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Ever thought of your imagination coming to life, just the way you pictured it? Pankaj Gole, a concept artist and a character designer show how this is possible.

Characters
The Creature
Characters
The Creature Scary sound
Characters
The Creature
Characters
The Creature

With the belief that artists are free-spirited souls and the urge of always growing and improving, Pankaj took up everything as a challenge that came his way and started freelancing for wall paintings, tattoos, caricatures, portraits and storyboard developments.

Characters
Moon Light Hut, Morning Meditation
Characters
Monster Home

Pankaj feels that art without thought is just a decoration. The possibility of giving life to ones’ thoughts and imagination through visual design, empowered Pankaj to become a concept artist and master the art of character design. Pankaj has had a chance of designing characters and mascots for branding, advertisement, board games, 2D animations, video games and books and is currently designing for kids’ games.

Characters
Everyday work sometimes irritates people, makes them look nervous or tense. Its like something is missing.
Characters
First Kiss

Let’s create a character!

Merging the clients’ brief and his own imagination of the brief, Pankaj starts by visualizing the character in terms of its form, costumes, emotions, personality, attitude, gestures, age, expressions and background. This is followed by rough sketching and modifying it by varying the design styles. He gives importance to proportions as they help in creating visual interest among these imaginary beings. Target audience surely plays a significant role in character designing.

Characters
Smelly Cat
Characters
Smelly Cat Cuteness

Pankaj explains this process with an example of a character called ‘Creature’. Considering the target audience as kids and young people, he began personifying the character.

Characters
What if Obama could be this?
Characters
The Gladiator

The Creature is an active and healthy female living in a jungle. She is cute, innocent, emotional and scary looking with cute and expressive rounded blue eyes. The idea was to fuse all the forest elements together and so creature has the body like a turtle, face like a horse & horns resembling tree branches. It was a challenge to make creatures’ character look scary, cute, emotional and innocent all at the same time.

Characters
The Warrior
Characters
Concept Art

To create the storyline, he does about 6-8 rough sketches per frame to get an idea about the desired environment, composed of characters in different angles and actions and also other supporting elements. He then settles for one sketch, deciding upon the colour scheme, colouring style and lighting source which helps him render the three-dimensional character, keeping in mind the feel of the story.

Characters
Merry Christmas
Characters
Digital Portrait

Style develops knowledge and knowledge creates a style!

The challenge of coming up with different styles can be overcome by always being on the lookout for new things, ideas and concepts and being curious and experimental to achieve something different and unique. Designing the basic shape keeping in mind the characters proportion, structure, body shape gestures and simplicity makes all the difference. Being true to himself and his profession, Pankaj always creates new characters and never reuses the old ones.

Characters
Rat
Characters
Rhino

To create his style, Pankaj starts out with the traditional method of pencil sketching as it gives him the freedom of playing with lines, rhythms and basic shapes and then modifies it with the digital mediums as it gives the freedom and possibility to create unbelievable art!

Characters
Childhood Dreams
Characters
Caricature of Baba Ramdev

Keep pushing forward, the time and efforts put in will lead to success!

Pankaj encourages young enthusiasts to believe in the beauty that lies within and not to compare oneself with others as every artists’ style is unique and different! Being passionate definitely opens up doors and luck syncs’ in automatically.

Characters
Chinese Street Food Seller Making Process
Characters
Chinese Street Food Seller Table Service
Issue 42

Published in Issue 42

Every designer wish to be independent and willing to jump into the word of freelance but most of them unaware of the fundamental challenges of the initial phase. So, we dedicated this issue to freelancers and interviewed some established and talented designers to dig deep for the expert advice. Kevin Roodhorst on the other hand, an experienced freelancer from Amsterdam, has recently shifted to be a full-timer with an Agency says “Freelancing is not all roses!” and shared the best way to survive as a freelancer! So, whether you are a freelancer or planning to be one, this issue is a must-read. Go ahead and order your copy here or subscribe to not miss any future issues!

 

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Every profession and field of work have certain tips that one must know before jumping into it. Lavanya Naidu, a freelancer, illustrator and animator shares some of the tips, especially to manage finances, she has followed.

Freelancer
Dino Buddies

Before I started off as a freelancer, I had spoken to seniors in my field and thus had a brief idea of what to expect. It motivated me to discipline myself from the beginning. When you don’t have a strict schedule and work from home, it can sometimes be hard to have a routine.

 

Some of the key points that I like to keep in mind when taking on a new project are:

Freelancer
Kittu's very mad day

Keeping Deadlines

Aside from the client deadline, I usually create a personal deadline, a couple of days before the expected delivery. This gives me a small window, in case there are unforeseen hurdles during the project timeline.

Freelancer
Kittu's very mad day

Clear Communication

At the start, before taking on an assignment, I prefer putting everything on the table with my client; when to expect drafts leading up to the final files, fixing the budget, making sure to mention when I might be taking time off, and assuring completion in good time. Clear communication keeps everyone on the same page and helps avoid misunderstandings

Freelancer
Kittu's very mad day

Inspiring Work

I try to take on work that helps me grow and challenges me. As the years have gone by, I have become more selective about what I like to take on, but I am always up for trying something new! I find that I can be true to my work when it is something I can connect with.

Freelancer
Dino Buddies

A Clear System of Payments

Although hard, it is important to be able to assess your skill level, the scale of the project, due to deadlines and quote a budget accordingly. It is equally important to set up a clear system of payments, create necessary invoices, and maybe even think about setting up an advanced payment before you begin work, and/or signing of a contract, when you can. I have been lucky to have had clients who have been very good to me but to avoid miscommunication at a later stage as well as to save precious time on both sides, it might be worth planning ahead.

Freelancer

I have found in my personal experience, that having these little details worked out, allows me to fully immerse myself in the creative process.

Since most of us freelancers work project to project, giving a thought about savings or investing money when you can might be useful, even if in small amounts. I find that it gives you a sense of security and also helps out on a rainy day.

Freelancer
A Butterfly Smile

There are some of the things that have worked for me over the years, but everyone has their own formula that works for them. Putting all of the nitty-gritty aside, we are lucky to be doing what we really love to do, that’s half the job done already!

Freelancer
A Butterfly Smile
Issue 42

Published in Issue 42

Every designer wish to be independent and willing to jump into the word of freelance but most of them unaware of the fundamental challenges of the initial phase. So, we dedicated this issue to freelancers and interviewed some established and talented designers to dig deep for the expert advice. Kevin Roodhorst on the other hand, an experienced freelancer from Amsterdam, has recently shifted to be a full-timer with an Agency says “Freelancing is not all roses!” and shared the best way to survive as a freelancer! So, whether you are a freelancer or planning to be one, this issue is a must-read. Go ahead and order your copy here or subscribe to not miss any future issues!

 

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Character designer, illustrator and storyboard artist, Ritaban Das, takes s through his own style of telling stories through illustrations in a single frame style of designing. He introduces his perspective that guides his ideas and also shares his process.

Single Frame
Sketching with friends. Personal work showing aliens as company while sketching.
Single Frame
Team Dank. Personal work depicting a rather artistic team spirit.
Single Frame
Together. Just a piece of commissioned work for my friend, depicting the funny side of companionship.

CG. What are the particular advantages and challenges of telling stories in a single frame?

Ritaban. Illustration or design is a visual communication medium. It is important to challenge yourself with a different perspective, scale and how your subjects interact with one another. When sketching, I produce numerous roughs or loose drawings which later make into more developed sketches. I then decide on a final composition. The most critical element is really an activity of the subject. The figure is usually doing something and caught before it happens or just after. The other elements are supporting artefacts. Whatever I draw, I think of it as a clue or a breadcrumb that helps understand the complete story and message. It’s up to the reader to put it all together and solve the riddle

Single Frame
Indian Warrior. For a monthly Facebook character design challenge. The topic was "Warrior".
Single Frame
Clown. Personal work, inspired by Eli Roth's film of same name.
Single Frame
Two Detectives cover artwork. For the unfinished graphic novel I was working upon with my brother.

CG. What are the essential designing tools and software you use for such an approach and how do you decide on what kind of a role they play in your work?

Ritaban. I usually make the design part in Photoshop, from scratch to end, and I work in Storyboard pro for storyboard. Tools can make your work easy or even open the avenues to do it faster, but it’s based on how good your design sense, storytelling abilities and drawings are. These are the most basic fundamentals to create anything.

Merry Christmas. Old commissioned work created during the Christmas season.
Two Detectives. A promotional poster for the unfinished graphic novel I was creating with my brother.
Single Frame
YUWA. For Art Exhibition last year, collaborating with the NGO Yuwa that empowers young girls,.

CG. What aspects do you particularly give attention to in your work to ensure effective communication through your illustrations?

Ritaban. I start by trying to understand the character, his/her background, history as well as his/her place in the story. Research helps at this stage since it’s so important to understand the world you’re creating before jumping into it Next, I’ll do a series of drawings where I figure out the characters shapes and attitude; I try to just draw the first thing that comes to mind, knowing that I’ll be changing it later. All the while, I’m searching for a new or interesting take on the character. After I’ve done a few rough thumbnails, I decide on the one that has the most appealing silhouette, shape proportions and that best describes the character. I then start to flesh out the character and begin to add details, keeping in mind any specific traits described in the script or story.

Single Frame
A promotional fan poster for the most anticipated boxing match in the history between McGregor and Mayweather.
Single Frame
Odd Socialites # 1. The first installment of a small comic strip project with my writer friend.
Single Frame
Red Necks. Personal work showing the not so friendly folk in town.

CG. How do you describe your process and goal of designing?

Ritaban. Being a Character Designer and Illustrator, most of my work is very much character driven, blended with humour and very graphical too. I always try to convey some sort of stories through each and every character or Illustration I make I like to play with various shapes and silhouettes and usually keep things simple. The character design process is, in a way, a combination of different things. I ask myself ‘Who am I drawing?’ What is his/her personality?’ I look at the work of influential artist sometimes to get some ideas or even start from a drawing I like and translate it into my style. Then, trying to forget those influences, I often start from scratch with a basic shape such as the face as it determines the rest of the character for me, then the body (this can be a circle, oval or even a pear shape – it all depends on the personality of the character I want to draw)

Single Frame
Battle of the Beasts. UFC 223 fan poster for the main fight between Ferguson and Khabib.
Single Frame
Inked! Personal work depicting a tattoo artist working his craft on the devil.
Issue-42-Cover

Published in Issue 42

Every designer wish to be independent and willing to jump into the word of freelance but most of them unaware of the fundamental challenges of the initial phase. So, we dedicated this issue to freelancers and interviewed some established and talented designers to dig deep for the expert advice. Kevin Roodhorst on the other hand, an experienced freelancer from Amsterdam, has recently shifted to be a full-timer with an Agency says “Freelancing is not all roses!” and shared the best way to survive as a freelancer! So, whether you are a freelancer or planning to be one, this issue is a must-read. Go ahead and order your copy here or subscribe to not miss any future issues!

 

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Reaching out to the Indian society for social issues is not everyone’s cup of tea. But some master this art and show us how this can be done by being bold yet sensitive. Browse through Geeta Parulekar’s work to get an idea!

social issues

With creativity running in her blood, Geeta always wanted to create something unique apart from the regular college assignments. This got her illustrating on social issues like rape, LGBT and racism to name a few, believing in the fact that this was the right way to present her thoughts to the public.

While researching on the social issue of the time, LGBT, Geeta came to the realisation that ‘Love has no gender’. Playing cards are something that is seen and used by everyone in our society. The face cards portray two same-gender beings on a single card and this became Geeta’s inspiration for her LGBT project illustrations.

Her style of illustrations is delicate and subtle, aimed at addressing extremely bold topics or social issues without hurting anyone. A fan of the vintage look and the Indian traditional miniature style of art, her artwork has a reflection of the same. To make LGBT more acceptable in the society, Geeta not only restricted herself to creating illustrations for publications but also designed motifs for t-shirts and coasters to support the movement.

The LGBT project illustrates all the three sexual orientations on three types of playing cards i.e. gay, lesbians and heterosexuals. The fourth card reveals the message of the campaign – ‘Love has no gender’

Issue-42-Cover

Published in Issue 42

Every designer wish to be independent and willing to jump into the word of freelance but most of them unaware of the fundamental challenges of the initial phase. So, we dedicated this issue to freelancers and interviewed some established and talented designers to dig deep for the expert advice. Kevin Roodhorst on the other hand, an experienced freelancer from Amsterdam, has recently shifted to be a full-timer with an Agency says “Freelancing is not all roses!” and shared the best way to survive as a freelancer! So, whether you are a freelancer or planning to be one, this issue is a must-read. Go ahead and order your copy here or subscribe to not miss any future issues!

 

Order Your Copy!

Wondering about the pros and cons of working for a publication or a media-house? Get an insight of what it is like to work for a media-house from the first-hand experience of illustrator, Gajanan D. Nirphale.

Illustrating for a Publication
MILIND SOMAN
Illustrating for a Publication
JAMES BOND

Having had the opportunity of exercising his skills as a concept artist with Fabeliser in 2015, Gajanan says that illustration is not just his passion but is his love!

Illustrating for a Publication
SHAHID KAPOOR (PADMAVAT)
Illustrating for a Publication
RITEISH DESHMUKH

Bright prospects of exploring and honing illustration skills in various topics like crime, education, politics, etc, all at the same time, got Gajanan working for DNA And Zee Media. This also gives him a chance to experiment with different styles across a wide range of projects like building storyboards, character designing and portraits.

Illustrating for a Publication
NANA PATEKAR
Illustrating for a Publication
AMITABH BACHCHAN (AGNIPATH)

Talking about the motivational factors influencing the decision making to work for a particular publication or newspaper, Gajanan considers the range of exposure of project typology, the target audience of the company and the monetary rewards are the most important.

Illustrating for a Publication
BALASAHEB THACKRE

When Challenges Become Advantageous!

Working as an illustrator, innovation and time limit are the biggest challenges for Gajanan. Taking into account the newspaper media, the outputs have to be an immediate and witty creation in response to the latest that is happening in the country.

Illustrating for a Publication
NAWAZUDDIN SIDDIQUI

This wittiness needs to be accompanied by simplicity in understanding, so as to reach out to the broad audience in terms of age groups and intellect, all throughout the country. And this can be achieved by a simple exercise of observation, wherever one is. Mumbai locals work best for Gajanan!

Illustrating for a Publication
AMIR KHAN

This way, the challenges actually become the means for the illustrator to keep up with the ever-increasing competition and help keep the publication house at the top. It also helps the illustrators’ individual growth in terms of quick mind-visualisations and their digital execution, thus working as a tool for speed-efficiency and functioning as a confidence-booster!

Illustrating for a Publication
RAJSAHEB THACKRE

Inspirations are Wonders!

Speaking of inspirations, Gajanan follows a lot of senior illustrators and also feels that nature casts its own magical inspirational spell on him. To get the best out of him, Gajanan understands the required topic in depth from the reporter in-charge and then fuses his inspirations with the trending topic to create an illustration in tandem with the amalgamation. Whereas creating portraits completely depends upon the character and its background.

Illustrating for a Publication
M.S.DHONI

@Copyright, Not to Worry!

In today’s digital world of art and everything is so easily available and downloadable, the problem of copyright is a major concern for artists and their valuable work. A publication house has its own registered copyright and working with/for them provides the artist with the security of their individual work being used by others only with permission.

Illustrating for a Publication
LORD GANESHA

The Driving Force

Gajanan feels that professional security comes from within. The style is an individualised element: it eliminates the fear of someone copying it. The combination of passion and practice is strong enough to guarantee an artist the security needed. Passion urges a person to know more and be updated while practice makes a man perfect, as the famous saying goes. This combination along with a keen eye for observation and a challenging spirit to try new things is the success mantra for any artist!

Illustrating for a Publication
ALEXANDER GRAHAM BELL
Issue 42 cover

Published in Issue 42

Every designer wish to be independent and willing to jump into the word of freelance but most of them unaware of the fundamental challenges of the initial phase. So, we dedicated this issue to freelancers and interviewed some established and talented designers to dig deep for the expert advice. Kevin Roodhorst on the other hand, an experienced freelancer from Amsterdam, has recently shifted to be a full-timer with an Agency says “Freelancing is not all roses!” and shared the best way to survive as a freelancer! So, whether you are a freelancer or planning to be one, this issue is a must-read. Go ahead and order your copy here or subscribe to not miss any future issues!

 

Order Your Copy!

Illustrator, Parvati Pillai, tells us how trying out new styles and forms of illustration are key for a designer to grow at one’s craft and expand one’s scope of work in current context.

Illustration
Spain. Tried to capture the magic and the essence of some fascinating countries
Illustration
Print for Food Mat
Illustration
Kamaladevi 115th Birthday Doodle

Various Styles Takes Conscious Effort

The art style and colour palette are very important to Parvati in storytelling, especially if designing for a particular target audience in mind. She tries to use colours and intricate patterns to incorporate various illustration styles. Like most artists, she has a natural inclination to a particular colour and illustration style. As a result of such tendencies, it takes a lot of effort to move away from it and consciously make choices to choose something new and work on something out of the box.

Illustration
Poster. Designed for Spring Demoday at Medialab, Aalto University
Illustration
Designs created for a wide range of products in the Chumbak’s Gold Collection

This challenge is what makes illustrating through various styles exciting and motivating. Also, this way ensures that one keeps coming up with new stuff from time to time without getting entangled in the same kind of work. One can only unearth their potential by discovering new forms, mediums, styles and so on in the process of trying to create fresh designs or illustrative work.

Illustration
Egg Skillet. Sunny spring recipe for 36 Days of Food
Illustration
Flying Dreams. Collaboration with Taxi Fabric was celebrating the concept of Mumbai as India’s 'City of Dreams'
Illustration
Flying Dreams. Collaboration with Taxi Fabric was celebrating the concept of Mumbai as India’s 'City of Dreams'

It is a Lot Like Science

It is all about experimentation. Parvati constantly tries to explore new subjects and experiment with new techniques. She aims to keep herself motivated and to keep practising different illustration styles in her free time. Her MacBook Pro and Wacom graphics tablet are her apparatus in this process, thereby – the two things she cannot work without. Likewise, she also enjoys working with inks and clay while she is currently exploring knitting and embroidery. This serves as a strong and healthy way to work with different mediums and see the potential that lies in them.

Illustration
Dream Machine. Collaboration with Taxi Fabric, celebrating the concept of Mumbai as India’ 'City of Dreams'
Illustration
Dream Machine. Collaboration with Taxi Fabric, celebrating the concept of Mumbai as India’ 'City of Dreams'

Parvati spends a major portion of a project’s time on ideation and iteration. She likes to take her time with the composition of the illustration and carefully choose her colour palettes. She also tries to evoke feelings of joy and bring out the intricacies of everyday life in my work. For her, illustration is a form of reflection and is inspired from life.

Illustration
Print for Coaster. Design created for Chumbak's dinning range
Illustration
A social media Illustration for Chumbak, celebrating spirit of Onam with Chumbak

For Money, Planning Ahead Always Helps

It is important to always have enough savings for emergencies, feels Parvati, as they may arise at any point of time without any indication. Likewise, she always tries to take up some projects for paying clients so that she has sufficient money to explore her creative and artistic endeavours. For some people, this may be a compromise but it is essential to her so that she may be able to sustain her creativity. Each one has their own style and approach to doing things, and whatever works for one is what one must do as the same size does not really fit all. Finally, practice and hard work are the most important things.

Illustration
Lebanon. Celebrating the different cultures found around the world
Illustration
Moving to Helsinki. Personal Illustration capturing the magic of my first autumn

One must be tenacious and maintain a positive attitude. Even if luck does not favour, persistence can take one more than just quite far; it can make all the difference. Even luck favours those who are persistent in their journey and don’t back down in spite of any odds they might face along the way.

Illustration
Finland. Celebrating the different cultures found around the world
Illustration
Print for Food Mat. Design created for Chumbak's dinning range
Issue-42-Cover

Published in Issue 42

Every designer wish to be independent and willing to jump into the word of freelance but most of them unaware of the fundamental challenges of the initial phase. So, we dedicated this issue to freelancers and interviewed some established and talented designers to dig deep for the expert advice. Kevin Roodhorst an experienced freelancer from Amsterdam, has recently shifted to be a full-timer with an Agency says “Freelancing is not all roses!” and shared the best way to survive as a freelancer. So, whether you are a freelancer or planning to be one, this issue is a must-read. Go ahead and order your copy here or subscribe to not miss any future issues!

 

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Moksha Rao

Shooting Lego stop-motion videos with her brother and drawing comics with friends in school took Moksha Rao a long way to be currently studying animation at the School of Visual Arts in New York with a lot of opportunities all throughout her journey up-till now. She got commissioned for projects and also freelanced with Mon Ami Foundation, an NGO, illustrating their products for them.


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Every designer wish to be independent and willing to jump into the word of freelance but most of them unaware of the fundamental challenges of the initial phase. So, we dedicated this issue to freelancers and interviewed some established and talented designers to dig deep for the expert advice.While illustrator Ritban Das, Pankaj Gole and digital artist Gajanan D. Nirphale shared their experience and advantage they get to be a freelancer. Kevin Roodhorst on the other hand, an experienced freelancer from Amsterdam, has recently shifted to be a full-timer with an Agency says “Freelancing is not all roses!” and shared the best way to survive as a freelancer.</p> <p>Lavanya Naidu, another expert freelance illustrator & animator, shared more specific key points to grow as a freelancer and manage the most crucial factor, ‘finances’. She also advises to start investing little amounts and save for the rainy day!</p> <p>This issue is packed with everyone’s share of advise for a freelancer while keeping it open for you to play as per your own rules. So, whether you are a freelancer or planning to be one, this issue is a must-read. Go ahead and order your copy here or subscribe to not miss any future issues!

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Gaurav Srivastava

Driven by his passion since childhood to bring imagination to life, Gaurav Srivastava earned a diploma in art as a 3D-modeller from the Academy out to specialise and work as a 2D-concept artist for games and digital paintings.


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Every designer wish to be independent and willing to jump into the word of freelance but most of them unaware of the fundamental challenges of the initial phase. So, we dedicated this issue to freelancers and interviewed some established and talented designers to dig deep for the expert advice.While illustrator Ritban Das, Pankaj Gole and digital artist Gajanan D. Nirphale shared their experience and advantage they get to be a freelancer. Kevin Roodhorst on the other hand, an experienced freelancer from Amsterdam, has recently shifted to be a full-timer with an Agency says “Freelancing is not all roses!” and shared the best way to survive as a freelancer.</p> <p>Lavanya Naidu, another expert freelance illustrator & animator, shared more specific key points to grow as a freelancer and manage the most crucial factor, ‘finances’. She also advises to start investing little amounts and save for the rainy day!</p> <p>This issue is packed with everyone’s share of advise for a freelancer while keeping it open for you to play as per your own rules. So, whether you are a freelancer or planning to be one, this issue is a must-read. Go ahead and order your copy here or subscribe to not miss any future issues!

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Parvati Pillai

Discovered illustration in her 3rd year of Bachelor’s in Animation from Maeers MIT Design, Pune. Steadily working for Chumbak and Tinkle, Parvati Pillai later joined Aalto University, Finland, as a Master’s student, thereon illustrating for a wide range of publications and brands like Google and many others.


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Every designer wish to be independent and willing to jump into the word of freelance but most of them unaware of the fundamental challenges of the initial phase. So, we dedicated this issue to freelancers and interviewed some established and talented designers to dig deep for the expert advice.While illustrator Ritban Das, Pankaj Gole and digital artist Gajanan D. Nirphale shared their experience and advantage they get to be a freelancer. Kevin Roodhorst on the other hand, an experienced freelancer from Amsterdam, has recently shifted to be a full-timer with an Agency says “Freelancing is not all roses!” and shared the best way to survive as a freelancer.</p> <p>Lavanya Naidu, another expert freelance illustrator & animator, shared more specific key points to grow as a freelancer and manage the most crucial factor, ‘finances’. She also advises to start investing little amounts and save for the rainy day!</p> <p>This issue is packed with everyone’s share of advise for a freelancer while keeping it open for you to play as per your own rules. So, whether you are a freelancer or planning to be one, this issue is a must-read. Go ahead and order your copy here or subscribe to not miss any future issues!

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Gajanan D. Nirphale

Hailing from a simple, non-artistic family, participating in state-level drawing competitions and winning trophies worked wonders for Gajanan D. Nirphale. Inspired by his sister, who was pursuing an art teacher diploma, Gajanan followed the trail to become an illustrator and earned a degree in Applied Arts from Aurangabad.


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Every designer wish to be independent and willing to jump into the word of freelance but most of them unaware of the fundamental challenges of the initial phase. So, we dedicated this issue to freelancers and interviewed some established and talented designers to dig deep for the expert advice.While illustrator Ritban Das, Pankaj Gole and digital artist Gajanan D. Nirphale shared their experience and advantage they get to be a freelancer. Kevin Roodhorst on the other hand, an experienced freelancer from Amsterdam, has recently shifted to be a full-timer with an Agency says “Freelancing is not all roses!” and shared the best way to survive as a freelancer.</p> <p>Lavanya Naidu, another expert freelance illustrator & animator, shared more specific key points to grow as a freelancer and manage the most crucial factor, ‘finances’. She also advises to start investing little amounts and save for the rainy day!</p> <p>This issue is packed with everyone’s share of advise for a freelancer while keeping it open for you to play as per your own rules. So, whether you are a freelancer or planning to be one, this issue is a must-read. Go ahead and order your copy here or subscribe to not miss any future issues!

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