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Lucas Wakamatsu, a Brazilian illustrator puts together a vibrant collection of illustrations that depict the stories and voices of different people. Through the course of this project, Lucas talks to people and empathises with their dreams, wishes, emotions and feelings to create reflective illustrations.

 

His illustrative style and beautiful compositions bring the personalities to life. The colours perfectly add to the story like mood. The attention to detail and texturing cannot be missed as they immensely add to the engaging experience.

 

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Storytelling
Storytelling
Storytelling
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Storytelling

The beauty of women is pure and refreshing; every man would agree. Spanish illustrator, Gabriel Moreno, is no different. Charmed by the raw beauty and behaviour of the female form, his artworks capture them through graphic and elegant imagery to make a mark in advertising. He talks to us to tell us more.

PREMIUM McWRAP
The Beauty of Women
San Gavino Mural

CG. Your illustrations and designs are very eye-catchy. How would you describe your style as?

Gabriel. I’d say my style is best described as based in the fine arts but with digital platforms in mind. When you grow up drawing, it just develops naturally. In some facets it’s academic and in others it’s personality. When I choose a subject, I envision whether it will go well with this style that I’ve developed, letting the style define itself.

CD Cover
COCA-COLA PACKAGING
FIAT500 CHINA

CG. What came first, the desire to work as an illustrator or as an advertising professional? How did you marry both? What were/are your inspirations?

Gabriel. The desire to be an illustrator was always first. As far as how I married them, when you desire to work as an illustrator I believe it’s like any other marriage. Sometimes you are on a high and sometimes you find the best way to stay together. Most of the time, the profession is completely fulfilling. Some days I’m more motivated to create than others. Therefore, I have my more artistic “hands-on” days and my less “hands-on” artistic days.

CITRUS AND MANDARINE

The inspirations depend on whether the work is commissioned or personal. If the work is commissioned, the inspiration comes from the subject matter provided by the agency and/or client. If the work is personal, the response is much easier.

 

The inspirations come from women. I’ve always watched women and how they move, their beauty, how they interact with the public, how they interact with themselves, and most importantly how to translate that beauty into my own work in a way that enlivens both them and the visions I have of them.

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Hare Edition
DONKEY

CG. Spain’s a very cultural and exquisite country. What Spanish elements do you incorporate in your designs, if at all any? How do you tweak your designs and illustrations according to international brands/clients?

Gabriel. Well, I come from Spain. So, in essence, Spanish culture naturally comes out of me in many ways. I suppose I can say that many of the women that I draw are from Andalusia and others have Spanish traits. However, the main elements that I look for are the eyes and mouth.

 

Many women have beautiful features and it’s just as easy for me to be intrigued by women from India, Italy, Greece, etc. I don’t necessarily feel that any of my work portrays “Spanish” characteristics bounded in culture or a particular Spanish method of approaching art.

COVER ILLUSTRATION
EROTIC STORIES BY JUAN JOSÉ MILLÁS

Regarding the international brands and clients, I adapt to the models given to me in order to professionally carry out the commission. There are always tweaks that need to be made to my style to correctly approach the subject matter. However, the style is the style. It deals more with how I want the visual aesthetic to turn out for the commission.

VODKA CRUISER
SOLO EXHIBITION

CG. What advice would you give to budding enthusiasts out there? What are your future goals and dreams that you wish to conquer?

Gabriel. I respond to this question by stating that you have to create a lot of work, and just keep creating. However, upon presenting your work in terms of achieving professional recognition, it’s best to have those 25 works that show who you most are. They must be your best work and transmit what you’ll bring to the art world. I have no dreams of conquering, I just wish to continue working in the illustration field for as long as possible.

Series of illustrations for the brand of shoes called Vögele

Published in Issue 24

Gone are the days when Illustrations would take a back seat. Now, they are becoming more proactive and are evolving the way we communicate. This time, Creative Gaga focuses on how the advertising world is opening its doors to this exciting form of design. Featuring renowned Illustrators like Chris Beatrice, Nasheet Shadani, Vijay Kumar, Gabriel Mareno and much more, this issue promises to leave no page unturned!

 

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Brice Chaplet aka Mr.Xerty from France shares his journey and insights as to what it takes to start out and establish oneself as a freelance digital artist and illustrator and create some surreal artwork.

Build Your Own Style to be a Successful Digital Artist!

CG. What according to you are the secrets to becoming a successful self-learning freelance digital artist?

Brice. No secret, it is all about ‘work, work, work!’ You have to practice yourself all the time and concentrate on what you do. In another way, you have to take some risks and explore new ways of creation. But you mainly have to build your own style day after day and stick to it!

Mr.Xerty-Ms-Majestic_Xerty

CG. Where do you feel the digital artist is heading in 2018 as a profession?

Brice. It’s been 10 years since I’m doing this and, to be honest, I at times find it more difficult today than when I started to work and get new clients. We (illustrators, creatives) are probably a bit too many in the market and freelancers don’t get the recognition and exposure they deserve.

 

This may be because people believe that it’s easy to produce artworks since it’s computer-assisted. Also, I think digital related jobs are not so well-highlighted. 10 years ago, Graphic-designer or Illustrator was the thing to do to have a cool job (In my point of view, as a French digital-artist).

CG. What kind of a digital impact do you feel digital design and platforms will have on the next generation and its society?

Brice. We can already be said it’s everywhere around us and it will continue in this way. Youth are born with it and they will see this as a totally assimilated thing and continue to develop it more and more. But we have to keep in my mind that it is important to inject poetry and bring our souls and a bit of ourselves into the pieces we create, else it will lead us to a cold and boring world.

CG. What is the main idea you behind your works and how do you conceptualise the composition?

Brice. It depends on the subject and the style I want to show. My style is very surrealistic and dreamy, with a worldwide cultural touch. I try to tell the story and illustrate my thoughts. I start writing some keywords on paper and a little story like “A little girl flying over flowers on a bird”.

 

Then I’ll draw a basic sketch, after which I’ll begin to work on the composition – first with Photoshop, using pictures I find on the stock website like Adobe-Stock or Deviant-Art or pictures I’ve already taken myself. It could also start from a cool picture (like a portrait) that inspires me and then I let my imagination flow – it’s more unconscious in this case and that’s how I can experiment some new techniques.

CG. Also, what are the main software and tools you specifically use and for what purpose?

Brice. I use a Wacom pen tablet (to draw light and shadows for example) in Photoshop (since the 10th!), which is the main software I’m using to create my artworks. I also use a bit of Maxon Cinema 4D and Adobe Illustrator to create shapes and abstract elements and writings.

CG. How do you suggest other young designers can attain efficiency in their skills and ideas?

Brice. Be open; collaborate; read a lot of books and watch tutorials! Get feedback from friends and also from strangers who don’t know you personally and will be more honest in their critics! This is one way to grow as a person and even as a designer – it all then very naturally reflects and shows in your work.

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