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Visual Communications specialist, Lisa Rath tells us what are the key qualities she looks for when hiring a young communication designer.

In a young designer, hunger for knowledge and performance are vital. An understanding of why they have chosen design discipline, and why they wish to pursue it as a career option, is a rather important factor in gauging a candidate’s potential. It provides an overview of their perspective, and approach, thus offering an insight into their temperament at a broader level.

 

In the current academic scenario, design education is often an option for school leaving students without superlative academic performance. Therefore, it’s important to know how much they are genuinely invested in design as a study and vocation. The willingness to absorb and learn is often an offshoot of their hunger and drive.

In the current academic scenario, design education is often an option for school leaving students without superlative academic performance. Therefore, it’s important to know how much they are genuinely invested in design as a study and vocation. The willingness to absorb and learn is often an offshoot of their hunger and drive.

Next, in line are drawing skills. Though computers are used for every design discipline today, the basic ability to express an idea via drawing is paramount. Skilled, communicative and disciplined use of sketching always leads to good, well thought out design solutions. The better we draw our ideas, the better we communicate with clients.

Good drawing always translates into a better-finished design solution.

One must remember this at all points of time – not only at the conceptual stage of a design process but as the work progresses through many phases.

An awareness of the socio-economic realities of our country and the rest of the world is desirable.

Understanding, sympathising and contextualising a design problem is essential for all designers pursuing any discipline. Without a good understanding of India or the world’s socio-political-economical landscape, young designers can be at a loss when exploring solutions for a potential project. It’s advocated that sociology and psychology should be part of design education.

 

On the same lines, it is not only an added advantage but to quite a large extent necessary and important, for a young designer to be interested in politics, books, films are it mainstream cinema, art films or absolutely anything under the sun.

Lastly, as a communication designer, it is very important to be communicative. Therefore, writing ability, debating ability and a great sense of humour is a must to survive in the studio.

Published in Issue 38

This issue, we try to explore different views from many well-known studio owners and senior designers. While Anthony Lopez of Lopez Design shared tips on what a studio looks for in a designer, Mohar Ray from Codesign highlights the key aspects that play a significant role and make the difference in whether you are hired or not as a promising designer. Also, this issue has an insightful article on ‘Branding with reason and love’ from Itu Chaudhuri, founder ICD (Itu Chaudhuri Design) along with Siddhi Ranade, explaining his tools of story telling through his unique style of illustrations. This issue is a must read for a talented graduate to a branding expert. Order you copy and enjoy reading it!

 

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Is it the right time for rebranding? And what may be the pros and cons of missing this opportunity? Many questions surface in our mind when we think of rebranding. Here, Chandan Wadhwa, director of Lopamudra Creative, provides answers to some of them with his unique experience.

Changing your branding is a great move but it can also turn into an embarrassing goof. It’s a risky endeavour. Though a lot depends on the purpose of rebranding whether it is a turning point in the company’s history or a massacre of followers.

 

Whichever is your reason, but rebranding surely calls for great marketing efforts. Without it, the brand could just lose it all, as the old doesn’t exist and the new has no recognition. Like Airtel, Videocon and Micromax; all did a great marketing exercise after rebranding to capture the market and gain recognition.

It’s always and never the right time for rebranding. It’s a decision that is based on a lot of variables and comes down to your brand’s exact positioning in the market.

 

If rebranding has ever crossed your mind, then it’s a good indication to start researching. No one knows your customer and brand better than you. Just trust your gut!

If you are still indecisive about it then here are a few pros and cons of rebranding.

Pros:

• A new vision. A new promise. And new customers.

 

• Your brand will be in sync with the industry trends and the new generation.

 

• You will be ready to grab fresh opportunities in the new market.

 

• Brings a fresh energy into a workplace. Employees stick around more expecting a better opportunity.

 

• It also surprises your competitors.

Cons:

• Expensive and time taking exercise. Requires Patience unless you hire Fiverr (but then you are definitely screwed).

 

• If you change your visual marketing without changing the company focus or vision, customers will detect that the new image is just ‘the lipstick on a pig’.

 

• And rebranding without remarketing is a ‘Suicide’.

 

• Rebranding is sometimes confused with a change of ownership or even bankruptcy. So, if you don’t do the research and hire the right experts, you can end up confusing your existing clientele too.

To summarise, if you are thinking about a rebranding exercise, don’t forget that it is an overall strategy and not just as simple as changing your logo. Every element you change can have a significant impact on your brand image as a whole. Also, make sure your new brand identity should be consistently carried across all marketing channels

Published in Issue 34

This is a rebranding special issue focused on finding the answers to some of the basic questions like what is the right time for re-branding? or what all needs changing and how exactly? We interviewed some of the best branding studios like Landor Mumbai, Elephant, VGC, Inchwork, and many more. If you are considering rebranding or want to learn more about the art of doing it then this issue is a must-read. So, go ahead and

 


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Don’t jump to the conclusions and enter into a world of assumptions, wait till The End, know the reality and live on peaceful terms for the time after completion of a project. Anuj Prasad from Desmania shares his insights about this phase, the last mile, as he calls it.

What is the Last Mile?

It’s often seen that designers and clients start getting flustered when the project is on the brink of completion. This is the last mile and the toughest to handle, because at this stage mind is in an anxious state to complete the project and get on with the next one.

 

Most designers feel the euphoria during creative phases and lose steam as the project moves into technical and execution mode.Perhaps, the last mile is the most important mile in any passage of activity that must come to a conclusive end. It is also the most frustrating mile as one is almost there but yet not.

It is the same feeling as your plane circling around before landing or your train parked at the outer locations as it crawls to the destination.

 

Such situations make the virtual time expand to disproportionate dimension, creating a good likelihood of losing cool. Flaring up at this point is so obvious, while the challenge is to let the positive energies flow steadily.

Tough to Handle? Not Really!

Patience and perseverance is the answer.

 

It is like making a painting with a hazy idea and then evolving it into something meaningful. Yet the final strokes make all the difference. Believe it or not, but a masterpiece is differentiated from an average piece of art based on the final strokes.

The same holds good in design, sustained energy to keep improving till the end of the project, penetrating down to tweak the final details, small little modifications and refinements make all the difference.

 

Being open to inputs from the stakeholders, while responding in judiciously is an art that each one of us needs to master consciously as our experience grows.

After-Effects of the Last Mile

The last mile has the power to break long-lasting relationships. Primarily because it creates the slip between ‘completion with contentment’ and ‘completion for the heck of it’.

 

A small advisory to the team to be prepared for this phase is a good beginning. Thereafter, project managers need to take on the mantle with a focussed aim to exceed the expectations of the client at the time of completion.

The intent should be to pair with the client and run the last mile as a true companion to touch the finishing line with aplomb and give a high five to each other!

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