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Job

CEO and Founding Director of Lopez Design, Anthony Lopez, provides a good look into what employers look for while looking for the new generation of designers, creators, innovators.

How do you land up with a job, and more importantly, how do you find the right job? The two are distinctly different. The right job must ideally balance what you are capable of doing and your future ambitions. It all comes down to how you approach job-seeking.

Getting a job is an anxious business, let alone getting the right one. The first and foremost step is to do a self-strengths and capabilities analysis, giving yourself marks for both tangible skills and non-tangible abilities. Aside of looking at your skills, strengths and conceptual abilities, an interview panel will evaluate your portfolio based on how you showcase your work. Never try to mislead the interviewer. Title your entries, and present only your best, avoiding elementary work. Your portfolio should clearly demonstrate your strengths.

Based on your self-assessment and portfolio, start to evaluate the type of job you would be interested in, and which you’d be fit for. Start short-listing firms, and study them carefully. In the case of Graphic Design or Visual Communication, there are many types of firms you can join: advertising, design studios or corporates. Every one of these will open up different roles requiring different strengths.

Decide your path, based on what will be the right for both you and the firm. Start writing individual mails to each firm. The best way is to draft a master letter, which you can modify to suit your pitch to each firm.

Here are a few tips that summarise the key points to finding the right job:

1. Believe in yourself.

Be confident about who you are and what you are capable of.

 


2. Present who you are honest, and be yourself.

Show positivity, and ensure it is demonstrated in every attempt throughout the process.

 


3. Every firm has its own personality and character; See if there is a match, and write them individual emails.

It is not very different from locating your desired home and the right landlord! I often tell my future clients that we need to check each other out to see if we are the right match. This is a good step to maintain.

 


4. Your portfolio showcases not only your capabilities, but your personality

Craft it well, and ensure you clearly communicate exactly what it is you are showcasing.

 


5. Connect the project to your role, contribution and impact it had.

Most importantly, let your hiring panel know the context and the purpose.

 


6. Never try to fit into a job you are not made for.

It is best to be in a position of adding value and being an asset to your firm and team. Any false attempt will take you down the snake instead of up the ladder.

Published in Issue 38

This issue, we try to explore different views from many well-known studio owners and senior designers. While Anthony Lopez of Lopez Design shared tips on what a studio looks for in a designer, Mohar Ray from Codesign highlights the key aspects that play a significant role and make the difference in whether you are hired or not as a promising designer. Also, this issue has an insightful article on ‘Branding with reason and love’ from Itu Chaudhuri, founder ICD (Itu Chaudhuri Design) along with Siddhi Ranade, explaining his tools of story telling through his unique style of illustrations. This issue is a must read for a talented graduate to a branding expert. Order you copy and enjoy reading it!

 

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One of the most popular and commonly used typeface/ font ‘Helvetica’ has been redrawn by the designers at Monotype to suit the needs of a modern day contemporary artist, reader or writer.

Font Helvetica

Used by numerous students for their projects to be used by brands like Apple and Nestlé in their logo designs, Helvetica is one of the most widespread and universal typefaces utilized around the world, thanks to its simple and crisp design. Originally created by Max Miedinger and Edward Hoffman in 1957, this Swiss typeface has been used by countless brands and has managed to remain quite popular even today. To keep up with the modern standards of this decade, Monotype has reintroduced Helvetica as “Helvetica Now”, which is simpler, clearer and more sophisticated than its predecessors. “The design introduces a new chapter in the Helvetica story- expanding its look and utility while reinvigorating its heritage”, says Charles Nix, type director of Monotype.

Font Helvetica

Helvetica Now has been upgraded to provide more alternatives for graphic designers and creative professionals, like having size – specific drawings with size – specific spacing and a wide range of fonts and sizes to choose from. Completed over a span of 4 years, the designers have carefully redrawn all the existing characters and produced a new family of fonts: 48 fonts with 3 optical sizes to be precise; which include micro, text and display. Overcoming the limitations of the previous typeface’s spacing and legibility, the three new optical sizes have broadened the scope of Helvetica.

Font Helvetica

Helvetica Now Micro has alterations like a larger x-height with wider forms and open apertures making it highly comprehensible even at smaller sizes (4-7 points). On the other hand, Helvetica Now Display has been enhanced to be more eloquent when it comes to big and bold messages as it eliminates the need to make physical adjustments to the spacing. The size which is ideal for reading and information-rich domains, Helvetica Now Text has weights ranging from Thin to Black, alongside adequate spacing and kernel, which makes is pleasing to read.

Font Helvetica

Apart from these sizes, the designers have worked meticulously to also create brand new alternate glyphs in this advanced Helvetica family. A single story ‘a’ and a straight legged capital ‘R’ with their own alternates of each weight and optical style has also been included. The designers have gone all way to provide a wide range of alternates for different purposes and have also included a suite Helvetica arrows.

Font Helvetica

Monotype has successfully modified and redrawn 40,000 letters of the older version of Helvetica and produced a font that is more applicable in modern times and provides more scope for designers. Helvetica Now is now available for people and can found on Monotype’s cloud-based font discovery system ‘Mosaic’. It can be bought as single weights or the complete typeface families at different prices.

Font Helvetica

Shaivalini Kumar

Always Start with a Sketch

Even though a lot of our work happens digitally, It’s important to establish a basic structure of what you wish to create! Physically sketching out the illustration is always a good practice.


Ideate

While ideating, create mood-boards, mind maps and write down everything that seems enticing. Narrow down on what you wish to create gradually and you’ll get your core idea.


Get Inspiration

Gathering inspiration is an important part of the process. Inspiration can also come from the smallest of things be it a conversation, a person, a place or a thought.


Build a Story

A trick can be used while illustrating characters is writing a short story around them, that entails details about the character’s personality traits. It makes the process of illustrating the character much more engaging.

Be Informed

Reading about areas outside of design is important for gathering content and making your illustration relatable to a larger number of people.


Experiment

Sometimes spontaneous decision to experiment with colours, textures, shapes and forms, can lead to unpredictable outcome, which can be interesting and unique.


Trial Runs

It’s okay to start from scratch, even multiple times. You may often end- up starting all over – but that contributes to making the final illustration much more refined and closer to what your core idea.

Render and Detail

Once you establish your base illustration, adding hints of details that are complementary to the forms will bring more life to what you have drawn.


Get Feedback

It’s always good to see what people feel about your creation and process, by getting feedback on your work you may be able to identify points that you might have missed out.


Practice

A lot! As you know, practice can make you perfect!

Published in Issue 30

We interviewed the branding experts, who are behind some of the very successful brands. Lopez Design, have shared the story behind the recently developed branding of ‘Bihar Museum‘ and also shared the basics of brand creation in the ‘Gyaan’ section. Young visual communication designer like Shaivalini Kumar shared her love for the letter design while experienced graphic designer Anup Shah dwelled upon his passion for calligraphy. In brief, this issue is packed with branding and typography design experts who can help you solve the mystery of the brand creation!

 

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Words can take your breath away, more so, when the words are written in mesmerizing hand drawn letters. Tobias Saul is a freelance designer based in Düsseldorf, Germany, and specializes in letter design. Here is an assortment of his work between 2017 and 2018. The range in style and depth of detail is absolutely mind boggling in this collection.

 

Tobias Saul gives a lot of thought to each of the lettering designs, where he plays with vintage ornamental elements to contemporary clean layouts, all the way exploring and creating delightful compositions.

 

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Onassis Cultural Centre, a space that brings together people to express and discover diverse art and contemporary culture, needed a visual identity that translated the same. And Beetroot Design shows us how it’s done.

Brief/ Challenge:

Onassis Cultural Centre, a platform for artists to come together to showcase and discover contemporary bold art, required an equally bold visual identity for the season 2017-18. This Athens based institution needed the identity to be open and relevant to everyone, thus reflecting the core idea behind OCC.

Solution:

Beetroot Design Group, a multi-award winning, Thessaloniki based design firm, explored and created a visual identity for OCC, that is made for everyone, and yet so unique. Beetroot achieved thus by putting together all the typographies from the publications and events of the season, thus portraying them all under one visual identity. For this, the firm specially created software, Flow Type, which is now available for free. The software helped handle the high volume of typographies and played a key role in their manipulation, thus resulting in expressive free-flowing words.

The overall visual identity is an explosion of energy, colours, movement and boldness. Each piece of work is vastly different in its expression, but it is beautiful how they all come together to narrate a single story.


Client: Onassis Cultural Centre
Design Studio: Beetroot Design


Every year, the art of logo design evolves to meet the new needs of the business world — and the gap between old and new has never been bigger than in 2019. Logos that were once seen as modern and fresh now appear outdated and cliched, so designers are looking to the horizon to see which trends are up-and-coming for next year.

At 99designs, we’ve been analyzing the trajectory of logo design since we launched in 2008. Looking at the current state of design, we handpicked the eight logo design trends below based on our predictions for 2019. Some are advancements in past trends, while others are new stylistic choices that capture the public’s eye at this point in time. Take a look at how the trendsetters are already incorporating these techniques, and master them yourselves now while they’re still cutting edge.

1. Friendlier Abstract Geometry

Geometric designs like grids and big, blocky shapes strike a chord with people lately, perhaps because today’s tech makes the world seems more futuristic, or maybe a greater pull towards order and structure. Whatever the reason, logos with abstract geometric shapes are increasingly common, and in 2019, that movement is taking a sharp turn into new territory.

Logo - Polytrr logo]

Logo design by 99designs designer Ludibes

Logo - Hayespitality logo]

Logo design by 99designs designer CostinLogopus

The new geometric logos are taking a “friendlier” approach. Abstract geometry is inherently cold and imposing, sometimes even authoritarian. To compensate, designers are softening the visuals with techniques like vibrant colors (particularly gradients) and more inviting compositions. By combining “cold” shapes with “warm” colors and composition, logos can have the best of both worlds — a mathematical, futuristic look that doesn’t intimidate the viewer.

Logo - Wy’East Foundation logo]

Logo design by 99designs designer tgolub

Logo - Alo logo]

Logo design by 99designs designer bo_rad


2. Traditional Emblems

Not everyone is looking to the future for logo inspiration — many designers are looking to the past. Part vintage and part pedigree, the traditional emblems trend draws on centuries-old design tactics to make the logos of new brands seem old and established. For business-minded clients, this trend is a smart sales tactic: it suggests a brand’s authenticity to make them seem more trustworthy and popular, even if they just launched yesterday.

Logo - Copper & Cane logo]

Logo design by 99designs designer Sign²in

Logo - Rusty’s at Blue Logo]

Logo design by 99designs designer Jeegy™

The trend incorporates elements from medieval family crests and historic guild emblems, but designers can temper the degree of how “historic” it seems. If you’re hesitant to dive head-first into this style, you can give your modern logo a slight textured effect to add just a hair of that classic “authentic” feel.

Logo - Spruce logo]

Logo design by 99designs designer Agi Amri

Logo - Distillery 36 logo

Logo design by 99designs designer Project 4


3. Neo-minimalism

A few years ago, the digital space saw a widespread minimalist movement. Web designers especially took hold, not only because of the aesthetics but also because of the functional benefits. No matter whether you love or hate the style, you have to admit minimalism is more practical for the web: the simpler designs both load faster and look better on mobile screens.

Logo - Puracups logo]

Logo design by 99designs designer aarif ™

Logo - Devi Deli logo]

Logo design by 99designs designer sami222

The minimalist movement became so popular, the question for 2019 is how to make your minimalist logo stand out from other minimalist logos. Hence the rise of “neo-minimalism.” Essentially, it’s doubling-down on minimalism — using even less visuals, sometimes just lines or basic shapes combined in a memorable or thought-provoking way.

Logo - Skystone logo]

Logo design by 99designs designer Choni

Logo - Greentown logo]

Logo design by 99designs designer Agusbo


4. Contextual Logos (Responsive +)

Responsive logos have been growing in popularity for years now, but lately they’re being taken to the next level. Instead of simply adapting logos for different screen sizes and platforms, companies are creating logo variants better optimized for an array of different uses, both on and off line.

Logo - Vesper Hill logo]

Logo design by 99designs designer svart ink

Logo - Public Space logo]

Design via Sulliwan Studio

For starters, contextual logos include different versions to fit where they’re being displayed — a smaller logo for mobile screens or wearables, a colorless logo for fliers, a simplified logo that still looks good printed on clothing material, etc. But the trend nowadays is going even further, offering logo variations that cater to certain customer groups. This enables greater maneuverability for marketers, who can hand-tailor promotions using the logo that speaks to certain customer groups best.

Logo - Opera Ballet Theatre logo]

Design via Elena Kitayeva

Logo - Artist Brea Weinreb logo]

Logo design by 99designs designer goopanic


5. Intricate Detailing

One school of design is pushing back against the “smaller-and-simpler” mentality of contextual logos. A certain branch of designers is embracing the fine details, making logos even more intricate and complex than last year.

Logo - Honeybee Tribe logo]

Logo design by 99designs designer Maciev

How you utilize new details is up to you. Some designers incorporate line shading for a more hand-drawn look, others are simply adding in subtleties such as the feathers of a bird or individual strands of hair. This trend is not mutually exclusive either; for example, you can use it with traditional emblems (which were historically all hand-drawn), or with geometric shapes for elaborate patterned backgrounds.

Logo - Olivivo logo]

Logo design by 99designs designer olimpio

Just keep context in mind and save the details for spaces where they can be appreciated — an intricate logo won’t translate well on the small screen of an Apple Watch.

Logo - One Plaze logo]

Logo design by 99designs designer Jeegy™


6. Illusory Logos

On the heels of the geometric themes, people are also responding well to logos with optic illusions. The specifics are less important — logos could be blatant optical illusions, or could simply have small distortions to make them stand out. There’s a lot of room for interpretation with this trend, but as long as it pushes the boundaries and “looks cool,”  it’ll suffice. Think of this trend as the 70s psychedelic style redone in the digital era.

Logo - Brickworks Australia logo]

Logo design by 99designs designer Milos Zdrale

Logo - Doppel logo]

Logo design by 99designs designer bo_rad

Logo - Tribe logo]

Logo design by 99designs designer ludibes

Logo - PS12 Logo]

Logo design by 99designs designer ultrastjarna


7. Integrating Negative Space

As a natural progression of recent years’ minimalist movement, designers have been incorporating negative space more and more. Lately, we’re seeing the emergence of actually using negative space to represent independent images within greater images.

Logo - Love at First Sight logo]

Logo design by 99designs designer cucuque design

Logo - Octopus logo]

Logo design by 99designs designer CostinLogopus

FedEx’s iconic “arrow” within the E and X was one of the original usages, but lately more brands are taking this idea and running with it. Aside from more stimulating visuals, this trend also benefits marketing — designers can use suggestive imagery (such as animal symbolism) and make monogram logos more visual by adding pictures within the letters. This trend is perfect for brands that want to add duality or extra depth to their identity.

Logo - Prinsta India logo]

Logo design by 99designs designer bo_rad


8. Overlapping Images

As we’ve seen with trends like illusions and geometric shapes, people are favoring more experimental visuals lately. In other words, logo designers must “think outside the box.”

Logo - Oak logo]

Logo design by 99designs designer bo_rad

One new visual trends that’s catching on lately is overlapping images. There’s not much to explain about the technique: you superimpose one element over another, sometimes to make a whole new shape in the shared area. You can be subtle about it like trendsetter PayPay, but more ambitious designers can build entire designs from the overlap to incorporate dual meanings just like with the negative space trend.

Logo - PopMint logo]

Logo design by 99designs designer Spoon Lancer

Most of the above trends are not mutually-exclusive — they can be combined to add new depths and dimensions individual trends couldn’t accomplish on their own. There’s ton of logo design inspiration headed your way in the upcoming year. The trick is figuring out which trends match your brand identity. Using illusory images might work well in attracting attention for niche or obscure markets, but they’d hold back more solemn brands by undermining their professionalism. Consider who you are as a brand before you decide which trends you will use to Create a Logo.

Starting from scratch isn’t that big a deal. Putting in your hundred percent, grabbing the right opportunities and administering patience go a long way in the evolutionary development of an idea. Gopika Chowfla shares her insight about the same.

Gopika Chowfla Design
Gopika Chowfla Design
Brand Identity for Veeba

After her graduation, choosing to work between 2 design studios and an ad agency to practice her learnings, Gopika joined the ad industry to do what she loved- illustration, logos, typography, poster making, packaging design and photography, and was mentored by amazing creative people at work like Frank Simoes and Mohammed Khan.

Gopika Chowfla Design
Gopika Chowfla Design
Logo and Packaging Design for Organica

The Genesis

In 1996 when the market was changing, print media took a back seat and film was reigning supreme. Being driven by the desire to be innovative and creative, she was not inspired by what she was doing and wanted to get into the realm of design. This gave birth to Gopika Chowfla Design.   Gopika Chowfla Design has evolved organically without much of a business plan or charting of a growth curve. The two driving forces for Gopika were enjoying the work she does and working with people who have the same motivation.

Gopika Chowfla Design
Packaging Design for Chelsea Teas

The Work-Culture 

A studio with the approach of making the clients’ job as own and this has helped establish long-term relationships with clients. Believing in a work ethic that is cooperative and in creating an environment that enables people to work and create in an engaging and supportive way, Gopika has always treated the workspace as a place of learning design as well as life skills.

Gopika Chowfla Design
Gopika Chowfla Design
Brand Identity for Spicejet Airlines

Her workspace is her life with her own children growing up around here and her colleague’s kids as well. Here, personal issues become shared events and everyone is welcome to bring their lives into this work space.   Gopika is proud of having created a space that has welcomed and nurtured as well as been enriched by some of the most talented and wonderful people. The result of this is evident in the output of the studio and the fact that people who have worked here never really leave.

Gopika Chowfla Design
Gopika Chowfla Design
Brand Identity for Spicejet Airlines

Growth and Expansion 

Gopika Chowfla Design was started as a dominantly print design studio but soon branding was their core strength. Getting into the digital space became essential and started extending their design services to web interfaces, primarily as an integral part of developing the total brand architecture as they like to approach brand development in as holistic a manner that they can.

Gopika Chowfla Design
Gopika Chowfla Design
Brand graphics and complete retail experience for Oxford Bookstore and Cha bar

Finding something exciting that challenges creatively, works as a starting point and is then executed in a manner that is fresh, logically thought out and beautifully designed.   When Gopika Chowfla Design was setup, clients typically engaged their advertising agencies for their brand and design-related jobs and these were done at very low fees by the agencies. So convincing a client to actually pay a proper fee to an independent design studio came with its own challenges. But soon enough a client recognized the value of engaging a designer for design specific projects as they got better, more specialized inputs. Seek clients who respect your work and give room to do what you do well.

Gopika Chowfla Design
Coaster design for Apsara

A Positive Outlook

Taking the challenges in a positive light as something new to tackle, it has never been a struggle to move forward. It rather is an enjoyable journey with plenty of interesting co-travelers and many important milestones.   With a young and agile team, we try and keep pace with changes that happen around us and respond accordingly. With social media being such an important part of communication and marketing, are into that area too.

Gopika Chowfla Design
Anya Hotels branding and design

Hidden Treasures

Loving what we do and letting the designers at Gopika Chowfla Design take charge of the assignments they are working on is Gopika Chowfla Design’s secret to achieve everything that they wish for. Making tow of her designers as partners. Gopika wishes to transform it into a cooperative where everyone is an owner, contributes to the earnings and takes a share of the profits.

Gopika Chowfla Design
Gopika Chowfla Design
Anya Hotels branding and design

Clients respect your work only if you respect it yourself. Figure out what you want your brand to stand for, be true to it. Don’t chase the money, go after the ideas and do great work and the money chases you! Surround yourself with talent and feed off it, so that it keeps you going when you feel like you’re drying up. Enjoy yourself, there couldn’t be a more fun job in the world – than as a designer.

Gopika Chowfla Design
Gopika Chowfla Design
Brand development for Apeejay Arts
Issue 44 - Creative Gaga

Published in Issue 44

Behind every successful studio, artist or designer there are stories of challenges, struggles and their unique solutions to these. With this issue, we interviewed many well-known names from the creative industry and found their different learnings and experiences behind making their own self as a brand. Though they all have a different take on this topic, still they all unanimously emphasise on focusing on their skills and quality delivery of the final outcome. So, if you are looking to establish yourself as a brand in the creative market or already in the process of it, this issue is a must read. Full of insights and inspirations from the best of the talents, this issue is waiting to reach your desks.

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Illustrators and designers from all over the world have fun participating in this project called ’36 days of Type’. Supernova Design, a Los Angeles based studio, presents their take on the project. The approach and style is very quirky, fun and upbeat. The colour palette is vibrant and exuberant. What is interesting is the story behind each of these types. And the layered details makes the composition all the more captivating. It’s not easy to work with a lot of elements, especially trying to find a balance between them all.

 

Here Supernova Designs handles a mixed bag of elements with panache and shows the viewer a spectrum of possibilities.

 

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If there’s one thing that disheartens a designer, it’s resistance. On the other hand, every designer should know how to use his free-flowing strokes to justify the core message. Graphic designer and illustrator Gautam Gajbar explains how he strikes the balance to come up with loud and expressive works.

Bowler. Design becomes effortless when you can immediately connect to the subject
Music & Life. When a designer has only him and his world to feel, the creation has strong reflections of the designer’s own persona and way of life

When Your Work Speaks, You Don’t Have to Interrupt

No Boss, no partner to stop you or disagree with you – in one’s own setup, the mind has the brief and the heart is the executor. The perceptions start with a few raw thoughts in the head, which come on to paper in the form of quick scribbles. You start from a core subject and then let the elements develop gradually. Finally making the composition a mix of impulsive visuals and aesthetically placed design elements. This whole process of arranging and composing these elements unfolds the story of the subject on its own.

Rickshaw Chaos. Portrays the daily journey of various people, to and fro work.
Flora Fountain, Mumbai

Not Being by a Particular Design Language Makes You Versatile.

Whether it’s scribbled pencil lines, brush strokes or edgy ink splashes, there is no restriction to using any particular written or spoken language. The key is how you use them and create a new free-flowing visual/graphic language which is understood just by looking at it. However, it’s important to keep in mind that one’s not deviating from the subject. It’s about being versatile and at the same time leaving one’s own unique essence in it each time.

Shivaji Park, Dadar, Mumbai
Panda Artwork. Without habitat there is no, wildlife in fact there is no life!
Gatweway Of India Fort, Mumbai

A Rule Free Zone Encourages Impulsiveness

A designer is not a scientist. Following one’s own instinct while at it is how a designer develops and grows. The idea is not to calculate and care about definitive forms and elements but to do what feels right. Art can never be wrong or right. It’s a personal opinion. You either like something or you don’t. As long as you’re using elements that everyone can connect to, you can rest assured your design is multi-dimensional, offering unique points of view depending on how one looks at it.

Batsman. Displays how design becomes effortless when you can immediately connect to the subject and plot
V T Station, Mumbai
Che Guevara. A reminder that the value of a real icon is always more than a slap-on design on a ten-dollar T-shirt

No Professional Hierarchy Means, No Rules

Imagine working for yourself and only yourself. That’s the advantage of being a freelancer. However, such comfort also comes with a lot of responsibility and challenges. Versatility is key, where one needs to adapt quickly and with the needs and demands of the client and manage deadlines on your own. In the end, it’s not your good social and communication skills but simply good work that gets you the clients.

Smoking Angel. Anything is possible when you are in control. Inspired from the movie John Constantine
Kala Ghoda, Mumbai
Peace of Mind. A doodle-like portrait inspired by the unique personality of a friend

There is an Opportunity to be Individual in the Industry

Independent set ups are a haven for young designers. It lets them stay true to what they do. Moreover, it gives designers the golden opportunity to work with clients, subjects and brands that they relate to and connect with immediately. Commissioned projects automatically become a part of a designer with respect to the subject. Such a liberating environment encourages the unique style of a designer.

Rajabhai Tower Fort, Mumbai
Death to Birth. The cycle of life that every human being passes through, in this age of information
Elephant Artwork. Watercolour is used along with a visual idea to communicate a strong belief

Be Relentless, Until and Unless the Goal is Achieved

Freedom is good only if it is managed well. One must not forget that there is a brand objective that needs to be fulfilled. After all, there is a difference between a painting and client work. Right from start to finish, one must not go off track and forget the subject. The key is to stick to the basal idea at all times. Think whatever, do whatever, but within a particular niche. This is how the entire art work flows from the mind of the artist into the minds of the viewers as one coherent story.

"WILD AFRICA" Graphic for Jungle lore
Hutatma Chowk Fort, Mumbai

Published in Issue 09

This issue focuses on strengths and weakness of Indian creative business with cover from Archan Nair. Also, include some of the fearless creatives who had made their mark in the industry without compromising on the quality of the output and many more interesting reads.

 

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The beauty of women is pure and refreshing; every man would agree. Spanish illustrator, Gabriel Moreno, is no different. Charmed by the raw beauty and behaviour of the female form, his artworks capture them through graphic and elegant imagery to make a mark in advertising. He talks to us to tell us more.

PREMIUM McWRAP
The Beauty of Women
San Gavino Mural

CG. Your illustrations and designs are very eye-catchy. How would you describe your style as?

Gabriel. I’d say my style is best described as based in the fine arts but with digital platforms in mind. When you grow up drawing, it just develops naturally. In some facets it’s academic and in others it’s personality. When I choose a subject, I envision whether it will go well with this style that I’ve developed, letting the style define itself.

CD Cover
COCA-COLA PACKAGING
FIAT500 CHINA

CG. What came first, the desire to work as an illustrator or as an advertising professional? How did you marry both? What were/are your inspirations?

Gabriel. The desire to be an illustrator was always first. As far as how I married them, when you desire to work as an illustrator I believe it’s like any other marriage. Sometimes you are on a high and sometimes you find the best way to stay together. Most of the time, the profession is completely fulfilling. Some days I’m more motivated to create than others. Therefore, I have my more artistic “hands-on” days and my less “hands-on” artistic days.

CITRUS AND MANDARINE

The inspirations depend on whether the work is commissioned or personal. If the work is commissioned, the inspiration comes from the subject matter provided by the agency and/or client. If the work is personal, the response is much easier.

 

The inspirations come from women. I’ve always watched women and how they move, their beauty, how they interact with the public, how they interact with themselves, and most importantly how to translate that beauty into my own work in a way that enlivens both them and the visions I have of them.

Giraffe
Hare Edition
DONKEY

CG. Spain’s a very cultural and exquisite country. What Spanish elements do you incorporate in your designs, if at all any? How do you tweak your designs and illustrations according to international brands/clients?

Gabriel. Well, I come from Spain. So, in essence, Spanish culture naturally comes out of me in many ways. I suppose I can say that many of the women that I draw are from Andalusia and others have Spanish traits. However, the main elements that I look for are the eyes and mouth.

 

Many women have beautiful features and it’s just as easy for me to be intrigued by women from India, Italy, Greece, etc. I don’t necessarily feel that any of my work portrays “Spanish” characteristics bounded in culture or a particular Spanish method of approaching art.

COVER ILLUSTRATION
EROTIC STORIES BY JUAN JOSÉ MILLÁS

Regarding the international brands and clients, I adapt to the models given to me in order to professionally carry out the commission. There are always tweaks that need to be made to my style to correctly approach the subject matter. However, the style is the style. It deals more with how I want the visual aesthetic to turn out for the commission.

VODKA CRUISER
SOLO EXHIBITION

CG. What advice would you give to budding enthusiasts out there? What are your future goals and dreams that you wish to conquer?

Gabriel. I respond to this question by stating that you have to create a lot of work, and just keep creating. However, upon presenting your work in terms of achieving professional recognition, it’s best to have those 25 works that show who you most are. They must be your best work and transmit what you’ll bring to the art world. I have no dreams of conquering, I just wish to continue working in the illustration field for as long as possible.

Series of illustrations for the brand of shoes called Vögele

Published in Issue 24

Gone are the days when Illustrations would take a back seat. Now, they are becoming more proactive and are evolving the way we communicate. This time, Creative Gaga focuses on how the advertising world is opening its doors to this exciting form of design. Featuring renowned Illustrators like Chris Beatrice, Nasheet Shadani, Vijay Kumar, Gabriel Mareno and much more, this issue promises to leave no page unturned!

 

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