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Onassis Cultural Centre, a space that brings together people to express and discover diverse art and contemporary culture, needed a visual identity that translated the same. And Beetroot Design shows us how it’s done.

Brief/ Challenge:

Onassis Cultural Centre, a platform for artists to come together to showcase and discover contemporary bold art, required an equally bold visual identity for the season 2017-18. This Athens based institution needed the identity to be open and relevant to everyone, thus reflecting the core idea behind OCC.

Solution:

Beetroot Design Group, a multi-award winning, Thessaloniki based design firm, explored and created a visual identity for OCC, that is made for everyone, and yet so unique. Beetroot achieved thus by putting together all the typographies from the publications and events of the season, thus portraying them all under one visual identity. For this, the firm specially created software, Flow Type, which is now available for free. The software helped handle the high volume of typographies and played a key role in their manipulation, thus resulting in expressive free-flowing words.

The overall visual identity is an explosion of energy, colours, movement and boldness. Each piece of work is vastly different in its expression, but it is beautiful how they all come together to narrate a single story.


Client: Onassis Cultural Centre
Design Studio: Beetroot Design


Illustrators and designers from all over the world have fun participating in this project called ’36 days of Type’. Supernova Design, a Los Angeles based studio, presents their take on the project. The approach and style is very quirky, fun and upbeat. The colour palette is vibrant and exuberant. What is interesting is the story behind each of these types. And the layered details makes the composition all the more captivating. It’s not easy to work with a lot of elements, especially trying to find a balance between them all.

 

Here Supernova Designs handles a mixed bag of elements with panache and shows the viewer a spectrum of possibilities.

 

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Creative Gaga - Issue 45

 




While creating an illustration, it’s important to carefully choose every element that goes into the work. Every aspect should add to the overarching concept. And this is what we see with the Roudra Bhangi illustration by Ibrahim Rayintakath.

 

Through this illustration, the touching story of a Guru-Shishya relationship is laid in numerous layers of colours, depth, patterns and emotions. The dizzying patterns, bold colours and layered shadows, all work together to draw the viewer deeper into the story.

 

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CURRENT ISSUE
Creative Gaga - Issue 45

 




Roudra Bhangi
Roudra Bhangi
Roudra Bhangi
Roudra Bhangi
Roudra Bhangi
Roudra Bhangi

Carlos Cadenas is a Venezuelan art director and graphic designer, who is passionate about type and poster design. He has received several prestigious awards for this experimental typography series.

 

Here Carlos explores typography for the ’36 Days of Type’ Challenge. The result of his work brings colours, textures and 3D form so perfectly together that it almost looks too easy! Carlos decided to play with 3D and went all out with his explorations. The abstract concepts depicted for each letter is a very interesting and giving way to see a story inside a story. Through this series, one can see a myriad of ideas, colours, perspectives and so much more.

 

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CURRENT ISSUE
Creative Gaga - Issue 45

 




36 Days of Type

Don’t just put a font for the sake of it, put it for creating an impactful impression on the reader. Browse through this list of 18 best calligraphy fonts to achieve your target.

Fonts are known to be the most important element of graphic design. Balancing the rest of the design with the type of font to be used is quite a challenging task for a designer.

 

It is but necessary to have the right font, not too much, not too less, to have a long-lasting impact of the message to be conveyed to the readers.

From what was done manually ages ago using ink and brush to create graceful calligraphy has now gone all digital, but still with the same look and feel of the hand-crafted old-time beauty.

 

Life and work have become much easier with the presence of the button, ‘download’ ! Take a look at these calligraphy fonts and choose the one which makes your work look its best by downloading it at no cost!

1. Candlescript

A smooth and flowy typeface designed with an intricate level of detail, Candlescript is suitable to be used as a logotype, custom typeface, title, header or advertisements.


Font
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18 Free Calligraphy Fonts

2. Mike Ferrari 

Mike Ferrari is a typeface based on the Spencerian Script. Composed using elegant and beautiful strokes, it is just the perfect font to gracefully colour up any project with a human touch.


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3. Feathergraphy

A high-quality script font with multilingual support and a large number of special characters, Feathergraphy is a hand-crafted typeface that can be used for logotypes, titles and slogans as well as a tattoo style font in clean and decorated versions.

 

Font Download

18 Free Calligraphy Fonts

4. Meat Buckets

A nervous script font, Meat Buckets comes with a taste of old-school style. Going for a full commercial version allows an extra 86 alternates, contextual ligatures and underlining to be used for a charming and elegant calligraphy.

 

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5. Olivia Script

An exclusive from The Font Bundles Store, Olivia Script is a sophisticated, graceful and modern calligraphy typeface complimenting the look of wedding invitations, greeting cards, posters, wall hangings and the likes.

 

Font  Download


6. Allura

Simple, clean, legible and casual characters describe Allura as an almost handwritten calligraphic script. Designed keeping advertising, display and packaging design in mind, Allura comes with extra alternate glyphs and flourished graphics, giving the professional designer a maximum flexibility.

 

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7. Kaligraf Latin 

Translating personal handwriting taken from the pages of calligraphy into characters for Kaligraf Latin, this font includes a few ornaments useful for creating typographic pages.

 

Font Download


8. Qaskin

An elegant script typeface available in two versions, black and white, Qaskin comes across as a light-hearted font, illustrating fun and frolic.

 

Font Download


9. Pinyon Script

Confident and showy swashes suggesting the style of the American-West, Pinyon Script is a romantic round hand script style font. Defined by slants and high stroke contrasts, this aristocratic style is friendly for large size texts.

 

Font Download


10. Plain Germanica 

Inspired by the Gothic and Medieval styles of design, Plain Germanica is a font face reminiscent of the historical beauty of those eras, transporting the reader back in time.

 

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11. Playlist

A perfectly imperfect hand-drawn font in dry brush styles, Playlist consists of 3 styles namely script, caps and ornament, which can create a beautiful design when jumbled in an orderly fashion.

 

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12. Qwigley

Winding around in a swirly fashion, Qwigley is the font-face for decorative letterforms. Contemporary in style, it has a  feminine feel to it, delicately embellishing the calligraphic typography.

 

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13. Kadisoka 

A handwriting font ideal for logotypes and headlines, Kadisoka is a script that comes along with a variety of ligatures, stylistic alternates and sets to be tried out for amazing graphics outcomes.

 

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14. Dancing Script OT

A cursive font with intermittent connections beautifully mimicking hand-written text, Dancing Script OT works as a visual style statement. Each word beginning with a letter in caps which goes below the baseline, it is just the quintessential font for a modern-stylized casual look.

 

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15. Fabfelt Script Font

A handwritten typo with grain effect, Fabfelt Script font comes with a retro feel. This is a monoline font, is just a perfect match for branding and headings.

 

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16. Great Vibes

A script with clean and clear flowy connections, heavy strokes and dramatic caps, Great Vibes is a font for breaking the monotony of design with its encircling ascenders and descenders.

 

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17. Playball Font

Inspired by American sporting calligraphy, namely vintage baseball cards, Playball is a connecting script, demonstrating athleticism, boldness and masculinity, thus making it perfect for festive informal and sporting occasions.

 

Font Download


18. Pacifico

A modern brush script, Pacifico is inspired by the American surf culture of the 1950s’. A slight touch of the retro style, it makes for an apt solution for a bold and engaging calligraphy font.

 

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Taking a good look at the new and emerging typefaces that have made their way into the design scene across the world, we follow the fresh ones that have carved a niche for themselves and even the classic ones that are here to stay. The world of type is, indeed, an interesting one today as it continues to grow further.

The power of words cannot be undermined. Especially in these modern times when it is not just about what is said but also how it is said. And that is what leads us to take a peek at the current trends in typography where so much has evolved over the years.

01
3D Typefaces

3D modelling has quite effectively found its place in the design arena of today through various forms and applications. With many diverse means of executing it, the style has been widely adopted by various designers and the freshness of this medium to innovate is what has ensured it stays in vogue.

Designed by JeanPierre Le Roux

Designed by PICTOGLAZE .

Designed by JeanPierre Le Roux


02
Serif Fonts

The classic appeal of Serif typefaces has kept itself alive, not fading away under the oncoming of other trending fonts that have come into the picture during the recent few years. The grace and ease with which this type flows are what has kept its exuberance alive. Truly ‘beautiful and timeless’.


03
Bold Typography

Bold typography has been here through the ages and is here to stay. Bold is, indeed, beautiful. It has the capacity to garner the attention of its audience and even engage it in the process. Who said bold is too loud? Not in 2018, at least.

Designed by Rudmer van Hulzen

Designed by Justin Poulter


04
Custom Fonts

The ‘Custom’ way has found a place for itself across all areas, forms and modes of design. Freedom and the ability these fonts provides are hard to mimic even as it is applied to suit different contexts. Such versatility is difficult to achieve otherwise, which is why the custom font is so in trend.

Designed by Lorena G


05
Geometric Type

Geometry is the keystone of all things design and functional. The Geometric Type, in the very same context, is unlikely to get outdated even in the modern times of 2018. One that cannot be ignored or sidelined, expect to see it executed on more than just one occasion.

Designed by Lumiko


06
Experimental Typography

There is space for experiments in every sphere, isn’t there? So in the case of type, experimental typography has emerged as the new thing of today. It runs without rule and produces some stunning results in effect. The new winner on the block, this one.

Designed by Krzysztof Iwanski

Designed by Josh Schaub


07
Typography With Real-Life Elements

No matter how great the virtual gets, it shall never overcome the real. That is why the effects of reality have made their way into the font world via typography featuring real-life elements. Font carved around everyday situations, essentials and people is certainly one new visual to keep an eye on.

Designed by Krzysztof Iwanski


08
Bold Alignment and Kerning

The not-so-neat typography has gained great acknowledgement and thus more presence in the recent few years as it continues to grow. With its fashionable and stylish appeal, it makes a lasting and relevant impact on more than just a few people. Who said all must be only in ‘order’!

Designed by Akatre Studio

Designed by MONK Scriptorium

Fascinated by Typefaces, Shibu P.G. guides us into the world of letters and fonts, where so much can be said even between the words.

The Oomph Factor.

Fonts have forged an almost unreal significance since the era of letter printing. There came the Serif, Sans Serif typefaces, which then evolved into Segoe, Frutiger, Univers, Helvetica and a multitude of other fonts that are presently innumerable. Inspiration from them to develop a new font was only found to be innate.

Finding New Font.

The font ‘Achi’ aims to outshine the regular fonts, radiating a unique style in the very first glance. The decision to choose only uppercase in the font stemmed from the desire to see it appear in bold and fascinating titles, phrases and of course brand names. With this in mind, the vision and purpose were
clearly set.

Carving a niche.

Creativity vocalises itself to each designer in its own specific manner, including through ink and paper – for example, letter-forming by hand being the first instinct. It is often the most simple of acts that finds itself being used as the common construction, shape or character, then applied to all letters in a font. In Achi’s case, it was the parallel line-formation and its spacing between each and every letter. Once a letter was shaped, the command over the font enabled executing an almost similar style to all other letters. Articulating the hand-drawn designs into the computer, using basic shapes and grids in Adobe Illustrator canvas, is time-consuming but effective, followed by polishing and tweaking as a final touch using Fontlab.

Published in Issue 39

As the festivity is all around, every brand or business is trying to impress the Indian audience. But what really works for us Indians? What is an Indian design? And how we can make designs for India? To understand it, we interviewed some Indian creatives who are successfully creating designs for the Indian audience. This issue of Creative Gaga is a light read for someone looking for inspirations or insights on Indian design and how the Indian audience can be enticed. So go ahead and order your copy or subscribe if you want to keep receiving a regular dose of inspirations!

 

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If it was only about words, we’d only need a word document. Typography is all about solving a problem by also communicating an ambience and character. “It’s about communicating a message and letterforms are our tools”, says typographer Shiva Nellaperumal. Below he explains his rules to the game from A to Z.

words
Alterneutral Manifesto/ poster.

You must know the past in order to design for future.

Design history is full of inspiration. When you’re not working, read a book or watch a movie; imbibe the visual culture through cinema, comics, music, books etc. Focus on how design has evolved, and what you can possibly bring to it next. There is a lot of value in a design that represents an era. Study the eras. A designer responds to stimuli provided by his/her environment and by analysing the past, one gets to know how other designers responded to the stimuli in their time. It’s very important for a designer to be firmly rooted in his/her time and design things that are relevant.

words
Adian Grid Specimen Poster.

Your process must be contextual to the nature of the project.

Each letter has its own semantic meaning that cannot be changed. We all know the letter ‘a’ of any typeface has a characteristic set of curves and lines. But what sets it apart is the way it is drawn. When working on letterforms, keep in mind the feel that the piece must convey. This could be very obvious or very subjective. For example, in the typographic posters for Doolally, the letters were designed to look like beer, in order to evoke the feeling of beer. But for the Public Enemy album art, a more subjective method was employed. Because their music is very harsh and represents the streets and calls for a militant action against racism, the feeling was conveyed through the use of stencil typeface that was specifically designed. The colours and composition also evoke the 80s feel which is when the album was made.

words
Struktur Construction.

A design based purely on aesthetic work is an end in itself.

Your work should serve a problem. Every design decision should be informed by whether that choice would bring you closer to communicating the message to the viewer. Of course, aesthetics are important, but not at the cost of the purpose of the design. Remember, you’re not painting scenery here but providing a creative solution. It’s not about what’s said, but how it’s said.

words
DJAD Posters

Typography’s sole purpose is to act as a vehicle for the content to be read comfortably.

But with expressive type, one has the freedom to express more meaning than just act as a carrier. It’s about communicating an ambience. It’s interesting to know that design is capable of working in subliminal ways. For example, certain typefaces when used in a certain way evoke a sense of the 70s. Design that can work in unsaid ways holds a lot of value. Try incorporating that in your design by focusing on the details rather than the bigger picture. That’s where the magic happens because the viewer understands what’s being communicated but doesn’t realise why or how!

words
Adian Grid Construction.

Design decisions are informed by the materials that can be used.

In typography, the challenge would be to pick the right typeface for a design problem, one that evokes the appropriate feeling in the user. For example, a medical journal must use a typeface that is commanding and neutral but a film poster could use a very expressive one. The basic principles of design like contrast, rhythm and balance need to be adjusted and worked on to achieve the needed feel. Type design is a craft. It is highly dependent on its production, where the technicalities must be impeccable for it to work properly. Typefaces are tools for designers. If graphic designers are architects, type designers are the ones who make the materials to be used.

words
It takes a nation of millions to hold us back by public enemy.

The greatest challenge is to push the design with technology and create work that challenges its own production.

Technology is integral to design. The aesthetics, production values and scale of a project are often heavily influenced by the technology available at the time. This sets eras apart. For example, during the letterpress era, the design was constrained by what the letterpress could do, but some of these constraints were reduced during the Photolettering era. And a whole different set of constraints were introduced when the computer became integral to design. There have always been designers who broke boundaries with the technology available like how Wolfgang Weingart did with his letterpress works or how Emigre did when computers first came out. Constraints excite the designer. A good example for this is the typeface, FF Beowulf by the guys at Letterror. It is a digital typeface that was part code and part drawing and its forms changed every time it was printed. Now with the recent advancements in type technology with open type and web fonts, it is an exciting time to be a type designer.

words
Murder Ballads by Nick Cave & the BadbSeeds.

Published in Issue 19

A typography special, made up of not only Indian type designers or designers whose first love is type, but also few very talented international designers who open a totally new playground with sharing their insights and inspirations. This issue has exclusive interviews with Lucky Dubz Trifonas from Netherlands, Indian UI & type designer Sabareesh Ravi and Shiva Nallaperumal, who believes, type designers are the material providers to all the creative professionals. Also, includes a special making of Nirlep rebranding done by Elephant Design and an interaction with the ace product designer Aman Sadana.

 

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As the digital world has made the world smaller, design has coalesced as well where different forms are uniting and new evolutions are seen. Illustration ‘Type’ is one such avenue of type design which can add more meaning to characters and words. Visual Communication Designer, Shaivalini Kumar throws some light on the key points to be kept in mind while venturing down this path.

Design is like a chemical reaction.

We’ve studied it in science how some reactions slowly yield products. That’s exactly how design works as well. It all starts with the hint of talent that predisposes one towards the creative side of the world, just like potential energy which when comes in contact with culture, people, books, dialect, surroundings and food explodes to yield a great product – a designer! Inspirations that cradle us from childhood combine and release themselves through creative energy which manifests in various forms. It’s all about finding magic in the mundane to create extraordinary designs.

cover
Design for Education.
Design for Education.
cover
Inner Spread
Inner Spread

It’s all about reading the letters!

Typography is a challenging area of design where one is limited with a form that is already defined; an ‘a’ has to look like an ‘a’ in order that people read it as ‘a’. This is where “illustrated type” has been a saviour for many designers who are inspired by the possibilities that typography has to offer. Combining illustration and graphic design, this mode of design allow designers to bridge their two areas of interest. In order to redefine a form that is already defined, it’s important to re-look at it often with a theme or a storytelling perspective. This is where a simplistic base structure is crafted and then modified by either constructing on top of them, modifying them, detailing them and giving them depth, all in a way so that each letter has its own story to tell.

Publication Design
Publication Design

It’s also a lot of hard work behind the scenes.

If you’re a digital artist, as most designers are in today’s world, it’s really important to be well informed with technological updates that can help enhance the design process. For those who are on the move a lot, working to make quick sketches using the Adobe Photoshop Sketch App on the iPad is a great way to utilise technology. One can then render the artwork on the laptop. Think of it as a scribble made digitally! While creating artwork, it’s also important to research extensively about the technicalities of design as well as what is trending. The last thing you want is to create something that could have turned out better. Read about artists as well, follow blogs, create a blog, share stories and most of all, collaborate and be an active member of a prolific design community in order to stay abreast with all the latest.

Illustrated type

Judge a book by its cover!

It’s popularly said that never judge a book by its cover. However, interesting illustrations and design is changing this belief. When a designer designs a book cover, their aim is to not only showcase the content of the book, but to also create a personality for the cover which is emotive and inviting. This vision enables the audience to engage with it on various levels. Think of it like packaging design and how critical that is for brands. In order to help make covers relevant and appealing, graphically illustrated typography and elements can be used that are designed to have a personality that suits the subject. In other words, make the matter the hero.

Hero Hoodies Identity Design
Hero Hoodies Identity Design

Published in Issue 30

Since stone age when individuals were identified with certain marks, branding has always been an integral part of our life. It has evolved so much that now every success can be connected to branding behind it, but still brand creation has always been a mystery. We interviewed the branding experts, who are behind some of the very successful brands. Lopez Design, have shared the story behind the recently developed branding of ‘Bihar Museum‘ and also shared the basics of brand creation in the ‘Gyaan’ section. Young visual communication designer like Shaivalini Kumar shared her love for the letter design while experienced graphic designer Anup Shah dwelled upon his passion for calligraphy. In brief, this issue is packed with branding and typography design experts who can help you solve the mystery of the brand creation! Hope you will enjoy the articles!

 

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We’ve seen it happen in English. But typography in Indian languages and scripts is all-together a different word game. “Apart from physical differences, there are different emotions and meanings attached to different languages” says Sabareesh Ravi. Here, he tells us what key points must be kept in mind to overcome the challenges of multi-lingual typography.

Don’t only speak the languages, but also understand them.

When you’re designing using different languages, it’s important to know how people interpret each word. It’s necessary to know the culture and character of that language. A word in Hindi would have different cultural sentiments as compared to the same word written in Malayalam. Once this is accomplished, that’s when you can truly communicate using typography. At the same time, the type of script also influences your designs. For example, English has both curvaceous and sharp independent letters which make it very flexible to work with. On the other hand, Hindi is a challenge to mould because the letters are connected with a top-line.

Indian languages
JEEVICHU POTTE BAI (Let me live brother).
Indian languages
AANA (Elephant)

Symbolism makes typography universal.

Often we see foreigners with a Sanskrit or Hindi tattoo. They don’t know the language, but it’s the meaning, the essence of that word which appeals to them. These days, many of the new generation kids do not know how to write in their mother tongue. That’s when symbolism plays its role, because every child can identify an elephant or a snail.

Indian languages
VATTAM CHUTTI (had to run around a lot)

Tap the inner psychology of shapes.

Typography is like a little game of dumb charades, doesn’t matter English or Hindi. Everyone relates certain shapes and gestures to certain meanings and interpretations. It’s very important to study the subject and also how it is imprinted in the minds of people. Just like how we use spectacles to depict Mahatma Gandhi or even a hat and moustache to portray Charlie Chaplin. Typography is about exploring such characteristics of the subject and using words to give it the desired shape. Interestingly, even when you just include 60% of a shape in a particular design, the rest of the job is done by the people themselves. Leave it to the audience to connect the dots.

Indian languages
World Kidney Day -14 March 2013

And of course, make your design fun for the viewer.

Certain rules never change in typography, no matter what. People like visuals more than words. That’s the reason why typography is such an effective form of design. Because it makes the audience believe they are looking at a visual, and not really reading. The success of typography is derived using that formula. The less it appears like words, more the chances of it being appreciated and enjoyed.

Indian languages
Hug Me

Published in Issue 19

A typography special, made up of not only Indian type designers or designers whose first love is type, but also few very talented international designers who open a totally new playground with sharing their insights and inspirations. This issue has exclusive interviews with Lucky Dubz Trifonas from Netherlands, Indian UI & type designer Sabareesh Ravi and Shiva Nallaperumal, who believes, type designers are the material providers to all the creative professionals. Also, includes a special making of Nirlep rebranding done by Elephant Design and an interaction with the ace product designer Aman Sadana.

 

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