1

A visual artist in the form of a cartoonist and animator, Manoj Sinha shares his process and details of his work one bit at a time, in order to achieve the right balance across aspects such as the tone of colours, the shades of lighting.

Depth in Details.

Manoj Sinha likes to play with simple elements in a rather detailed and no-nonsense way to create a portrait that is very much life-like if not larger than life. He starts out with the basics and rough works, turning basic aspects of the persona more and more real with each step as he progress towards the final outcome. The result is a sharp artwork with lively qualities.

Step 1

Started with a simple, rough sketch. Since this involved a pretty basic shading-like technique in order to give the portrait an outline and overall context. This is good enough to start with and build upon.

Step 2

This step involved applying the base colours on the face alongside some light shading. The rest of the elements i.e. the hair, the dress and the earrings were kept the same as in the rough sketch that was the starting point.

Step 3

Further details were added to the lips and teeth. The smile brings out the core of the personality’s expression and so it was highlighted.

Step 4

Just one ear of the subject has been made visible in the portrait and so it was important to provide it the right amount of attention. So, more detailing was done on the ear.

Step 5

Dark textures and sharp lines were added around the eyes to give the persona a practical look. Similarly, the eyeballs were also given details highlighting the reflection of light in the eyes.

Step 6

Shadow of the hair falling over the right eye was done. Which enhanced the lighting effect that was given to the image in the previous steps, thus bringing about an actual feel of the subject by making the portrait more realistic.

Step 7

Details were added to the earrings, hair and face in the form of greater definition, colour and texturing.

Step 8

The final details to hair and skin colour were then added with fine lines and rough stroke smoothing. Reached the final desired result, bringing out the real personality of the subject.

Published in Issue 41

Every year brings many opportunities and hopes along with celebrations. For this issue, we reached many visual artists and designers to know their expectations from the year 2018. This issue’s cover designer, Shreya Gulati is exceptionally impressed by the advancement of technology in design, especially how VR & AR has impacted new ways of creating. Whereas Seerow Unni, a digital artist sees the simple and minimal design is here to stay for long. So, whether you have many or none expectations for the year, this issue is a must-read. Go ahead and order your copy here or subscribe to not miss any future issues!

 

Order Your Copy!
CURRENT ISSUE
Creative Gaga - Issue 48

 

Illustrator, Priyanka Karyekar, run us through the concept-based approach she takes to her work, and how that guides her process of designing her illustrations – right from observing to developing a strong concept, on until treatment and finally communicating effectively.

Concept
Lucky Friend
Concept
Fri-yay
Concept
Weekend Swag

No Substitute For A Concept.

One must rather believe in having a strong concept. Treatment can be varied – for example, the colours that are used across artworks can very well be inspired by the subjects and personalities of the concepts. One might want to focus more on the big idea rather than the treatments and beautifying the elements. If you have a strong idea in your hand, you will eventually find a way to make it look good. The need is to be more simple yet effective. Likewise, quirkiness need not and may not always a part of the illustrations.

Concept
What I Ate For Dinner
Concept
Black Chicken

There are certain subjects that may be serious, but you want to make it more fun to get the whole serious tone out – it entirely depends on what exactly you want to communicate. In the same way, do not really look to maintain symmetry and proportion in compositions, if that suits one’s temperament, style and approach. For example, in some of the illustrations, there is no symmetry that is trying to be achieved – it’s just the way of drawing;, not force-fitting any rules while one is drawing.

Concept
Work Life
Concept
Happy 9 Years
Concept
Chai Therapy

Treatment Varies From Subject To Subject.

It can be very simple and minimalistic, or it can have those tiny details that add value to your subject. Adding minor details are actually the observations that you are trying to put into your design, which is also a great way to make your design truly relevant. People, their stories, and events happening around are what mostly inspire any form of artwork, directly or indirectly. All one has to do is observe; that’s all it takes – a keen sense of observation. The stories that you are trying to communicate through visuals, one must recognise, the need of strong colour systems as well – colours that decide the mood of the illustration.

Concept
Batatyachi Chal
Concept
Batatyachi Chal
Concept

To Truly Evolve Our Craft Is The Way Forward.

If artists and designers of all forms focus on the 3H’s (Head, Heart and Hands), their work will positively impact and take forward the process and future results of the field – that would be true evolution. The ‘Head’ stands for the ideation. The ‘Heart’ is for being empathetic towards the people you are working for. Then, lastly, all you need is skilful ‘Hands’ to execute that big idea that is visually appetising. That is the core of achieving what is desired. If these three things can be ensured in the years to come, then the creative communication can not only take a big step forward but can make a giant leap instead, especially with the kind of technology that is available to us today.

Concept
Me
Concept
Cute Monsters

Published in Issue 41

Every year brings many opportunities and hopes along with celebrations. For this issue, we reached many visual artists and designers to know their expectations from the year 2018. This issue’s cover designer, Shreya Gulati is exceptionally impressed by the advancement of technology in design, especially how VR & AR has impacted new ways of creating. Honing and sharpening one’s skills is always a quest for every creative. So, whether you have many or none expectations for the year, this issue is a must-read. Go ahead and order your copy here or subscribe to not miss any future issues!

 

Order Your Copy!

CURRENT ISSUE
Creative Gaga - Issue 48

 

Seerow Unni, a keen animator, takes us through his approach and process. He sheds light on how he arrives at improvising in the course of designing, and why it is so vital to enjoy each and every aspect of the progression.

The core intention is to convey the message.

For that, it is essential that one enjoys each and every moment of the process of creation, no matter how small or big the work. For example, rather than just as a simple image or illustration, one may perceive everything as a scene, like in a movie. This leads to adding details, emotions, fun and more to a scene. Similarly, when we get it right, fun or wit and humor are the easiest ways to make people fall in love with what we create. Improvisation, likewise, is a part and parcel of the experience. From the very beginning, one may sustain the habit of keeping a close eye on the developments that are happening in the world of creative designing. For instance, I had started with the traditional canvas and then with time, shift to the digital medium.

One may continue to keep familiar and updated with the works of renowned digital artists. This automatically teaches to adapt to the needs of the changing times.

Diversity is a boon in the form of a challenge.

Dealing with different clients from diverse fields means they all have different requirements. They all demand a new approach, something that’s entirely path-breaking in the making of their animated film. This gives the freedom to keep the entire setting as well as characters so different from previous work. One must look at this as an opportunity instead of as a challenge and, no matter how big or small the work is, enjoy it to the fullest. Even if you are good in it, keep practicing and never stop sketching. It is equally important that you follow the famous artists and be updated about the trends and changes in design. There is no shortcut to success; as hard work always pays off in the end.

Changing with the times involves observing the direction.

The trend this year is shifting towards clean and minimal design from the complex, elaborated ones. Flat designs are going to be in the limelight. The idea is to keep things simple and minimal. In fact, minimalism is probably going to be a huge trend this year, not just in design, but in all walks of life. The challenge to come up with new ideas would be of galactic proportion. But simplicity is the way to go forth, and it has got a lot of untapped potentials. We will be able to see these elements everywhere from movie titles to logos and other mediums. As far as perception goes, our audiences have always been game for positive changes. They will embrace the change with open arms.

Published in Issue 41

Every year brings many opportunities and hopes along with celebrations. For this issue, we reached many visual artists and designers to know their expectations from the year 2018. This issue’s cover designer, Shreya Gulati is exceptionally impressed by the advancement of technology in design, especially how VR & AR has impacted new ways of creating. Honing and sharpening one’s skills is always a quest for every creative. So, whether you have many or none expectations for the year, this issue is a must-read. Go ahead and order your copy here or subscribe to not miss any future issues!

 

Order Your Copy!
CURRENT ISSUE
Creative Gaga - Issue 48

 

From a back bench doodler to a fine-arts graduate from JNAFAU Hyderabad, Sri Priyatham specialised in the art of caricature, to work with a clientele like Microsoft India, Redmond, Deloitte to name a few and to be published in The Hindu, Deccan Chronicle,etc. He is soon launching his pet project, “The Art Factory” in Hyderabad to conduct art classes.


Related Posts



Find Him Here


CURRENT ISSUE
Creative Gaga - Issue 48

 

POST TAGS:

Payal Gupta is a young, Mumbai-based entrepreneur handling multiple professions of being a chef, food stylist and floral designer at the same time. She is the only global award winner in this field in which she has worked for a decade. Her quest for knowledge led her to earn a diploma in photography and Management from IIM, Bangalore.


Find Her Here


CURRENT ISSUE
Creative Gaga - Issue 48

 

POST TAGS:

Ad Here

Illustrator, Ernest Priego Martin, takes us through his approach behind making caricatures of various personalities. He speaks about the observation that goes into each of his works and the significance of watching carefully so as to achieve the best execution.

observation
By Ernest Priego

According to you, what are the most important aspects of ensuring justice to represent the actual personalities of people through caricatures?

Ernest Martin: In the first place, the similarity is the most important. Without resemblance, there is no caricature. The thing that comes next is to not offend the person and still tell as much as possible about their personality. Keeping both these aspects in mind, it is rather important to maintain the apt balance that is desired in order to create an effective caricature.

By Ernest Priego


How do you make sure you represent people in a way that viewers relate to the caricatures?

Ernest Martin: I seek that in a single glance the most singular characteristics of the person are known. Every character has his or her own unique traits that symbolise or signifies the person, whether they are the very physical features of the individual or characteristics in the conduct, temperament or personality. I also do that exercise when I look at the person and try to capture the first impression so as to work with it.

How do you decide on the proportion of features in different characters?

Ernest Martin: I do not really decide the proportion of features; as each person shows them through physical and psychological characteristics the proportions that I must emphasise upon in my work. It is something intuitive. It is just about amplifying or focusing on those particular aspects of the person that stands out and strengthen their persona i.e. features that describe their individuality and make them ‘who they are’.



By Ernest Priego

What facets of people’s real-life personalities play a role in your depiction of them?

Ernest Martin: It depends on your assignment or your activity – if you are a politician, actor, musician, athlete, etc. That will influence the final result because it is not necessarily one aspect or the other in a person, but their entire self, which includes what they do, how they do it, their own unique style and expression in the course of the act and so on which defines them.

How have you grown and evolved your style, over the years?

Ernest Martin: There is no magic formula for growing and evolving one’s own style. It all comes down to the dedication, the number of working hours and the quality of effort that one puts into one’s craft, as is the case with just about anything that we choose to do and apply ourselves to. And, of course, learning to look and observe is vital as that is how we learn best.

By Ernest Priego


What kind of changes would you like to see in your existing design trends related, in 2018?

Ernest Martin: I would like to work with other materials such as acrylic, and even merge them with digital – that would be interesting to see in terms of the various processes that could be applied and results that could be achieved. Though at the moment, I am comfortable with what I do and I see no need to change.

How do you think these changes will impact the process and perception of these designs?

Ernest Martin: I do not plan to change the way I draw by much, although that depends on the personal mood. The mood, context, requirement, application and such other aspects determine how a piece of work is executed and arrived at. Anyway, for now, I am rather satisfied with impressing the viewer in the same way as I did in 2017.

By Ernest Priego
By Ernest Priego

Published in Issue 41

Every year brings many opportunities and hopes along with celebrations. For this issue, we reached many visual artists and designers to know their expectations from the year 2018. This issue’s cover designer, Shreya Gulati is exceptionally impressed by the advancement of technology in design, especially how VR & AR has impacted new ways of creating. Honing and sharpening one’s skills is always a quest for every creative. So, whether you have many or none expectations for the year, this issue is a must-read.

 

Order Your Copy!
CURRENT ISSUE
Creative Gaga - Issue 48

 

Representing people is no small task, especially when each one is a complex amalgamation of peculiar moods, styles, experiences and so on. Sketch artist, Prakash Thombre, readily takes on the challenge of transmitting real life onto the canvas through his various sketches of everyday personalities.

Observation is where it all begins.

Among the various subjects he sketches and draws, Prakash Thombre always finds Portraits to be most fascinating and interesting – mainly because he chooses his subjects from real life. Most of them, he captures on camera when traveling, later using them as references. He feels drawing Portraits helps to study people around us and connect with them – it’s like capturing their life narrative in lines and shades in the form of sketches. He has a keen interest in body language and face reading.

While observing people in real life, he generally tries to find the story about the person. Carefully observing the costumes, facial features, gestures, posture, etc. tells him an interesting story, which he then tries to capture in sketches and drawings. Aspects or elements like these help display and represent the core personality or temperament of the subjects. When he is observing a subject, he studies the minute details about their costumes, poses, gestures, expressions, facial features and so on. If everything compliments each other, it becomes an interesting story to capture in lines as a sketch or drawing.

The style is best when synonymous with spontaneity.

Prakash is not very comfortable with following one style or technique, nor is he comfortable with the typical copybook fundamentals of rendering. He likes to be spontaneous with the tools and its application, and prefers the lines to be free-flowing and organic in nature – nothing rigid, nothing attempted. Further, with regard to the style of sketching and colouring, the nature of lighting and the likes depends on the time and place.

Usually, on location, he chooses to use the pencil, finding it to be the most efficient tool to play with the line pressure and tonal values. Sometimes, he also uses fountain pens, but with flex and fude nibs, as they provide fantastic dynamic lines, depending on the pen angles and pressure. The sketch artist finds water-colour to be the most dynamic medium since he feels It gives a lot of flexibility with the way one applies and uses it.

Using fundamental tools and techniques is the base of foolproof skills.

If we take a good look at it, most of the designers today are inclined towards using smart devices to draw and sketch – like the iPad or Wacom Cintique – which Prakash feels cripple the true potential of the designer to draw with real tools. He rather opines that designers should use these tools but, at the same time, bring in and maintain the habit of drawing with hands and real tools, where they don’t have options like ‘Undo’ and the likes at their disposal. So, starting the design process with sketching using real tools will help explore and capture ideas quickly, and then explore further to refine it through Smart devices like the iPad or Wacom.

Published in Issue 41

Every year brings many opportunities and hopes along with celebrations. For this issue, we reached many visual artists and designers to know their expectations from the year 2018. This issue’s cover designer, Shreya Gulati is exceptionally impressed by the advancement of technology in design, especially how VR & AR has impacted new ways of creating.

 

Honing and sharpening one’s skills is always a quest for every creative. So, whether you have many or none expectations for the year, this issue is a must-read.

 

Order Your Copy!
CURRENT ISSUE
Creative Gaga - Issue 48

 

Concept & visual artist from Mumbai, Medha Srivastava takes us through what really motivates her work and depictions. Likewise, she introduces us to the process by which she executes what she wants to convey onto the canvas, merging realism with animation.

What makes you merge realism with animated effects across your works, and in what way does it contribute to your style?

Medha Srivastava: I express myself better through art and, so, when I feel deeply touched by a social issue, it begins to manifest thoughts into my head and gradually bring to life an artistic representation. Being a keen observer, I also tend to pay attention to details in my surrounding vicinity and that helps me pick up on textures, shapes, colours and the likes that I see every day.

What are the tools that you apply to bring about this merger, and how do they help to execute that effect?

Medha Srivastava: It usually begins with doodling variations of my thoughts onto paper, before going onto the final piece that is digitally created and developed using Adobe Photoshop integrated with a digital sketchpad (Wacom). Also, it proves to be quite useful to be able to edit, undo or backtrack on certain elements so that I can accommodate changes and adjust details according to what I would want to finished design to look like.

What fascinates you as subjects for your work?

Medha Srivastava: As I have always been fascinated with realism, conceptualisation and ideation. The whole idea of metaphors and thought-provoking depiction of art is something which I am naturally drifted to. Concepts and character building are of primary precedence as they align with my main intent in any artwork of mine.

 

Also, I have always followed the importance of light and shadow in my artworks too. Social issues, particularly, have always inspired me to create further.

How would you describe your style of work and the perspective behind it?

Medha Srivastava: My style of work is mostly realistic with a hint of stylisation and conceptualisation. The love of putting realism into my artwork eventually helps me to incorporate realistic elements in my paintings. Initially, I started with mere illustrations and slowly got inclined towards the world of concepts.

 

I think as an artist, I need to keep an open mind as I don’t know where technology, opportunities and my work will take me.

Many things have changed in design, during past few years, and the trends are shifting very rapidly. So, in the new year, what are your predictions for your genre of design?

Medha Srivastava: In my opinion, the digital art will pick up the brisk pace in the year 2018. A decade ago, digital art wasn’t as recognised as traditional art but it is pleasing to see so many artists developing an interest towards it. Additionally, having prior experience as a game artist, I believe that the gaming industry in India is set to blossom in the coming years and there will be extensive opportunities for upcoming artists in our country.

Likewise, what are the changes that you, personally, would like to see in 2018?

Medha Srivastava: I would like to see, in 2018, artists showing emphasis on various other subjects such as fantasy, sci-fi or even self-developed new concepts and ideas.

 

Another significant trend I would like to witness is that of artists showing dedicated importance to the stages of pre-production which include concept development, character creation, and environment designs.

Published in Issue 41

Every year brings many opportunities and hopes along with celebrations. For this issue, we reached many visual artists and designers to know their expectations from the year 2018. This issue’s cover designer, Shreya Gulati is exceptionally impressed by the advancement of technology in design, especially how VR & AR has impacted new ways of creating.

Honing and sharpening one’s skills is always a quest for every creative. So, whether you have many or none expectations for the year, this issue is a must-read.

 

Order Your Copy!
CURRENT ISSUE
Creative Gaga - Issue 48

 

Originally from Bhusawal Jalgaon district, Chandrasekhar Thakur attained his Applied Arts degree from D Y Patil, Pune, taking illustration as his specialisation. Having explored various styles, he currently works with Truebil as an Art Director, and CO-Founder of ‘HAPPiNESS For You’ where in addition to illustrating, he also explores working for digital films and supervising most of the print works.


Featured In


Every year brings many opportunities and hopes along with celebrations. For this issue, we reached many visual artists and designers to know their expectations from the year 2018.</p> <p>This issue’s cover designer, Shreya Gulati is exceptionally impressed by the advancement of technology in design, especially how VR & AR has impacted new ways of creating. Whereas Seerow Unni, a digital artist sees the simple and minimal design is here to stay for long. On the other hand, Caricature artist from Barcelona (Spain), Ernest Priego Martin is really satisfied with his techniques and materials and doesn’t want to see much change in this year.</p> <p>Honing and sharpening one’s skills is always a quest for every creative. So, whether you have many or none expectations for the year, this issue is a must-read. Go ahead and order your copy here or subscribe to not miss any future issues!

Related Posts


No posts were found.


Find Him Here


CURRENT ISSUE
Creative Gaga - Issue 48

 

POST TAGS:

Dheeraj Bangar is an illustrator based in Pune, India, with almost 7 years of experience working as a freelancer and as part of an animation & graphic studio. Having graduated in Computer Science and completed his GD art in Applied Art from Abhinav Kala Mahavidyalay, Pune, he is currently working at Green Gold Animation as a visual development artist.


Featured In


Every year brings many opportunities and hopes along with celebrations. For this issue, we reached many visual artists and designers to know their expectations from the year 2018.</p> <p>This issue’s cover designer, Shreya Gulati is exceptionally impressed by the advancement of technology in design, especially how VR & AR has impacted new ways of creating. Whereas Seerow Unni, a digital artist sees the simple and minimal design is here to stay for long. On the other hand, Caricature artist from Barcelona (Spain), Ernest Priego Martin is really satisfied with his techniques and materials and doesn’t want to see much change in this year.</p> <p>Honing and sharpening one’s skills is always a quest for every creative. So, whether you have many or none expectations for the year, this issue is a must-read. Go ahead and order your copy here or subscribe to not miss any future issues!

Related Posts



Find Him Here


CURRENT ISSUE
Creative Gaga - Issue 48

 

POST TAGS: