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If you’re talented, you will be noticed. The world is full of freelance opportunity these days, just that one must know which and when to take one. A successful designer is one that find his/her niche in the design world, believes young illustrator Ashish Subhash Boyne. Here, he tells us how showcasing everyday stories in a refreshing manner can open doors to a ‘not so every day’ life!

Freelance
AGHORA.
Freelance
AGHORA.

Find inspiration in everyday things that are omnipresent

People often pass by without taking notice of things that they encounter every single day. For executing story illustrations, these are the places you need to look. The skill is to give mundane life a refreshing and ‘never seen or heard before’ appeal. Like Surmai that showcases the story of a small boy who lives near fishing docks or 100 Kisses that shows how a cup of tea passes through so many people of different backgrounds. Just keep in mind, the purpose of the work is to be understood by everyday people. The execution needs to be simple. Don’t forget that fantasy is all around and finding a unique niche is the key to getting recognised.

Freelance
AGHORA.
Freelance
AGHORA.

Education prepares the talent within you

Most people are born with certain talents that define their future. Ask any designer to take a peek back into their childhood; they’d tell you they loved things like drawing, comics and imaginative forms. As you go grow up and finally get into school to do what you love doing, you start to understand yourself better. The vague question of ‘what do you want to do?’ starts to become clearer. Illustration art needs high observation of the subject matter that needs to be combined with your skill to visualise and express the idea in a simpler way. Studying design helps you do that. It also leaves you an initial portfolio that introduces you to the outside world.

Freelance
SURMAI.
Freelance
SURMAI.

The outside world is a self-learning experience

The transition from a student to a professional is a gradual process where change settles in with time and comes the wider understanding of client needs, concepts and ideas. Hard work, dedication and passion are the three key attributes that you need to bring to the class every day of your professional life.

Freelance
100 KISSES.
Freelance
100 KISSES.

A satisfied client is a gateway to the freelance career

When you’re just about to start off to try and make a mark for yourself in the big world of design, often most people wonder ‘How do I do this?”. It’s simple. Concentrate on things that come to you. Whether it’s your first assignment or project it’s important to make each and everything you do unique and fulfilling as per the client’s requirements. The rest is history.

Freelance
100 KISSES.

Published in Issue 22

Dedicated to the talented design graduates who are not just looking to work but seeking experience in order to realise the greater goal of life. The issue features various designers from India and abroad. Kevin Roodhorst from The Netherlands realised his goal so early in life that propelled him to start his career as a designer as young as 13. Ashish Subhash Boyne, a student of Sir JJ Institute of Applied Art realised his dream while studying when he started doing freelance projects, which allow him to express his free thoughts. To name a few talents we have Vivek Nag from Fine Arts from Rachna Sansad Mumbai, Simran Nanda from Pearl Academy New Delhi, Anisha Raj from MAEER MIT Institute of Design Pune, Giby Joseph from Animation and Art School Goa and much more. This issue gives a fresh perspective of talented graduates and their unique approach to design.

 

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Loris F. Alessandria, an Italian freelance illustrator who loves Lego and dogs, feels that inspiration is not in and for chosen few, but all around for us to recognise, acknowledge and appreciate. He goes on to expound on his own insightful findings owing to being open to them along the way.

CG. Having a strong sense of design and the ability to put yourself out there, where do you see yourself in the next couple of years?

LA. Thank you. I am working hard to improve my skills, and to find some new ways to communicate. In the next couple of years, I’d like to see myself as a trusted freelancer; one who gets the opportunity to work with very cool people around the globe.

Editorial illustration commissioned by RCS for Mediapower Linc Magazine.

CG. How is your approach different from others around you? What is the inspiration for the same?

LA. I do not know if my approach is different or not, but I personally think it is not. The chosen approach depends on the project at hand i.e. what is required and apt for it so that it comes into effect in the best way possible. Usually, though, I like to make use of expressive characters and even play with a lot of colours. My inspiration comes in different forms and mediums; they could be in the form of illustrated books, graphic design projects or animated movies as well. I’m always inspired by the thousands of talented people around me.

CG. How do you narrow down to a specific element and work on making it more important? How does your core thought (the subject of your work, or the way it is executed) make its way from sketches to the final render?

LA. Usually, the final illustrations are really similar to my sketches; more like an extension of the sketches. It’s a little different when I sketch for storyboards; in this case, it’s more important for me to focus on actions instead of the design by itself.

Loris F. Alessandria - Inspiration
Editorial illustration for Sport Magazine, UK.

CG. Your illustrations seem to be woven around a lot of colours; a relatable character and, essentially, human-based themes. How do you manage to tell this story in a stationary frame?

LA. Well, that’s the hardest part of our job. I try to give personality and temperamental qualities to my characters. Likewise, I also make an effort to create a good environment that stays in sync with the characters, so that the two elements gel well with one another and produce an impactful effect, in turn. The focus of attention is laid upon the action or the message that the illustration is intended to convey to or bring about in the audience

Beedrill is the whacky, fun-looking Pokèmon for The Pokèdex Project.

CG. Do you consider technology a big part of art today, and its impact on constantly changing trends? What inspires your work and keeps you updated on modern techniques and styles?

LA. I think technology is a big player in today’s times and era, whether it is in the form of the wide and diverse range of tools one has at disposal, or of the innovative ways you can stay connected with other creatives. I usually use Tumblr and Instagram to find inspirational things, and they also prove to be helpful mediums to keep updated every day.

CG. We live in a multi-media world where people want fast information and fast response rates. How has this turned creative business trends into essentials?

LA. Everything is fast. The world of communication, too, is affected by this rhythm. Most of the times, my commissions have very tight timelines, and that can sadly cause some loss in terms of quality. Sometimes, using simple images is the best way; sometimes it’s not.

Loris F. Alessandria - Inspiration
Jacala. Is a white monkey in a contrastingly colourful and mystical jungle. Made as a personal project in 2016.
client

Published in Issue 37

The issue includes interactions with Preeti Vyas from VGC on ‘How to pitch for clients or retain the existing one’ and Ashish Deshpande from Elephant on ‘Challenges of working with a startup’, along with some best freelancers like Archan Nair, Shreya Shetty and Paul Sandip, sharing their knowledge of working with various clients. Also, Sachin Puthran from Thatzit.com gave a 10-point no-nonsense guide for studios to handle their finances. A must read, if you are planning for the financial year ahead or worried about your handling your money matter, this issue can give you much-needed insight and guide you to a better financial health of your business or freelancing. 

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As the digital world has made the world smaller, design has coalesced as well where different forms are uniting and new evolutions are seen. Illustration ‘Type’ is one such avenue of type design which can add more meaning to characters and words. Visual Communication Designer, Shaivalini Kumar throws some light on the key points to be kept in mind while venturing down this path.

Design is like a chemical reaction.

We’ve studied it in science how some reactions slowly yield products. That’s exactly how design works as well. It all starts with the hint of talent that predisposes one towards the creative side of the world, just like potential energy which when comes in contact with culture, people, books, dialect, surroundings and food explodes to yield a great product – a designer! Inspirations that cradle us from childhood combine and release themselves through creative energy which manifests in various forms. It’s all about finding magic in the mundane to create extraordinary designs.

cover
Design for Education.
Design for Education.
cover
Inner Spread
Inner Spread

It’s all about reading the letters!

Typography is a challenging area of design where one is limited with a form that is already defined; an ‘a’ has to look like an ‘a’ in order that people read it as ‘a’. This is where “illustrated type” has been a saviour for many designers who are inspired by the possibilities that typography has to offer. Combining illustration and graphic design, this mode of design allow designers to bridge their two areas of interest. In order to redefine a form that is already defined, it’s important to re-look at it often with a theme or a storytelling perspective. This is where a simplistic base structure is crafted and then modified by either constructing on top of them, modifying them, detailing them and giving them depth, all in a way so that each letter has its own story to tell.

Publication Design
Publication Design

It’s also a lot of hard work behind the scenes.

If you’re a digital artist, as most designers are in today’s world, it’s really important to be well informed with technological updates that can help enhance the design process. For those who are on the move a lot, working to make quick sketches using the Adobe Photoshop Sketch App on the iPad is a great way to utilise technology. One can then render the artwork on the laptop. Think of it as a scribble made digitally! While creating artwork, it’s also important to research extensively about the technicalities of design as well as what is trending. The last thing you want is to create something that could have turned out better. Read about artists as well, follow blogs, create a blog, share stories and most of all, collaborate and be an active member of a prolific design community in order to stay abreast with all the latest.

Illustrated type

Judge a book by its cover!

It’s popularly said that never judge a book by its cover. However, interesting illustrations and design is changing this belief. When a designer designs a book cover, their aim is to not only showcase the content of the book, but to also create a personality for the cover which is emotive and inviting. This vision enables the audience to engage with it on various levels. Think of it like packaging design and how critical that is for brands. In order to help make covers relevant and appealing, graphically illustrated typography and elements can be used that are designed to have a personality that suits the subject. In other words, make the matter the hero.

Hero Hoodies Identity Design
Hero Hoodies Identity Design

Published in Issue 30

Since stone age when individuals were identified with certain marks, branding has always been an integral part of our life. It has evolved so much that now every success can be connected to branding behind it, but still brand creation has always been a mystery. We interviewed the branding experts, who are behind some of the very successful brands. Lopez Design, have shared the story behind the recently developed branding of ‘Bihar Museum‘ and also shared the basics of brand creation in the ‘Gyaan’ section. Young visual communication designer like Shaivalini Kumar shared her love for the letter design while experienced graphic designer Anup Shah dwelled upon his passion for calligraphy. In brief, this issue is packed with branding and typography design experts who can help you solve the mystery of the brand creation! Hope you will enjoy the articles!

 

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