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Nature is blessed with a wonderful variety of things and one that captures the eyes of many are the animals. Created in various forms and having unique patterns, Richard Field, illustrates them in his own style using worldwide cultural influences. He elaborates on his nature inspired designs.

inspired
The Dark Owl.
Aiyana
inspired
The Travelling Turtle.
The Night Owl

CG: What is the story behind what you do? How did you discover your talent and how did you work towards making it more than that? What were your inspirations? What were some challenges you had to overcome?

RF: Field-inspired, a play on the words ‘feel inspired’, is my name as an Illustrator. Having been inspired by so many things, it’s nice to do some inspiring of my own. My collection started when I was trying to make a bit of extra cash selling flash sheets to tattoo parlors around South London. Tattooists are always on the look out for new artwork to display in their shops. I used to work on black and white illustrations inspired by a variety of cultures around the world. My Native American, Mãori and folk art inspired illustrations caught the eye of a few people on Facebook and I decided to start adding colours and working on a new collection inspired by some of the nature’s most iconic animals.

inspired
The Bull.
Giraffe
The Aware Wolf
inspired
The Stag Prince.

CG: Animals play a central role in your designs. Can you throw some more light as to why? How did you find inspiration in animals and their patterns?

RF: Isn’t wildlife the most wonderful thing we have on this planet? I’ve definitely chosen the best subject to illustrate. The shapes and patterns that it forms never cease to amaze me. It’s a great achievement to be able to put your own stamp on animals we see so often. I enjoy trying to add a bit of personality to them – the ‘Wise’ Lion or the ‘Truthful’ tiger. Nature is full of so much hidden beauty, the idea is to try to encourage people to take a closer look at the artwork and look beyond to read the halftones and patterns.

inspired
African Buffalo.
The Crowned Crane
The Last Black Macaque
inspired
The Mountain Ram.

CG: Your designs have a striking contrast against black, creating an illuminated look and feel. How does that enhance the design?

RF: In my current collection, I work on black using a similar colour theme across all prints. By using strong, bold colours on black I hope to encourage the user to look closer at the detail. It’s not easy working on black, sometimes the colours can get a bit lost during the printing process – but I love the end result. Hopefully, people like how the artwork jumps off the canvas.

inspired
The African Elephant.
The Last Lion
Zebra
inspired
The Truthful Tiger.

Published in Issue 28

This Illustration Special is best to know why and how illustration as a popular medium is taking the design world by storm! From evolution of illustrations to its place in the world today, renowned designers and illustrators like Abhishek Singh, Mukesh Singh, Archan Nair, Alicia Souza, Raj Khatri with some international talent such as Fil Dunsky from Russia, Iain Macarthur and Richard Field from UK, who live and breathe illustration, would be the right people to gain some insight from. With many more talents to explore with great insights and excellent techniques, again a fully packed issue is waiting to amaze you!

 

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Caricature artist Paul Moyse talks about the secret behind captivating caricatures and his journey to becoming a successful artist.

Caricature
Mr. Beans

Paul Moyse, a successful artist who specializes in fine art caricatures, has an inimitable style to his art. Through his unmatched skill with his brush, he creates realistic caricatures that perfectly capture the spirit of the emotion.

Caricature
Daniel Craig

Paul always knew as a kid in the 1970’s that he would grow up to be a professional artist. It was only a matter of time for this dream to be realized, though the path wasn’t easy. In the 1980’s he became fascinated with the art of caricatures. He spent his teens emulating the caricature from the British show ‘Spitting Image’ and the cartoons of Kevin ‘KAL’ Kallaugher in the Economist.

Caricature
Einstein by Paul Moyse

But in his later years, Paul had to work several jobs to pay bills, all the while developing his skill on the side. In 2006 he finally got his break with his first magazine commission for Radio Times. And since then there has been no looking back.

Caricature
Group of Game of Thrones Sketches

His body of work includes commissions by Weekly Standard, live caricatures for Sir Paul McCartney, and paintings for several eminent private clients. A big highlight that catapulted his career forward was meeting Derren Brown, a renowned mentalist and illusionist, and painting him for the BP awards in 2012. Another memorable moment was getting a commission from Tim Jenison, the film producer, with Penn and Teller, the American magicians and entertainers.

Caricature
John Lydon by Paul Moyse

When asked, what is so captivating about caricatures, Paul said, “I think caricature taps into the part of the brain that recognizes features from memory, the part that allows us to separate one face from another in an instant, but it does so in an exaggerated way for humourous effect.”

Caricature
Neil Patrick

Paul believes observation and empathy are the most important tools required to capture the right expression. Being able to understand what is going on behind the eyes is essential to recreating it.

 

Given a choice, he prefers traditional mediums of painting over digital ones. This is because of the end result being a physical product; also the knowledge that it cannot be deleted or easily reproduced with the click of a button.

Caricature
Pope Francis by Paul Moyse

In retrospect, the journey to be an established artist wasn’t easy. For Paul, the hardest lesson was treating art as a serious profession. And the path of getting paid was filled with ups and downs. But through perseverance, stubbornness, and plenty of practice, success did come his way. Paul also attributes his success to luck, timing, and consistently ignoring the people who said it can’t be done.

Caricature
Tomhanks
Issue 44 - Creative Gaga

Published in Issue 44

Behind every successful studio, artist or designer there are stories of challenges, struggles and their unique solutions to these. With this issue, we interviewed many well-known names from the creative industry and found their different learnings and experiences behind making their own self as a brand. Though they all have a different take on this topic, still they all unanimously emphasise on focusing on their skills and quality delivery of the final outcome. So, if you are looking to establish yourself as a brand in the creative market or already in the process of it, this issue is a must read. Full of insights and inspirations from the best of the talents, this issue is waiting to reach your desks.

 

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Critics, admirers and friends have in unison called his work controlled explosion of energy and movement. Tom J Manning believes this is true as it is his conscious effort to evoke positive and creative energy through his works. He presents an account of his design beliefs, thoughts and practices.

Evoking Positive and Creative Energy
Nike Wild
Personal Project
Mind Over Matter

Moving Images Are More Alive Than Static

I am fascinated by the flow of time, particularly the moments that may never be repeated. I also realise that nothing is ever truly still. With these themes in mind I make very quick strokes using special custom brushes. Smudging and fast scratchy pencil lines add to this effect. The theme of movement relates to the energy in my work. I always add simple lines to the outside of an image to make it ‘move’ even if it is portrayed as a static object.

Vinyl Cover
Evoking Positive and Creative Energy
Vinyl Cover
Repair Album

Contrast Adds Depth

I like to keep my images bright. That’s why I use vibrant colours, mainly orange. I find that I can isolate the brightness of the colours by using grayscale, which makes them stand out almost like highlights. I tend to work in darker colours first before layering brighter colours on top. I feel that this helps to create a more indepth kind of image.

Personal Project
INTERNAL CONFUSION.
Personal Project
Love and Pride
MUSE BOOK COVER.

Connect Comes From Positive Emotions

Most of my work is open to interpretation, especially the abstract work. When I do portraits I want the audience to understand who the person is and what they do and perhaps a glimpse into their personality. I also try to invoke happiness, content, hope, sadness and change within my images. My style always attempts to make good out of the bad, light out of the dark. Quick and vibrant strokes of colour represent that creative and positive energy.

Alberto De Tenis Illustrations
Alberto De Tenis Illustrations

Free To Pick, Think And Draw

In nature you can see so many things moving, so many colours and varieties. I pick them up in abundance and use them in my work. Like, the quick strokes in my paintings are inspired from Leafy Sea Dragons. Or, the orange comes from the colour of the Malay Lacewing Butterfly. More importantly, I find mixed media to be free and expressionistic which is perfect for my style and the themes I wish to communicate. It also allows me to keep my work traditional and raw. Often a single image could contain as many as 15 different media all mixed together with a digital finish.

Linkin Park, Musical Illustrations
Linkin Park, Musical Illustrations
Linkin Park, Musical Illustrations
Linkin Park, Musical Illustrations
Linkin Park, Musical Illustrations

Published in Issue 16

We always wish we had someone to show us the right way of doing things when we were starting our professional journey. And that’s why we have based this issue on graduates. The cover feature is an ensemble of advice from top names of the industry. We have also showcased few talented fresh graduates from across the country, keeping with the theme. You’ll find Tom J Manning and Pallavi Sen share their international exposure as well as insights behind their unique approach. Also featuring Shreya Shetty, a prominent concept artist, who shares the secret behind the believable characters she creates. She believes, with practice and patience, anyone can be a good artist.

 

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