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There are stories hidden in faces and bodies. Exaggeration brings them to the fore. A good caricaturist lives the subject and discovers the multiple facets that make the story. Caricature artist Manoj Sinha reflects while talking about his design process.

Manoj Sinha - Caricaturist
Donald Trump, courtesy Hindustan Times Group
Manoj Sinha - Caricaturist
PM Narendra Modi, courtesy Hindustan Times Group by Manoj Sinha
Manoj Sinha - Caricaturist
Captain Amarinder Singh, courtesy Hindustan Times Group by Manoj Sinha

To watch is to learn.

Keep your eyes wide open. Watch every character and everything about them. Absorb yourself into your characters and feel their presence around. Understand their behaviour, attitudes, experiences, and temperament. There is a story made by all these elements. Observe their actions, as they often determine the story. And then exaggerate all these through your strokes to re-tell the story.

Ajay Devgan, courtesy Hindustan Times Group by Manoj Sinha
Manoj Sinha - Caricaturist
Daroga ji, courtesy Hindustan Times Group by Manoj Sinha
Manoj Sinha - Caricaturist
Om Puri, courtesy Hindustan Times Group
caricaturist
Mr. Nitish Kumar, courtesy Hindustan Times Group by Manoj Sinha


Manoj Sinha - Caricaturist
Aamir Khan, courtesy Hindustan Times Group
Manoj Sinha - Caricaturist
Raj Babbar, courtesy Hindustan Times Group
caricaturist
Mr. Rahul Bajaj, courtesy Hindustan Times Group by Manoj Sinha

Mind precedes the pen.

Forget paper and pencil for some time. Take mental notes of their personality, work, and gestures, creating images in your mind, that’ll eventually come out in the form of caricatures. A caricaturist not just observes, but dissects. Study not just the character of every person, but the characteristic features as well. Generally, subjects have distinctive features that instantly catch the eye of an artist. In such cases, it becomes easy to exaggerate them and create the caricature. In other cases, the artist needs to dig deep into the subject and find out which feature or aspect to play with.

Manoj Sinha - Caricaturist
Virat Kohli, courtesy Hindustan Times Group
Manoj Sinha - Caricaturist
Harmanpreet Kaur, courtesy Hindustan Times Group
Manoj Sinha - Caricaturist
Kapil Dev, courtesy Hindustan Times Group

A caricaturist not just observes, but dissects. Study not just the character of every person, but the characteristic features as well. Dig deep into the subject to find out features to play with.


Manoj Sinha - Caricaturist
RONALDINHO, courtesy Hindustan Times Group
Manoj Sinha - Caricaturist
Danny Boyle, courtesy Hindustan Times Group
caricaturist
Naseerudin Shah, courtesy Hindustan Times Group by Manoj Sinha

Fun is inbuilt.

One needs to know the nuances of the subject to add to the appeal of the artwork. Read and analyse everything about your character. It will automatically develop a personal opinion about the person. As a caricature artist, the opinion is often laden with humour. Put the character in focus and the fun in the story will come out automatically. The more colourful a personality, the more fun you have doing the caricature.

Manoj Sinha - Caricaturist
A P J Abdul Kalam, courtesy Hindustan Times Group
Manoj Sinha - Caricaturist
Pranb Mukharjee, courtesy Hindustan Times Group


Manoj Sinha - Caricaturist
Jayalalithaa, courtesy Hindustan Times Group
Yashpal, courtesy Hindustan Times Group by Manoj Sinha

Caricature is not fiction.

Almost every time, a caricature is about a real personality and the story attached. It is the duty of a caricaturist to portray the true character of the subject chosen. Therefore it is important to understand the thin line that separates humour from sarcasm. The key lies in creating insightful humour and most importantly, being true to the character. That is why one needs to spot the “LOL” factor in everything around. You never know, what strikes off the next story.

Manoj Sinha - Caricaturist
George W. Bush, courtesy Hindustan Times Group
Manoj Sinha - Caricaturist
Bal Thakrey, courtesy Hindustan Times Group by Manoj Sinha
Ranveer Singh, courtesy Hindustan Times Group by Manoj Sinha


Manoj Sinha - Caricaturist
Dalai Lama, courtesy Hindustan Times Group
Manoj Sinha - Caricaturist
Barack Obama, courtesy Hindustan Times Group
Mr. Ratan Tata, courtesy Hindustan Times Group by Manoj Sinha

A story is timeless.

A good caricature starts a relationship, between the story and the viewer. Media, today, is moving at an astonishing rate. Therefore it is important to choose topics that are not going to be forgotten at the next ‘Breaking News’ segment. The importance of a story lies in the fact that it brings education along with fun. This way, the news may become redundant but the awareness of the change that the news brings to the daily lives of the people, lingers on

Manoj Sinha - Caricaturist
Steve jobs, courtesy Hindustan Times Group
Manoj Sinha - Caricaturist
Mark Zuckerberg, courtesy Hindustan Times Group
Manoj Sinha - Caricaturist
Sunder Pichai, courtesy Hindustan Times Group

Published in Issue 12

first interactive issue of Creative Gaga with Augmented Reality features. This issue focuses on the transition of Advertising from real to virtual and blurring the boundaries of both at the same time. Also bundled with lots of interesting articles and interviews.

 

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Digital and Ball-point artist, Shital Verma, tells us about his process and idea behind creating portraits of renowned individuals from various fields and what exactly it takes to bring out what they symbolise or stand for as personalities. In other words, highlighting their unique stories which make them a recognizable face.

Stories
John Hurt
Wolverine
Amitabh Bachchan

CG. How do you conceptualise the use of lines and textures in your works and how do you execute them?

Shital. To begin with any drawing or artwork, I look at the character first and what kind of lines or textures justify the artwork; whether it’s a ballpoint pen drawing or digital drawing, and such other aspects. Lines and strokes, in particular, are my priority. All this helps me gain a clear picture of how I want to further proceed with the conceptualisation and execution.

Capturing the Stories Behind Every Face!
Clint Eastwood
Bob Marley
Shahrukh Khan

CG. What fascinates you most about the stories behind every face while creating portraits?

Shital. I choose some distinguished characters for portrait paintings, such as Salvador DALI, Zohra Sehgal, John Hurt, Ranbeer and many more. Their expressions with which they get naturally or symbolically associated with over a period of time are what tell their on-screen and real-life stories to the audience. I mostly try to represent and portray their charisma in my works, in the best possible way. In Virat Kohli’s portrait (on page 38), for example, I tried to bring out his toughness and determination through lines.

Haruki Murakami
Stories
Tiger Shroff
Ecstatic
Stories
Lata Mangeshkar

CG. Which software and tools do you mainly use and how do you apply them to achieve the desired effects?

Shital. I mostly use a digital pen tablet (Wacom Cintiq), as well as pencil and ballpoint pen, as my favourite tools. For digital artworks, in particular, I use Photoshop and Painter. Today, there are a great number and variety of tools with diverse functions that are easily accessible and available, so it all depends on what needs to be executed and in which manner.

Virat Kohli
Zohra Sehgal
Stories
Joaquin Phonix
Stories
Old Lady

CG. What is the main intention you wish to achieve through your work?

Shital. Being an artist, I mostly do it for my own satisfaction, while sometimes I get the opportunity to create something for the newspaper or for a friend request. Subjectivity is what essentially lies at the crux of any form of art, which is why there is no ‘right’ or standard answer to why we do it. The process itself is as gratifying as the result, if not more. So, in my case, the idea is to attain fulfilment within myself through my work.

Portrait of Ranveer Singh
Portrait for Rajnikanth
For Geet Chaturvedi's book

CG. What according to you are the most essential elements of creating portraits and how can one master them?

Shital. In my opinion, the eyes are the most essential part of the portrait and 70% to 80% of a portrait’s character comes out right when the eyes are drawn accurately. Yet, it does not mean that mastering the skill of drawing the eyes allows one to compromise on the other aspects as they too are equally important to add to and complete the character.

Deepika Padukone
Tom Alter

CG. What would you advice others young designers who practice a similar line of work?

Shital. My advice to young artists is to do more and more sketching and life study, structures, nature study apart from your digital work. Sketching is like ‘Riyaaz’ – the more you sketch, the finer the artist you become. The scope to create is wide open, much like the horizon; all one needs to do is stretch and deepen their vision, for the sky is the limit.

Birthday Gift
Jeff Bridges

Published in Issue 43

With the changing weather comes the season of Interns, with fresh new energy everywhere. With this comes dilemmas like where to intern and how to get selected in your favourite studio. So to bring little more clarity on current market trends of selecting the right interns, we interview some of the well-known studios to find their ‘Secret Process’ of selection.

 

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