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Colours form an integral part of the world we live in. And more often than not, our feelings, emotions and even taste can be validated with colours! According to an article written by Charles Spence in BioMed Central 2015, five colour-taste studies were conducted and their results indicate some startling results.

For example, the colours black, purple and violet are widely associated with bitterness. White and blue is associated with the salty sea. Yellow and green represent a sour taste, because of its obvious recall to limes and lemons. Sweet is linked to pink or red.

Truth be told, colours can have a major influence on people’s purchase decisions. Most brands are associated with one or more colours; organizations have embraced the colour psychology as a major driver in their branding strategy. Why? Because people are drawn to certain colours for certain reasons and they carry associations with objects and tend to feel them.

Colour - Lollypop Design

As designers, we need to pay detailed attention to the colours we choose while designing a brand. Colour creates contrast, hierarchy, balance & rhythm. Choosing the right colour palette is important as it not only creates interest but also creates an emotional or subconscious connect with the people. Here are a few tips by Shrivathsan Raguraman, Sr. UI Designer of Lollypop Design, have a look.

Understanding Colours is Understanding Product

Colour - Lollypop Design

Research indicates that 85% of the decision made by individuals towards choosing a product was based on colours only. Colours carry an emotional value; each colour emotes different feelings and perception; these aren’t general emotions that are associated with it but the whole nature itself is built around it and perceived in a psychological aspect. For example:


Red – energy, power, and passion
Green – ambition, growth, freshness, and safety
Blue – tranquillity, confidence, and intelligence
Yellow – happiness, intellect, and energy
Black – power, elegance, and mystery
White – cleanliness, purity, and perfection

Questions and Considerations Before Choosing a Colour Palette

Before we get to explaining how to pick colours and go on to explaining the colour wheel, let’s be clear about a few fundamental questions that we should ask ourselves even before jumping on to the branding elements of the product. The questions would give you a sense of direction and make life simpler:

1) Are we designing for a brand new product or an established brand?

Brand New Product: Fresh branding might require you to understand the reasoning and the emotional connect of the brand. It will give you much-needed freedom to chose and play with your colours, unlike the defined products. We generally prefer to choose either monochromatic or complementary as they create more emotional value and a sense of purpose.

Defined product: One should understand the product and the guidelines it comes with. There might be many limitations or directions that we need to follow. So get acquainted with it. For example, Google or Microsoft has strict guidelines. In such cases, we suggest you choose the Analogous/ Triadic palette as they allow to stick to the prominent brand colour while allowing to play with the other colours from the wheel as an accent. It is like choosing a group of friendly neighbours to build a harmonious product.

2) Do we understand the product?

Colour - Lollypop Design

What is the intent of the product? What does it want to communicate? What problem does it want to solve? Who will use this product?  These questions will lead us to shortlist the primary and secondary colours of the product.

3) Do we understand the users well?

Colour - Lollypop Design

Who are the users we are targeting? What are there behavioural graphs? What their mental models like? How tech-savvy are they? What region do they belong to? What is their culture? Everything comes into play when you are deciding on the brand colours. Ask as many relevant questions as possible.

4) Are we accommodating the W3C principle?

Colour - Lollypop Design

Choosing a palette also involves accessibility as one of the major challenges for a product designer. As a designer, you must ensure that the product is accessible by all sets of colour vision deficiency personas. Adding to that, textual contrast check is really important which needs to be done before adding any coloured text over any background colour. This allows us in covering the CVD people by providing them with an accessible product.

How do we choose the colours?

Finally, let’s decode the different sets of colours and principles that will always make life easier as designers. Always look up to the nature of the product when it comes to choosing colours but before you go overboard looking for inspiration you have to understand the basics of the colour wheel. Follow Colour theory 101; there are many diverse ways of picking colour sets that work together. Try to pick the combination best suited for you ranging from those that are easy to use till difficult to use. We’ll explain this further below:

• Complementary – Easy To Use

As the name suggests, these colours are placed adjacent to each other in the colour wheel.  They complement each other perfectly. This colour scheme works best for brands that are trying to communicate reliability and a sense of balance. It’s like the colour blue says ‘you are beautiful’ to the colour orange, which complements its attributes, and vice versa.

RunAdam or Paytm Money are good examples of brands with complementary colours.

• Monochromatic – Easy To Use

These colours share the hues and tones of a base colour. When you use shades of the same colour, the ideal notion behind this is that it creates harmony and natural sync. Monochromatic colour sets are easy to remember since the user can associate these shades with one another and still can remember what brand or product it is.

Farmrise would be a great example of a monochromatic colour brand.

• Analogous – Exercise Caution

The word analogous means ‘comparable’. Under this, analogous colours refer to any set of colours on the colour wheel that are immediately adjacent, i.e, three colours left or right from the one of your choosing. As a set, these four colours will be considered as analogous colours. Analogous colours are preferred when there is a need to create a sense of harmony and contentment for brand design.

Paypal, Mastercard are good examples of brands with analogous colours.

• Triadic – You can try

This method is akin to choosing colours that are evenly spaced in an equilateral triangle. These colours are selected from the wheel in such a way that they provide high contrast and rich vibrancy in design. How do we do this? By picking colours, (to the left or right) that are equally spaced from one another on the colour wheel. For example, if you pick a specific colour on the wheel, you can go ahead and pick a colour that is three colours away on either side. These contrasting colours make for an effective, yet tough to create a palette.

Mozilla and  Burger King are good examples of the brands with triadic colours.

• Tetradic – Are you brave enough?

This is a four-colour structure evenly spaced on the colour wheel. This scheme is best suitable if you want to create an accent with colours, ie, you choose one dominant colour and three accents supporting it. This colour scheme is similar to triadic, which creates a vibrant and strong palette but is tough to handle.

Google & Microsoft is a good example of a Tetradic colour scheme.

Suggested Tools

Our suggestions towards tools that can be used to choose your palette:

 

Coolors.co – It’s super easy to use and it can show you multiple analogous variations of a single hue.

Adobe Color – Make your own colour palette from colour-wheel to hexcode and easily use it with most adobe apps & software.

Canva Colour wheel – It helps to generate your combinations and help build your palette.

Hope this helps you in building a beautiful palette for your product, Happy branding!

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As designers, ordinary events shouldn’t be ignored, for in them lie inspirations and insights that everyone saw but never noticed. How good you are with tuning your eyes to your mind is what counts, believes Karthik M. He makes some interesting points that translate into how to notice things so that people can take notice of your work.

Periods
First Coffee
Poster for Easy Cabs
Adoption
Vichar (thoughts)

Beauty Lies in The Eyes of the Observer

Any creative journey starts with observation; the ability to see beyond what is visible and read between the lines. Different designers will have different tones in which they try and communicate what they perceive, whether it’s through mockery, humour or abstract routes. What’s important is to find a unique connection inside what you observe and bring that to life in a personal way.

Road Ritual
Government Job

One will realise that over the course of time, doing justice to yourself will help bring recognition, as your designs make way into websites, blogs and so on. Create work that instigates discussion. And advertising is a good place to learn how to do that because it always keeps you curious and makes you dig for insights.

Life. An everyday situation, shown with a unique connotation; one that instigates the viewer to think beyond what they see.
Apocalypse. An everyday situation, shown with a unique connotation; one that instigates the viewer to think beyond what they see.
Grope Spot. An everyday situation, shown with a unique connotation; one that instigates the viewer to think beyond what they see.

As Every Sight has an Insight

Pretty much so. Inspirations are many and they are hiding everywhere. It could be in a fight you’ve had with your partner that might trigger a chain of thought or sometimes as simple as how your pet curls up and sleeps It’s funny how something so small are like blips on a radar screen and which actually have the potential to manifest into great ideas. The underlying element is of course to constantly look for inspirations to invent and create.

Connect. A series of illustrations exploring grey areas of life in black and white.

For Illustrators, Advertising is the Best School

There are probably millions of people out there who can draw, who can illustrate. They love to tell stories, share concepts via striking visual form. For them, and their audience, it’s something that never gets dull. And that’s why, advertising is the perfect launch pad for great talent. It not only allows you to do what you do best, but also teaches you other key traits that are vital for someone in a creative profession.

Cover for Helter Skelter Book
Editorial Design for Helter Skelter Book, Hands
Editorial Design for Helter Skelter Book, SpeakingTongues

Advertising, helps designers see a bigger picture; one beyond the edges of their canvas. It not only lets you make things but also teaches you how to present your idea to the world. It makes you a thinker, a creator, most importantly, it makes you a doer.

Sorry State
Silent Killer
Smirking Salary. Sometimes, words can be great visuals as well, demonstrates this tongue-in-cheek design.

Published in Issue 24

Illustration For Advertising Special! Gone are the days when Illustrations would take a back seat. Now, they are becoming more proactive and are evolving the way we communicate. This time, Creative Gaga focuses on how the advertising world is opening its doors to this exciting form of design. Featuring renowned Illustrators like Chris Beatrice, Nasheet Shadani, Vijay Kumar, Gabriel Mareno and much more, this issue promises to leave no page unturned!

 

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Snow, rain, forest, desert – nature never followsany particular style. Graphic design studio, Prasun Mazumdar Design believes in a similar variety. Inspired by nature, it likes to work with natural tools, the hands, to create artworks that are organic and free-flowing, just like nature itself.

Design
Installation art for DLF Promenade
Design
Shiva Illustration

Nature is the Best Reference.

Wings of a butterfly. Tail of a peacock. The sunset sky. The veins of leaves. Nature is full of such beautiful designs and v aried display of creativity. The idea is to make a regular morning walk in the park seem like a walk through an art gallery. Spend more time with nature. Register natural patterns and forms. That’s how you’ll gradually realize that lessons from a book don’t help as much as dir ect interaction with life and nature.

Design
Illustration for Rajesh Pratap Singh, Rock Collection
Design
Designed for Royal Enfield

Variety Makes This World an Exciting Place.

Graphic designers must learn this from nature. Everything that exists around us has been designed for a particular purpose. Designs should also have a similar aim, an appropriate purpose. Nature is a live demonstration of the various simulations and executions of the same subject. Like that tree in front of your home. It’s the same tree that looks different in the morning sunshine as compared to its dark shadows dancing on a wall at night.

Pundits. A mixed visual language, showing the musical combination of heavy classical notes backed by electronic beats
Through the Words of Mr. Bond. Illustration for ‘The Kashmiri Storyteller’ by Ruskin Bond
Should start again? The world after the apocalypse with the crow holding a hope in the form of a seedling
Jim. Tee and denim design, inspired by Jim Morrison, showcases his persona using shapes and colours

Design Should Not Be What You Want It To Be, But Rather What it Should Be.

The main problem these days is that many designers are creating artworks that ‘appeal to the masses’. That’s usually because clients want it that way. In a world where everyone interprets art differently, such works of art are ineffective. Moreover, they are detrimental to the diversity that is inherent in nature and society. As a result, the whole world of art and design is getting formulated. The philosophy should be to do good designs and make them for what they are meant to be.

Metamorphosis. Inspired by constellations and night sky phenomenon, the design shows metamorphosis at different levels around us
Metamorphosis. Inspired by constellations and night sky phenomenon, the design shows metamorphosis at different levels around us

Nature Gave Us Tools.

We decide its use. Like our hands. It gives one a lot of options to experiment with allowing for new outcomes every time. Technology has helped graphic designers immensely. However, working with hands is a different feeling altogether. The idea is not to be different, but to feel your work as you make it. Those pencil impressions on the thumb, the colour and ink stains on the palm, the aching joints of the finger s, are all signs of raw and fresh work.

Tanabana. The word ‘tanabana’ means matrix. This illustrative book cover was made with a thread like effect
Packaging for Smuze

Your Design is an Ecosystem.

If trees, rivers, animals, birds, insects, soil and rocks were design elements, a forest would be the artwork. It’s for a designer to bring together unrelated elements to make it seem like one harmonious family. Singling out one element and making it rich can disturb the balance of the overall layout later on. Hence, the bigger picture should always be kept in mind.

Design
Packaging for Spichi
Design
Packaging for Spichi
For Royal Enfield

Evolution is a Way of Survival.

Mutation, we all know, is what keeps life going. Nature has an appropriate solution for revival and survival. The same concept can be applied while making identities. Using the right fonts, understanding them and their usage, can create identities that can stand the test of time. Experiment with fonts, mutate them. But before all that, know the surroundings, that is, the philosophy of the brand, its placement in the market and various other factors affecting the brand. Keeping all this in mind, make necessary changes to the font to get a desired result.

Rebranding for Erna’s Gourmet
Rebranding for Erna’s Gourmet

Self Belief Leads to Adaptation.

While starting off as an independent venture, don’t narrow the choices. Try your hands on everything. Be everything. Don’t restrict your capabilities. Of course, the change from a protected environment to the wilderness is not easy. But if you’re good, nothing can stop you.

Designed for Jawa

Published in Issue 11

This is a Design in India Festival Special! This issue also explored the Jewellery Design & Wedding Photography with some cool techniques to learn from experts in Gyaan section.

 

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Whether a mystery is intriguing or not depends a lot on how you tell it. “Abstract ideas, when combined with the correct medium, give rise to captivating artworks” says illustrator Saloni Sinha. She shares some secrets on how to attain the idea-medium sync.

Saptan Stories, Illustrative Story
Saptan Stories, Illustrative Story

It’s a no chicken or egg analogy.

The idea comes first. Period. The medium gives a vent to portray the context like in ‘Skating Glory’, an installation made for NID Bangalore’s annual fest. For this artwork, illustrations using poster paints were made on corrugated sheets which were later cut into skateboard shape so as to give it a fun and raw college-like look.

Skating Glory
Saptan Stories, Illustrative Story
Saptan Stories, Illustrative Story

At times, the medium participates in the idea as in the case of the glass etched illustration ‘Evolve’. The creature that is depicted is embedded rather than staying in its free form, implying the translucency of the creature’s existence.

Evolve
Cornucopia, Event Poster

Mix it up to sort it out.

Mixed media works best when it comes to abstraction of ideas. The traditional style of inking, when later coloured digitally, helps give the artwork a modern philosophical look. The idea in ‘Escapism’ is all about observing, guarding and the dilation of these when observed from a different perspective. And the digital aspect, like the hazy boundaries and the surreal surroundings, help dramatise the theme.

Escapism
Amogh Symphony - IV, Album cover art
YSP - Chaos // Despair, Album cover

A mix is also noticeable in ‘Droid in Process’ that has an illustration against a digitally created futuristic background, giving it a unique appeal.

Silver Tears - Ensnared, Album cover

While working with mixed media, it’s important to not let the medium disrupt your idea. The medium should enhance the thought. Like in ‘Profanity’, digital tones of light and dark are used to showcase the power of the illustrated dark lord.

Profanity
Eastern Ghats Wildlife Society, Branding and Educational Posters

Colour code the thoughts.

Though colour patterns vary from medium to medium, the basic fact remains that colours are selected keeping in mind the mood of the context. The saturated ones suggest vigour and powerful ideas as in ‘Bloom’. The creature’s bright green dress gives a vive of purity and harmonistic perspective of nature. Her bright red hair gives the feeling of passion and joyousness that nature has to offer.

Bloom, depicts the comfort and the bloom of the nature

On the other hand the dull colours talk about the subtleness or the illusive nature of the idea. ‘The Grand Escape’ stays in the grey zone to highlight the underlying theme. The artwork suggests the collision of thoughts in an abstract way which leads to the breakfree of a mind that then spreads into a different zone.

The Grand Escape
Practo, UI/UX

Symbolisms, metaphors and analogies are also mediums.

Abstraction involves disguising plane visions. The illustrated mechanical hand of Frankenstein in ‘Bring Me to Life’ depicts the conscious idea of destruction by our own. But the twist in observation here is that the posture of the hand is not threatening in any sense, rather it is playful. The ugly mechanical hand tries to explore the beauty of the butterfly in a way he isn’t aware of, as he was never taught the love behind his creation. The underlying thought, is that the ugliness we are born with doesn’t traverse if the love and care doesn’t.

Bring Me to Life

In ‘Tangles of Insanity’, the creature, its lustrous outgrowths and the dark background can be compared to the mind and mood of the artist who spreads the brushes rhythmically on to the canvas, creating a dilemma for itself and plunging into the dark corners of the mind in order to deviate from the general consciousness.

‘Not Just Another Pill’ uses the analogy of the effects of drugs. The random outburst of mixed feelings out of the node and the hand symbolises, it’s about how you take the pill and adapt it in your life. Metaphorically, it’s the feel good factor of a thought or an idea incepted in the human mind.

Not Just Another Pill
Jeepers Creepers - In Constant State of Crisis, EP cover

Published in Issue 14

Digital Art Special! We dedicated this issue to Digital Art where we explored the connection between our dreams and imagination and how the flexibility of technology can be used to document that. In his exclusive article, Android Jones explains the broader perspective of digital art. Featuring Ankur Singh Patar, Archan Nair, Harshvardhan Kadam and Aamina Shazi Arora, every article discusses how each of them has an individual way of working and yet they all look at life beyond the obvious to appreciate it’s beauty.

 

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Sushant Ajnikar, who draws inspiration from the vivid display of India’s art and colours, a designer in his office, but a parent to homeless little pups on the road, a caring husband to a worried wife, and a rider on the road enjoying the journey, the beauty that is riding. He rides to connect to the reality and more to meet his four-legged friends on the road, who are forgotten and ignored. Hop on to enjoy the ride further!

The design is an amalgamation of myriad things born out of the million thoughts crammed in our gray cells, where inspiration takes form in different shapes and colours. You feed your brain with all kinds of stimuli and when you sit down to churn out something, you never know what may actually trigger a thought. Riding gives me every stimulus I may ever need and hones my creativity. And that’s just one thing.

1. Riding Teaches To Be Disciplined

Both on and off the road. Discipline doesn’t curb creativity but it makes sure that what you intend to do, actually sees fruition. Learn to have discipline in doing my research. Discipline in following a plan and going about it or atleast try to.


2. To Be Brave

Be brave enough to ditch routine, and take on a new route. Try something new. Learn something different.



3. To Be Flexible

I cannot ride with the assumption that my life’s going to be sorted with all the facilities I want. I have to be flexible enough to adjust to any kind of adversity or scenario or surprises. Bingo for design (a designer). Flexibility is creativity’s best friend and a creative person should always be ready to adapt.


4. To Get Hands Dirty and Be Humble

I cannot do 16,000 km without getting some elbow grease, without sitting in the mud on a hot summer’s day, drinking water from a tap. Similarly, I will never succeed as a designer if I don’t do the groundwork. I need to start at the bottom, to get to the very top. No shortcuts here.

5. To Accept Fears

I am human and being scared of the unknown is only natural. But I need to accept it so that I can resolve it. In design, if something is challenging enough to scare me, I should be able to address it, instead of sitting on it, pretending to be cool and making unnecessary mistakes, as no one likes a smartass who knows nothing.


6. Makes You A Keen Observer

I observe everything. I now notice things that I wouldn’t have earlier and there is such joy in observing. The more I observe, the better I am able to sketch my memories out, the more I am able to adapt them to the design, if at all.



7. Teaches To Embrace Failure

When you are on the road, you may have these goals that you set out to achieve. However, you may not see its fulfillment, and the reasons cannot be controlled. And that’s completely okay. The best part of failure is that you get a second chance to do it all over again. You know what to expect then, what to do or not do. The same applies to design rejection and failure is as much a part of this industry as glory is. I need to be able to accept, learn and move on. You almost always end up doing better.


8. Riding Teaches To Keep it Simple

Don’t complicate stuff. Ask any self-respecting designer what they think is the best design and simple will almost always being one of the words that will crop up. Simple isn’t boring, simple can be adventurous, simple can be fancy, simple can be exciting, simple can be anything, it’s just how simply you are able to convey or do what you want to do

Published in Issue 33

We all face it! But everyone has their own unique way to come out of it, in this issue we try to explore different ideas of handling the ‘Creative Burnout’. The most common of all was #travelling, through everyone do it in their own unique style. Like Luke Ritchie from South Africa finds the nature and mountains as the best source of inspiration while Sushant Ajnikar says riding his bike and meeting four-legged loyal friends, dogs, on the way is the best way to learn. So, pack your bags and don’t forget to subscribe your copy before you leave!

 

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This century belongs to creativity and innovation. In everything we do. The way we live is a lot different from what it used to be earlier. Our engagement to shape our future has become intense and pervasive. Design is omnipresent. It is so naturally embedded all around us that sometimes we don’t even notice it. Be it in architecture, product, textile, fashion or graphic design. In the past few years however sensitivity towards design has taken a turn for the better. People today are more aware and are slowly but surely appreciating the impact good design can have in their lives.

Associate Creative Director and Partner of GCD StudioShahana Jain is going to specifically talk about graphic design as an industry and how it has built a standing for itself as a fast growing discipline. Communication design has seen exponential growth in recent years following the surge in consumerism and media. Branding, packaging and advertising are crucial to the success of a product or service in this fiercely competitive environment where presentation is as important as quality. More so with the explosion of digital media, graphic design has found a new area of expansion.

A new brand is created every day. With the new generation rearing to go, the startup ecosystem is fearlessly growing and new players are constantly aspiring to become big names. In such a scenario each one is trying to create their unique space and identity. Branding has therefore become an obvious starting point for those who want to make their presence felt.

For instance many design firms in India is constantly working with start-ups in the technology, FMCG and hospitality space to help them create a distinct identity that then interfaces with the world. Designers are contributing to the entire visual world around us. There is immense scope for designers in almost every industry.

More and more industrial companies are utilising the services of product designers as their inputs often lead to added values in terms of improved usability, lowered production costs and more appealing products. The design is, therefore, emerging as a much sought after career option. If you have a flair for design, the industry offers you wonderful opportunities to prove your mettle. We, as designers, therefore play a vital role in giving expression to an idea and have the power to influence the success of a brand.

With retail moving into self-service formats, the shelf appeal of packaging has become more important than ever. The market is flooded with products vying for consumer attention. Packaging design has become critical, as it is the initial point of purchase: the point of decision making for the buyer.

Attractive and relevant graphics, appropriate balance of colours and typography, as well as attention to forms and material make a significant difference in the aesthetic appeal of a product. Large corporates and businesses have realized the importance of packaging design and are continuously investing in revamping their product packaging so as to make it more in line with current trends and to counter competition.

Advertising has also evolved in last decade. With the advent of the digital media and people consuming information all the time, short, simple and impactful advertising has become the order of the day. You have to be instantly noticed to make an impression in a cluttered marketing environment.

The consumer should feel excited and compelled to ‘follow’ you, ‘like’ you or ‘tweet’ about you. Divided consumer attention can be channelized using the tools of good design. Given the changing fabric of advertising, more time and energy is being spent by big and small corporates on brand strategy including the use of effective marketing and social media tools to get the message out.

Digital, web and app development is an area there maximum expansion has happened. And it will only increase in the future. If you do not have web presence you’re not in the running. Meaningful content development, both visual and copy is essential to maintain brand presence. Smart UI and UX design including easy layout and navigation determines whether an app/website is user friendly and hence functionally viable. Therefore role of graphic design becomes critical in finding appropriate solutions for the task at hand.

From a global standpoint, design is no longer contained within the boundaries of any country, as the world wide net is really one holistic platform. It forces design to find some sort of universal language and designers to be aware of trends around the world. Every new brand is present on the net and the net is accessible to people in virtually every corner of the world.

While this was always the mantra for ‘global’ brands and MNCs – today even if you are a boutique coffee roaster in Coorg, you will have presence on the net and your brand and product will be accessible to people all over the world! So designers sitting in New Delhi or Beguserai, could be creating brands for a consumer in Tokyo or Chicago! And therefore designers need to be up to speed with developments and expectations not just in their local area or country but also on a global platform.

The design industry in India is adapting itself to deal with increasing demand for good, discerning design, both locally and globally. Design schools are equipping themselves with the best teaching tools and updated software knowledge to keep pace with industry requirements. Design companies on the other hand are beefing up their service portfolios and bandwidth by adding to their skillsets and expertise.

Freelancers have found new ground, as there is work for everybody. This is in turn is enabling the availability of talent to large and small organizations who are setting up their independent design departments to accommodate the gamut of work.

To sum up, the design industry is booming and is in a very promising space today. The future is getting brighter, every aspect of life demands a new approach, a new solution, a new way of looking at it.

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Character designer, illustrator and storyboard artist, Ritaban Das, takes s through his own style of telling stories through illustrations in a single frame style of designing. He introduces his perspective that guides his ideas and also shares his process.

Single Frame
Mummy ka Scratcher
Single Frame
Team Dank. Personal work depicting a rather artistic team spirit.
Single Frame
Sketching with friends. Personal work showing aliens as company while sketching.
Single Frame
Kung Fu Singh
Single Frame
Together. Just a piece of commissioned work for my friend, depicting the funny side of companionship.

CG. What are the particular advantages and challenges of telling stories in a single frame?

Ritaban. Illustration or design is a visual communication medium. It is important to challenge yourself with a different perspective, scale and how your subjects interact with one another. When sketching, I produce numerous roughs or loose drawings which later make into more developed sketches. I then decide on a final composition. The most critical element is really an activity of the subject. The figure is usually doing something and caught before it happens or just after. The other elements are supporting artefacts. Whatever I draw, I think of it as a clue or a breadcrumb that helps understand the complete story and message. It’s up to the reader to put it all together and solve the riddle

Single Frame
Indian Warrior. For a monthly Facebook character design challenge. The topic was "Warrior".
Soccer Dad

Single Frame
Clown. Personal work, inspired by Eli Roth's film of same name.
Single Frame
Two Detectives cover artwork. For the unfinished graphic novel I was working upon with my brother.

CG. What are the essential designing tools and software you use for such an approach and how do you decide on what kind of a role they play in your work?

Ritaban. I usually make the design part in Photoshop, from scratch to end, and I work in Storyboard pro for storyboard. Tools can make your work easy or even open the avenues to do it faster, but it’s based on how good your design sense, storytelling abilities and drawings are. These are the most basic fundamentals to create anything.

Merry Christmas. Old commissioned work created during the Christmas season.
Two Detectives. A promotional poster for the unfinished graphic novel I was creating with my brother.

Komorebi Poster
Single Frame
YUWA. For Art Exhibition last year, collaborating with the NGO Yuwa that empowers young girls,.

CG. What aspects do you particularly give attention to in your work to ensure effective communication through your illustrations?

Ritaban. I start by trying to understand the character, his/her background, history as well as his/her place in the story. Research helps at this stage since it’s so important to understand the world you’re creating before jumping into it Next, I’ll do a series of drawings where I figure out the characters shapes and attitude; I try to just draw the first thing that comes to mind, knowing that I’ll be changing it later. All the while, I’m searching for a new or interesting take on the character. After I’ve done a few rough thumbnails, I decide on the one that has the most appealing silhouette, shape proportions and that best describes the character. I then start to flesh out the character and begin to add details, keeping in mind any specific traits described in the script or story.

Single Frame
A promotional fan poster for the most anticipated boxing match in the history between McGregor and Mayweather.
Heavy Dudes

Single Frame
Odd Socialites # 1. The first installment of a small comic strip project with my writer friend.
Single Frame
Red Necks. Personal work showing the not so friendly folk in town.

CG. How do you describe your process and goal of designing?

Ritaban. Being a Character Designer and Illustrator, most of my work is very much character driven, blended with humour and very graphical too. I always try to convey some sort of stories through each and every character or Illustration I make I like to play with various shapes and silhouettes and usually keep things simple. The character design process is, in a way, a combination of different things. I ask myself ‘Who am I drawing?’ What is his/her personality?’ I look at the work of influential artist sometimes to get some ideas or even start from a drawing I like and translate it into my style. Then, trying to forget those influences, I often start from scratch with a basic shape such as the face as it determines the rest of the character for me, then the body (this can be a circle, oval or even a pear shape – it all depends on the personality of the character I want to draw)

Single Frame
Battle of the Beasts. UFC 223 fan poster for the main fight between Ferguson and Khabib.
Single Frame
Inked! Personal work depicting a tattoo artist working his craft on the devil.
The Anarchist
Scary guy with skill
Issue-42-Cover

Published in Issue 42

Every designer wish to be independent and willing to jump into the word of freelance but most of them unaware of the fundamental challenges of the initial phase. So, we dedicated this issue to freelancers and interviewed some established and talented designers to dig deep for the expert advice. Kevin Roodhorst on the other hand, an experienced freelancer from Amsterdam, has recently shifted to be a full-timer with an Agency says “Freelancing is not all roses!” and shared the best way to survive as a freelancer! So, whether you are a freelancer or planning to be one, this issue is a must-read. Go ahead and order your copy here or subscribe to not miss any future issues!

 

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In such complicated times, it’s all about being simple. Simple is effective when it comes to design, believes Lundgren+Lindqvist, a Swedish design studio. It’s all about saying a lot more with a lot less. Engaging in a conversation, they tell us more on how they create effective and memorable design.

Design
Varvet - Visual Identity, Stationary and Sinages
Varvet - Visual Identity, Stationary and Sinages
Design
Varvet - Visual Identity, Stationary and Sinages

CG: Describe your journey as Lundgren+Lindqvist. What have been your accomplishments?

LL: When we started Lundgren+Lindqvist in 2007, our primary goal was to do what we love and stay afloat doing so. Now our ambition has grown along with our team, but we still want to do the best possible work. Over the years, we have had the opportunity to work with a great number of amazing clients, creating work that we can all be very proud of.



O/O-Brewing Baltic Porter-Packaging Design

CG: Your designs appear simple, effortless and smooth; however that is probably not the case behind the scenes. What all do you have to go through to arrive at the final design outcome?

LL: Simple is hard. Every project starts with a coconut. We use fine grain sandpaper to peel off layer by layer until we expose the core. That’s because we believe in honesty. Achieving that means removing the make-up to expose the bare, naked truth.

Design
Akademi valand photography next to the ocean exhibition catalogue covers

CG: What inspirations are included in your design? How does your background reflected in your designs?

LL: Like most in our line of business, we take an active interest in neighbouring creative fields; such as the arts and architecture. It is hard to judge as to what extent our Scandinavian background has influenced us. Of course, the legacy of great designers and thinkers such as Paul Kjaerholm, Olle Eksell and Alvar Aalto continue to inspire.

O/O - Brewing - Carismatico - Packaging and Visual Identity


O/O-Brewing Bangatan

CG: You work across various mediums. How working on paper differ from working for the digital space?

LL: Paper is definite, in that a printed piece is final. On the other hand, the digital space is an indefinite, organic medium. Both mediums offer unique possibilities. While conscious of this, we try to build each project around a concept and an idea rather than on the media of choice.

Maria Sole - Ferragamo, Visual identity and packaging
Design
Maria Sole - Ferragamo, Visual identity and packaging

CG: Designs have to look amazing and at the same time solve a problem and fulfil a greater purpose. How do you balance your and your client’s views?

LL: A good designer-client relationship is, like any relationship, based on trust. When there is a lack of trust from either side, the outcome will suffer.

Design
Critical Mass Studio Document Holder
Design
Critical Mass Studio Document Holder


Critical Mass Studio Pencils
Critical Mass Studio Poster
Critical Mass Studio The Totebags

CG: The world of design is constantly evolving. How do you keep up with the change?

LL: Although times are indeed changing, certain truths will remain. Our inherent curiosity and thirst for knowledge allows us to stay updated in a very natural, organic way. We visit exhibitions, read and travel a lot. Staying updated is nurturing our interests, which is the fuel we use for our daily (and sometimes nightly) design and development work.

A Sense of Place, Refugees welcome poster book
Design
Recto Verso Mirror


Design
Recto Verso Spread

CG: What other countries would you say are very prominent when it comes to design? What are your views on Indian design? Anything Indian that has caught your eye?

LL: In terms of graphic design, our neighbours Norway and Finland are definitely countries to watch out for as they are challenging those with a traditionally strong graphic design output such as Switzerland, England and the Netherlands. In terms of India, we are shamefully aware of the fact that we know very little about the country’s design scene. Perhaps Creative Gaga Magazine can put an end to our ignorance.

O/O - Brewing - Packaging and Visual Identity
O/O-Brewing-AW-2016-Packaging and Art Direction

Published in Issue 21

Branding With Packaging! They say not to judge a book by its cover. But they also say that exceptions are always there. There’s no doubt, branding and packaging are the faces of any business and product. They decide the way people will receive the brand; whether they will accept it or reject it. To understand and gain more perspective on this much-unsolved mystery, we invited many branding and packaging experts who throw light on the topic.

 

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Every designer develops a style, which can be seen through his or her work. No matter which medium you choose to work in, it is this unique point of view that gives an identity to the artwork. Shreya Gulati gives an insight about her bold and quirky work and delves deep into the process that helps her achieve this style.

Versatility
Versatility
Upstox Branding.

Deconstructing The Subject.

Shreya enjoys in fragmenting the illustration and having fun with each part as it allows her the freedom to create something different each time. Working on individual parts rather than the whole gives her the bold, clean and quirky style that is clearly visible in her illustrations. Bright colours, striking graphics and playful characteristics are synonymous with her style. She loves creating characters and building stories around them. Designing contains many permutations and combinations of applying art and problem solving methodologies. The vastness and the limitless possibilities fascinate her and this lends very unconventional and experimental expressions in her designs.

Versatility
Versatility
Still from the Video ‘Financial Management’.

Versatility is the Key.

She does not believe in any one particular style but likes to experiment with different palettes, treatments and line work according to the subject matter. Not being bound by any precondition and taking the flexibility to explore different mediums and have fun with it makes her each piece unique. Moving effortlessly through mediums her versatile style of work has taken her through illustrating a children’s book to designing an app for stock trading.

Versatility
Pseudo Sapera.
Versatility
Future is Female

Versatility
Pride

Inspiration from the Subconscious.

Inspiration is not something that is acquired but it is the objects, visuals, words or anything that influences you and seeps into your memory. She draws inspiration from memory, sometimes by referring to her Tumblr dashboard which is constantly evolving as she travels and records the inspiring things that she sees around her. Sometimes she also refers to the artworks of the artists she adores. She loves drawing human forms, especially female, mostly not clothed. Human anatomy and sex are the two subjects she enjoys exploring the most.

Versatility
Pop Stickers.
Musings

Design is Therapeutic.

She doesn’t have a defined design process but lays emphasis on research and scavenges for information. Whether it is watching a movie, reading an article or a book everything influences her in some way or the other. At times, the trigger is found right away if not then she analyses the data thoroughly and doesn’t stop till the cue is found. Solution lies in understanding the problem in depth and drawing a clear brief. It is sheer joy when your target consumer is happy with the product and you see your designs being accepted and becoming a part of your users. She enjoys designing thoroughly and finds it very healing and therapeutic.

Versatility
Obot Character.
Anamolies

Asia Map

Seeing Excellent Work Pushes.

In case of a creative burnout or when she feels creatively exhausted, she loves to surf the Internet to see some brilliant work. At times, images, visuals or powerful words that might not be directly connected but seem to have an impact, infuse great ideas. Being exposed to the great work being produced inspires and influences to push the bar further. Seeing good work inspires her but when she finds some extraordinary work it motivates her to push harder and work to achieve greater heights. The amazing and boundless world of design keeps unfolding in mysterious ways inspiring to work more and more.

Genesis
Imperator

Water will evaporate to become steam or freeze to become ice. Certain formulas and physical and chemical characteristics never change, even during the experiment of design. Change however is controlled by the elements in play, whether its colours and shapes or lines and patterns, the end-result is dependent on various external factors as well. A Brand, Strategy and Experience designer Sourajit Sengupta takes us through some of his design principles. Have you got your design goggles on?

Design
Branding for Travosh
Design
Packaging for Travosh
Design
UI for Travosh

Be the Solvent to Create a Solution.

Design is not just about creating an artwork. It’s a solution that varies from brand to brand and person to person. For a designer, it’s like dressing up according to a particular occasion. Is it going to be fun and funky or formal and sleek?

 

It’s not about what you feel like or what you want, but what the situation demands from you. The key is to understand the brand and dissolve yourself in it enough to be able to think from the clients perspective. Consider it like a science experiment, where the process and procedure must rigorously be followed in order to get the desired results.

Design
Sandoitchi Logo
Design
Sandoitchi Branding
Branding for Lokmat
Branding for Avendus

Don’t Force it.

Force might facilitate everything in the scientific world, but when it comes to design, forcing it has never worked. Firstly, one must be in the field for their love and passion for design and not because of external pressures. As long as you love what you do, the journey will appear effortless and smooth, making you a perfectionist sooner or later.

 

And that’s when it will translate in your work. Design has to be invisible and basic. It does not have to be forced. It’s not about simple colour palettes or minimalism, it’s about what is relative for that project. If it relates, it becomes memorable and recallable.

Branding for Empyrean School
Branding for Empyrean School
Forum Mall Book Design
Signage Design for Forum Mall

Give your Design Dreams Milestones.

Development is a series of chain reactions, where thinkers took what existed even beyond. For example, a light bulb couldn’t have been invented if electricity hadn’t been discovered. And the later wouldn’t have been so if a kite wasn’t flown. The concept is same for design. Start off every project with the caliber of making it a dream project.

 

Creating a difference in the design world is a huge consideration and can be best achieved by creating smaller milestones that may someday combine together to make a difference altogether. The key is to be open to all types of knowledge and methods. Put your hands on different styles and projects, especially the ones that are out of your comfort zone

Design
Space Design for Reliance HQ
Design
Space Design for Reliance HQ
Design
Space Design for Reliance HQ

Published in Issue 23

The issue explores a topic which is close to every designer, the Business of Design. We try to understand from the experienced ones that when is the right time to open own studio and what more you should get in your toolbox before taking the plunge! We had interactions with many talented studio founders like Rajesh Dahiya, Archan Nair, Ishan Khosla, Prasun Mazumdar and Anupam Tomer. Also featuring some of the best talents around the world such as Martin Grohs from Germany and Avi Sehmi from Canada along with Sourajit Sengupta from New Delhi. This issue not only provide answers to many questions but also initiate many new ones to explore further! We hope you will enjoy exploring the possibility of your studio with this issue.

 

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