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Words can take your breath away, more so, when the words are written in mesmerizing hand drawn letters. Tobias Saul is a freelance designer based in Düsseldorf, Germany, and specializes in letter design. Here is an assortment of his work between 2017 and 2018. The range in style and depth of detail is absolutely mind boggling in this collection.

 

Tobias Saul gives a lot of thought to each of the lettering designs, where he plays with vintage ornamental elements to contemporary clean layouts, all the way exploring and creating delightful compositions.

 

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CURRENT ISSUE
Creative Gaga - Issue 45

 




Hand Lettering
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Onassis Cultural Centre, a space that brings together people to express and discover diverse art and contemporary culture, needed a visual identity that translated the same. And Beetroot Design shows us how it’s done.

Brief/ Challenge:

Onassis Cultural Centre, a platform for artists to come together to showcase and discover contemporary bold art, required an equally bold visual identity for the season 2017-18. This Athens based institution needed the identity to be open and relevant to everyone, thus reflecting the core idea behind OCC.

Solution:

Beetroot Design Group, a multi-award winning, Thessaloniki based design firm, explored and created a visual identity for OCC, that is made for everyone, and yet so unique. Beetroot achieved thus by putting together all the typographies from the publications and events of the season, thus portraying them all under one visual identity. For this, the firm specially created software, Flow Type, which is now available for free. The software helped handle the high volume of typographies and played a key role in their manipulation, thus resulting in expressive free-flowing words.

The overall visual identity is an explosion of energy, colours, movement and boldness. Each piece of work is vastly different in its expression, but it is beautiful how they all come together to narrate a single story.


Client: Onassis Cultural Centre
Design Studio: Beetroot Design


Every year, the art of logo design evolves to meet the new needs of the business world — and the gap between old and new has never been bigger than in 2019. Logos that were once seen as modern and fresh now appear outdated and cliched, so designers are looking to the horizon to see which trends are up-and-coming for next year.

At 99designs, we’ve been analyzing the trajectory of logo design since we launched in 2008. Looking at the current state of design, we handpicked the eight logo design trends below based on our predictions for 2019. Some are advancements in past trends, while others are new stylistic choices that capture the public’s eye at this point in time. Take a look at how the trendsetters are already incorporating these techniques, and master them yourselves now while they’re still cutting edge.

1. Friendlier Abstract Geometry

Geometric designs like grids and big, blocky shapes strike a chord with people lately, perhaps because today’s tech makes the world seems more futuristic, or maybe a greater pull towards order and structure. Whatever the reason, logos with abstract geometric shapes are increasingly common, and in 2019, that movement is taking a sharp turn into new territory.

Logo - Polytrr logo]

Logo design by 99designs designer Ludibes

Logo - Hayespitality logo]

Logo design by 99designs designer CostinLogopus

The new geometric logos are taking a “friendlier” approach. Abstract geometry is inherently cold and imposing, sometimes even authoritarian. To compensate, designers are softening the visuals with techniques like vibrant colors (particularly gradients) and more inviting compositions. By combining “cold” shapes with “warm” colors and composition, logos can have the best of both worlds — a mathematical, futuristic look that doesn’t intimidate the viewer.

Logo - Wy’East Foundation logo]

Logo design by 99designs designer tgolub

Logo - Alo logo]

Logo design by 99designs designer bo_rad


2. Traditional Emblems

Not everyone is looking to the future for logo inspiration — many designers are looking to the past. Part vintage and part pedigree, the traditional emblems trend draws on centuries-old design tactics to make the logos of new brands seem old and established. For business-minded clients, this trend is a smart sales tactic: it suggests a brand’s authenticity to make them seem more trustworthy and popular, even if they just launched yesterday.

Logo - Copper & Cane logo]

Logo design by 99designs designer Sign²in

Logo - Rusty’s at Blue Logo]

Logo design by 99designs designer Jeegy™

The trend incorporates elements from medieval family crests and historic guild emblems, but designers can temper the degree of how “historic” it seems. If you’re hesitant to dive head-first into this style, you can give your modern logo a slight textured effect to add just a hair of that classic “authentic” feel.

Logo - Spruce logo]

Logo design by 99designs designer Agi Amri

Logo - Distillery 36 logo

Logo design by 99designs designer Project 4


3. Neo-minimalism

A few years ago, the digital space saw a widespread minimalist movement. Web designers especially took hold, not only because of the aesthetics but also because of the functional benefits. No matter whether you love or hate the style, you have to admit minimalism is more practical for the web: the simpler designs both load faster and look better on mobile screens.

Logo - Puracups logo]

Logo design by 99designs designer aarif ™

Logo - Devi Deli logo]

Logo design by 99designs designer sami222

The minimalist movement became so popular, the question for 2019 is how to make your minimalist logo stand out from other minimalist logos. Hence the rise of “neo-minimalism.” Essentially, it’s doubling-down on minimalism — using even less visuals, sometimes just lines or basic shapes combined in a memorable or thought-provoking way.

Logo - Skystone logo]

Logo design by 99designs designer Choni

Logo - Greentown logo]

Logo design by 99designs designer Agusbo


4. Contextual Logos (Responsive +)

Responsive logos have been growing in popularity for years now, but lately they’re being taken to the next level. Instead of simply adapting logos for different screen sizes and platforms, companies are creating logo variants better optimized for an array of different uses, both on and off line.

Logo - Vesper Hill logo]

Logo design by 99designs designer svart ink

Logo - Public Space logo]

Design via Sulliwan Studio

For starters, contextual logos include different versions to fit where they’re being displayed — a smaller logo for mobile screens or wearables, a colorless logo for fliers, a simplified logo that still looks good printed on clothing material, etc. But the trend nowadays is going even further, offering logo variations that cater to certain customer groups. This enables greater maneuverability for marketers, who can hand-tailor promotions using the logo that speaks to certain customer groups best.

Logo - Opera Ballet Theatre logo]

Design via Elena Kitayeva

Logo - Artist Brea Weinreb logo]

Logo design by 99designs designer goopanic


5. Intricate Detailing

One school of design is pushing back against the “smaller-and-simpler” mentality of contextual logos. A certain branch of designers is embracing the fine details, making logos even more intricate and complex than last year.

Logo - Honeybee Tribe logo]

Logo design by 99designs designer Maciev

How you utilize new details is up to you. Some designers incorporate line shading for a more hand-drawn look, others are simply adding in subtleties such as the feathers of a bird or individual strands of hair. This trend is not mutually exclusive either; for example, you can use it with traditional emblems (which were historically all hand-drawn), or with geometric shapes for elaborate patterned backgrounds.

Logo - Olivivo logo]

Logo design by 99designs designer olimpio

Just keep context in mind and save the details for spaces where they can be appreciated — an intricate logo won’t translate well on the small screen of an Apple Watch.

Logo - One Plaze logo]

Logo design by 99designs designer Jeegy™


6. Illusory Logos

On the heels of the geometric themes, people are also responding well to logos with optic illusions. The specifics are less important — logos could be blatant optical illusions, or could simply have small distortions to make them stand out. There’s a lot of room for interpretation with this trend, but as long as it pushes the boundaries and “looks cool,”  it’ll suffice. Think of this trend as the 70s psychedelic style redone in the digital era.

Logo - Brickworks Australia logo]

Logo design by 99designs designer Milos Zdrale

Logo - Doppel logo]

Logo design by 99designs designer bo_rad

Logo - Tribe logo]

Logo design by 99designs designer ludibes

Logo - PS12 Logo]

Logo design by 99designs designer ultrastjarna


7. Integrating Negative Space

As a natural progression of recent years’ minimalist movement, designers have been incorporating negative space more and more. Lately, we’re seeing the emergence of actually using negative space to represent independent images within greater images.

Logo - Love at First Sight logo]

Logo design by 99designs designer cucuque design

Logo - Octopus logo]

Logo design by 99designs designer CostinLogopus

FedEx’s iconic “arrow” within the E and X was one of the original usages, but lately more brands are taking this idea and running with it. Aside from more stimulating visuals, this trend also benefits marketing — designers can use suggestive imagery (such as animal symbolism) and make monogram logos more visual by adding pictures within the letters. This trend is perfect for brands that want to add duality or extra depth to their identity.

Logo - Prinsta India logo]

Logo design by 99designs designer bo_rad


8. Overlapping Images

As we’ve seen with trends like illusions and geometric shapes, people are favoring more experimental visuals lately. In other words, logo designers must “think outside the box.”

Logo - Oak logo]

Logo design by 99designs designer bo_rad

One new visual trends that’s catching on lately is overlapping images. There’s not much to explain about the technique: you superimpose one element over another, sometimes to make a whole new shape in the shared area. You can be subtle about it like trendsetter PayPay, but more ambitious designers can build entire designs from the overlap to incorporate dual meanings just like with the negative space trend.

Logo - PopMint logo]

Logo design by 99designs designer Spoon Lancer

Most of the above trends are not mutually-exclusive — they can be combined to add new depths and dimensions individual trends couldn’t accomplish on their own. There’s ton of logo design inspiration headed your way in the upcoming year. The trick is figuring out which trends match your brand identity. Using illusory images might work well in attracting attention for niche or obscure markets, but they’d hold back more solemn brands by undermining their professionalism. Consider who you are as a brand before you decide which trends best represent you.

Starting from scratch isn’t that big a deal. Putting in your hundred percent, grabbing the right opportunities and administering patience go a long way in the evolutionary development of an idea. Gopika Chowfla shares her insight about the same.

Gopika Chowfla Design
Gopika Chowfla Design
Brand Identity for Veeba

After her graduation, choosing to work between 2 design studios and an ad agency to practice her learnings, Gopika joined the ad industry to do what she loved- illustration, logos, typography, poster making, packaging design and photography, and was mentored by amazing creative people at work like Frank Simoes and Mohammed Khan.

Gopika Chowfla Design
Gopika Chowfla Design
Logo and Packaging Design for Organica

The Genesis

In 1996 when the market was changing, print media took a back seat and film was reigning supreme. Being driven by the desire to be innovative and creative, she was not inspired by what she was doing and wanted to get into the realm of design. This gave birth to Gopika Chowfla Design.   Gopika Chowfla Design has evolved organically without much of a business plan or charting of a growth curve. The two driving forces for Gopika were enjoying the work she does and working with people who have the same motivation.

Gopika Chowfla Design
Packaging Design for Chelsea Teas

The Work-Culture 

A studio with the approach of making the clients’ job as own and this has helped establish long-term relationships with clients. Believing in a work ethic that is cooperative and in creating an environment that enables people to work and create in an engaging and supportive way, Gopika has always treated the workspace as a place of learning design as well as life skills.

Gopika Chowfla Design
Gopika Chowfla Design
Brand Identity for Spicejet Airlines

Her workspace is her life with her own children growing up around here and her colleague’s kids as well. Here, personal issues become shared events and everyone is welcome to bring their lives into this work space.   Gopika is proud of having created a space that has welcomed and nurtured as well as been enriched by some of the most talented and wonderful people. The result of this is evident in the output of the studio and the fact that people who have worked here never really leave.

Gopika Chowfla Design
Gopika Chowfla Design
Brand Identity for Spicejet Airlines

Growth and Expansion 

Gopika Chowfla Design was started as a dominantly print design studio but soon branding was their core strength. Getting into the digital space became essential and started extending their design services to web interfaces, primarily as an integral part of developing the total brand architecture as they like to approach brand development in as holistic a manner that they can.

Gopika Chowfla Design
Gopika Chowfla Design
Brand graphics and complete retail experience for Oxford Bookstore and Cha bar

Finding something exciting that challenges creatively, works as a starting point and is then executed in a manner that is fresh, logically thought out and beautifully designed.   When Gopika Chowfla Design was setup, clients typically engaged their advertising agencies for their brand and design-related jobs and these were done at very low fees by the agencies. So convincing a client to actually pay a proper fee to an independent design studio came with its own challenges. But soon enough a client recognized the value of engaging a designer for design specific projects as they got better, more specialized inputs. Seek clients who respect your work and give room to do what you do well.

Gopika Chowfla Design
Coaster design for Apsara

A Positive Outlook

Taking the challenges in a positive light as something new to tackle, it has never been a struggle to move forward. It rather is an enjoyable journey with plenty of interesting co-travelers and many important milestones.   With a young and agile team, we try and keep pace with changes that happen around us and respond accordingly. With social media being such an important part of communication and marketing, are into that area too.

Gopika Chowfla Design
Anya Hotels branding and design

Hidden Treasures

Loving what we do and letting the designers at Gopika Chowfla Design take charge of the assignments they are working on is Gopika Chowfla Design’s secret to achieve everything that they wish for. Making tow of her designers as partners. Gopika wishes to transform it into a cooperative where everyone is an owner, contributes to the earnings and takes a share of the profits.

Gopika Chowfla Design
Gopika Chowfla Design
Anya Hotels branding and design

Clients respect your work only if you respect it yourself. Figure out what you want your brand to stand for, be true to it. Don’t chase the money, go after the ideas and do great work and the money chases you! Surround yourself with talent and feed off it, so that it keeps you going when you feel like you’re drying up. Enjoy yourself, there couldn’t be a more fun job in the world – than as a designer.

Gopika Chowfla Design
Gopika Chowfla Design
Brand development for Apeejay Arts
Issue 44 - Creative Gaga

Published in Issue 44

Behind every successful studio, artist or designer there are stories of challenges, struggles and their unique solutions to these. With this issue, we interviewed many well-known names from the creative industry and found their different learnings and experiences behind making their own self as a brand. Though they all have a different take on this topic, still they all unanimously emphasise on focusing on their skills and quality delivery of the final outcome. So, if you are looking to establish yourself as a brand in the creative market or already in the process of it, this issue is a must read. Full of insights and inspirations from the best of the talents, this issue is waiting to reach your desks.

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Illustrators and designers from all over the world have fun participating in this project called ’36 days of Type’. Supernova Design, a Los Angeles based studio, presents their take on the project. The approach and style is very quirky, fun and upbeat. The colour palette is vibrant and exuberant. What is interesting is the story behind each of these types. And the layered details makes the composition all the more captivating. It’s not easy to work with a lot of elements, especially trying to find a balance between them all.

 

Here Supernova Designs handles a mixed bag of elements with panache and shows the viewer a spectrum of possibilities.

 

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CURRENT ISSUE
Creative Gaga - Issue 45

 




If there’s one thing that disheartens a designer, it’s resistance. On the other hand, every designer should know how to use his free-flowing strokes to justify the core message. Graphic designer and illustrator Gautam Gajbar explains how he strikes the balance to come up with loud and expressive works.

Bowler. Design becomes effortless when you can immediately connect to the subject
Music & Life. When a designer has only him and his world to feel, the creation has strong reflections of the designer’s own persona and way of life

When Your Work Speaks, You Don’t Have to Interrupt

No Boss, no partner to stop you or disagree with you – in one’s own setup, the mind has the brief and the heart is the executor. The perceptions start with a few raw thoughts in the head, which come on to paper in the form of quick scribbles. You start from a core subject and then let the elements develop gradually. Finally making the composition a mix of impulsive visuals and aesthetically placed design elements. This whole process of arranging and composing these elements unfolds the story of the subject on its own.

Rickshaw Chaos. Portrays the daily journey of various people, to and fro work.
Flora Fountain, Mumbai

Not Being by a Particular Design Language Makes You Versatile.

Whether it’s scribbled pencil lines, brush strokes or edgy ink splashes, there is no restriction to using any particular written or spoken language. The key is how you use them and create a new free-flowing visual/graphic language which is understood just by looking at it. However, it’s important to keep in mind that one’s not deviating from the subject. It’s about being versatile and at the same time leaving one’s own unique essence in it each time.

Shivaji Park, Dadar, Mumbai
Panda Artwork. Without habitat there is no, wildlife in fact there is no life!
Gatweway Of India Fort, Mumbai

A Rule Free Zone Encourages Impulsiveness

A designer is not a scientist. Following one’s own instinct while at it is how a designer develops and grows. The idea is not to calculate and care about definitive forms and elements but to do what feels right. Art can never be wrong or right. It’s a personal opinion. You either like something or you don’t. As long as you’re using elements that everyone can connect to, you can rest assured your design is multi-dimensional, offering unique points of view depending on how one looks at it.

Batsman. Displays how design becomes effortless when you can immediately connect to the subject and plot
V T Station, Mumbai
Che Guevara. A reminder that the value of a real icon is always more than a slap-on design on a ten-dollar T-shirt

No Professional Hierarchy Means, No Rules

Imagine working for yourself and only yourself. That’s the advantage of being a freelancer. However, such comfort also comes with a lot of responsibility and challenges. Versatility is key, where one needs to adapt quickly and with the needs and demands of the client and manage deadlines on your own. In the end, it’s not your good social and communication skills but simply good work that gets you the clients.

Smoking Angel. Anything is possible when you are in control. Inspired from the movie John Constantine
Kala Ghoda, Mumbai
Peace of Mind. A doodle-like portrait inspired by the unique personality of a friend

There is an Opportunity to be Individual in the Industry

Independent set ups are a haven for young designers. It lets them stay true to what they do. Moreover, it gives designers the golden opportunity to work with clients, subjects and brands that they relate to and connect with immediately. Commissioned projects automatically become a part of a designer with respect to the subject. Such a liberating environment encourages the unique style of a designer.

Rajabhai Tower Fort, Mumbai
Death to Birth. The cycle of life that every human being passes through, in this age of information
Elephant Artwork. Watercolour is used along with a visual idea to communicate a strong belief

Be Relentless, Until and Unless the Goal is Achieved

Freedom is good only if it is managed well. One must not forget that there is a brand objective that needs to be fulfilled. After all, there is a difference between a painting and client work. Right from start to finish, one must not go off track and forget the subject. The key is to stick to the basal idea at all times. Think whatever, do whatever, but within a particular niche. This is how the entire art work flows from the mind of the artist into the minds of the viewers as one coherent story.

"WILD AFRICA" Graphic for Jungle lore
Hutatma Chowk Fort, Mumbai

Published in Issue 09

This issue focuses on strengths and weakness of Indian creative business with cover from Archan Nair. Also, include some of the fearless creatives who had made their mark in the industry without compromising on the quality of the output and many more interesting reads.

 

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The beauty of women is pure and refreshing; every man would agree. Spanish illustrator, Gabriel Moreno, is no different. Charmed by the raw beauty and behaviour of the female form, his artworks capture them through graphic and elegant imagery to make a mark in advertising. He talks to us to tell us more.

PREMIUM McWRAP
The Beauty of Women
San Gavino Mural

CG. Your illustrations and designs are very eye-catchy. How would you describe your style as?

Gabriel. I’d say my style is best described as based in the fine arts but with digital platforms in mind. When you grow up drawing, it just develops naturally. In some facets it’s academic and in others it’s personality. When I choose a subject, I envision whether it will go well with this style that I’ve developed, letting the style define itself.

CD Cover
COCA-COLA PACKAGING
FIAT500 CHINA

CG. What came first, the desire to work as an illustrator or as an advertising professional? How did you marry both? What were/are your inspirations?

Gabriel. The desire to be an illustrator was always first. As far as how I married them, when you desire to work as an illustrator I believe it’s like any other marriage. Sometimes you are on a high and sometimes you find the best way to stay together. Most of the time, the profession is completely fulfilling. Some days I’m more motivated to create than others. Therefore, I have my more artistic “hands-on” days and my less “hands-on” artistic days.

CITRUS AND MANDARINE

The inspirations depend on whether the work is commissioned or personal. If the work is commissioned, the inspiration comes from the subject matter provided by the agency and/or client. If the work is personal, the response is much easier.

 

The inspirations come from women. I’ve always watched women and how they move, their beauty, how they interact with the public, how they interact with themselves, and most importantly how to translate that beauty into my own work in a way that enlivens both them and the visions I have of them.

Giraffe
Hare Edition
DONKEY

CG. Spain’s a very cultural and exquisite country. What Spanish elements do you incorporate in your designs, if at all any? How do you tweak your designs and illustrations according to international brands/clients?

Gabriel. Well, I come from Spain. So, in essence, Spanish culture naturally comes out of me in many ways. I suppose I can say that many of the women that I draw are from Andalusia and others have Spanish traits. However, the main elements that I look for are the eyes and mouth.

 

Many women have beautiful features and it’s just as easy for me to be intrigued by women from India, Italy, Greece, etc. I don’t necessarily feel that any of my work portrays “Spanish” characteristics bounded in culture or a particular Spanish method of approaching art.

COVER ILLUSTRATION
EROTIC STORIES BY JUAN JOSÉ MILLÁS

Regarding the international brands and clients, I adapt to the models given to me in order to professionally carry out the commission. There are always tweaks that need to be made to my style to correctly approach the subject matter. However, the style is the style. It deals more with how I want the visual aesthetic to turn out for the commission.

VODKA CRUISER
SOLO EXHIBITION

CG. What advice would you give to budding enthusiasts out there? What are your future goals and dreams that you wish to conquer?

Gabriel. I respond to this question by stating that you have to create a lot of work, and just keep creating. However, upon presenting your work in terms of achieving professional recognition, it’s best to have those 25 works that show who you most are. They must be your best work and transmit what you’ll bring to the art world. I have no dreams of conquering, I just wish to continue working in the illustration field for as long as possible.

Series of illustrations for the brand of shoes called Vögele

Published in Issue 24

Gone are the days when Illustrations would take a back seat. Now, they are becoming more proactive and are evolving the way we communicate. This time, Creative Gaga focuses on how the advertising world is opening its doors to this exciting form of design. Featuring renowned Illustrators like Chris Beatrice, Nasheet Shadani, Vijay Kumar, Gabriel Mareno and much more, this issue promises to leave no page unturned!

 

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In a world where technology is emerging as the winner, Aditi Dash, a young visual artist, takes on a massive challenge to create organised designs where concepts and innovative ideas are the first thing that meet the eye. The cheerful colours, the organised layout, all variables merge together to only highlight the fact that software is simply a tool of the trade and is dictated by the designer.

 

Aditi Dash tells us more about how she tames technology to create memorable designs.

Taming Technology to Create Memorable Designs by Aditi Dash - Creative Gaga

Never Dwell in a Comfort Zone and Work within Boundaries

Design should be functional while having visual appeal. And that’s why it’s important that a designer’s design sensibilities seem organized. The messaging in an artwork needs to be easy to grasp and understand, otherwise one loses interest. Designers can most definitely incorporate elements that inspire them like organized, and that does not mean it becomes their style. A designer must be able to continually challenge abilities and traverse through the vast possibilities this field of expression has to offer.

Mutton Munch - Taming Technology to Create Memorable Designs - Creative Gaga

Read about Graphic Designing in Designing with Clarity of Purpose


Mediums Change and so do Techniques

Print design is gradually losing traction and digital seems to be the new platform where designer chose to master their work. Although digital platforms miss out on the tangible appeal of print media, it is more versatile and can be explored as an experimental medium. Designing for a digital space has a whole universe of RGB colours at one’s disposal and requires being pixel perfect. Print on the other hand requires a good understanding of all the materials involved, like the kind of paper, inks, printing techniques etc.

Nocturnal - Taming Technology to Create Memorable Designs - Creative Gaga

Technology is Simply Tools of the Trade

Technology is not a choice in today’s world, and it’s something that design is incomplete without in most cases. And that is the challenge.

Magazine - Taming Technology to Create Memorable Designs - Creative Gaga

Anybody can learn how to use software and start designing but that’s not the point. It’s important to understand that we are the masters and not these tools. And hence a design sense and prowess is what one must work on before anything else. As a creative thinker, it’s important to make technology work as a catalyst for innovative ideas and concepts that should emerge as the hero of a design.

Mutton Munch -Taming Technology to Create Memorable Designs - Creative Gaga

Approach Challenges with Confidence

The goal of every design should be to serve a purpose and contribute to society. Once you plunge into the world of design, challenges will be thrown your way and the trick to overcome them is to face them with confidence, even if your mind is thinking twice. This attitude means half the battle won. There is no fear in design, because no one loses; there is nothing to lose. All there is to gain. Gain inspiration, knowledge and skill.

Jazila - Taming Technology to Create Memorable Designs - Creative Gaga

Published in Issue 29

As the growth of a tree can be determined by the strength of its roots, in the same way, we can try to presume the growth of design by the quality of fresh talent. So we dedicated this issue to all the Design Graduates of 2015. It includes all the young talent from last year graduates to recent graduates and students who will be graduating in the next few years. We also tried to understand the impact of digital medium on our design education. We have featured design graduates from varied fields of design from most of the top colleges and institutes.

 

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Critics, admirers and friends have in unison called his work controlled explosion of energy and movement. Tom J Manning believes this is true as it is his conscious effort to evoke positive and creative energy through his works. He presents an account of his design beliefs, thoughts and practices.

Evoking Positive and Creative Energy
Nike Wild
Personal Project
Mind Over Matter

Moving Images Are More Alive Than Static

I am fascinated by the flow of time, particularly the moments that may never be repeated. I also realise that nothing is ever truly still. With these themes in mind I make very quick strokes using special custom brushes. Smudging and fast scratchy pencil lines add to this effect. The theme of movement relates to the energy in my work. I always add simple lines to the outside of an image to make it ‘move’ even if it is portrayed as a static object.

Vinyl Cover
Evoking Positive and Creative Energy
Vinyl Cover
Repair Album

Contrast Adds Depth

I like to keep my images bright. That’s why I use vibrant colours, mainly orange. I find that I can isolate the brightness of the colours by using grayscale, which makes them stand out almost like highlights. I tend to work in darker colours first before layering brighter colours on top. I feel that this helps to create a more indepth kind of image.

Personal Project
INTERNAL CONFUSION.
Personal Project
Love and Pride
MUSE BOOK COVER.

Connect Comes From Positive Emotions

Most of my work is open to interpretation, especially the abstract work. When I do portraits I want the audience to understand who the person is and what they do and perhaps a glimpse into their personality. I also try to invoke happiness, content, hope, sadness and change within my images. My style always attempts to make good out of the bad, light out of the dark. Quick and vibrant strokes of colour represent that creative and positive energy.

Alberto De Tenis Illustrations
Alberto De Tenis Illustrations

Free To Pick, Think And Draw

In nature you can see so many things moving, so many colours and varieties. I pick them up in abundance and use them in my work. Like, the quick strokes in my paintings are inspired from Leafy Sea Dragons. Or, the orange comes from the colour of the Malay Lacewing Butterfly. More importantly, I find mixed media to be free and expressionistic which is perfect for my style and the themes I wish to communicate. It also allows me to keep my work traditional and raw. Often a single image could contain as many as 15 different media all mixed together with a digital finish.

Linkin Park, Musical Illustrations
Linkin Park, Musical Illustrations
Linkin Park, Musical Illustrations
Linkin Park, Musical Illustrations
Linkin Park, Musical Illustrations

Published in Issue 16

We always wish we had someone to show us the right way of doing things when we were starting our professional journey. And that’s why we have based this issue on graduates. The cover feature is an ensemble of advice from top names of the industry. We have also showcased few talented fresh graduates from across the country, keeping with the theme. You’ll find Tom J Manning and Pallavi Sen share their international exposure as well as insights behind their unique approach. Also featuring Shreya Shetty, a prominent concept artist, who shares the secret behind the believable characters she creates. She believes, with practice and patience, anyone can be a good artist.

 

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New styles keep developing; that’s evolutions. Yet, they root out of the vintage, mostly. That’s why illustrator, Bobby Evans, refuses to ignore retro and acknowledges it through his personal and professional works.

January Bloody Mary
Retro Roots Revived
June Margarita. 2016

CG. How do you achieve the Retro or classic style of illustration, and how do you think it contributes in the modern context?

Bobby. In recent years, I’ve found commercial clients often looking to convey a sense of heritage and history to their brands, and vintage-looking work has been at the heart of that. I think, in such a fast-paced modern world, people are looking to hark back to ‘simpler times’, and a ‘classic’ illustration style can make something feel timeless along with a reassurance of quality.

October Thermos
Vodafone Adverts

I learned to build the illustration up and, then, when I thought it was ‘finished’, started to remove layers while taking away anything superfluous that might distract from the core concept of the image. More often than not, I would end up with a more concise and pure piece of work that did its job more effectively.

Vodafone Adverts
Vodafone Adverts

CG. How do you manage to balance contemporary style of illustration with a retro feel?

Bobby. I don’t refer to a specific piece of collected imagery. The work is a result of taking in a multitude of influences from both, the past and the modern world I live and work in.

Hawt Sauce Packaging
Full Moon – Potion Bottle

I want to avoid pastiche or mimic a vintage piece of design; that work has already been done. I want to create something new, but, obviously, it will be informed by the style of things I am naturally drawn to – most of those things are vintage.

Black Cat’s Hiss – Potion Bottle
Hawt Suace Packaging 2

CG. What and how much do you think is the role of a simplistic and minimalistic approach in your work?

Bobby. As my illustration skills developed, I often found my work is more complicated, but I noticed they weren’t saying anything more. So, I work to convey the idea as best I can on a poster i.e. “What is the simplest way I can represent X?”

Baku Old Town
Acadia National Park Poster

I love design and illustration with function – anything from old flight safety cards to vintage science diagrams. Anything that distills an idea or visual down to its basic parts gets my vote. A canvas such as a matchbox or stamp forces the artists to be clearer and sparing with line and shape to carry their idea over.

LA ROUX Gig Poster
Customisable Travel Ticket

CG. How do you feel the retro styles of representation can be used to enhance the communication in today’s times?

Bobby. Having a background in screen-printing, I love imagery harking back to an age of craft and care – enjoying all the trappings, limitations and errors caused by unreliable printing technology. Misprints, broken halftone and loose registration show a human touch to the image that I think we miss with computer-based artwork.

Tiger Print

I illustrate with modern tools, but have a history in screen-printing, and love how a print process can affect the work to create interesting outcomes you wouldn’t have initially thought about. The imperfect results of archaic print processes have added a unique and finished warmth to vector based illustrations that would otherwise feel cold and clinical.

Illustrated Laser-cut Wooden Christmas Tree Ornaments

CG. How do you make this classic modern appeal to the audience, such that they relate to it?

Bobby. I think, creating an image that initially grabs the audience with its bold clarity and immediate recognition of both tone and subject is important. But, then, also having a further depth and detail to investigate means the audience will take it in for more than just a second and want to stay with the piece. It’s always about balance.

Rolling stones 7” sleeve

Published in Issue 35

The season of the festival has started and everyone is preparing to have a unique one this time with less cash and more fun. We interview many creatives who creates promotional or calendar design each year. As most of the thing around us had shifted to digital, even calendar design and the promotion has shifted. But Yorick Pintos, a strategic consultant at studio Kohl suggests that best option would be a mix of both. If you are interested in print design & want to understand the future of the same. So, go ahead and order your latest issue copy!

 

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