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There are stories hidden in faces and bodies. Exaggeration brings them to the fore. A good caricaturist lives the subject and discovers the multiple facets that make the story. Caricature artist Manoj Sinha reflects while talking about his design process.

Manoj Sinha - Caricaturist
Donald Trump, courtesy Hindustan Times Group
Manoj Sinha - Caricaturist
PM Narendra Modi, courtesy Hindustan Times Group by Manoj Sinha
Manoj Sinha - Caricaturist
Captain Amarinder Singh, courtesy Hindustan Times Group by Manoj Sinha

To watch is to learn.

Keep your eyes wide open. Watch every character and everything about them. Absorb yourself into your characters and feel their presence around. Understand their behaviour, attitudes, experiences, and temperament. There is a story made by all these elements. Observe their actions, as they often determine the story. And then exaggerate all these through your strokes to re-tell the story.

Ajay Devgan, courtesy Hindustan Times Group by Manoj Sinha
Manoj Sinha - Caricaturist
Daroga ji, courtesy Hindustan Times Group by Manoj Sinha
Manoj Sinha - Caricaturist
Om Puri, courtesy Hindustan Times Group
caricaturist
Mr. Nitish Kumar, courtesy Hindustan Times Group by Manoj Sinha


Manoj Sinha - Caricaturist
Aamir Khan, courtesy Hindustan Times Group
Manoj Sinha - Caricaturist
Raj Babbar, courtesy Hindustan Times Group
caricaturist
Mr. Rahul Bajaj, courtesy Hindustan Times Group by Manoj Sinha

Mind precedes the pen.

Forget paper and pencil for some time. Take mental notes of their personality, work, and gestures, creating images in your mind, that’ll eventually come out in the form of caricatures. A caricaturist not just observes, but dissects. Study not just the character of every person, but the characteristic features as well. Generally, subjects have distinctive features that instantly catch the eye of an artist. In such cases, it becomes easy to exaggerate them and create the caricature. In other cases, the artist needs to dig deep into the subject and find out which feature or aspect to play with.

Manoj Sinha - Caricaturist
Virat Kohli, courtesy Hindustan Times Group
Manoj Sinha - Caricaturist
Harmanpreet Kaur, courtesy Hindustan Times Group
Manoj Sinha - Caricaturist
Kapil Dev, courtesy Hindustan Times Group

A caricaturist not just observes, but dissects. Study not just the character of every person, but the characteristic features as well. Dig deep into the subject to find out features to play with.


Manoj Sinha - Caricaturist
RONALDINHO, courtesy Hindustan Times Group
Manoj Sinha - Caricaturist
Danny Boyle, courtesy Hindustan Times Group
caricaturist
Naseerudin Shah, courtesy Hindustan Times Group by Manoj Sinha

Fun is inbuilt.

One needs to know the nuances of the subject to add to the appeal of the artwork. Read and analyse everything about your character. It will automatically develop a personal opinion about the person. As a caricature artist, the opinion is often laden with humour. Put the character in focus and the fun in the story will come out automatically. The more colourful a personality, the more fun you have doing the caricature.

Manoj Sinha - Caricaturist
A P J Abdul Kalam, courtesy Hindustan Times Group
Manoj Sinha - Caricaturist
Pranb Mukharjee, courtesy Hindustan Times Group


Manoj Sinha - Caricaturist
Jayalalithaa, courtesy Hindustan Times Group
Yashpal, courtesy Hindustan Times Group by Manoj Sinha

Caricature is not fiction.

Almost every time, a caricature is about a real personality and the story attached. It is the duty of a caricaturist to portray the true character of the subject chosen. Therefore it is important to understand the thin line that separates humour from sarcasm. The key lies in creating insightful humour and most importantly, being true to the character. That is why one needs to spot the “LOL” factor in everything around. You never know, what strikes off the next story.

Manoj Sinha - Caricaturist
George W. Bush, courtesy Hindustan Times Group
Manoj Sinha - Caricaturist
Bal Thakrey, courtesy Hindustan Times Group by Manoj Sinha
Ranveer Singh, courtesy Hindustan Times Group by Manoj Sinha


Manoj Sinha - Caricaturist
Dalai Lama, courtesy Hindustan Times Group
Manoj Sinha - Caricaturist
Barack Obama, courtesy Hindustan Times Group
Mr. Ratan Tata, courtesy Hindustan Times Group by Manoj Sinha

A story is timeless.

A good caricature starts a relationship, between the story and the viewer. Media, today, is moving at an astonishing rate. Therefore it is important to choose topics that are not going to be forgotten at the next ‘Breaking News’ segment. The importance of a story lies in the fact that it brings education along with fun. This way, the news may become redundant but the awareness of the change that the news brings to the daily lives of the people, lingers on

Manoj Sinha - Caricaturist
Steve jobs, courtesy Hindustan Times Group
Manoj Sinha - Caricaturist
Mark Zuckerberg, courtesy Hindustan Times Group
Manoj Sinha - Caricaturist
Sunder Pichai, courtesy Hindustan Times Group

Published in Issue 12

first interactive issue of Creative Gaga with Augmented Reality features. This issue focuses on the transition of Advertising from real to virtual and blurring the boundaries of both at the same time. Also bundled with lots of interesting articles and interviews.

 

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He observes, delves and emerges with his own version of reality. Caricaturist Shijo Varghese remains true to his subject while reflecting his observations. Concentrating on parts, he lets them come together to narrate the true character and spirit portrayed by unreal proportions. He explains how.

the Subject with Soulful Distortion
Messi. Personal work. About the football superstar by Shijo Varghese
Danny-DeVito. Personal work. About the comedian-actor

A Caricature should Appeal to the Soul

When a caricature is taken up with a conscious mind, the result is impressive. However, when it is taken up with a desiring heart, the result is appealing. A true caricature charms not just the eye, but the soul.

 

A caricaturist must take to his drawing board as meditation, losing himself to the organic growth of the thought and lines. That’s when the subjects rise to become what he wants them to be while staying as close to the true character as possible.

the Subject with Soulful Distortion
Sreesanth. For Stumped!, a collection of 2011 world cup winning Indian team
Harbhajan Singh. Done for Stumped! a collection of 2011 world cup winning Indian team

Humans are a Sum Total of Parts

A caricaturist not just observes, but dissects. He studies not just the character of every person, but the characteristic features as well. The eyes, nose, lips or hair complements the happy, sad, positive or negative vibe that the subject exudes.

 

Generally, subjects have distinctive features that instantly catch the eye of an artist. In such cases, it becomes easy to exaggerate them and create the caricature. In other cases, the artist needs to dig deep into the subject and find out which feature or aspect to playing with. Distortion can go to any extent but the fact remains that it should not take away the person’s soul.

Shijo and Tintu. Personal work. Caricature of self and wife
Vrooom!. A collection of Formula One drivers’ caricatures by Shijo Varghese

Style Grows Forever

A style that blossoms with time is an accomplishment. There is no greater joy than creating a new phenomenon every time the pencil gets to work. Creations that evolve naturally, liberally and timelessly are the ones that bridge the real world with the virtual.

 

However, the focus should be on getting the subject’s essence, whichever style you may choose. Strokes, textures, patterns and everything else follows. Spontaneity is a big tool that every caricaturist must employ. Ideas come in when you are not looking for it. Making that the trigger point often results in uninhibited, impartial creations.

Bernie Ecclestone. Personal work about personalities of F1 2011 in India
Yuvraj Singh. Done for Stumped!, a collection of 2011 world cup winning Indian team

Know it before Distorting it

For every caricaturist, it is very important to have a very good understanding of anatomy and proportions to do good work. We should know the basics before distorting or exaggerating. It is alright to look at subjects with an eye of humour. But ultimately, the job of a caricaturist is to express the characteristic essence of the subject.

Sachin Tendulkar by Shijo Varghese
Amitabh Bachchan. Personal work. A take on the icon

Humour with Care

There is a thin line that separates humour from sarcasm. Therefore it is important to honour the former while communicating the core message. Employing free-spirited strokes, ever new shading techniques and an understanding of the subject results in insightful humour and most importantly, being true to the character. Who said caricatures can only tickle the rib? It has all the power to take care of the mind too!

Roger Federer. Personal work. Interpretation of the tennis superstar
Steve Jobs. Personal work. Recreating the charm of the genius

There is a Ctrl Z for Everything

That’s one benefit of the digital technology. One doesn’t need to worry much about the final product. The ‘ctrl z’ solves everything for everyone. At the same time, it takes away the raw charm of working with pencils. The basic process of putting pencil to paper brings with it lots of ad venture, experiment and learning.

 

Pencils can be used in various ways as per the need. Strokes and shading style moulds itself as per y our thought. And there is a virtue in it. You’ll love every moment of creating, distorting and destructing. And this can never be delivered by any software.

Dwayne Bravo. Done for Howzaat, a collection of caricatures of members of the Chennai Super Kings team
Dhoni. Personal work. A take on the skipper

Never Give Up

Being able to draw is a gift from god. One should keep practising to improve one’s talent. Whatever time it takes, never stop or compromise with the quality. Make observation a habit and then a process. Most importantly, be your own critic. Remember, you loved it that’s why you are at it. And you can’t give up anything you love so easily!

Priyanka Chopra. Indian Actress by Shijo Varghese
Sergio Pérez. Formula One Driver

Published in Issue 10

With this issue, we are exploring yet another discipline of design – Web and UI. With the changing times, Indian designers are increasingly opting for this new medium. But are we really prepared to take the global challenge? What’s missing and what do we strive on? We invited few leading practitioners of the industry to deliberate on this issue.

 

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