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Colours can paint a good picture or spoil it altogether, literally. Graphic Designer, Meroo Seth, speaks about and elaborates upon her approach towards finding the essential colour combination in sync with the remaining elements of her work.

Meroo Seth
Get Grubs Takeaway Bags.
Meroo Seth
Get Grubs Packaging Design.
Meroo Seth
Get Grubs Stationary design.

To connect is the calling.

Design plays a huge role in Meroo’s life; it’s a voice through which she finds expression. It not only makes her look at things differently but also manages to play with her opinions. Communicating complicated ideas simply; connecting with people, and making the world a beautiful place through appealing visuals is what spurs her. No doubt, she takes to an approach of fun, curiosity, happiness, and playfulness when working on her illustrations. She’s more than happy if her work can bring about a sense of delight in people, making them feel something good while solving problems as well.

Meroo Seth

Finding your own palette.

Colour sense comes with experience and the trial-and-error of playing with different sets of colours. She has seen her own colour palettes changing and evolving with time. Conversations with friends and strangers; meeting new people, and being open to new experiences are like finding a new colour palette, to Meroo. The process of building an unusual bridge between different observations and associations triggers insights and inspiration within her. According to her, emotion is the most important factor to consider while creating balanced colour palettes. That is why she avoids overusing a colour, while, many-a-times, the colour itself inspires her to create the design.

Meroo Seth
Making salad together.

Creating the balance.

Colour is a powerful and important communication tool and is tied to religious, cultural, political and social influences. So, it’s not enough for a designer to use a colour merely because one likes it.

Meroo Seth
Alphabet G Mug.
Meroo Seth
Alphabet M Mug.

Colours communicate various meaning; even all colours combinations signify differently, evoking varied emotions and feelings when paired with another colour. So, she believes it’s very important that elements in the composition balance weight. For example, the thickness of a form, colour, texture and the kind of forms should also have a consistent style they follow. Sometimes, the form cannot say it all; the use and amount of colours then play an even more important role in communicating the idea.

Meroo Seth
Cavaya Fine Dine Menu.
Meroo Seth
Cavaya Fine Dine stationary.

Harmonising elements.

Meroo firmly trusts that everything and everyone supports and relies on one another and that it applies in the case of colours too. Each colour change relies on what the rest of the colours and elements are. The shades and tones can be played amongst each other to provide an appealing look while balancing the elements of the composition.

Meroo Seth
Food posters.
Meroo Seth
Eating Together.

At times, she isolates a colour to give it focus, so as to create a totally unique impact. Likewise, she also plays with light and shade to create an interesting mood. While choosing a colour palette, she comes up with a few keywords the palette should reflect when creating a mood board for a particular subject – for example, ‘happy, fun and bold’. Now, that’s sure to spread some smiles.

Meroo Seth
Best Friends.
Meroo Seth
Coffee cups for The Hangout Café.

Published in Issue 35

The season of the festival has started and everyone is preparing to have a unique one this time with less cash and more fun. We interview many creatives who creates promotional or calendar design each year. As most of the thing around us had shifted to digital, even calendar design and the promotion has shifted. But Yorick Pintos, a strategic consultant at studio Kohl suggests that best option would be a mix of both. If you are interested in print design & want to understand the future of the same. So, go ahead and order your latest issue copy!

 

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Graphic designer, Itu Chaudhuri, lets out his experience and insight in the field of branding. He expresses what goes into creating effective brands, and the various aspects or elements that play a role in the process.

Branding
The Wild Stone Code Range.

CG. What is the relationship between the product and the branding? How does the former shape or inspire the latter?

IC. For some brands, the product’s properties are the heart of the brand. For example, we know Mercedes by their cars, which are a model of stability and Germanic engineered perfection; not by their advertising or showrooms or their F1 Cars (which they do very well). For those brands, branding needs to reflect what’s special about the product, but rarely reflects the product itself. The ‘what’s special’ part, in turn, depends on the category. For more functional products, it’s about a clear benefit from using it (e.g. relieving pain).

Branding
The Real Tea Range.

For less functional brands, the benefit may be more in the mind i.e. how it makes people feel, or its ‘values’ (what it encourages its customers to believe in). This is also true for brands, which we know by their advertising more than by the special qualities of the product (e.g. a mobile service like Vodafone or Airtel). But, rarely does the branding show the product itself. If the product is a packaged product that’s never unpacked (think deodorants, or insect repellents, or a fizzy drink), then the branding and the product are practically fused (even when large advertising budgets support the brands).

Branding
Branding
Branding
Eicher Live.

CG. According to you, How and to what extent, does branding impact an audience?

IC. Every customer knows that they are being manipulated. So, branding works best when it slips under the radar of the customers or escapes their ‘crap detector’. Yet, if the brand seems to admit this while managing to charm the customers, it works. The audience is then willingly helpless to resist. This means that the branding is, in some sense, invisible when it appears to belong or be inevitable as if there was no other way it could have appeared. This requires honesty on the owner’s part and linking the brand to what is true. Despite this, it’s carefully orchestrated. Simply appearing artless won’t do it. Done right, it can succeed in disarming the customer.

Branding
The Almirah.
Branding
The Almirah.

CG. What do you do to ensure that the brand character comes across fully in the final design?

IC. Personality is the key, and thus cannot be overlooked or sidelined at any stage. It’s a mental model of the brand that describes the brand’s character and attitude, more like a representative, and thus implies its appearance.

Brand applications for ‘Hired’.

CG. What do you feel should be proportion, or how much is the need for balance, between minimalism and complexities in a design?

IC. The point isn’t a balance: it’s more a purposeful imbalance. Different brands need different treatments, so that one may do best in a minimal style, and another with a busy, or even chaotic style. This is a necessary facet that one needs to recognise and remember throughout the process.

Branding
Annual Report Design for IDFC.
Branding
Branding
Branding
Branding
Branding

CG. What do you feel is an essential part of branding?

IC. Deep understanding of the client’s truth is fundamental and most essential, but making sure that it’s attractive to their customers is of value, at the same time. If you succeed on the first count and fail on the second, you touch no one. The other way around, and the attraction will be skin deep. It very clearly is a case of both or nothing.

Branding
Publication design for Breakthrough.

Published in Issue 38

This issue, we try to explore different views from many well-known studio owners and senior designers. While Anthony Lopez of Lopez Design shared tips on what a studio looks for in a designer, Mohar Ray from Codesign highlights the key aspects that play a significant role and make the difference in whether you are hired or not as a promising designer. Also, this issue has an insightful article on ‘Branding with reason and love’ from Itu Chaudhuri, founder ICD (Itu Chaudhuri Design) along with Siddhi Ranade, explaining his tools of story telling through his unique style of illustrations. This issue is a must read for a talented graduate to a branding expert. Order you copy and enjoy reading it!

 

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If it was only about words, we’d only need a word document. Typography is all about solving a problem by also communicating an ambience and character. “It’s about communicating a message and letterforms are our tools”, says typographer Shiva Nellaperumal. Below he explains his rules to the game from A to Z.

words
Alterneutral Manifesto/ poster.

You must know the past in order to design for future.

Design history is full of inspiration. When you’re not working, read a book or watch a movie; imbibe the visual culture through cinema, comics, music, books etc. Focus on how design has evolved, and what you can possibly bring to it next. There is a lot of value in a design that represents an era. Study the eras. A designer responds to stimuli provided by his/her environment and by analysing the past, one gets to know how other designers responded to the stimuli in their time. It’s very important for a designer to be firmly rooted in his/her time and design things that are relevant.

words
Adian Grid Specimen Poster.

Your process must be contextual to the nature of the project.

Each letter has its own semantic meaning that cannot be changed. We all know the letter ‘a’ of any typeface has a characteristic set of curves and lines. But what sets it apart is the way it is drawn. When working on letterforms, keep in mind the feel that the piece must convey. This could be very obvious or very subjective. For example, in the typographic posters for Doolally, the letters were designed to look like beer, in order to evoke the feeling of beer. But for the Public Enemy album art, a more subjective method was employed. Because their music is very harsh and represents the streets and calls for a militant action against racism, the feeling was conveyed through the use of stencil typeface that was specifically designed. The colours and composition also evoke the 80s feel which is when the album was made.

words
Struktur Construction.

A design based purely on aesthetic work is an end in itself.

Your work should serve a problem. Every design decision should be informed by whether that choice would bring you closer to communicating the message to the viewer. Of course, aesthetics are important, but not at the cost of the purpose of the design. Remember, you’re not painting scenery here but providing a creative solution. It’s not about what’s said, but how it’s said.

words
DJAD Posters

Typography’s sole purpose is to act as a vehicle for the content to be read comfortably.

But with expressive type, one has the freedom to express more meaning than just act as a carrier. It’s about communicating an ambience. It’s interesting to know that design is capable of working in subliminal ways. For example, certain typefaces when used in a certain way evoke a sense of the 70s. Design that can work in unsaid ways holds a lot of value. Try incorporating that in your design by focusing on the details rather than the bigger picture. That’s where the magic happens because the viewer understands what’s being communicated but doesn’t realise why or how!

words
Adian Grid Construction.

Design decisions are informed by the materials that can be used.

In typography, the challenge would be to pick the right typeface for a design problem, one that evokes the appropriate feeling in the user. For example, a medical journal must use a typeface that is commanding and neutral but a film poster could use a very expressive one. The basic principles of design like contrast, rhythm and balance need to be adjusted and worked on to achieve the needed feel. Type design is a craft. It is highly dependent on its production, where the technicalities must be impeccable for it to work properly. Typefaces are tools for designers. If graphic designers are architects, type designers are the ones who make the materials to be used.

words
It takes a nation of millions to hold us back by public enemy.

The greatest challenge is to push the design with technology and create work that challenges its own production.

Technology is integral to design. The aesthetics, production values and scale of a project are often heavily influenced by the technology available at the time. This sets eras apart. For example, during the letterpress era, the design was constrained by what the letterpress could do, but some of these constraints were reduced during the Photolettering era. And a whole different set of constraints were introduced when the computer became integral to design. There have always been designers who broke boundaries with the technology available like how Wolfgang Weingart did with his letterpress works or how Emigre did when computers first came out. Constraints excite the designer. A good example for this is the typeface, FF Beowulf by the guys at Letterror. It is a digital typeface that was part code and part drawing and its forms changed every time it was printed. Now with the recent advancements in type technology with open type and web fonts, it is an exciting time to be a type designer.

words
Murder Ballads by Nick Cave & the BadbSeeds.

Published in Issue 19

A typography special, made up of not only Indian type designers or designers whose first love is type, but also few very talented international designers who open a totally new playground with sharing their insights and inspirations. This issue has exclusive interviews with Lucky Dubz Trifonas from Netherlands, Indian UI & type designer Sabareesh Ravi and Shiva Nallaperumal, who believes, type designers are the material providers to all the creative professionals. Also, includes a special making of Nirlep rebranding done by Elephant Design and an interaction with the ace product designer Aman Sadana.

 

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Kshitij Tembe reintroduces the memories of Italian films that contained the impact of World War II. Redesigning the posters of The Bicycle Thief, he attempts to replicate the vibe of that age.

Creating the set-up.

The Bicycle Thief stands as a symbol of the neo-realistic film era of Italy. Through the representation of this iconic classic, the intention was to personify that phase of time. Its no-nonsense style is what guided the poster-work, throughout. The unpretentious manner of the movie was the essence that needed to be captured in the work.

Establishing the sync.

The non-use of artificial sets peculiarly characterised the cinema of this genre. The film was instead shot at real-life locations in the midst of moderate societies. Paying attention to this simplistic quality, a minimalist and modern approach was chosen for the depiction – through elements such as the Typeface. A natural harmony thus arose between the movie and its representation.

bicycle
bicycle
bicycle

Creating the balance.

The bicycle subtly runs as a secondary ingredient, through the motion picture. Yet, even though it doesn’t announce itself, its significance cannot be undervalued. Hence, the poster gently broadcasts the bicycle as an important element in the story, without establishing its impact. It does so simultaneously while allowing the audience to connect the dots during the film.

bicycle
bicycle

Published in Issue 19

A typography special, made up of not only Indian type designers or designers whose first love is type, but also few very talented international designers who open a totally new playground with sharing their insights and inspirations. This issue has exclusive interviews with Lucky Dubz Trifonas from Netherlands, Indian UI & type designer Sabareesh Ravi and Shiva Nallaperumal, who believes, type designers are the material providers to all the creative professionals. Also, includes a special making of Nirlep rebranding done by Elephant Design and an interaction with the ace product designer Aman Sadana.

 

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