1

The barriers have broken and the people unified, all thanks to the World Wide Web. This, for designers is nothing less than a revolution. British freelance graphic designer, Chloe Galea, who now lives in Berlin, has made the most of this invention to provide modern designs for clients situated worldwide. Here, in a conversation with Creative Gaga, she tells us more about how she reaches out to the wider audience with her design and technology.

CG: Your designs seem very systematic, columned and well-organised. Is this your style? How do you and your design sense and techniques change when designing for the web, as compared to other canvases?

Chloë: Order and space are vital components in digital designing. I think it is aesthetics that I appreciate in many aspects of my life. As my flat is certainly bright, airy and decorated in a fairly limited palette. Plus, I think that my continued interest in print and editorial design has meant that I am always working with grids and looking at how best to structure the content I am given. The basics don’t change much when it comes to designing for digital or web either. The style still employs a grid, where careful attention is paid to typography and its hierarchy. At the same time, it is vital to strike a visual balance that makes the design look right. There are obviously different restraints that must be taken into account when working on print or digital design, but other than these technicalities, nothing much changes.

CG: Being European, where art and design are culturally embedded and dates back to memorable artists and evergreen creations; how are brands, clients and audience taking to the present web activity?

Chloë: It’s like homogeneous mixture, where it’s hard to separate both. There are certainly a few established brands I have worked with in London that have struggled to keep up with all the new technological and social developments. But I think everyone knows just how important it is now to have an intelligent curated presence online, to actively engage with the audience and stay up-to-date with the latest digital and web trends. That all said, the print isn’t going anywhere; it is ever evolving and finding new ways to remain relevant.

CG: As a designer, how do you stay abreast of latest design happenings and creations? How do you reach out to the world? How much do you depend on the web and how much does the web depend on you?

Chloë: There is no rocket science involved. Reading is important, spending time online is important. I lose hours to Pinterest as well as get out of the house, walk around the city, meet up with like-minded people and make a point of attending industry talks and events. While it would be a mistake to rely on the internet for all creative inspiration, I think no one would deny just what an amazing resource it is. It’s also a boon for freelancers out there as it facilitates promotion and communication with clients regardless of where they are in the world.

CG: What would be some traits and qualities that you feel should be present in a designer to be ready to create for the times of today? Have you had the opportunity to visit or work with any Indian clients?

Chloë: I went to a talk recently at Betahaus, Berlin and the speaker said there are three things a designer needs to be: talented, punctual and likeable. In terms of Indian clients, no I haven’t worked with any. However, I have spent some time in India and would love the opportunity to go back!

Published in Issue 25

Creative Gaga kicks off the year with an issue that asks the important questions, is it the web that’s leading the brands or the other way around? With 2014 witnessing an increase in brands investing in digital marketing, 2015 will only be bigger. We can say India has accepted the revolution, where more and more people are opening browsers to e-commerce, literally window shopping, and setting up shops online as well. The issue brings together renowned designers with digital experience, who discuss and throw light on the pros and cons of this change and where we possibly are headed with this in the future.

 

Order Your Copy!

Creating a real-life or a reel-life character is like putting various puzzle pieces together. It’s easy to see someone and say ‘I recognise that person.’, but drawing from scratch is a different thing all together. Illustrator and digital artist, Nikhil Shinde, talks more about this less explored form of communication and how it can be made into a powerful tool.

characters
LATE NIGHT CHAT
characters
SADHU BABA

Surprise the audience by giving them something unexpected.

The idea of making different types of characters and models with suitable environments is always expected from a digital artist. So why not create them with a twist? Get random by stepping out of the box. Get unexpected by deviating from the initial plan. When the final outcome is not what you thought initially, you’re pretty much on the right track.

characters
THE KARNA
characters
KAPIL SHARMA

The real deal comes with unreal characters.

Believe it or not, it’s pretty easy to make a real character. It’s simply about making a replica of an existing person and all it is focusing on getting the right details in place. But fantasy or self-imagined characters demand a lot of time to think about their anatomy, pose, composition etc. Even though there is a stark difference in the creation of both real and non-real characters, what never changes is the approach in making them. As a designer, it’s vital to contribute your style and personality to it as well. This is what personalises the artwork and makes it ‘yours’.

characters
KRISHN
characters
SHAKTIMAN

Every work of yours must be your very favourite.

Even though some designs and projects get recognised over others that a designer has created, the bottom line is that they’re all of equal value. The designer puts the same amount of energy, thought and skill in each artwork. It’s important to not lose that focus. Because, if that balance is disrupted, it might make way for a shaky future.

characters
GRANNY AND MONEY
characters
THE WITCH

Digital paintings are not meant for walls.

In India, digital painting is yet to be accepted as a mode of communication. And from what it looks like, it’s still a while away. The only reason is because India lacks encouragement in this field as well as basic knowledge. Once we’re able to overcome this, it’s only then that digital paintings will make for a much more natural form of communication.

characters
Dr. MANMOHAN SINGH
characters
DIABLO CHARACTER
characters
BLACK EYE

Published in Issue 24

Gone are the days when Illustrations would take a back seat. Now, they are becoming more proactive and are evolving the way we communicate. This time, Creative Gaga focuses on how the advertising world is opening its doors to this exciting form of design. Featuring renowned Illustrators like Chris Beatrice, Nasheet Shadani, Vijay Kumar, Gabriel Mareno and much more, this issue promises to leave no page unturned!

 

Order Your Copy!

Nikhil Shinde

Born in Dhule, Maharashtra, Nikhil Shinde is a freelance illustrator. Starting off his career in 2010 through digital paintings, he now works with Photoshop and Corel Draw to create memorable work.


Featured In


Gone are the days when Illustrations would take a back seat. Now, they are becoming more proactive and are evolving the way we communicate. This time, Creative Gaga focuses on how the advertising world is opening its doors to this exciting form of design. Featuring renowned Illustrators like Chris Beatrice, Nasheet Shadani, Vijay Kumar, Gabriel Mareno and much more, this issue promises to leave no page unturned!

Related Posts



Find Him Here


POST TAGS:

Gone are the days when Illustrators used to take the back seat in the advertising world. With things today, they’re emerging as the forerunners of some amazing and memorable communication that is being recognized. No doubt, clients, like OLX and Docomo, are exploring this valuable asset with Nithin Rao Kumblekar.

advertising
advertising

Contacting an illustrator for a TVC shoot might not be something we hear of everyday, but when OLX got in touch with Nithin Rao, it was a wise decision. The client wanted a campaign that would carry forward in print as well, and thus, saving time and cost, decided to get the shoot illustrated. Simple to look at, but the task was a challenging one for the artist. The OLX team had asked him to create every object separately in the layout so that they could pick each one later, according to their needs. Thus, the illustration required Nithin to create every object completely even if it was overlapped by the objects.

advertising

When Docomo demanded an illustration route for its exciting print campaign ‘The bedtime stories’, Nithin knew it would be storytelling through single visuals. Without over complicating the visual, he worked carefully with shadow and light to establish humor and wit using relatable scenarios. To give the story a setting, subtle placement of props were used, like the placement of a kid’s drawing book, school bag and water bottle with a fish on it.

advertising

Published in Issue 24

Gone are the days when Illustrations would take a back seat. Now, they are becoming more proactive and are evolving the way we communicate. This time, Creative Gaga focuses on how the advertising world is opening its doors to this exciting form of design. Featuring renowned Illustrators like Chris Beatrice, Nasheet Shadani, Vijay Kumar, Gabriel Mareno and much more, this issue promises to leave no page unturned!

 

Order Your Copy!

Pin It on Pinterest