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For most people, starting alone is daunting; Anjali DSouza explains how she feels about the entire concept of being a freelancer? Read on to know what a young designer should know before jumping down the freelance path…

World of freelance
COLOURED BLISS
GRAPHIC GREETINGS

Dealing With Real Problems

For most people, starting alone is daunting; however, for Anjali, the entire concept of freelance was a welcome challenge. In order to create a lasting impression and stamp her mark on the global level, she has worked hard and tried to put herself in the shoes of her client. Earning the praise of clients and critics alike, this designer knows the emotions of design problems enabling her to arrive at a solution.

THE NEW CASSETTE
THE NEW CASSETTE
World of freelance
THE NEW CASSETTE

Perseverance Pays

Being a designer in India is not easy, competition is tough and her mantra is to work hard and believe in oneself. Creating your own distinctive style that sets you apart will always help you move forward; for Anjali, Indian folk tales combine with bold colours and expressive line work elevating her above the rest. After understanding the problem, adequate research is required to move ahead and execute the solution and this is exactly what makes Anjali DSouza click!

World of freelance
DESIGNING DEWARISTS

“For Anjali, Indian folk tales combine with bold colours and expressive line work elevating her above the rest in freelance”

World of freelance
THE CLASSICS RE-IMAGINED
THE NEW CASSETTE

Young Designer should keep in Mind

Being a team player is integral, working with strong-minded individuals can help shape a fresh career and provide opportunities to learn from other designers. Another important aspect is to connect with the client so as to find a common point and further a healthy process of working together. Lastly, in order to ‘grow’ as a designer, one must be open to working hard and accepting both praise and criticism

PLAYFUL PUPPETS

Published in Issue 32

If you are a recent graduate or about to finish your college then this issue may have answers to many of your questions. Like, how to get the best placement or the internship? How to present best in front of the interviewer? Which studio or agency to choose to start your career? How to work in a team or choose to be a freelancer? This issue has advice from many experts such as Ashwini Deshpande and Gopika Chowfla who gave the secrets of choosing the right intern for their well-known design teams. And on another hand, Rajaram Rajendran and Ranganath Krishnamani advise young designer to gain multiple skills and be the best at them. Also, recent MIT Post Graduate Vinta Jakkal shares her secret with which she grabbed the great opportunity of joining the Elephant Design, Pune team to start her career.

 

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The subconscious is a powerful inspiration cauldron. Without one’s knowledge, experiences, emotions, and beliefs find their way into anything one creates. Designer duo, Shrinivas and Shivaram of 9Twenty Creative talk about what makes them experiment with that wily mistress, imagination.

Bumjo Turns Pink
Bumjo Turns Pink

Imagination is where intelligence has fun.

The subconscious is a pot overflowing with ideas. And when two heads ponder over it, the result is a mix of thoughts that are free expressions of both. Entering the realm of surreal and inexplicable gives the freedom to do whatever the pen wants.

 

On the way, trying to figure out the design philosophy, dabbling in the uncertain, unresolved realm of the subconscious. This results in a progressive moulding of the creative synergy that binds together any collaboration.

Kites
Kites
Kites

Surrealism stems from life.

Each artist is a source of untapped inspiration.The subconscious is a powerful inspiration cauldron. Before you know, your experiences, emotions and beliefs find their ways into anything you create. The subconscious is the universe. Our thought process is unfettered. This perhaps results in the varied, bizarre forms that our works exhibit.

Mooshik

Arriving at an idea is not a process but an experience.

Two heads bring to the table different perspectives. A heated brainstorming session leads to a potpourri of ideas and media. And suddenly, a pattern emerges; a combination arises almost as if it was tailor-made. Different areas of interest thrown together create unique visual performances.

 

The right feel and combination is not a structured process. A subliminal sense helps create the story with the elements.

Clients do understand creativity.

There seems to be a general consensus that clients are evil creatures who do not understand the vastness of the creative idea. We have not had to divert too far from the original concepts with the clients we have dealt with so far. We put forward our creative thoughts and try to stick with them.

 

Incorporating client preferences to mesh with the original concept also requires creative agility and should probably be treated as a creative challenge by itself. Having clients give us creative inputs makes the final output stronger.

An idle brain is nobody’s workshop.

It is difficult for any creative brain to sit idle. The exhilaration lies in experimenting with different media. The saying ‘You may fail when you attempt but are doomed if you don’t try!’ has always been an inspiration. Origami, illustrations, photography, designs; there is still a lot more to cover.

 

The challenge lies in extending an idea to different media. The execution, the adaptation, and the exhilaration at the final result drive us to try something different each time.

There’s a real delight in putting pen to paper.

Yes, there is a certain thrill in dipping a brush in ink and swirling it across a white sheet. This training and experience in the traditional process is a must-have for any designer. The feedback that you get from the physical feel of a brush on canvas or folding paper is something that you just cannot argue with.

 

While the classic will always have its place, using technology for easing workflow and quickening turnaround time is only common sense.

The road to the imagination is never-ending.

It is never easy to start by being different. A roller-coaster ride with the ups and downs with all the twists and turns awaits every artist. This is a never-ending journey. And for a designer, just moving ahead with all the new experiences is the key.

Published in Issue 06

With festive cover, this issue offers in-depth insights into contemporary jewellery design, controlling light in your photo shoots, surreal illustration by 9Twenty studios and many more! So, if you like to take a deep plunge into the imagination and inspirational word of these artists, don’t miss this issue and order your copy here!

 

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Currents in the graphic design world are constantly changing, and those trends that keep adapting, growing and switching affect the entire business world. If you want to release a product, create a new website, rebrand your business, or invest in your advertising, you need to know what is in and what is popular right now.

However, quality and popularity are two very different terms that you need to have in mind. Some trends are popular for a short time –they light up in flames as fast as they go out. So, if you’re on a serious project and you’re in need of a valuable design that won’t be forgotten quickly, then you need to do your homework and find out which trends will be left with a quality stamp. The following definitely worth your attention.


Asymmetry

Although symmetry isn’t dead, it’s clear that it’s now shadowed by a trend which enables richer options when it comes to composition – asymmetry. Because of its form, asymmetry opens more possibilities for accenting; it’s simpler to make action buttons visible this way, for example.

words

Bold Colours

Pastel and soft colours are now a thing of the past – neon as well, thankfully. During this year, many outstanding pieces of graphic design contained two strong, vibrant colours. If you decide to go with this trend, you can be positive that your brand will stand out.

5 Essential Tools of Motion Graphics

Geometric Shapes 

Those with OCD will be happy to know that there’s still some structure left. Geometric shapes have been introduced to graphic design, and it’s not at all uncommon to see them used as a minimalistic element. So, if you desire simplicity, this is a trend you should turn to.

Visual Communication - AnantKulkarni
All About by Anant Kulkarni
Visual Communication - AnantKulkarni
Phone Cover Design Applications by Anant Kulkarni

Illustrations 

When we speak about the trends that marked 2017, illustrations must be mentioned. Original artwork finally found its place in the contemporary graphic design, so you shouldn’t be surprised if your run into a website that consists only of illustrations. They give a whimsical storytelling vibe to the digital world.

While we’re on the subject, you should also pay attention to modern retro – it has very interesting elements that simultaneously breathe with urban and vintage. These two currents will give your business a spirit and make it alive.

Meroo Seth

Dynamics 

If you’re ready to go beyond limits and incorporate something completely different into your brand, then you should know that now is a perfect time. Dynamics designs that are completely chaotic and without any frames or outer lines are a new movement that’s taking over the internet. So, if you think you need something bold, daring and unexpected, this is the thing for you.

Another consequence of disorder is a mixture of photography and other elements – open composition. So now you don’t have to dwell on a decision in order to figure out whether you want to implement photos or original artwork to your business because you can go with both.


Playful Fonts 

Up until recently, graphic design was minimalistic, which also implied that the lettering needs to be neat and clean. However, these limits were also broken, and now it’s not at all uncommon to come across playful writings, scattered letters and cropped titles. It’s a trend that goes well together with reigning chaos and designs without determined restrictions.

It’s obvious that this trend can do damage to your business – it takes a real professional to develop a design like this that works well, so make sure you find the right person for the job.

words

Cinemagraphs 

A wonderful addition to all trends listed above are cinemagraphs – a moving picture is the final puzzle piece that the world of graphic design needs. However, simplicity is the key here; if you want to implement a cinemagraph on your website, make sure that it doesn’t draw too much attention to what you have to offer. But, if you make the right decision, you can be positive that it will leave a wow impression on your visitors.

It’s obvious that minimalism which was extremely popular up until this year, became boring to everyone. So now, graphic designers worldwide turned to drawing and experimenting, and welcomed chaos into their work. Each of the trends listed above will linger on – it’s up to you to see which one is the most suitable for what you have in mind and need realized.

Veteran Illustrator and designer, Anant Kulkarni, takes us through a visual journey by illustrating and explaining how imagery is a powerful tool of communication. He describes how one can keep an audience intact and engaged through the still medium.

Visual Communication - AnantKulkarni
Ganesha Design 4
Visual Communication - AnantKulkarni
Person
Visual Communication - AnantKulkarni
Bird Typo
Visual Communication - AnantKulkarni
Symmetrical Graphic design

CG. What is the main intention or idea you desire to achieve through your work?

AK. It is my responsibility to get as close as possible to the audience, communicating through visuals. So, I always keep myself engaged in creating visuals that are a part of my study, besides assignments. This practice really helps every creative person, whether a student or professional. I try to express my views through every picture, conveying the same message through different visual solutions and like to keep my audience engaged in the visuals, maintaining their curiosity. As every artist has his/her own way to express, in my case it is visuals, and visuals only. I look up to each day as a new challenge and start thinking of something new!

Visual Communication - AnantKulkarni
Ganesha Graphic Design 2
Visual Communication - AnantKulkarni
Icons
Visual Communication - AnantKulkarni
All About by Anant Kulkarni
Visual Communication - AnantKulkarni
Art Prints

CG. What role do aspects like geometry and symmetry play in your visual works?

AK. I’m always searching for new things to execute through visual forms. Geometrical design patterns are a part of my study – a technique developed over years of consistent practice. Though I don’t know much about technical geometry, except the basic shapes such as circles, squares, triangles, hexagons, lines etc. provoke me to explore them in all possible combinations. I started creating very simple forms, and it became a habit while trying to convert objects into forms, using geometrical shapes. Symmetry and asymmetry are principles of design, but I ignore these terminologies while working, as they may disturb my visual thought.

Visual Communication - AnantKulkarni
Food Typo
Visual Communication - AnantKulkarni
Visual Communication - AnantKulkarni
Icons
Visual Communication - AnantKulkarni
Visual Language.
Visual Communication - AnantKulkarni
Ganesha Graphic Design

CG. How do you choose your colours and apply them to be balanced across geometric patterns?

AK. Visual concepts and drafting are very important; colours come later. The use of colour has its own purpose, and it depends on various factors. Of course, it is a choice of the artist, as to which colours to choose as per the concept. If you observe, a lot of famous artists can be identified through their colour palette. The use of colours helps to enhance the beauty of your visuals. Some artists use and apply particular colours to convey messages and create moods. I try to keep my designs bright, eye-catching and more attractive, but I give maximum attention to the visual form. The only care I take while using colour is to not disturb the image.

Visual Communication - AnantKulkarni
City Life
Visual Communication - AnantKulkarni
Parrots
Visual Communication - AnantKulkarni
Scary Sketchbook
Visual Communication - AnantKulkarni
Ganesha Graphic Design 3
Visual Communication - AnantKulkarni
Bird Typo 2

CG. What, and how much, does proportion contribute to what you wish to execute?

AK. Proportions, in my illustration and compositions, play a vital role. They are a part of design principles, too. When I plan composition, I always think of it as a sequence – “What is going to be seen first? ‘What has more emphasis?’ I then think of other related visuals that would keep the audience engaged through the entire picture. Harmony, movement, and size of the forms are other important aspects of design.

Visual Communication - AnantKulkarni
Mug Design Applications
Visual Communication - AnantKulkarni
Crockery Design Applications
Visual Communication - AnantKulkarni
Tag Design Applications
Visual Communication - AnantKulkarni
T-shirt Design Applications
Visual Communication - AnantKulkarni
Coasters

CG. How necessary is the white of the background in your illustrations?

AK. It is very important. Positive and negative spaces are the two main important aspects of every composition. This helps you enhance and beautify your image. Leaving white spaces in design, or any picture or composition gives relief to the viewer to grasp the image very easily. White spaces help a lot in finding out the subject in a clear manner, even in text, if you have proper spacing; it helps in reading more comfortably. In the end, it provides the all-important visual comfort.

Visual Communication - AnantKulkarni
Pencil Typo
Visual Communication - AnantKulkarni
Bags

Cover Designed for Issue 39

As the festivity is all around, every brand or business is trying to impress the Indian audience. But what really works for us Indians? What is an Indian design? And how we can make designs for India? To understand it, we interviewed some Indian creatives who are successfully creating designs for the Indian audience. This issue of Creative Gaga is a light read for someone looking for inspirations or insights on Indian design and how the Indian audience can be enticed. So go ahead and order your copy or subscribe if you want to keep receiving a regular dose inspirations!

 

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In this technologically driven world, it is sometimes refreshing to admire design that is inspired from things that have been forgotten. Using paper as a canvas as well as a tool, Yulia Brodskaya captures old age in a unique and trendy manner. In conversation with Creative Gaga, she throws light on her style and inspirations.

Paper Illustrations
Amethyst

CG: You’ve worked with internationally renowned personalities and brands. Briefly, take us through your design journey. The tough times, the easy times. What made you take up designing as a profession? How did ‘paper illustrations’ come about?

YB: Even with a background in graphic design, I always have a tendency to work with hand-made styles, especially paper. I started to use the edge-glued paper technique more than 6 years ago. I prefer not to call it quilling as it’s more about drawing with paper rather than on it. Slowly and steadily experimenting with the art form has allowed me to make quilling more stylish and modern.

Paper Illustrations
Joy.
Paper Illustrations
CADBURY.

CG: Lines and patterns seem to be common among most of your designs. Is there a reason or is just simply your style? Why the ‘old’ faces? What is your style and design process?

YB: Many motifs/elements come from the medium e.g. a coil is a natural thing to do with a paper strip, but I try to use a variety of paper elements including flat-cut paper sculpture, decoupage etc. just to keep the art visually interesting and diverse.

Paper Illustrations
GYPSY.

Like every designer occupies a particular niche, my designs express and depict old age. Merging the edge-glued paper strips technique to depict wrinkles enhances the experience both for the designer and the viewers.

Paper Illustrations
GODIVA.
Paper Illustrations
KING OF SPADES.

CG: What do you feel are three things that an illustrator must have in today’s competitive environment? How do you evolve and keep up with changes that happen around?

YB: First is paper, then glue and finally a pair of scissors! On a serious note, an illustrator should stay true to his/her own style but at the same time keep experimenting and changing it slightly over time. This is a natural process and most of the time undergoes a subconscious change.

Paper Illustrations
Lovesdoves
Paper Illustrations
HEADSCARF.

CG: Is there any cultural influence in your designs? How do you manage to give an ‘international appeal’ to your designs?

YB: There is no cultural influence unless it’s a particular project that demands a particular look and feel. My influences are typography, paper, nature, and colours – things that are pretty much universal and appeal to everyone

Paper Illustrations
BABUSHKA.
Paper Illustrations
NOEL.

CG: What are your inspirations? Any tips for talented designers that are waiting to be recognised?

YB: Like mentioned earlier, anything that occurs in nature is what appeals and inspires. Everything from interesting texture to unique colours can be a starting point for a new idea. And as far as the motto goes, it’s doing what you love and loving what you do.

Paper Illustrations
WHERE WISHES COME TRUE.
Paper Illustrations
BLACKWHITE COLOUR.

Published in Issue 27

This issue explores one of the widely discussed product design and automobile #design which is very close to our heart. We spoke to few leading names to find out the future of product design and understand the Indian designer sensibilities and practices. Everyone believe that it’s not just functionality but also the visual appeal of the product which plays a crucial in the success of a product. This issue is a bundle of inspirations and insights from the well know product and automobile designers. A must read which you will enjoy for sure.

 

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Colours can paint a good picture or spoil it altogether, literally. Graphic Designer, Meroo Seth, speaks about and elaborates upon her approach towards finding the essential colour combination in sync with the remaining elements of her work.

Meroo Seth
Get Grubs Takeaway Bags.
Meroo Seth
Get Grubs Packaging Design.
Meroo Seth
Get Grubs Stationary design.

To connect is the calling.

Design plays a huge role in Meroo’s life; it’s a voice through which she finds expression. It not only makes her look at things differently but also manages to play with her opinions. Communicating complicated ideas simply; connecting with people, and making the world a beautiful place through appealing visuals is what spurs her. No doubt, she takes to an approach of fun, curiosity, happiness, and playfulness when working on her illustrations. She’s more than happy if her work can bring about a sense of delight in people, making them feel something good while solving problems as well.

Meroo Seth

Finding your own palette.

Colour sense comes with experience and the trial-and-error of playing with different sets of colours. She has seen her own colour palettes changing and evolving with time. Conversations with friends and strangers; meeting new people, and being open to new experiences are like finding a new colour palette, to Meroo. The process of building an unusual bridge between different observations and associations triggers insights and inspiration within her. According to her, emotion is the most important factor to consider while creating balanced colour palettes. That is why she avoids overusing a colour, while, many-a-times, the colour itself inspires her to create the design.

Meroo Seth
Making salad together.

Creating the balance.

Colour is a powerful and important communication tool and is tied to religious, cultural, political and social influences. So, it’s not enough for a designer to use a colour merely because one likes it.

Meroo Seth
Alphabet G Mug.
Meroo Seth
Alphabet M Mug.

Colours communicate various meaning; even all colours combinations signify differently, evoking varied emotions and feelings when paired with another colour. So, she believes it’s very important that elements in the composition balance weight. For example, the thickness of a form, colour, texture and the kind of forms should also have a consistent style they follow. Sometimes, the form cannot say it all; the use and amount of colours then play an even more important role in communicating the idea.

Meroo Seth
Cavaya Fine Dine Menu.
Meroo Seth
Cavaya Fine Dine stationary.

Harmonising elements.

Meroo firmly trusts that everything and everyone supports and relies on one another and that it applies in the case of colours too. Each colour change relies on what the rest of the colours and elements are. The shades and tones can be played amongst each other to provide an appealing look while balancing the elements of the composition.

Meroo Seth
Food posters.
Meroo Seth
Eating Together.

At times, she isolates a colour to give it focus, so as to create a totally unique impact. Likewise, she also plays with light and shade to create an interesting mood. While choosing a colour palette, she comes up with a few keywords the palette should reflect when creating a mood board for a particular subject – for example, ‘happy, fun and bold’. Now, that’s sure to spread some smiles.

Meroo Seth
Best Friends.
Meroo Seth
Coffee cups for The Hangout Café.

Published in Issue 35

The season of the festival has started and everyone is preparing to have a unique one this time with less cash and more fun. We interview many creatives who creates promotional or calendar design each year. As most of the thing around us had shifted to digital, even calendar design and the promotion has shifted. But Yorick Pintos, a strategic consultant at studio Kohl suggests that best option would be a mix of both. If you are interested in print design & want to understand the future of the same. So, go ahead and order your latest issue copy!

 

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The campaign for Soolantra utilises characterisation very effectively to depict the efficacy of the treatment and its ability to eliminate the symptoms of the chronic skin disorder – Rosacea once and for all.

skin - Soolantra

Brief

Galderma, a specialist on skin medical solutions developed a potent topical treatment, ‘Soolantra’ for Rosacea, a common chronic inflammatory skin disorder which affects an estimated 40 million people worldwide. In the past ten years, dermatological research failed to provide an effective treatment whereby causing exasperation in patients and doctors alike.

skin - Soolantra

The Challenge

In this scenario, the challenge was to showcase Soolantra in a new light. The differentiating factor of this topical treatment was its efficacy when compared to other treatments available. But, with so many treatments falsely advertising themselves to be effective, the campaign had to be innovative and make people believe that this topical treatment is distinct among the many available in the market.

skin - Soolantra

The Solution

The concept of the campaign was based on the story of good versus evil or strong versus weak. With Soolantra as the mighty hero overpowering the evil Rosacea that has plagued its victims since a decade, this universal story captured the true essence of the product while being relatable to the mass audience. To make a large impact and gain maximum exposure, the campaign was showcased in personal and non-personal channels. The animated endorsement appeared on iPads of representatives during sales calls, banners, physician’s website and professional e-mails. Along with print materials such as posters, flash cards, and brochures, even high-profile tactics at the American Academy of Dermatology convention was held.

skin - Soolantra

Result

By showcasing Soolantra as the powerful topical ascending above all other agents to overpower the papules appearing on the face of the sufferers, this groundbreaking endorsement has achieved to convey its benefits and create awareness about its presence in the market. Receiving an extremely positive feedback overall, there has been a steady increase in total prescriptions since the launch of the campaign.

skin - Soolantra

Credits

 

Agency: McCann Echo
Creative Production Studio: Ars Thanea

 

Video:
Executive Creative Director: Peter Jaworowski
Director: Karol Kołodziński
Producer: Marcin Molski, Aleksander Kmiecik
Script: Karol Kołodziński
Art Directors: Karol Kołodziński, Paweł Szklarski
Storyboard Artist: Michał Lisowski
Technical Lead: Łukasz Skurczyński
CG Supervisor: Paweł Szklarski
Concept Artist: Michał Lisowski
Character Artist: Łukasz Skurczyński
Lead Shading & Lighting: Paweł Szklarski
Shading Artist: Paweł Szklarski
Rendering Artist: Paweł Szklarski
Texture Artists: Paweł Szklarski, Piotr Nowacki
Animation Supervisors: Patryk Habryn, Łukasz Skurczyński
Character TD: Victor Vinyalis
3D Animators: Hugo Garcia, Patryk Habryn
Compositing: Karol Kołodziński
IT Support: Krzysztof Zarzycki
Music, Sound FX, Mastering: Wojciech Roguski, Marcin Cisło
Business Unit Director: Marcin Molski

 

Print:
Executive Creative Director: Peter Jaworowski
Art Director: Karol Klonowski
Producer: Marcin Molski, Aleksander Kmiecik
Concept Artist: Michał Lisowski
Digital Artists: Karol Klonowski, Marcin Kowalski, Łukasz Wiktorzak, Piotr Frączkowski
3D Lead Artist: Piotr Nowacki, Paweł Szklarski
Modeling & Texture Artists: Łukasz Skurczyński, Piotr Nowacki, Paweł Szklarski
Shading Artist: Piotr Nowacki, Paweł Szklarski
Business Unit Director: Marcin Molski

We are amidst the times of discussion and debate about art, craft and design. In spite of that, the fact remains that a piece of creation should ultimately let the audience experience a sense of joy and a desire to touch or possess the work, believes designer Pallavi Sen. She reflects how, at the core, the job of a visual is to create an aesthetic tool to create happiness and joy.

Pallavi Sen - Joy
Pomfret
Pallavi Sen - Joy
Rooster

Patterns create a visual experience.

Despite all the opinions and arguments about the trend in the art world, pure aesthetics should still be the top priority objective for a visual. To achieve this, patterns play an important role as a tool. It captures the viewer’s attention, providing a space to just gaze and wonder, rather than look for a more complex explanation for why that piece of work exists. When you repeat motifs, you create something beautiful, abstract and unrelated to our everyday life. For instance, a mango stops being what it is when you repeat it a dozen times.

Pallavi Sen - Joy
Raja Rani
Pallavi Sen - Joy

Placement defines the effect.

Things of obvious beauty, when placed against something unusual, take the viewing experience to a different level altogether. The traditional Rangoli at every Indian home is a beautiful work of art in itself. But when placed against an ordinary door, like a grey floor or a dusty sidewalk, the effect is heightened. Or say, an Ikkat piece draped over a record player. If you want to add to the visual effect of the piece, combine repeating motifs and an unusual placement.

Pallavi Sen - Joy
Pallavi Sen - Joy
Circus Circus

Colours help focus on the subject.

Colours act as a tool in any artwork. It becomes a character of the story and stays the same, no matter where it is placed. Some colours have a strong effect on the viewer. They take over what you make and you become an instrument. This happens a lot with high pigment colours. They are so dazzling that any mark looks wonderful. Keeping it all in one bold colour like red helps unify all the different lines and shapes into one image, against a stark background. At its best, a work should be a declaration that the beautiful object is still most important and make you feel the joy when you look at something.

Pallavi Sen - Joy
Madhuri

At times, the material decides the design.

Be open to your approach of materials while creating something. The recommended way is to keep adding materials to your work as you find them and then decide if it fits or not. Sometimes, however, you can work the other way round. Make a colour palette, draw the design out and then go shopping for fabrics. But even when it is so planned, you may find something that feels great to the eye, like a fabric that is golden or has wonderful movement. Whenever you see something lovely or interesting, try and incorporate it. You’ll be surprised to know how, at times, the material decides the design.

Pallavi Sen - Joy
Pattern Pot

Stay true to yourself.

Everything you see, hear, feel, experience are sources of inspiration. Look at books on design, a new design in homes, innovative products, designers showcased at fashion weeks and even architecture from the past. Take a stroll in a museum and watch the many different styles and trends across the world and hundreds of years back in time. Keeping your eyes open to all of these keeps you in touch with what is visually attractive. All this while, stay very true to yourself and your idea of beauty & joy and always encourage and allow yourself to change.

Pallavi Sen - Joy

Published in Issue 16

We always wish we had someone to show us the right way of doing things when we were starting our professional journey. And that’s why we have based this issue on graduates. The cover feature is an ensemble of advice from top names of the industry. We have also showcased few talented fresh graduates from across the country, keeping with the theme. You’ll find Tom J Manning and Pallavi Sen share their international exposure as well as insights behind their unique approach. Also featuring Shreya Shetty, a prominent concept artist, who shares the secret behind the believable characters she creates. She believes, with practice and patience, anyone can be a good artist.

 

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Graphic designer, Itu Chaudhuri, lets out his experience and insight in the field of branding. He expresses what goes into creating effective brands, and the various aspects or elements that play a role in the process.

Branding
The Wild Stone Code Range.

CG. What is the relationship between the product and the branding? How does the former shape or inspire the latter?

IC. For some brands, the product’s properties are the heart of the brand. For example, we know Mercedes by their cars, which are a model of stability and Germanic engineered perfection; not by their advertising or showrooms or their F1 Cars (which they do very well). For those brands, branding needs to reflect what’s special about the product, but rarely reflects the product itself. The ‘what’s special’ part, in turn, depends on the category. For more functional products, it’s about a clear benefit from using it (e.g. relieving pain).

Branding
The Real Tea Range.

For less functional brands, the benefit may be more in the mind i.e. how it makes people feel, or its ‘values’ (what it encourages its customers to believe in). This is also true for brands, which we know by their advertising more than by the special qualities of the product (e.g. a mobile service like Vodafone or Airtel). But, rarely does the branding show the product itself. If the product is a packaged product that’s never unpacked (think deodorants, or insect repellents, or a fizzy drink), then the branding and the product are practically fused (even when large advertising budgets support the brands).

Branding
Branding
Branding
Eicher Live.

CG. According to you, How and to what extent, does branding impact an audience?

IC. Every customer knows that they are being manipulated. So, branding works best when it slips under the radar of the customers or escapes their ‘crap detector’. Yet, if the brand seems to admit this while managing to charm the customers, it works. The audience is then willingly helpless to resist. This means that the branding is, in some sense, invisible when it appears to belong or be inevitable as if there was no other way it could have appeared. This requires honesty on the owner’s part and linking the brand to what is true. Despite this, it’s carefully orchestrated. Simply appearing artless won’t do it. Done right, it can succeed in disarming the customer.

Branding
The Almirah.
Branding
The Almirah.

CG. What do you do to ensure that the brand character comes across fully in the final design?

IC. Personality is the key, and thus cannot be overlooked or sidelined at any stage. It’s a mental model of the brand that describes the brand’s character and attitude, more like a representative, and thus implies its appearance.

Brand applications for ‘Hired’.

CG. What do you feel should be proportion, or how much is the need for balance, between minimalism and complexities in a design?

IC. The point isn’t a balance: it’s more a purposeful imbalance. Different brands need different treatments, so that one may do best in a minimal style, and another with a busy, or even chaotic style. This is a necessary facet that one needs to recognise and remember throughout the process.

Branding
Annual Report Design for IDFC.
Branding
Branding
Branding
Branding
Branding

CG. What do you feel is an essential part of branding?

IC. Deep understanding of the client’s truth is fundamental and most essential, but making sure that it’s attractive to their customers is of value, at the same time. If you succeed on the first count and fail on the second, you touch no one. The other way around, and the attraction will be skin deep. It very clearly is a case of both or nothing.

Branding
Publication design for Breakthrough.

Published in Issue 38

This issue, we try to explore different views from many well-known studio owners and senior designers. While Anthony Lopez of Lopez Design shared tips on what a studio looks for in a designer, Mohar Ray from Codesign highlights the key aspects that play a significant role and make the difference in whether you are hired or not as a promising designer. Also, this issue has an insightful article on ‘Branding with reason and love’ from Itu Chaudhuri, founder ICD (Itu Chaudhuri Design) along with Siddhi Ranade, explaining his tools of story telling through his unique style of illustrations. This issue is a must read for a talented graduate to a branding expert. Order you copy and enjoy reading it!

 

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Michael L. Dolto - Design Education

Utilising technology through the mediums of light and sound, designer and interactive performance artist, Michael L. Dolto enjoys honing and nurturing individuals’ awareness of their environment. This approach and attitude are what provide him the constant nudge to guide the younger ones.

As a new academic year is about to commence, one is reminded of the expectations one has of the educational experience. All is not rosy, neither all thorny, for that matter; it is mostly a mixed affair—there are “good” and “not-so-good” aspects of any educational institution, Indian or foreign. Students, generally, are quite adept at recognising negatives over the positive. As per Michael Dolto, though, the best bet is to make qualitative judgments while employing parameters such as the follows:

1. Malleability

It is useful to have a set of academic goals for oneself. At the same time, the context to be in school should be to get exposed to things you didn’t even know existed. Certainly, you may have ideas as to what is out there, but it is more likely that you will be able to discover fascinating new things through your time spent with faculty. You have to remain open to possibilities and be true to your own interests, and so also consider it fine to shift your goals based on the experiences of your education.

All is not rosy, neither all thorny, for that matter; it is mostly a mixed affair—there are “good” and “not-so-good” aspects of any educational institution, Indian or foreign

2. Experiment

Students are often stressed about finding work when they graduate. In the creative industries, there is no formula, per se. The professional market is starting to realise that the world is capable of changing very quickly. One’s marketarketability will increase with the ability to adapt. This ability is developed only through experimentation and taking chances with one’s work. This experience will only make you more confident and able to adapt to any professional opportunity that much quicker.

3. Process over Product

Every design school should focus on developing an individual’s creative process, not the individual’s product. What makes you valuable in the workplace is your ability to solve problems; to reconcile parameters with resources to make the ends meet. If a faculty gives you a bad critique of your work, reflect on the processes you implored, not the end product.

4. Detachment

A creative process should include a sense of detachment. The object is not important; the object is an expression, just as you form your sentences in dialogue. You need to learn how to detach yourself from your work. It is the only way to develop your critical and analytical thinking.

Success in any creative field is a measure of one’s ability to develop analytical and critical thinking. Teachers and peers will help you, but only you can become a best observer of yourself.

5. Perspective

An education in design is likely very different than the education you have previously received. The foundation of one’s success in any creative field is a measure of one’s ability to develop analytical and critical thinking. Teachers and peers will help you, but only you can become an observer of yourself.

6. Environment

In evaluating your education, understand that the texture shifts at all academic institutions. Faculty enter and leave on their own trajectories, so the chemistry of faculty can vary tremendously. Some years may be better at a given institution, compared to another. Thus, “good” and “bad” is a relative dialectic, as the teaching methods of one institution will likely vary greatly from another institution at any given time. Not everyone learns in the same way, so the effectiveness of the experience can vary among individual students.

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