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Imagination is the greatest form of flattery and for a designer; it doubles up as a way to pay homage to legends, icons and inspirations. Illustrator Shesh Kiran created the caricature portrait of flute maestro Pandit Hariprasad Chaurasia. He explains how.

Portrait
Portrait

Step 1

Started the rough sketching with new file of 300 dpi resolution. I used the tablet pen for this sketch with the various brush sizes from 25 to 30.

Step 2

Create a new layer below the sketch layers and filled it with black colour. Kept the fill opacity to 62% which makes the rough sketch partially visual.

Step 3

Added a new layer and started filling the flat skin colour in this layer. Also added another layer for colouring the clothes.

Step 4

Used new traditional texture brushes to detail the hair, eyes and skin tone. Airbrushes were used to bring shades and highlights of skin.

Portrait

Step 5

Further worked on the skin using ‘transform’ from the brush presets to lighten the skin and to create the softer tones using airbrush.

Portrait

Step 6

From the reference image collected the cloth colour palette to bring the real life feel. With the airbrush started detailing the clothes with the selected colour palette.

Portrait

Step 7

Gave a final touch to artwork using various opacity and ‘flow’ on hands, fluet and background as per the requirment to bring the depth and lighting. Hence arrive at the final portrait artwork.

Tools Used:

• Adobe Photoshop

• Wacom Bamboo tablet

• Airbrushes & round brushes for painting.

Published in Issue 21

Branding With Packaging Special! They say not to judge a book by its cover. But they also say that exceptions are always there. There’s no doubt, branding and packaging are the faces of any business and product. They decide the way people will receive the brand; whether they will accept it or reject it. To understand and gain more perspective on this much-unsolved mystery, we invited many branding and packaging experts who throw light on the topic.

 

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CURRENT ISSUE
Creative Gaga - Issue 49

 

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Illustrations with a human touch are what people look for and designer Ashwani Nagar understands that concept very well. His illustrations maintain the feel and emotion that resonate with people which in turn help them connect to the artwork at first sight.

 

Inspired by mundane events and interesting everyday people, one of his projects called Life in a Metro, Airport Swag depicts his acute sense of observation of how people behave and react while undergoing their daily journey to and from work to home. Collaborating with art partner Manish Minglani, the series of 12 posters offer a microscopic view on peoples’ everyday actions and behaviour. Made using sketchbook, Photoshop and Illustrator, this artwork symbolises how humour can help educate and create positive change in society.

 

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Illustrations
Airport Swag
Illustrations
Airport Swag
Illustrations
Airport Swag
Illustrations
Airport Swag
Illustrations
Alien Attack, Life in Metro
Illustrations
Taak Jhaak, Life in Metro
Illustrations
Loot Sako toe Loot lo, Life in Metro
Illustrations
Khaao aur khaane do, Life in Metro
Mast Malang, Life in Metro
Laila Majnu, Life in Metro
Hum Saath Saath Hain, Life in Metro
Dharna Pradarshan, Life in Metro
Asiye na mujhe tum dekho, Life in Metro
Show Stopper, Life in Metro
Super Power, Life in Metro

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Paintings don’t just have a layered concept but also layered design. What might appear as uni-surface and simple, actually goes through various complicated and calculated processes in the digital world today. Illustrator Rahul Sharma, uses his painting called ‘Last Fight’ to take us through its initial and final formation.

Step 01

After the brief has been absorbed into the mind and an initial thought or idea manifest itself, a small greyscale thumbnail is created, around 800×600 pixels in size. Once happy with the outcome, the next step is to increase the size and resolution to 300 dpi.

Step 02

A new layer is then created over the thumbnail after changing its opacity to 30%. The characters are then defined further, creating the line art.

Step 03

Another new layer is then created at the very top, and opacity of the rough sketch is turned to 30% and proper line art is carefully done by tracing out and fine tuning the picture. This stage is important as it becomes the base and guideline for the painting.

Step 04

The rough sketch layer at the bottom is turned off and the final art line becomes clearer.

Step 05

Following this, a new layer is created underneath the line art and named as ‘base colour layer’. The sketch is gradually coloured in. Because this happens underneath the line art layer, there is no risk of destroying the line art.

Step 06

Once the base colours are filled, notice that the mood of the painting begins to set in.

Step 07

Once satisfied with the outcome, a new layer is created, this time above the line art, and is filled in with necessary colours.

Step 08

While colouring the painting in, be aware of the light and shadows.

Step 09

And gradually, with patience, the painting starts to come more alive as colour creates tones of drama and action.

Step 10

The painting at this stage might appear finished, but not quite. It’s important to go in as deep as possible to make it real. The final stage involves creating the henna design on the woman’s leg. This is done on a single layer which is switched on in overlay mode, giving the henna a greenish hue.

Step 11

Once completely satisfied with the outcome, the layers are all merged. Thereafter, light and dark effects can be played with by visiting the adjustments tab.

Step 12

Once final adjustments are made, a new and final layer is created over the painting and filled with a light tone of bright orange. This is then changed to the overlay mode and the opacity is reduced to 20%. This is basically what renaissance masters use to do with their painting as the glaze unifies the painting’s colours.

Published in Issue 26

Packaging is the first vital step towards enchanting the audience. Who doesn’t like a cute box or a trendy bottle? With this issue, Creative Gaga lets the cat out of the box to reveal the world of packaging design. Featuring various local and international designers like Petar Pavlov from Macedonia and Brandziac from Russia, Elephant Design and Impprintz from Pune, the issue promises to be a keepsake for many.

 

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CURRENT ISSUE
Creative Gaga - Issue 49

 

Illustrator, Parvati Pillai, tells us how trying out new styles and forms of illustration are key for a designer to grow at one’s craft and expand one’s scope of work in current context.

Illustration
Nordic Rebels
Illustration
Nordic Rebels
Illustration
Nordic Rebels
Illustration
Nordic Rebels
Illustration
Kamaladevi 115th Birthday Doodle

Various Styles Takes Conscious Effort

The art style and colour palette are very important to Parvati in storytelling, especially if designing for a particular target audience in mind. She tries to use colours and intricate patterns to incorporate various illustration styles. Like most artists, she has a natural inclination to a particular colour and illustration style. As a result of such tendencies, it takes a lot of effort to move away from it and consciously make choices to choose something new and work on something out of the box.

Illustration
SilverKris Magazine
Illustration
Poster. Designed for Spring Demoday at Medialab, Aalto University
Illustration
Designs created for a wide range of products in the Chumbak’s Gold Collection

This challenge is what makes illustrating through various styles exciting and motivating. Also, this way ensures that one keeps coming up with new stuff from time to time without getting entangled in the same kind of work. One can only unearth their potential by discovering new forms, mediums, styles and so on in the process of trying to create fresh designs or illustrative work.

Illustration
Egg Skillet. Sunny spring recipe for 36 Days of Food
Illustration
Flying Dreams. Collaboration with Taxi Fabric was celebrating the concept of Mumbai as India’s 'City of Dreams'
Illustration
Flying Dreams. Collaboration with Taxi Fabric was celebrating the concept of Mumbai as India’s 'City of Dreams'
Illustration
Spain. Tried to capture the magic and the essence of some fascinating countries

It is a Lot Like Science

It is all about experimentation. Parvati constantly tries to explore new subjects and experiment with new techniques. She aims to keep herself motivated and to keep practising different illustration styles in her free time. Her MacBook Pro and Wacom graphics tablet are her apparatus in this process, thereby – the two things she cannot work without. Likewise, she also enjoys working with inks and clay while she is currently exploring knitting and embroidery. This serves as a strong and healthy way to work with different mediums and see the potential that lies in them.

Illustration
Dream Machine. Collaboration with Taxi Fabric, celebrating the concept of Mumbai as India’ 'City of Dreams'
Illustration
Dream Machine. Collaboration with Taxi Fabric, celebrating the concept of Mumbai as India’ 'City of Dreams'
Illustration
Print for Food Mat

Parvati spends a major portion of a project’s time on ideation and iteration. She likes to take her time with the composition of the illustration and carefully choose her colour palettes. She also tries to evoke feelings of joy and bring out the intricacies of everyday life in my work. For her, illustration is a form of reflection and is inspired from life.

Illustration
Print for Coaster. Design created for Chumbak's dinning range
Illustration
A social media Illustration for Chumbak, celebrating spirit of Onam with Chumbak

For Money, Planning Ahead Always Helps

It is important to always have enough savings for emergencies, feels Parvati, as they may arise at any point of time without any indication. Likewise, she always tries to take up some projects for paying clients so that she has sufficient money to explore her creative and artistic endeavours. For some people, this may be a compromise but it is essential to her so that she may be able to sustain her creativity. Each one has their own style and approach to doing things, and whatever works for one is what one must do as the same size does not really fit all. Finally, practice and hard work are the most important things.

Illustration
Lebanon. Celebrating the different cultures found around the world
Illustration
Moving to Helsinki. Personal Illustration capturing the magic of my first autumn

One must be tenacious and maintain a positive attitude. Even if luck does not favour, persistence can take one more than just quite far; it can make all the difference. Even luck favours those who are persistent in their journey and don’t back down in spite of any odds they might face along the way.

Illustration
Finland. Celebrating the different cultures found around the world
Illustration
Print for Food Mat. Design created for Chumbak's dinning range
Issue-42-Cover

Published in Issue 42

Every designer wish to be independent and willing to jump into the word of freelance but most of them unaware of the fundamental challenges of the initial phase. So, we dedicated this issue to freelancers and interviewed some established and talented designers to dig deep for the expert advice. Kevin Roodhorst an experienced freelancer from Amsterdam, has recently shifted to be a full-timer with an Agency says “Freelancing is not all roses!” and shared the best way to survive as a freelancer. So, whether you are a freelancer or planning to be one, this issue is a must-read. Go ahead and order your copy here or subscribe to not miss any future issues!

 

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CURRENT ISSUE
Creative Gaga - Issue 49

 

Moritz Adam Schmitt, a German illustrator breaks through his creative block with a very fascinating approach. He closes his eyes and scribbles random lines. Then he looks for interesting shapes through the scribbles to weave a story. With Adobe Illustrator, he develops the sketch and finally adds texture and light with Adobe Photoshop. The result is a breathtaking composition of fantasy and drama. These compositions are a great inspiration to help think outside the box.

 

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Illustrations
Illustrations
Illustrations
Illustrations
Illustrations

A master piece is not just created by drawing a few lines and colouring the different areas formed. It indeed is a full package of detailing the model, the textures, the lights and the angles involved, just in the right amount, as Dushyant Bhardwaj explains us.

Dushyant Bhardwaj
Lighting Doodles. A quick lighting doodle using basic shapes like boxes and spheres.

With a keen liking and special place for drawing and sketching in his heart as a kid, Dushyant Bhardwaj was inspired by the amazing sketches and art pieces that his cousin created on Lightbox. This got him learning in detail and depth what he really loved, sketching and expand his learning horizons to three-dimensional art. It even escalated his interest levels for the subject

Dushyant Bhardwaj
Wiring the Needles. A fun render experimenting with miniatures using 3DS Max, Photoshop and V-Ray.

An Artwork Without a Story is Like a Ship Without a Rudder!

This thought made Dushyant ponder about everything he saw around him. A picture with interesting lighting and gripping elements engrossed him and he in turn attached a story to it as this made it easier for him to put his thoughts on canvas while recreating the same scene.

 

Old, abandoned buildings and structures always caught his attention as they definitely had a story attached to them, which Dushyant tries narrating through his work.

Dushyant Bhardwaj
Detective’s Desk. An apartment of 40-something detective while solving a crime committed in the city.

Detailing: The Key to Create Realistic Art!

Detailing depends on the kind of outcome that is wanted and also camera angles one works with. Adding details to a piece of art will definitely make it look real and believable, but if overdone can completely ruin it.

Dushyant Bhardwaj
Little Radish. Based on the concept of Goro Fujita, a test scene to learn more about Arnold renderer engine.

While detailing a realistic image, it is important to keep in mind the overall view of the artwork while designing model and the intricacies of its textures. A stylised artwork would not require so much detailing as a realistic one would.

Dushyant Bhardwaj
Abandoned Storeroom. The idea was to convey that libraries, books, newspapers, cycles and other old things are dying in the modern world.

An artwork with a closeup view would require one to focus first on the primary details like microelements, that will be in limelight, and then move on to the secondary details to be developed for the overall view.

Dushyant Bhardwaj
ISO Game Renders, Elvenar. Environments created for Innogames – Elvenar.

For instance, working on a texture which is rusty and has paint chipped off would require to concentrate on the area having the chipped paint, the formation of the cracks and the spreading of the rusted texture. Also, adding too much chipped off paint and rust may destroy it and take the life out of that asset.

Dushyant Bhardwaj
Lighting Doodle. A quick lighting doodle using Maya and Arnold.

Lighting: A Creator or a Destroyer!

Lighting plays a crucial role in any scene. It can either can make a scene or break it. Deciding the lighting for the scene has to be a smart choice as it should be in tandem with the storyline and the subject of the scene as well as be successful in conveying the emotions attached, for the scene to be comprehensible for the viewer.

Dushyant Bhardwaj
ISO Baby Room. An experiment with the new render Fstorm to achieve a very soft mood with modelling, texturing and lighting.

Taking inspirations for lighting from Pinterest and other imagery for reference is always helpful. Dushyant Bhardwaj uses a mix of different digital softwares like 3DS Max, Maya, V-Ray, Photoshop, Arnold, to name a few, for the creation of his artwork pieces.

Dushyant Bhardwaj
Junkbot. An experiment with substance painter to texture a junkbot modelled using 3DS Max.

Sailing in the Sea of Professionals!

Stepping into a market full of talented professionals has never been easy. For him to be successful, Dushyant Bhardwaj believed in the fact to create quality work rather than quantity. To be noticed and commissioned, he started putting out his portfolio on the digital and social media like YouTube, CGSociety forum and Artstation.

Dushyant Bhardwaj
Room. Artwork inspired from the short film Alarm.

He suggests the same to budding and upcoming artists to thrive in the field they love. Also, as the saying goes, perseverance is the key to success.

Dushyant Bhardwaj
Silent Witness. A scene to study about cinematic lighting and storytelling in a still picture.

Published in Issue 43

With the changing weather comes the season of Interns, with fresh new energy everywhere and your talented creatives wanting to test their skills and knowledge in the real world of live creative briefs and super creative professional environment. This issue is a must-read for internees and fresh talents. Go ahead and order your copy here!

 

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CURRENT ISSUE
Creative Gaga - Issue 49

 

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Planning to venture into the world of motion graphics? Great, now as you take the plunge to explore it in the depth of the different areas of the graphics world, which will help you to stretch your imagination. But the more you explore the more you feel that it may require a lifetime to experiment and learn. So here we, listed out some the essential tools to start from.

When you start your journey of becoming a motion graphic designer you will encounter numerous programs. You not only need a great artistic eye as a motion designer but also need to master some of these tools. Though every tool has its own importance, when using these tools, please remember they only add value to your artistic wisdom.

Here Adaar has summed up the essential tools that may help you add value to your creativity.


1. Adobe Photoshop

A very useful and must know tool for any motion graphics designer when it comes to things like create textures, design boards, image manipulation etc. Expertise in Photoshop can help you create great designs elements for your motion graphic projects.


2. Adobe Illustrator

It’s a vector based software with an array of useful tools for motion graphics, which help you create great motion graphics design vector elements such as logos, shape objects, and vector background. Also, Illustrator files can very easily be imported into After Effects for animation, without losing quality.


3. Cinema 4D

One of the most popular 3D modelling, animation and motion graphic software which gives creative professionals the tools needed to create stunning 3D graphics. This will take your skill-set to the next level. All the tool in Cinema 4D helps you to enhance your 3D modelling, animation, and rendering. It is very flexible while integrating into After Effects.

There are other 3D programs like Maya or Max 3Ds, but when it comes to creating outstanding motion graphics Cinema 4D is the best. It allows you to render out higher-quality 3D visuals through its popular third-party render engines – Octane, Redshift, V-Ray, etc. To make a place for yourself in the motion graphics world, you have to be well-versed in Cinema 4D.



4. After Effects

Generally known as AE is an extension that helps carry motion graphics. After Effects is one of the most important tools one must learn while stepping into motion graphics world. It can provide you with high-quality customised visual effects and also help you to create & control great motion graphic works. Strong knowledge of AE will help you to make captivating visual effects for 2D and 3D animation, compositing, motion tracking, object removal, simulation effects, template creation and much more.

After Effects is flexible in integrating with 3D applications like 3D max Maya and Cinema 4D etc. Besides, there are so many built-in plug-ins and third-party plug-ins that let you play with interesting special effects.


5. Special Effects Tools

You can further raise the level of your motion graphics projects by applying many of the custom special effects tools like X-particle, Real Flow etc. for special effects like particles, water, smoke, fire and a whole lot more.


 

These tools will definitely help you add value to your creativity. And from here onwards ‘Just keep learning and keep growing!’

CURRENT ISSUE
Creative Gaga - Issue 49