1

ad here

Vivek Mandrekar takes us through his journey of illustrating digital movie posters effectively. In the process, he also shares his own illustrating journey and insights gained behind the reel.

Posters by Vivek Mandrekar

CG. What’s the story behind choosing movies specifically as your avenue?

Vivek: First and foremost, it was an obsession with watching all kinds of movies that led me to see movie posters on a theatre lobby, lamppost, street-side wall, video store, newspaper or in a film journal. The artwork on them, especially the Hollywood ones, intrigued me. It gave an essence of what the movie would be before watching it. Then recreating and drawing the visual from posters became an interest. Be it Shah Rukh Khan from “Baazigar,” Jim Carrey from “The Mask,” Arnold Schwarzenegger, Sylvester Stallone from any of their movies or even a “Jurassic Park” logo. I did not know, however, this interest would lead me to become a full-time movie poster artist. So, yes, life has been kind.

Posters by Vivek Mandrekar

CG. As a digital artist in this genre, how do you perceive the film poster painters and process of the previous era and, thus also, how are client expectations different today from then?

Vivek: Huge Respect! To all the veteran poster artists of that era. I was privileged enough to meet and learn from them. God bless them all. The process is the same till now. The only things which have changed are the medium, technology, time, involvement of more minds and interference. Those days, a poster artist was given creative freedom. These days, everyone knows everything except the artist working on it. But I can’t help it, so I’m going with the flow and doing my best job around it for a living.

CG. How did your design journey start and how did you carry it forward through any related education, learning processes, practice and experiences?

Vivek: It started with my father, Late Shri. Arvind Mandrekar, who was a fine artist and illustrator for Amar Chitra Katha. So my upbringing in art and inspirations were from him and also my drawing teachers, Beena Godambe miss and Rajesh Rumade sir, who guided me in my school days. Presently, I have been learning under the guidance of a well known fine artist and teacher, Shri. Suresh Bhosale sir. Post the 90’s a digital era in designing started, of which movie posters were part. It had everything from a Title Design, Image Manipulation to Colour Grading done digitally.

Posters by Vivek Mandrekar

Somewhere, the childhood interest in movie posters created a curiosity that pushed me to learn the tools of the trade. But, in those days, there was limited access to tutorials, the internet and online courses. Thankfully, a god-sent friend of mine, Dinesh Narayanan, a master digital artist in entertainment art, gave me advanced training in Adobe Photoshop, which was the tool for creating movie posters. But, afterwards, due to personal circumstances, I could not afford to join art school or take formal education in it. I started working at an early age in the movie poster industry, which wasn’t easy at the beginning. I did odd jobs for survival. Humiliation; insults from senior artists in the field; failure and rejections came with it. But if I look back on these now, there was a silver lining. These experiences have been my education and learnings which led me to follow my dream.

CG. What’s your progression of taking artwork from understanding the brief to executing the final result?

Vivek: It starts with the reading of a script. Then, grounded on that, concept sketches and mood boards are created with various options. After approval and revisions, a photoshoot is directed based on the concept sketches. Post the photoshoot, the actual magic starts, where the final execution of the poster starts shaping up.

Posters by Vivek Mandrekar

CG. Which films or related works would you consider your best and could you please elaborate on the process they involved?

Vivek: Not yet. Long way to go! The journey has just started. But what gave me recognition and a foothold in the industry was my work on the movie, “Thugs of Hindostan.” Especially the illustrated Imax poster, which got me appreciation from my inspiration and legendary movie poster artist, Paul Shipper sir. What more could I ask!

CG. What features or nuances do you need to pay attention to in your artwork so as to engage today’s audience?

Vivek: Aesthetics, balance, composition, typography, mood and, above all, storytelling are the required features for any movie poster. Movie posters have the power to hold viewers’ attention and tell a story within seconds. Condensing a 2-3 hour movie in a single image is not as easy as it seems.

CG. Can you name some of the artists and illustrators who inspire you and what about their works draws your attention?

Vivek: There are so many in various art forms but some of them I look up to and still learn from in poster art are Diwakar Karkare, Eswar, Yashwant Parab, Drew Struzan, Paul Shipper, Steven Chorney, Bob Peak, Bill Gold, John Alvin, James Goodridge, Mark Westermoe, Rory Kurtz, Steeve Reeves, Akiko Stehrenberger and some of my contemporaries, Raj Khatri, Tuney John, Vinci Raj.

Photographers like Abhitabh Kame, Gautam Rajadhyaksha, Rico Torres. Typography artists such as Kamal Shedge, Jignesh Pancholi, Sandeep Bobade, Thom Schillinger. Illustrators include Bal Thackeray, Vikas Sabnis, Raj Thackeray, Pundalik Vaze, C.M. Vitankar, Deelip Khomane, Mort Drucker, Norman Rockwell, Frank McCarthy, Sam Spratt, Jason Seiler.

Posters by Vivek Mandrekar

CG. What kind of projects interest you and is there any particular kind of work you are looking for?

Vivek: Every kind of project interests me as long as there is creative freedom. Currently, I am more inclined towards doing illustration-based movie posters.

CG. Do you have any other areas of interest as an illustrator and artist?

Vivek: I have been experimenting, learning and achieving traditional medium techniques in my digital paintings, which has given me a different avenue to explore – the other side of my interest and calling, apart from movie poster art. Thanks to the arrival of Wacom Tablet and Balaji Waghmare, an artist and friend who taught me to use it. Also, Sheridan J, whose tutorials helped me learn digital painting art.

CG. What do you think the future holds for poster designing?

Vivek: In the past ten years, poster designing got much more attention, thanks to the exposure on social media platforms. But on the other hand, due to the dying print culture, consumption has shifted to digital thumbnails and video content. Agencies and artists are now just a small part of this industry. Hence, evolving and adapting according to the trends are the only ways to reach success.

Posters by Vivek Mandrekar

CG. What skills do you think the upcoming poster designers need to have in order to be in tune with these anticipated changes in the field and how can filmmakers contribute to taking the art genre in a better direction?

Vivek: Patience, observation, being honest with your work, and constantly learning are the only skills required, rest follows. Don’t get attracted to the glamorous side of the industry. Be focused and dedicated to your craft! Everything will arrive at the right time.

 

Filmmakers can contribute by being more respectful towards the art of poster designing and help it become an asset.

Vivek_Feature - Amitabh Bachchan
CURRENT ISSUE

 

ad here

In a world where technology is emerging as the winner, Aditi Dash, a young visual artist, takes on a massive challenge to create organised designs where concepts and innovative ideas are the first thing that meet the eye. The cheerful colours, the organised layout, all variables merge together to only highlight the fact that software is simply a tool of the trade and is dictated by the designer.

Aditi Dash tells us more about how she tames technology to create memorable designs.

Taming Technology to Create Memorable Designs by Aditi Dash - Creative Gaga

Never Dwell in a Comfort Zone and Work within Boundaries

Design should be functional while having visual appeal. And that’s why it’s important that a designer’s design sensibilities seem organized. The messaging in an artwork needs to be easy to grasp and understand, otherwise one loses interest. Designers can most definitely incorporate elements that inspire them like organized, and that does not mean it becomes their style. A designer must be able to continually challenge abilities and traverse through the vast possibilities this field of expression has to offer.

Mutton Munch - Taming Technology to Create Memorable Designs - Creative Gaga

Read about Graphic Designing in Designing with Clarity of Purpose


Mediums Change and so do Techniques

Print design is gradually losing traction and digital seems to be the new platform where designer chose to master their work. Although digital platforms miss out on the tangible appeal of print media, it is more versatile and can be explored as an experimental medium. Designing for a digital space has a whole universe of RGB colours at one’s disposal and requires being pixel perfect. Print on the other hand requires a good understanding of all the materials involved, like the kind of paper, inks, printing techniques etc.

Technology is Simply Tools of the Trade

Technology is not a choice in today’s world, and it’s something that design is incomplete without in most cases. And that is the challenge.

Magazine - Taming Technology to Create Memorable Designs - Creative Gaga

Anybody can learn how to use software and start designing but that’s not the point. It’s important to understand that we are the masters and not these tools. And hence a design sense and prowess is what one must work on before anything else. As a creative thinker, it’s important to make technology work as a catalyst for innovative ideas and concepts that should emerge as the hero of a design.

Mutton Munch -Taming Technology to Create Memorable Designs - Creative Gaga

Approach Challenges with Confidence

The goal of every design should be to serve a purpose and contribute to society. Once you plunge into the world of design, challenges will be thrown your way and the trick to overcome them is to face them with confidence, even if your mind is thinking twice. This attitude means half the battle won. There is no fear in design, because no one loses; there is nothing to lose. All there is to gain. Gain inspiration, knowledge and skill.

Jazila - Taming Technology to Create Memorable Designs - Creative Gaga
Nocturnal - Taming Technology to Create Memorable Designs - Creative Gaga

Published in Issue 29

As the growth of a tree can be determined by the strength of its roots, in the same way, we can try to presume the growth of design by the quality of fresh talent. So we dedicated this issue to all the Design Graduates of 2015. It includes all the young talent from last year graduates to recent graduates and students who will be graduating in the next few years. We also tried to understand the impact of digital medium on our design education. We have featured design graduates from varied fields of design from most of the top colleges and institutes.

 

Order Your Copy!
CURRENT ISSUE

 

ad here

The founder of ICD, Itu Chaudhuri, lets out his experience and insight in the field of branding. He expresses what goes into creating effective brands, and the various aspects or elements that play a role in the process.

Brand Identity for Taggd

CG. What is the relationship between the product and the branding? How does the former shape or inspire the latter?

ICD. For some brands, the product’s properties are the heart of the brand. For example, we know Mercedes by their cars, which are a model of stability and Germanic engineered perfection; not by their advertising or showrooms or their F1 Cars (which they do very well). For those brands, branding needs to reflect what’s special about the product, but rarely reflects the product itself. The ‘what’s special’ part, in turn, depends on the category. For more functional products, it’s about a clear benefit from using it (e.g. relieving pain).

Brand identity for thebo

For less functional brands, the benefit may be more in the mind i.e. how it makes people feel, or its ‘values’ (what it encourages its customers to believe in). This is also true for brands, which we know by their advertising more than by the special qualities of the product (e.g. a mobile service like Vodafone or Airtel). But, rarely does the branding show the product itself. If the product is a packaged product that’s never unpacked (think deodorants, or insect repellents, or a fizzy drink), then the branding and the product are practically fused (even when large advertising budgets support the brands).

Branding
Branding
Branding
Eicher Live.

CG. According to you, How and to what extent, does branding impact an audience?

ICD. Every customer knows that they are being manipulated. So, branding works best when it slips under the radar of the customers or escapes their ‘crap detector’. Yet, if the brand seems to admit this while managing to charm the customers, it works. The audience is then willingly helpless to resist. This means that the branding is, in some sense, invisible when it appears to belong or be inevitable as if there was no other way it could have appeared. This requires honesty on the owner’s part and linking the brand to what is true. Despite this, it’s carefully orchestrated. Simply appearing artless won’t do it. Done right, it can succeed in disarming the customer.

Branding
The Almirah.

Branding
The Almirah.

CG. What do you do to ensure that the brand character comes across fully in the final design?

ICD. Personality is the key, and thus cannot be overlooked or sidelined at any stage. It’s a mental model of the brand that describes the brand’s character and attitude, more like a representative, and thus implies its appearance.

Branding
The Wild Stone Code Range.
Brand applications for ‘Hired’.

CG. What do you feel should be proportion, or how much is the need for balance, between minimalism and complexities in a design?

ICD. The point isn’t a balance: it’s more a purposeful imbalance. Different brands need different treatments, so that one may do best in a minimal style, and another with a busy, or even chaotic style. This is a necessary facet that one needs to recognise and remember throughout the process.

Annual Report Design for IDFC.
Branding

CG. What do you feel is an essential part of branding?

ICD. Deep understanding of the client’s truth is fundamental and most essential, but making sure that it’s attractive to their customers is of value, at the same time. If you succeed on the first count and fail on the second, you touch no one. The other way around and the attraction will be skin deep. It very clearly is a case of both or nothing.

Branding
Publication design for Breakthrough.
Branding
The Real Tea Range.

Published in Issue 38

This issue, we try to explore different views from many well-known studio owners and senior designers. While Anthony Lopez of Lopez Design shared tips on what a studio looks for in a designer, Mohar Ray from Codesign highlights the key aspects that play a significant role and make the difference in whether you are hired or not as a promising designer. Also, this issue has an insightful article on ‘Branding with reason and love’ from Itu Chaudhuri, founder ICD (Itu Chaudhuri Design) along with Siddhi Ranade, explaining his tools of story telling through his unique style of illustrations. This issue is a must read for a talented graduate to a branding expert. Order you copy and enjoy reading it!

 

Order Your Copy!
CURRENT ISSUE

 

ad here

We go through many interesting design projects each day and find them inspiring enough to be shared further. Projects which have the potential to inspire and spark multiple ideas. So, here are few selected one for this week’s poster design inspiration, enjoy!

Posters Design by Syddharth Mate

Inspiration
Inspiration-13-Xavier-Esclusa-Trias-RetroBrands-13
Inspiration

Poster Collection for Retro Brands by Xavier Esclusa Trias

Indian digital Artists

Posters for Bollywood movies by Raj Khatri

Inspiration

Branding & Posters for George Brown College by Underline Studio

Poster Design for Designit by Supernova Design

GIG Posters by Posters BluMoo

Inspiration
Inspiration
Inspiration
Minimalist posters by Vinay Gowtham M

Google Fonts Posters by Abhishek Garg

Motion Posters by Kickin

Posters by Jeremy Rieger

Posters by Shiva Nallaperumal

If you have designed posters or someone else’s, which is equally inspiring for fellow creatives, then share it with us on contribute@creativegaga.com

CURRENT ISSUE

 

How do we involve a viewer into our art illustrations?

 

Ishan Trivedi, through his illustrative story of 3 live puppets, uses a surreal tone to captivate his viewers. The vibrant colours help make the characters and the environment pop. The soft textures and the blurred edges make it all seem so dreamy. The detail in the character emotions and layers too cannot be missed.

 

Connect Here

 

Ad Here

Veteran Illustrator and designer, Anant Kulkarni, takes us through a visual journey by illustrating and explaining how imagery is a powerful tool of communication. He describes how one can keep an audience intact and engaged through the still medium.

Visual Communication - AnantKulkarni
Ganesha Design 4
Visual Communication - AnantKulkarni
Person
Visual Communication - AnantKulkarni
Bird Typo
Visual Communication - AnantKulkarni
Symmetrical Graphic design

CG. What is the main intention or idea you desire to achieve through your work?

AK. It is my responsibility to get as close as possible to the audience, communicating through visuals. So, I always keep myself engaged in creating visuals that are a part of my study, besides assignments. This practice really helps every creative person, whether a student or professional. I try to express my views through every picture, conveying the same message through different visual solutions and like to keep my audience engaged in the visuals, maintaining their curiosity. As every artist has his/her own way to express, in my case it is visuals, and visuals only. I look up to each day as a new challenge and start thinking of something new!

Visual Communication - AnantKulkarni
Ganesha Graphic Design 2
Visual Communication - AnantKulkarni
Icons
Visual Communication - AnantKulkarni
All About by Anant Kulkarni
Visual Communication - AnantKulkarni
Art Prints

CG. What role do aspects like geometry and symmetry play in your visual works?

AK. I’m always searching for new things to execute through visual forms. Geometrical design patterns are a part of my study – a technique developed over years of consistent practice. Though I don’t know much about technical geometry, except the basic shapes such as circles, squares, triangles, hexagons, lines etc. provoke me to explore them in all possible combinations. I started creating very simple forms, and it became a habit while trying to convert objects into forms, using geometrical shapes. Symmetry and asymmetry are principles of design, but I ignore these terminologies while working, as they may disturb my visual thought.

Visual Communication - AnantKulkarni
Food Typo
Visual Communication - AnantKulkarni
Visual Communication - AnantKulkarni
Icons
Visual Communication - AnantKulkarni
Visual Language.
Visual Communication - AnantKulkarni
Ganesha Graphic Design

CG. How do you choose your colours and apply them to be balanced across geometric patterns?

AK. Visual concepts and drafting are very important; colours come later. The use of colour has its own purpose, and it depends on various factors. Of course, it is a choice of the artist, as to which colours to choose as per the concept. If you observe, a lot of famous artists can be identified through their colour palette. The use of colours helps to enhance the beauty of your visuals. Some artists use and apply particular colours to convey messages and create moods. I try to keep my designs bright, eye-catching and more attractive, but I give maximum attention to the visual form. The only care I take while using colour is to not disturb the image.

Visual Communication - AnantKulkarni
City Life
Visual Communication - AnantKulkarni
Parrots
Visual Communication - AnantKulkarni
Scary Sketchbook
Visual Communication - AnantKulkarni
Ganesha Graphic Design 3
Visual Communication - AnantKulkarni
Bird Typo 2

CG. What, and how much, does proportion contribute to what you wish to execute?

AK. Proportions, in my illustration and compositions, play a vital role. They are a part of design principles, too. When I plan composition, I always think of it as a sequence – “What is going to be seen first? ‘What has more emphasis?’ I then think of other related visuals that would keep the audience engaged through the entire picture. Harmony, movement, and size of the forms are other important aspects of design.

Visual Communication - AnantKulkarni
Mug Design Applications
Visual Communication - AnantKulkarni
Crockery Design Applications
Visual Communication - AnantKulkarni
Tag Design Applications
Visual Communication - AnantKulkarni
T-shirt Design Applications
Visual Communication - AnantKulkarni
Coasters

CG. How necessary is the white of the background in your illustrations?

AK. It is very important. Positive and negative spaces are the two main important aspects of every composition. This helps you enhance and beautify your image. Leaving white spaces in design, or any picture or composition gives relief to the viewer to grasp the image very easily. White spaces help a lot in finding out the subject in a clear manner, even in text, if you have proper spacing; it helps in reading more comfortably. In the end, it provides the all-important visual comfort.

Visual Communication - AnantKulkarni
Pencil Typo
Visual Communication - AnantKulkarni
Bags
CURRENT ISSUE

 

Cover Designed for Issue 39

As the festivity is all around, every brand or business is trying to impress the Indian audience. But what really works for us Indians? What is an Indian design? And how we can make designs for India? To understand it, we interviewed some Indian creatives who are successfully creating designs for the Indian audience. This issue of Creative Gaga is a light read for someone looking for inspirations or insights on Indian design and how the Indian audience can be enticed. So go ahead and order your copy or subscribe if you want to keep receiving a regular dose inspirations!

 

Order Your Copy!

ad here

Colours can paint a good picture or spoil it altogether, literally. Graphic Designer, Meroo Seth, speaks about and elaborates upon her approach towards finding the essential colour combination in sync with the remaining elements of her work.

Meroo Seth
Get Grubs Takeaway Bags.
Meroo Seth
Get Grubs Packaging Design.
Meroo Seth
Get Grubs Stationary design.

To connect is the calling.

Design plays a huge role in Meroo’s life; it’s a voice through which she finds expression. It not only makes her look at things differently but also manages to play with her opinions. Communicating complicated ideas simply; connecting with people, and making the world a beautiful place through appealing visuals is what spurs her. No doubt, she takes to an approach of fun, curiosity, happiness, and playfulness when working on her illustrations. She’s more than happy if her work can bring about a sense of delight in people, making them feel something good while solving problems as well.

Meroo Seth

Finding your own palette.

Colour sense comes with experience and the trial-and-error of playing with different sets of colours. She has seen her own colour palettes changing and evolving with time. Conversations with friends and strangers; meeting new people, and being open to new experiences are like finding a new colour palette, to Meroo. The process of building an unusual bridge between different observations and associations triggers insights and inspiration within her. According to her, emotion is the most important factor to consider while creating balanced colour palettes. That is why she avoids overusing a colour, while, many-a-times, the colour itself inspires her to create the design.

Meroo Seth
Making salad together.

Creating the balance.

Colour is a powerful and important communication tool and is tied to religious, cultural, political and social influences. So, it’s not enough for a designer to use a colour merely because one likes it.

Meroo Seth
Alphabet G Mug.
Meroo Seth
Alphabet M Mug.

Colours communicate various meaning; even all colours combinations signify differently, evoking varied emotions and feelings when paired with another colour. So, she believes it’s very important that elements in the composition balance weight. For example, the thickness of a form, colour, texture and the kind of forms should also have a consistent style they follow. Sometimes, the form cannot say it all; the use and amount of colours then play an even more important role in communicating the idea.

Meroo Seth
Cavaya Fine Dine Menu.
Meroo Seth
Cavaya Fine Dine stationary.

Harmonising elements.

Meroo firmly trusts that everything and everyone supports and relies on one another and that it applies in the case of colours too. Each colour change relies on what the rest of the colours and elements are. The shades and tones can be played amongst each other to provide an appealing look while balancing the elements of the composition.

Meroo Seth
Food posters.
Meroo Seth
Eating Together.