When History and Mythology Relates to Our Present

mythology

The best thing about history is the way it carries on into the future and is always part of our present. For a country like India where culture and history define who and what we are, mythology is one aspect that presents designers with a hook. Story telling, science or self-exploration, mythology can be anything you want it to be, believes designer Pooja Bhapkar. More on her contemporary interpretation of the subject.

It’s all about drawing in line!

For many designers, certain elements work very well as they see beyond it, compared to the rest. For example, working with lines and using a strong sense of symbolism. Changing the texture of lines changes the meaning. Lines can be rhythmic, straight, diagonal, zig zags, swirls, rounded shapes, decorative forms and of course a bit of abstraction. An abundance of repetitive patterns create rhythm and adds drama to the overall artwork. It’s like a line puzzle where the audience submerges to follow the lines and read the overall picture. This gives the artwork a flowing energy.

Shravan Calligraphy. Inspired by nature and the aromas that dictate our mood, calligraphy dedicated to the fifth month of the Hindu calendar is depicted using fine lines.

Modernise the traditional.

India is laden with a rich cultural history and if young generations really try and understand the Hindu mythology, one can see how informative and scientific it all is. One does not have to be religious or too cultural to get inspired from such works. A way to look at mythology is to represent them as energies and interpret it in a manner that you understand. Then, it’s a matter of recreating that representation in a creative form, whether one creates Gods and Goddesses as superheroes or contemporary forms that become a story for everyone to understand. Discover the core and the rest will fall in place.

Solah Shringar. This beautiful design portrays Goddess Lakshmi In ‘Solah shringar’ or sixteen adornments of a Hindu bride on her wedding day.

Practice colour coded designs.

For those who use symbolism in their designs, colour is extremely important. And to help separate and space out intricate designs, colour helps to segregate portions, only enhancing the narrative of a design. They also aid in enhancing the rhythm and deciding the eye direction by making the focus more prominent.

Published in Issue 30

Since stone age when individuals were identified with certain marks, branding has always been an integral part of our life. It has evolved so much that now every success can be connected to branding behind it, but still brand creation has always been a mystery. We interviewed the branding experts, who are behind some of the very successful brands. Lopez Design, have shared the story behind the recently developed branding of ‘Bihar Museum‘ and also shared the basics of brand creation in the ‘Gyaan’ section. Young visual communication designer like Shaivalini Kumar shared her love for the letter design while experienced graphic designer Anup Shah dwelled upon his passion for calligraphy. In brief, this issue is packed with branding and typography design experts who can help you solve the mystery of the brand creation! Order your copy today!

 

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Creative Gaga - Issue 38
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