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38Technology Journalist, Abhimanyu Ghoshal, takes us through the photography essentials of clicking for Live music concerts, also its nitty-gritty and rather subtle aspects.

Photography
Photography

Cater to the Niceties and Niche of the Craft.

Clicking for Live music gigs is a whole lot different from clicking otherwise. You’re tasked with capturing the energy, vibe and mood of a concert, with very little control over critical elements such as lighting, shooting positions and the ability to direct your subjects. That is a whole different ball game from shooting with models in a production setting that conforms to your brief, and with a team to support you as well. It is this thrill of capturing imagery of Live music performances or concerts that is rather exciting, and that is also what makes the very process of doing it enjoyable, satisfying and valuable in itself.

Photography
Photography

Make Your Way Through The Hurdles.

There are several constraints that present interesting challenges – you only get to shoot during the first two or three songs (after which you have to leave the photo pit in front of the stage); there are strong lights that bathe the performers in colour and blow out details in your shots, and you can’t access every portion of the stage that you might want to. It’s fun to work around these and try to create compelling images. Good lighting, a well-appointed stage and an enthusiastic audience go a long way in making your pictures stand out.

Photography
Photography

Soak in the Vibe; Then let it Reflect.

Depending on the music and the artist’s background, one must compose pictures to suit their vibe and what they’re known for. For example, with metal bands, one may try to capture a dark atmosphere by isolating the subject, including the smoke emanating from smoke machines and treat the raw image accordingly. With pop acts, on the other hand, one can try to highlight the performers’ signature costumes. Researching artists’ music and previous photographic coverage before shooting their concerts certainly helps to quite an extent, in this regard.

Photography
Photography

Step out of Familiar Terrain, and Walk into New Horizons.

It can certainly be more exciting to click artists who you are familiar with, than those you don’t know quite well. As a music lover, though, the opportunity to discover new acts is a bonus. Shooting unfamiliar performers gets you out of your comfort zone, thus expanding your horizons as a photographer. Do not fall for poor composition and over-the-top editing; both issues can easily be fixed by referring to the works of more accomplished photographers and practicing consciously.

Photography
Issue-38

Published in Issue 38

With this issue, we try to explore different views from many well-known studio owners and senior designers. While Anthony Lopez of Lopez Design shared tips on what a studio looks for in a designer, Mohar Ray from Codesign highlights the key aspects that play a significant role and make the difference in whether you are hired or not as a promising designer. Also, this issue has an insightful article on ‘Branding with reason and love’ from Itu Chaudhuri, founder ICD (Itu Chaudhuri Design) along with Siddhi Ranade, explaining his tools of storytelling through his unique style of illustrations. This issue is a must read for a talented graduate to a branding expert. Order your copy and enjoy reading it!

 

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Visual Communications specialist, Lisa Rath tells us what are the key qualities she looks for when hiring a young communication designer.

In a young designer, hunger for knowledge and performance are vital. An understanding of why they have chosen design discipline, and why they wish to pursue it as a career option, is a rather important factor in gauging a candidate’s potential. It provides an overview of their perspective, and approach, thus offering an insight into their temperament at a broader level.

 

In the current academic scenario, design education is often an option for school leaving students without superlative academic performance. Therefore, it’s important to know how much they are genuinely invested in design as a study and vocation. The willingness to absorb and learn is often an offshoot of their hunger and drive.

In the current academic scenario, design education is often an option for school leaving students without superlative academic performance. Therefore, it’s important to know how much they are genuinely invested in design as a study and vocation. The willingness to absorb and learn is often an offshoot of their hunger and drive.

Next, in line are drawing skills. Though computers are used for every design discipline today, the basic ability to express an idea via drawing is paramount. Skilled, communicative and disciplined use of sketching always leads to good, well thought out design solutions. The better we draw our ideas, the better we communicate with clients.

Good drawing always translates into a better-finished design solution.

One must remember this at all points of time – not only at the conceptual stage of a design process but as the work progresses through many phases.

An awareness of the socio-economic realities of our country and the rest of the world is desirable.

Understanding, sympathising and contextualising a design problem is essential for all designers pursuing any discipline. Without a good understanding of India or the world’s socio-political-economical landscape, young designers can be at a loss when exploring solutions for a potential project. It’s advocated that sociology and psychology should be part of design education.

 

On the same lines, it is not only an added advantage but to quite a large extent necessary and important, for a young designer to be interested in politics, books, films are it mainstream cinema, art films or absolutely anything under the sun.

Lastly, as a communication designer, it is very important to be communicative. Therefore, writing ability, debating ability and a great sense of humour is a must to survive in the studio.

Published in Issue 38

This issue, we try to explore different views from many well-known studio owners and senior designers. While Anthony Lopez of Lopez Design shared tips on what a studio looks for in a designer, Mohar Ray from Codesign highlights the key aspects that play a significant role and make the difference in whether you are hired or not as a promising designer. Also, this issue has an insightful article on ‘Branding with reason and love’ from Itu Chaudhuri, founder ICD (Itu Chaudhuri Design) along with Siddhi Ranade, explaining his tools of story telling through his unique style of illustrations. This issue is a must read for a talented graduate to a branding expert. Order you copy and enjoy reading it!

 

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Graphic designer, Itu Chaudhuri, lets out his experience and insight in the field of branding. He expresses what goes into creating effective brands, and the various aspects or elements that play a role in the process.

Branding
The Wild Stone Code Range.

CG. What is the relationship between the product and the branding? How does the former shape or inspire the latter?

IC. For some brands, the product’s properties are the heart of the brand. For example, we know Mercedes by their cars, which are a model of stability and Germanic engineered perfection; not by their advertising or showrooms or their F1 Cars (which they do very well). For those brands, branding needs to reflect what’s special about the product, but rarely reflects the product itself. The ‘what’s special’ part, in turn, depends on the category. For more functional products, it’s about a clear benefit from using it (e.g. relieving pain).

Branding
The Real Tea Range.

For less functional brands, the benefit may be more in the mind i.e. how it makes people feel, or its ‘values’ (what it encourages its customers to believe in). This is also true for brands, which we know by their advertising more than by the special qualities of the product (e.g. a mobile service like Vodafone or Airtel). But, rarely does the branding show the product itself. If the product is a packaged product that’s never unpacked (think deodorants, or insect repellents, or a fizzy drink), then the branding and the product are practically fused (even when large advertising budgets support the brands).

Branding
Branding
Branding
Eicher Live.

CG. According to you, How and to what extent, does branding impact an audience?

IC. Every customer knows that they are being manipulated. So, branding works best when it slips under the radar of the customers or escapes their ‘crap detector’. Yet, if the brand seems to admit this while managing to charm the customers, it works. The audience is then willingly helpless to resist. This means that the branding is, in some sense, invisible when it appears to belong or be inevitable as if there was no other way it could have appeared. This requires honesty on the owner’s part and linking the brand to what is true. Despite this, it’s carefully orchestrated. Simply appearing artless won’t do it. Done right, it can succeed in disarming the customer.

Branding
The Almirah.
Branding
The Almirah.

CG. What do you do to ensure that the brand character comes across fully in the final design?

IC. Personality is the key, and thus cannot be overlooked or sidelined at any stage. It’s a mental model of the brand that describes the brand’s character and attitude, more like a representative, and thus implies its appearance.

Brand applications for ‘Hired’.

CG. What do you feel should be proportion, or how much is the need for balance, between minimalism and complexities in a design?

IC. The point isn’t a balance: it’s more a purposeful imbalance. Different brands need different treatments, so that one may do best in a minimal style, and another with a busy, or even chaotic style. This is a necessary facet that one needs to recognise and remember throughout the process.

Branding
Annual Report Design for IDFC.
Branding
Branding
Branding
Branding
Branding

CG. What do you feel is an essential part of branding?

IC. Deep understanding of the client’s truth is fundamental and most essential, but making sure that it’s attractive to their customers is of value, at the same time. If you succeed on the first count and fail on the second, you touch no one. The other way around, and the attraction will be skin deep. It very clearly is a case of both or nothing.

Branding
Publication design for Breakthrough.

Published in Issue 38

This issue, we try to explore different views from many well-known studio owners and senior designers. While Anthony Lopez of Lopez Design shared tips on what a studio looks for in a designer, Mohar Ray from Codesign highlights the key aspects that play a significant role and make the difference in whether you are hired or not as a promising designer. Also, this issue has an insightful article on ‘Branding with reason and love’ from Itu Chaudhuri, founder ICD (Itu Chaudhuri Design) along with Siddhi Ranade, explaining his tools of story telling through his unique style of illustrations. This issue is a must read for a talented graduate to a branding expert. Order you copy and enjoy reading it!

 

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Illustrator, Siddhi Ranade, takes us through his thought process and the key aspects that goes into the tale-telling through his illustrations. He, thereby, goes on to illuminate the various facets, such as geometry, colour and the nature of the subject; how they contribute to his work, and also why design needs to be time relevant in constantly modifying times.

Siddhi Ranade - tale-telling
STILL A DEBT TO PAY.
Siddhi Ranade - tale-telling
HIDING THE OTHER HALF. COLOURS.

Every tool has a crucial role.

Geometry, patterns, and symmetry are assets that enhance a certain piece of work. They add to the simplicity and alignment of the illustration. It enables one with various combinations during the execution, Siddhi feels. ‘Line’, though, is the dominating factor for him to get to that exact line that expresses the true meaning of the illustration. The ‘Colours’ are next which help him add a mood to it in a more dramatic way that further dominates the existence of the artwork produced.

THE WAIT – THE EXPRESSION. STROKES.
Siddhi Ranade - tale-telling
SURYATRI.

Colour speaks more than words.

When Siddhi does portraits, he usually chooses to derive the colours from the life and experiences of his subjects. Through a brief exchange with the individual, he gets a tone of the colours from the way they talk and behave. “It’s all an entire palette performing in front of me,” he says, “All I have to do is just adjust it a little, and give justice to what I produce with respect to the subject. The colour gives individuality to the expression and the forms, narrating the best message of it.

THE DAY BEFORE YESTERDAY. DUO.
Siddhi Ranade - tale-telling
KNOWING–UNKNOWING. TALK TO ME.

Each subject varies as a personality.

We all are made of nature. Every person is made of his own grid of life and experiences, embedded with thoughts. These various moods inspire Siddhi. As an illustrator, he likes to access this inner core and explore more of it. At times, he finds it hard, as the thoughts are a lot different than portraying the person; it is challenging to reflect him or her in the same way. While graphically redesigning the individual, the aspects of reality and the second nature he/she plays as an illustration need to be balanced with care. Tackling this becomes more of what he loves to do. That can be done in colours and textures, which add more to the subject.

Siddhi Ranade - tale-telling
BELLADONNA – NEVER BETRAY A BEAUTIFUL LADY.
Siddhi Ranade - tale-telling
ABHINAYA – THE EXPRESSION. STROKES.

Time renews the visual tale.

Almost everything can be graphically illustrated and redesigned, but there is a need to reach to all those complex and tangled up expressions of real life that can be solved and enhanced in a minimalistic way. With a healthy visual bank, so as to find reference to the various aspects of life, as also to innovate, it is an integral part of a designer’s life to modify and update as the industry needs. Hence, changing the visual output is the need of time. The content remains the same, though the expression and the visual impact changes, which is the exciting and beautiful part of tale-telling.

Siddhi Ranade - tale-telling
A CLOSED DOOR, AN OPEN WINDOW. MIDNIGHT

Published in Issue 38

With this issue, we try to explore different views from many well-known studio owners and senior designers. While Anthony Lopez of Lopez Design shared tips on what a studio looks for in a designer, Mohar Ray from Codesign highlights the key aspects that play a significant role and make the difference in whether you are hired or not as a promising designer. Also, this issue has an insightful article on ‘Branding with reason and love’ from Itu Chaudhuri, founder ICD (Itu Chaudhuri Design) along with Siddhi Ranade, explaining his tools of story telling through his unique style of illustrations. This issue is a must read for a talented graduate to a branding expert. Order you copy and enjoy reading it!

 

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NH1 Design takes us through its approach behind freshly branding a local Indian street food outlet while ensuring that it retains an identity credible of being authentic, fun, young and affordable.

Brief

The Ahmadabad market had been selling anything but authentic Vada Pav (typically, a local Mumbai delicacy); brands were serving it with cheese, Spinach, and cholle (a form of peas). The essential idea for Majja, a quick-service restaurant selling Indian street food as a branded and hygienic experience, was thus to reinforce the delicacy’s authenticity. Targeting the youth and office-goers, who prefer a quick snack at an affordable price, the challenge was to create a brand synonymous with authentic taste, fun, young and affordability.

NH1 - Vada Pav

The Concept

The word Majja (fun) is commonly used across India, especially in Gujarat. We created a fun verbal brand language that could be easily understood across different languages and cultures – a friendly tone of voice that completely aligned with the brand ethos.

The Solution

The visual story was inspired by the street life of Mumbai. The use of illustrated stories of people and the streets of Mumbai further emphasised the authenticity of the Vada Pav.

NH1 - Vada Pav
NH1 - Vada Pav
NH1 - Vada Pav
NH1 - Vada Pav
NH1 - Vada Pav
NH1 - Vada Pav
NH1 - Vada Pav
NH1 - Vada Pav
NH1 - Vada Pav
NH1 - Vada Pav
NH1 - Vada Pav
NH1 - Vada Pav
NH1 - Vada Pav
NH1 - Vada Pav
NH1 - Vada Pav
NH1 - Vada Pav
NH1-Vada Pav

Together, the visual and verbal language established a consistent set of assets for the brand. Every touch-point was meticulously detailed. Applications included signage, environmental graphics, packaging, stationery, website, adverts, tent cards, floor graphics, social media posts, uniforms, food trucks, menu, danglers and others.

Published in Issue 38

This issue, we try to explore different views from many well-known studio owners and senior designers. While Anthony Lopez of Lopez Design shared tips on what a studio looks for in a designer, Mohar Ray from Codesign highlights the key aspects that play a significant role and make the difference in whether you are hired or not as a promising designer. Also, this issue has an insightful article on ‘Branding with reason and love’ from Itu Chaudhuri, founder ICD (Itu Chaudhuri Design) along with Siddhi Ranade, explaining his tools of story telling through his unique style of illustrations. This issue is a must read for a talented graduate to a branding expert. Order you copy and enjoy reading it!

 

Order Your Copy!

Mohor Ray, co-founder of Codesign, explains the two most fundamental and key aspects that play a significant role and make the difference in whether you are hired or not as a promising designer

Usually, an interview is a conversation that begins almost always at the portfolio and then meanders to understand intention, clarity, and commitment behind the showcased work and person behind the work. There are two things that stand out beyond the basics:

Firstly, originality.

It might sound almost obvious, but the originality of thought and craft is not as common as one would (and should) expect. The originality of thought is a strong, unique approach to a problem or context, while originality of craft demonstrates proficiency with basic skills to create a unique aesthetic approach. Originality establishes that the designer has internalised the fundamental and foundational aspects of a design process, and is now able to create his/her own unique approaches.

All design is problem-solving, but it is the original ingenuity of some that stand out. As a practice, I am concerned not only with the quality of output but also how distinct and differentiated it is.

Secondly, creative ability.

The ability to think and work across media and contexts, seamlessly. This will be the norm and not a good-to-have in the immediate future. While specialisations and specialists will continue to be significant in a time of growing creative collations, it will also warrant designers who are able to move between media seamlessly in the pursuit of impactful and meaningful design solutions.

Media, both new and old, rarely exists in vacuum, and to match integrated experiences that we now live as consumers, designers too will need to think ‘integrated’ from day one.

Published in Issue 38

This issue, we try to explore different views from many well-known studio owners and senior designers. While Anthony Lopez of Lopez Design shared tips on what a studio looks for in a designer, Mohar Ray from Codesign highlights the key aspects that play a significant role and make the difference in whether you are hired or not as a promising designer. Also, this issue has an insightful article on ‘Branding with reason and love’ from Itu Chaudhuri, founder ICD (Itu Chaudhuri Design) along with Siddhi Ranade, explaining his tools of story telling through his unique style of illustrations. This issue is a must read for a talented graduate to a branding expert. Order you copy and enjoy reading it!

 

Order Your Copy!

NH1 Design

Founded in 2013, NH1 Design is a Gurgaon–based boutique Design studio that helps clients communicate their business strategy through its creative solutions. Winning the Kyoorius D&AD Design Awards, four years in a row.


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Each year around this time, many fresh young talented designers come out as design graduates to join the best of studios and agencies. Despite many find the perfect fit for their talent but still majority faces many dilemmas and questions. So with this issue, we try to explore different views from many well-known studio owners and senior designers. While Anthony Lopez of Lopez Design shared tips on what a studio looks for in a designer, Mohar Ray from Codesign highlights the key aspects that play a significant role and make the difference in whether you are hired or not as a promising designer.<br /> Also, this issue has an insightful article on ‘Branding with reason and love’ from Itu Chaudhuri, founder ICD (Itu Chaudhuri Design) along with Siddhi Ranade, explaining his tools of story telling through his unique style of illustrations. This issue is a must read for a talented graduate to a branding expert. Order you copy and enjoy reading it!

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Finding the modern in the ancient is a matter of vision and desire, to renew the old in such a way that is thoroughly transformed in not only its form and look, but its very fibre and perception. That is what illustrator Omar Gilani prefers to do through his rather fascinating interpretations.

Ancient Future
Desert Warrior Aunty.

CG. Your range of work bears contemporariness as a trend that seemingly defines or represents your style. What inspired this concept and what is your idea behind it?

OG. I wanted to show what I want to see (more like giving a perspective into one’s outlook, interpretations, and perceptions). Science fiction or fantasy typically falls into very western tropes, and the subcontinent is usually ignored in those regards. That was frustrating, for me – that no one was depicting how this region may look in the future, and so I decided to give it a shot in my spare time just for fun.

Ancient Future
Pindi Boyz.

CG. What impact or effect do you intend this ‘contemporary’ or ‘modern’ element to have upon your audience?

OG. I just wanted to show that it is possible to create such kind of visuals and interpretations through such representations of everyday objects, many-a-times easily taken for granted. If anyone can look at my work and feel motivated to do something outside the box for themselves, I’d consider that a huge win for myself.

Ancient Future
Sitaar Player.

CG. What inspires you as subjects for your depictions?

OG. Just everyday things I see around me inspires me as subjects, and I easily find them worthy enough to take shape as depictions. We have a pretty rich culture and ancient history, and to wonder, visualise, interpret and finally depict how that would evolve – or not – in the next hundred to two hundred years is a rather interesting and exciting task.

Ancient Future
The Bounty Hunter.

CG. What role does lighting have in your illustrations, and how do you approach and apply it?

OG. Lighting has a rather significant role in any realistic illustration. I use lighting to determine the initial composition of a piece. Dividing the canvas into simple black and white shapes to see if all the various aspects are harmonious, helps me do that. The lighting in the shot helps guide at this step, and it does go on further to play a huge role throughout the development of the piece as a whole.

Ancient Future
Smog City.

CG. How do you conceptualise what you depict?

OG. I have a fair bit of back-story for the world I’m depicting, and so it is a matter of combining a certain scenario with that back-story. Artistic elements like colours and lighting play a role in conceptualising, composing and finally executing a shot to create the final image. I approach it as thinking I’m creating a screenshot from a movie.

Ancient Future
Inner City Tourists.

CG. What kind of improvisations or changes would you like to intend to bring about in your style?

OG. I’m learning to work with 3D these days, and it’s already hugely improving my flow of work. An essential change that I would like to make is to just get better at showing what’s in my head i.e. depict more clearly and precisely the image that is conceived in the mind, such that it is represented effectively on canvas. Although, it must be noted, that is a lifelong, constantly ongoing and evolving journey.

Ancient Future
Panorama1.
Ancient Future
Departure.

Published in Issue 38

With this issue, we try to explore different views from many well-known studio owners and senior designers. While Anthony Lopez of Lopez Design shared tips on what a studio looks for in a designer, Mohar Ray from Codesign highlights the key aspects that play a significant role and make the difference in whether you are hired or not as a promising designer. Also, this issue has an insightful article on ‘Branding with reason and love’ from Itu Chaudhuri, founder ICD (Itu Chaudhuri Design) along with Siddhi Ranade, explaining his tools of story telling through his unique style of illustrations. This issue is a must read for a talented graduate to a branding expert. Order you copy and enjoy reading it!

 

Order Your Copy!

Sonal Nagwani

Born and raised in Uttar Pradesh, illustrator Sonal Nagwani grew up expressing herself through drawings and doodles. Started off with engineering, but finished graduating from Symbiosis Institute of Design, Pune in April 2017 as a graphic designer and is currently working as a visual designer at a Bangalore based start-up named CREO.


Featured In


Each year around this time, many fresh young talented designers come out as design graduates to join the best of studios and agencies. Despite many find the perfect fit for their talent but still majority faces many dilemmas and questions. So with this issue, we try to explore different views from many well-known studio owners and senior designers. While Anthony Lopez of Lopez Design shared tips on what a studio looks for in a designer, Mohar Ray from Codesign highlights the key aspects that play a significant role and make the difference in whether you are hired or not as a promising designer. Also, this issue has an insightful article on ‘Branding with reason and love’ from Itu Chaudhuri, founder ICD (Itu Chaudhuri Design) along with Siddhi Ranade, explaining his tools of story telling through his unique style of illustrations. This issue is a must read for a talented graduate to a branding expert. Order you copy and enjoy reading it!

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Sahib Bawa

Currently pursuing his Masters in Fine Arts (Sculpture) from Govt. College of art, Chandigarh, Sahib Bawa has been greatly inspired by humans & nature, and he believes he has been working hard towards understanding the subjects better. Through the medium of teaching & freelancing he has been able to get a better understanding & deeper knowledge of art that allows him to explore all design dimensions.


Featured In


Each year around this time, many fresh young talented designers come out as design graduates to join the best of studios and agencies. Despite many find the perfect fit for their talent but still majority faces many dilemmas and questions. So with this issue, we try to explore different views from many well-known studio owners and senior designers. While Anthony Lopez of Lopez Design shared tips on what a studio looks for in a designer, Mohar Ray from Codesign highlights the key aspects that play a significant role and make the difference in whether you are hired or not as a promising designer. Also, this issue has an insightful article on ‘Branding with reason and love’ from Itu Chaudhuri, founder ICD (Itu Chaudhuri Design) along with Siddhi Ranade, explaining his tools of story telling through his unique style of illustrations. This issue is a must read for a talented graduate to a branding expert. Order you copy and enjoy reading it!

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