, what never changes is the approach in making them. As a designer, it’s vital to contribute your style and personality to it as well. This is what personalises the artwork and makes it ‘yours’.

characters
KRISHN
Characters - Nikhil Shinde
Characters - Nikhil Shinde
characters
SHAKTIMAN
Ganesha
Witch
characters
SADHU BABA

Every Work of Yours Must be Your Very Favourite

Even though some designs and projects get recognised over others that a designer has created, the bottom line is that they’re all of equal value. The designer puts the same amount of energy, thought and skill in each artwork. It’s important to not lose that focus. Because, if that balance is disrupted, it might make way for a shaky future.

characters
GRANNY AND MONEY
Characters - Nikhil Shinde
characters
THE WITCH

Characters - Nikhil Shinde
Radha

Digital Paintings are not Meant for Walls

In India, digital painting is yet to be accepted as a mode of communication. And from what it looks like, it’s still a while away. The only reason is that India lacks encouragement in this field as well as basic knowledge. Once we’re able to overcome this, it’s only then that digital paintings will make for a much more natural form of communication.

House wife making Chai (Tea)
Characters - Nikhil Shinde
characters
Dr. MANMOHAN SINGH
characters
DIABLO CHARACTER
characters
BLACK EYE

Published in Issue 24

Gone are the days when Illustrations would take a back seat. Now, they are becoming more proactive and are evolving the way we communicate. This time, Creative Gaga focuses on how the advertising world is opening its doors to this exciting form of design. Featuring renowned Illustrators like Chris Beatrice, Nasheet Shadani, Vijay Kumar, Gabriel Mareno and much more, this issue promises to leave no page unturned!

 

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CURRENT ISSUE
Creative Gaga - Issue 49

 

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Advertising is an interesting profession and those who work within it know of the everyday humps and bumps, the charm and harm that one has to deal with. As an Illustrator, when the brief is, as usual, a one liner and non-directional; in this case ‘create an illustration on advertising’, the job can be pretty tough. Many images and situations come to mind, and after you’ve decided which one you’d like (and the client would too), that’s when the real work begins. Illustrator, Nithin Rao Kumblekar, takes us through the key steps (illustration tutorial) to arrive at the cover illustration done for this issue’s cover.

Step 01

Always start the illustration with a rough scribble. This helps to get the idea on paper faster. While you do that, it’s advisable to check if it’s working in the layout or not. After that’s finalised, make a fine line drawing by putting all detailing in place. After that comes the lighting. Give a monochromatic tone on the entire sketch and decide the light source and the reflection. This gives a fair idea about the final look.

Step 02

Next, create different objects in separate layers. Once all the objects have been created, then give the basic shades in respective colours for each layer. This helps understand the colour tone for the illustration in the required light. Here, an 80-volt bulb effect is created in the shady bathroom. One thing that needs to be aware of is that the highlight cannot be pure white. The entire tone has to be yellowish.

Step 03

Now, select a soft brush to work in most of the places. Notice, a rough brush is also used in certain spaces that help colour filling to be faster.

Step 04

Once the direction of light is figured, we can move forward in details. Here, the tiles have been put in perspective after which the lights and reflections have followed. It is important to note that light plays tricks with different surfaces. Here, the bathroom tiles must reflect the light. If you are unable to judge the light, then it’s better to visit the actual site where you can see the reflection and tone in the required direction.

Step 05

The next stage is to get the expression right. Notice how the shadow formation on the expression of the character is what gives the entire look. Here, the reflection is monotonous. If this were an outdoor scene, the shadow light would have been in a bluish tone. However, that is not the case in this illustration. After getting the light, shadow and reflection right, the next step is to focus on further detailing. This includes creating facial hair. Notice how close the bulb is to the head and so a glare effect is created on top of objects below the light source. Hence, a yellowish tone is made to overlap the character.

Step 06

One can add as many elements to create detail in the picture. Here, crumpled pieces of paper are added to the story. Notice how the light direction changes on each paper. If you have trouble understanding light and shadow, then it’s always better to get a reference. Take pictures from a camera of the objects for reference.

Step 07

The final stage is the completion of the illustration. One very important thing to keep in mind is to always keep saving your Photoshop le multiple times. You never know when the le might get corrupted and you might end up banging your head on the monitor.

Published in Issue 24

Illustration For Advertising! Gone are the days when Illustrations would take a back seat. Now, they are becoming more proactive and are evolving the way we communicate. This time, Creative Gaga focuses on how the advertising world is opening its doors to this exciting form of design. Featuring renowned Illustrators like Chris Beatrice, Nasheet Shadani, Vijay Kumar, Gabriel Mareno and much more, this issue promises to leave no page unturned!

 

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CURRENT ISSUE
Creative Gaga - Issue 49

 

Karthik M
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Karthik M is a commerce graduate and also studied at Ecole Intuit Lab. Preferred to be known as a tinkerer, doodler, scribbler and maker, this self-taught man has an abode of experience in the illustration and advertising sector of 10 years.


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Illustration For Advertising Special! Gone are the days when Illustrations would take a back seat. Now, they are becoming more proactive and are evolving the way we communicate. This time, Creative Gaga focuses on how the advertising world is opening its doors to this exciting form of design. Featuring renowned Illustrators like Chris Beatrice, Nasheet Shadani, Vijay Kumar, Gabriel Mareno and much more, this issue promises to leave no page unturned!

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As designers, ordinary events shouldn’t be ignored, for in them lie inspirations and insights that everyone saw but never noticed. How good you are with tuning your eyes to your mind is what counts, believes Karthik M. He makes some interesting points that translate into how to notice things so that people can take notice of your work.

Periods
First Coffee
Poster for Easy Cabs
Adoption
Vichar (thoughts)

Beauty Lies in The Eyes of the Observer

Any creative journey starts with observation; the ability to see beyond what is visible and read between the lines. Different designers will have different tones in which they try and communicate what they perceive, whether it’s through mockery, humour or abstract routes. What’s important is to find a unique connection inside what you observe and bring that to life in a personal way.

Road Ritual
Government Job

One will realise that over the course of time, doing justice to yourself will help bring recognition, as your designs make way into websites, blogs and so on. Create work that instigates discussion. And advertising is a good place to learn how to do that because it always keeps you curious and makes you dig for insights.

Life. An everyday situation, shown with a unique connotation; one that instigates the viewer to think beyond what they see.
Apocalypse. An everyday situation, shown with a unique connotation; one that instigates the viewer to think beyond what they see.
Grope Spot. An everyday situation, shown with a unique connotation; one that instigates the viewer to think beyond what they see.

As Every Sight has an Insight

Pretty much so. Inspirations are many and they are hiding everywhere. It could be in a fight you’ve had with your partner that might trigger a chain of thought or sometimes as simple as how your pet curls up and sleeps It’s funny how something so small are like blips on a radar screen and which actually have the potential to manifest into great ideas. The underlying element is of course to constantly look for inspirations to invent and create.

Connect. A series of illustrations exploring grey areas of life in black and white.

For Illustrators, Advertising is the Best School

There are probably millions of people out there who can draw, who can illustrate. They love to tell stories, share concepts via striking visual form. For them, and their audience, it’s something that never gets dull. And that’s why, advertising is the perfect launch pad for great talent. It not only allows you to do what you do best, but also teaches you other key traits that are vital for someone in a creative profession.

Cover for Helter Skelter Book
Editorial Design for Helter Skelter Book, Hands
Editorial Design for Helter Skelter Book, SpeakingTongues

Advertising, helps designers see a bigger picture; one beyond the edges of their canvas. It not only lets you make things but also teaches you how to present your idea to the world. It makes you a thinker, a creator, most importantly, it makes you a doer.

Sorry State
Silent Killer
Smirking Salary. Sometimes, words can be great visuals as well, demonstrates this tongue-in-cheek design.

Published in Issue 24

Illustration For Advertising Special! Gone are the days when Illustrations would take a back seat. Now, they are becoming more proactive and are evolving the way we communicate. This time, Creative Gaga focuses on how the advertising world is opening its doors to this exciting form of design. Featuring renowned Illustrators like Chris Beatrice, Nasheet Shadani, Vijay Kumar, Gabriel Mareno and much more, this issue promises to leave no page unturned!

 

Order Your Copy!
CURRENT ISSUE
Creative Gaga - Issue 49

 

Chris Beatrice
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Chris Beatrice is a US based illustrator. With a Bachelors of Fine Arts from Massachusetts College of Art in Boston, his work has graced the covers of classic books such as Gulliver’s Travels, Robinson Crusoe etc. in addition to children’s books, games and packaging. His clients include leading names like MacMillan, Scholastic, Disney/Hyperion, Penguin, etc.


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Illustration For Advertising Special! Gone are the days when Illustrations would take a back seat. Now, they are becoming more proactive and are evolving the way we communicate. This time, Creative Gaga focuses on how the advertising world is opening its doors to this exciting form of design. Featuring renowned Illustrators like Chris Beatrice, Nasheet Shadani, Vijay Kumar, Gabriel Mareno and much more, this issue promises to leave no page unturned!

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Creative Gaga - Issue 49

 

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Childhood memories and stories are two things we can never let go of. Giving form to characters and shape to fairytale stories, US illustrator Chris Beatrice is the hand behind those wondrous drawings that we read instead of the words themselves. He talks to us about his style and shares his journey.

Feeding Time
Freedom
Moon Path
KooKoo Train Station

CG: We’ve all probably read books that had covers designed by you. What lead to your fascination for fairytales and fictitious characters?

Chris: Really just reading stories as a kid and having them read to me. I still like illustrated stories, even if the only illustration is the cover, because you get a blend of the artist’s vision and your own, both inspired by the actual story. It’s amazing how a great book cover can actually make a mediocre book a bit more enjoyable, because you get some personal identification with the characters and environments in the book.

Down in a Hole
Kolsch Dog
Cicero

With children’s picture books we go a step further and really try to tell the story with the pictures, often adding elements that don’t literally appear in the text, or which hit you more viscerally than the corresponding words.

Lecture at the Swamp
Gulliver
The Skunk

CG: What excites you most about what you do? What homework and brainstorming exercises do you carry out before having a fair idea of what you wish to execute?

Chris: Part of me loves the science of light, form, anatomy, etc. – just using my brain to make something real and tangible on a 2D surface, making real, believable creatures out of a bunch of little marks. The other part that’s fascinating is learning about history, costume, animals, architecture, whatever. I want my pictures to be completely sound in terms of historical accuracy, even if 99% of the audience wouldn’t know the difference. There is so much misinformation out there that I at least want my stuff to be reliable.

Henry
Welcome
Science Room

I also love the feeling of going on a somewhat open ended journey. I never know 100% what I am going to get. I know the kind of feeling I want to evoke, and the story that the picture needs to tell, but it’s not always clear how that’s going to happen. To call it trial and error would be misleading, but it really is like you just need to jump into the picture, try stuff, and respond to what’s happening, what’s working and not working, as well as the entirely new things that happen magically and you’re lucky just to see them and be able to keep them.

Caught
Leaving The Swamp
Gladiator

CG: The stories that you’ve portrayed are famous not just in USA, but worldwide. How do your illustrations and designs cater to the world audience? What elements do you use in order to relate your designs to them?

Chris: I’ve noticed that my work seems to resonate equally in the U.S. and Europe at least. Part of that is as I draw a lot from European folk tales, which is really my favorite source of inspiration. I’m not as into fantasy as I used to be, and though I love reading comics I don’t really want to make them. So my work comes across as kind of classic.

Uncle SamB
Penny waking up late
Penny on the stairs

I just do pictures that I would want to see when reading these stories. But I do very much respect the integrity of different cultures and am extremely sensitive to not simplifying or caricaturing them. If I’m doing an Indian folk tale you can bet I’m going to find out how people in India, at the time and place the story is set, dress, wear their hair, etc., right down to the professions of the characters, their economic status, and so on.

Soccer Girl
Flying Window
Surprise Party

CG: What has your experience been with the advertising industry?

Chris: Believe it or not advertising is some of my favorite work to do. The process is fast and dynamic, and most importantly perhaps, I feel like I am making an image that is going to be around for a long time, and seen by a lot of eyes. We try things, see what works, and if it doesn’t work we talk about exactly why. Often with books, authors think the image is just supposed to literally represent part of the story, but if that’s the case, it’s really not adding anything. Sometimes it’s hard for certain authors to really home in on what a ‘picture’ should be saying.

Stage Fright
Afternoon

CG: Apart from book covers, gaming and packaging designs, how do you plan to take your skill forward into other dimensions? What is your dream project that’s still waiting to happen?

Chris: That’s a tough one! Maurice’s Valises kind of is my dream project. As a commercial artist there is a wide range of possibilities, from being a small part of a huge team (e.g. a concept artist on an animated movie), to being half of a small team (e.g. illustrating a book). I’ve been doing the latter for quite a while now, but at some point I will probably drift back to a larger more collaborative venue. It’s kind of impossible to mix those two – you can’t, for example, animate a feature film by yourself, and you can’t use a huge team to illustrate a picture book.

Alfred
Swamp Things
After the Snow

Published in Issue 24

Illustration For Advertising Special! Gone are the days when Illustrations would take a back seat. Now, they are becoming more proactive and are evolving the way we communicate. This time, Creative Gaga focuses on how the advertising world is opening its doors to this exciting form of design. Featuring renowned Illustrators like Chris Beatrice, Nasheet Shadani, Vijay Kumar, Gabriel Mareno and much more, this issue promises to leave no page unturned!

 

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CURRENT ISSUE
Creative Gaga - Issue 49

 

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Gone are the days when Illustrators used to take the back seat in the advertising world. With things today, they’re emerging as the forerunners of some amazing and memorable communication that is being recognized. No doubt, clients, like OLX and Docomo, are exploring this valuable asset with Nithin Rao Kumblekar.

advertising
Namaste India Milk, Agency: ADK Fortune Communications Pvt. Ltd.
advertising
Urbanrise, Agency: One MG, Chennai
advertising
advertising

Contacting an illustrator for a TVC shoot might not be something we hear of everyday, but when OLX got in touch with Nithin Rao, it was a wise decision. The client wanted a campaign that would carry forward in print as well, and thus, saving time and cost, decided to get the shoot illustrated. Simple to look at, but the task was a challenging one for the artist. The OLX team had asked him to create every object separately in the layout so that they could pick each one later, according to their needs. Thus, the illustration required Nithin to create every object completely even if it was overlapped by the objects.

Wall graphic for Sulekha.com
Wall graphic for Sulekha.com

Wall graphic for Sulekha.com
advertising

When Docomo demanded an illustration route for its exciting print campaign ‘The bedtime stories’, Nithin knew it would be storytelling through single visuals. Without over complicating the visual, he worked carefully with shadow and light to establish humor and wit using relatable scenarios. To give the story a setting, subtle placement of props were used, like the placement of a kid’s drawing book, school bag and water bottle with a fish on it.

advertising
Client: Killer dryShampoo, Agency: Makani
advertising
Client: Killer dryShampoo, Agency: Makani
advertising
Client: Killer dryShampoo, Agency: Makani
advertising

Published in Issue 24

Gone are the days when Illustrations would take a back seat. Now, they are becoming more proactive and are evolving the way we communicate. This time, Creative Gaga focuses on how the advertising world is opening its doors to this exciting form of design. Featuring renowned Illustrators like Chris Beatrice, Nasheet Shadani, Vijay Kumar, Gabriel Mareno and much more, this issue promises to leave no page unturned!

 

Order Your Copy!
CURRENT ISSUE
Creative Gaga - Issue 49

 

Advertising is one such arena where one can achieve as much as they’d like; provided, that they’ve got the skills, talent and of course the courage. Nasheet Shadani, believes it’s for every illustrator to make the most of this opportunity and create magical pieces that can manifest themselves as memorable communications.

Advertising
Poster for Vodafone India
Advertising
Poster for Vodafone India
Advertising
Poster for Vodafone India

If the Idea is the Soul of Any Work Then Illustration is the Body.

It is common belief that it’s tough for a fresh college graduate to walk in with a portfolio and land into advertising directly. Common notions are that one needs ‘contacts’ and ‘references’. That’s not true. A good portfolio is the key into this exciting world, provided that the work contains not only cool designs and illustrations, but strong and unique ideas behind them as well. Once you make your way in, the world is yours. And for an illustrator, it’s a very exciting place. There is a bit of illustration in everything you create, whether it’s a logo design, typography, calligraphy or even a photo shoot.

Advertising
Poster for Vodafone India
Advertising
Poster for Vodafone India
Advertising
Poster for Vodafone India
Advertising

Love Problems More Than Solutions.

Pablo Picasso once said, “God is really only another artist. He invented the giraffe, the elephant and the cat. He has no real style, He just goes on trying other things”. Once a new style is cracked, the job is done. Then it’s all about moving on to explore something new. It’s important to go for the best style that suits the brief rather than retro fitting what you are good at. It also depends on the brief, if the best solution is a minimal vector graphic then why waste energy and time in creating intricate miniature art?

Poster for Vodafone India
Poster for Vodafone India
Dancer Meets Potter, Dancer Meets Puppet. Surajkund Mela theme is used to invite people on behalf of Vodafone using vivid and vibrant illustrations.

Do the Doodle.

Whatever is the result, it all starts with a doodle. Never sit on the computer directly. It is always better to think, let your subconscious work on the problem then transfer your thoughts into paper and use that doodle as a building block. Remember that even though we’ve got incredible programs and software at our disposal, they can’t do the thinking; they cannot generate ideas. Surrounding yourself with interesting and creative things can help inspire. Whether it’s things you collect from your travels or simply dig deep into the rich Indian culture, design and artistic forms are all around us.

The Elves and the Shoemaker, Santa’s Gift and Wicked Harry.

What’s Stopping You?

Short deadlines, overnight work, client’s not so friendly feedback and budget issues are few things that, sometimes, stop us in doing great work. But it ultimately depends on the kind of brand you’re working with. There are clients like Vodafone who love illustrations and there are other clients who are more focused on photo shoots or stock images. Can you imagine Amul advertising without those funny illustrative ads? Once you figure out that illustration is the best answer to this brief then the real job starts to convince the client on the benefit of using illustration in that particular case. Illustration in advertising is very different from illustrations elsewhere. Here, every single line must serve a purpose and should add to that overall message.

Advertising
ORIYA, URDU, MALAYALAM. A campaign to promote the dying art of calligraphy.
Advertising
COUPLE. A print ad to show the ill effects of bad breath in a funny way.
Advertising
Illustration for Taxi Fabric

Published in Issue 24

Gone are the days when Illustrations would take a back seat. Now, they are becoming more proactive and are evolving the way we communicate. This time, Creative Gaga focuses on how the advertising world is opening its doors to this exciting form of design. Featuring renowned Illustrators like Chris Beatrice, Nasheet Shadani, Vijay Kumar, Gabriel Mareno and much more, this issue promises to leave no page unturned!

 

Order Your Copy!
CURRENT ISSUE
Creative Gaga - Issue 49

 

Whether real life or reel life, we are surrounded by interesting characters. Some pass us by, but some get stuck in the mind and hearts. It’s no different for caricature expert Shijo Varghese, who wanted to draw Captain Jack Sparrow’s illustration for his eye-catchy attitude and appearance. Here he takes us on a step by step guide on how he achieved to create a beautiful illustration.

Illustration

Step 01

Drawing Detailing.

After finalising the subject, a bunch of pictures were collected to study elements like facial features, expressions, actions etc. After a reference picture was selected, an outline sketch is drawn using a Faber Castell mechanical pencil 0.5 on an 85 GSM paper. It’s better to start with the nose, the central element in any face, and then draw everything else around it. After the outlines are finalised, it’s time for detailing. Detailing always starts from the eyes. The hatching technique is used according to the shape, which are generally a group of straight lines. Once that’s achieved, it’s break time. That means, leaving the artwork alone for a few hours and returning to it. If all looks fine, it is then scanned as a 300 dpi JPEG.

Illustration

Step 02

Colouring.

Once the image is scanned, it is then opened in Photoshop CS5 for colouring. Keep in mind that the drawing (illustration) is placed on top of the layer as multiply and lock and a neutral tone is filled below the drawing layer, which serves as a foundation.

Illustration

Step 03

This is followed by creating another layer above the neutral colour layer. This layer is used for detailed colouring along with soft and hard round brushes.

Illustration

Step 04

Colouring is the critical part that is used to bring the character to life. A vast majority of time is then spent on fine-tuning the depth of colour using neutral tones because that’s what the subject demands.

Illustration

Step 05

More character and drama is created using a hard rounded brush in 30-50% opacity.

Illustration
Illustration

Step 06

The last step involves the addition of highlights to finalise the image.

Published in Issue 24

Gone are the days when Illustrations would take a back seat. Now, they are becoming more proactive and are evolving the way we communicate. This time, Creative Gaga focuses on how the advertising world is opening its doors to this exciting form of design. Featuring renowned Illustrators like Chris Beatrice, Nasheet Shadani, Vijay Kumar, Gabriel Mareno and much more, this issue promises to leave no page unturned!

 

Order Your Copy!
CURRENT ISSUE
Creative Gaga - Issue 49

 

The beauty of women is pure and refreshing; every man would agree. Spanish illustrator, Gabriel Moreno, is no different. Charmed by the raw beauty and behaviour of the female form, his artworks capture them through graphic and elegant imagery to make a mark in advertising. He talks to us to tell us more.

PREMIUM McWRAP
The Beauty of Women
San Gavino Mural

CG. Your illustrations and designs are very eye-catchy. How would you describe your style as?

Gabriel. I’d say my style is best described as based in the fine arts but with digital platforms in mind. When you grow up drawing, it just develops naturally. In some facets it’s academic and in others it’s personality. When I choose a subject, I envision whether it will go well with this style that I’ve developed, letting the style define itself.

CD Cover
COCA-COLA PACKAGING
FIAT500 CHINA

CG. What came first, the desire to work as an illustrator or as an advertising professional? How did you marry both? What were/are your inspirations?

Gabriel. The desire to be an illustrator was always first. As far as how I married them, when you desire to work as an illustrator I believe it’s like any other marriage. Sometimes you are on a high and sometimes you find the best way to stay together. Most of the time, the profession is completely fulfilling. Some days I’m more motivated to create than others. Therefore, I have my more artistic “hands-on” days and my less “hands-on” artistic days.

CITRUS AND MANDARINE

The inspirations depend on whether the work is commissioned or personal. If the work is commissioned, the inspiration comes from the subject matter provided by the agency and/or client. If the work is personal, the response is much easier.

 

The inspirations come from women. I’ve always watched women and how they move, their beauty, how they interact with the public, how they interact with themselves, and most importantly how to translate that beauty into my own work in a way that enlivens both them and the visions I have of them.

Giraffe
Hare Edition
DONKEY

CG. Spain’s a very cultural and exquisite country. What Spanish elements do you incorporate in your designs, if at all any? How do you tweak your designs and illustrations according to international brands/clients?

Gabriel. Well, I come from Spain. So, in essence, Spanish culture naturally comes out of me in many ways. I suppose I can say that many of the women that I draw are from Andalusia and others have Spanish traits. However, the main elements that I look for are the eyes and mouth.

 

Many women have beautiful features and it’s just as easy for me to be intrigued by women from India, Italy, Greece, etc. I don’t necessarily feel that any of my work portrays “Spanish” characteristics bounded in culture or a particular Spanish method of approaching art.

COVER ILLUSTRATION
EROTIC STORIES BY JUAN JOSÉ MILLÁS

Regarding the international brands and clients, I adapt to the models given to me in order to professionally carry out the commission. There are always tweaks that need to be made to my style to correctly approach the subject matter. However, the style is the style. It deals more with how I want the visual aesthetic to turn out for the commission.

VODKA CRUISER
SOLO EXHIBITION

CG. What advice would you give to budding enthusiasts out there? What are your future goals and dreams that you wish to conquer?

Gabriel. I respond to this question by stating that you have to create a lot of work, and just keep creating. However, upon presenting your work in terms of achieving professional recognition, it’s best to have those 25 works that show who you most are. They must be your best work and transmit what you’ll bring to the art world. I have no dreams of conquering, I just wish to continue working in the illustration field for as long as possible.

Series of illustrations for the brand of shoes called Vögele

Published in Issue 24

Gone are the days when Illustrations would take a back seat. Now, they are becoming more proactive and are evolving the way we communicate. This time, Creative Gaga focuses on how the advertising world is opening its doors to this exciting form of design. Featuring renowned Illustrators like Chris Beatrice, Nasheet Shadani, Vijay Kumar, Gabriel Mareno and much more, this issue promises to leave no page unturned!

 

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