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With the stakes of digital art soaring high in the market, have a look at some of the best Indian digital artists and get-going to be one!

Wanting to give life to your imagination? What are you waiting for! This is just the right time to start out and the right environment to be inspired from!

 

Be it replicating an image of a famous personality or creating other-worldly characters, anything and everything is possible with digital art using a simple pen-tab and digital software.

 

Follow these brilliant Indian Digital Artists and hop onto a journey of unplanned surprises and master-piece outcomes!

1. Aashit Singh

Aashit Singh is a Mumbai-based visionary artist specialising in creating visual representations of the intangible and other-worldly imagery. He feels that realism in psychedelic art is important to be able to relate to these psychedelic visions. Read the detailed article on Constructing Psychedelic Experience! featuring Aashit’s deep insights.

 


Digital Art

2. Ankur Patar

Ankur Patar, a national and international award winner, has had over 13 years of experience in the advertising industry. Accredited with being chosen as one of the best digital artists of India in 2012, he has brands like Adidas, Nike, Adobe and the likes associating him for years.

 

His recent collaboration with Adobe to recreate lost masterpieces got him into the limelight once again. He was one of the only 4 digital artists chosen from throughout the world to recreate paintings using only Adobe stock imagery.  Ankur also shared how does Digital Art help to exceed your imagination!

 


3. Archan Nair

A firm believer of creating what the heart says, Archan shifted from being a fashion major and an entrepreneur to a self-taught digital and visual artist and illustrator specialising in mixed media and digital art. He is now a Germany-based independent Indian Digital Artist with cultural roots from India. Archan calls this artwork as Psymbionic – a digital Illustration of human and the subtler elements of being human.

 


4. Jithin Roda

Jithin Roda is a freelance concept artist and illustrator based in Kerala. His passion for art got him specializing in a wide spectrum of the illustration world like pre-visualisation, concept designing, cover designing and illustrating for posters and topics in general.

 


5. Medha Srivastava

Attracted towards art depicting metaphors and thought-provoking subjects, Medha, previously a gaming artist has been fascinated by conceptualisation, ideation and realism. Concepts and character building have always aligned with the intent of her artwork.

 

Starting out with simple digital illustrations, she eventually moved on to the world of concept art. Social issues contribute to a major part of her inspirations. To be true to her style of art, which she defines as realistic with a tint of stylisation and conceptualisation, she picks up on things she sees in her vicinity like shapes, colours, patterns and textures for the visual representation of her digital masterpieces. She insists on thoughtfully mixing Realism with Conceptualisation.

 


6. Mukesh Singh

Mahabharata, the epic of epics, can be told and retold time and again, still feeling fresh and young to the receptor. Dissatisfied with the earlier visual representations of the Mahabharata, Mukesh Singh took on a journey to explore the characters of this epic through his own style of digital art and with the aim of wanting the audience of today to not just identify and accept the character’s inner selves but their outer ones too, which are external manifestations of their inner selves.

 


characters

7. Nikhil Shinde

Nikhil Shinde, an Indian digital illustrator feels that creating a character is similar to assembling the pieces of a puzzle together. He puts in his heart, mind and soul to create out-of-the-box characters and gives them a twist in a way which takes the audience by surprise!

 


advertising

8. Nithin Rao Kumblekar

Starting out in his career as an art director in an advertising agency in 2005 and having gained some experience in the field, Nithin decided to freelance as an illustrator from the year 2010, with a focus on commercial illustrations. Since then there has been no looking back and he has brands like IBM, Lenovo, Brittania, Idea cellular and alike as part of his clientele.

 

He has also collaborated with global advertising agencies like Saldo Disegni Italy, Kassett Norway, JWT Delhi and Bangalore, Leo Burnett Mumbai, Saatchi & Saatchi Bangalore, etc creating pieces of digital art to be used by them for their promotions and in other areas.

 


9. Pavan Rajurkar

Pavan Rajurkar, a young Mumbai-based freelance illustrator believes that traditional and digital art compliment and complete each other. In spite of being in the digital era, he feels that the mind is directly connected to the hand and a hand-drawn doodle is the strongest way to brainstorm, leading to an idea.

 

Pavan has worked for numerous reputed advertisement agencies and was also featured in Lürzer’s Archive’s 200 Best Illustrators worldwide in 2016.

 


Emotions

10. Pratima Unde

Accepting the challenge to create a unique beauty, Pratima Unde leaves no stone unturned to explore her subject of illustration. Specialising in expressing human emotions, she highlights these in her digital portraits through a particular technique called Giggling.

 

Focusing on subjects which are shy, she spends days with them sitting face to face, expressing the unexpressed, only to discover something new every day. This portrait is of a Joyous Rajasthani, as she likes to call it.

 


Versatile Designer

11. Rahul Arora

Rahul Arora is a Mumbai based freelance digital illustrator. Believing in the fact that versatility plays a massive role in the life of an artist, his spectrum of working typologies in the field of design is pretty wide, varying from illustrating for advertising to character designing, story-boarding, environment designing and comic books illustrations.

 

Keeping his clients in the centre of any project, Rahul feels that the designer is responsible for conveying the idea of the client through the creation of styles matching the needs of the clients; thus the style of the designer is a reflection of the clients’ sensibility and vision!

 


12. Raj Khatri

Raj Khatri is a Mumbai-based movie buff, visual designer and a digital artist who believes and lives by the fact that experimentation is the key to self-discovery. This thought has helped him create some brilliant movie posters and other artwork, only using the medium of digital art.

 

Having had more than a decade of an experience in various sectors of the field of design like websites, social media, flash animations, TV series, films and many more, he now heads the creative team at an entertainment design studio known as Marching Arts.

 


Indian thelas

13. Ranganath Krishnamani

Ranganathan Krishnamani is a free-thinker, an obsessive doodler and has a soft corner for architecture. An illustrator driven by passion, he feels that self-developed style is what contributes to the uniqueness of an artist.

 

With a keen eye for observation and a distinct point of view, Ranganathan captures and expresses the unique stories of simple everyday life through his own developed style of minute detailing in his digital illustrations.

 


14. Seerow Unni

Believing that the core idea of an artwork is to convey the message to its readers, Seerow Unni, a digital illustrator says that every artwork should be considered as a scene of a movie, as it helps in adding the missing elements, thus adding life and giving depth to the scene. Fun and witty humour are the key elements to grab peoples’ attention.

 

To be a part of the community, it is important to keep oneself updated with the latest trends and happenings of the digital design market. He feels that this year the trend is shifting to from complexity and elaborations to minimalism. He says the key is to enjoy the process and improvise at every level.

 


Characters Shreya Shetty

15. Shreya Shetty

Balancing fantasy and realism, Shreya Shetty creates characters dictating a sense of otherworldliness, yet being anatomically and functionally viable. Following certain thumb rules like relating the character to its environment and keeping the background subtle, she has mastered the art of creating original, believable fantasy characters on a digital screen.

 

She believes that the right expressions and poise can create a memorable moment that will stick with the audience even after the story is over.

 


16. Sri Priyatham

Earning his very first commission by turning his bedroom into a studio during his student days motivated and inspired Sri Priyatham to transform his love and passion for illustration into his profession. To have a free-flowing lifestyle and working on his own terms and conditions, he chose to work as a freelance illustrator creating digital art pieces.

 

The social platform of Facebook helped him communicate and promote his artwork and get commissioned. The reach of other social platforms like Instagram, Reddit and Imgur worked wonders for him to get in touch with a global clientele from the continents of America, Europe and Australia.

 


17. Sukanto Debnath

With an experience of living in changing surroundings and different cultures, Sukanto Debnath, a Hungary-based Indian digital artist explores human behaviour and body language through his extensively detailed yet sketchy illustrations.

 

He believes that travelling and exposure to various folk arts and cultures opens up an artist’s mind to think beyond the usual, thus resulting in mature design. The global artist has created this digital painting called ‘People in Groups’ where he expresses the facial features of Hungarian locals and their body language.

 


Illustrations

18. Uday Mohite

Uday Mohite is a digital-caricature specialist and paints characters believing them to be a piece of art! He does a deep research to understand the features that define and describe the subject of his digital illustration and then exaggerates certain components like colours or characteristic features to start a conversation with the viewer.

 


19. Vishnu

With an impeccable passion for drawing and sketching, Vishnu tries to achieve perfection in all of his artworks. With only an experience of a short span of 5 years in the world of art, he has mastered the skills and techniques of digital art in his own way, developing his own personal style.

 

To be the perfectionist he wishes to be, Vishnu puts his mind, body and soul into his work to achieve an intricate level of detailing, which is visible in all his sketches.

 


Vivek_Feature - Amitabh Bachchan

20. Vivek Mandrekar

Currently working as the chief creative designer for movie posters under the banner of Yash Raj Films, Vivek Mandrekar has come a long way from being just a self-taught artist to mastering the art of creating posters for the film industry.

 

Face expressions tell stories and Vivek has captured these different stories of many great legends of the Indian film industry through his digital paintings. One such famous artwork is that of the Bollywood star, Mr Amitabh Bachchan, created using Adobe Photoshop and Wacom pen-tablet.

The transformation in the art styles from hand-made to computerised and digitalised versions is taking the world and people in its wave of craze! This fast-growing art style has its own beauty and charm to capture the viewer, mesmerising him in its aura.

What is Digital Art?

In the era of rapid changes, new solutions and technologies evolving every minute, each higher than the previous, every field and profession is running the rats’ race to grab the new as soon as it can. One such interesting field is the line of art which has been digitalised and is called “Digital Art”.

 

Digital art is nothing but the traditional art form of hand-painting being modified into digital ways and styles of painting. It is an expression of ones’ thoughts, ideas and visions through an explicit medium of digital multi-media.

With a shift in the ticking of the clock from analogue to digital and the advent of computers in the 1990s, artist Sachin Puthran has seen it all, from hand-made tactile paintings and expressions being a physical manifestation of the artist’s vision to the digital paintings now meeting the ever-changing and quick demands of the clients!

Art From Pencil to Stylus

Indian traditional art has been practiced since time immemorial, accredited with famous art pieces. In the present day, with extremely talented artists pervading in every corner of our country, there are various representations of this traditional art in the form of digital art, defined by the individuals’ interpretation of the same.

Ranganath Krishnamani, took on to create a series dedicated to Thelas, the moving supermarket on Indian streets. Using his unique style of digital drawings, he expresses different kinds of thelas, from the ones selling chaat to ganne ka ras and barf ke gole, bringing out the smile and happiness on the readers face, similar to their reaction on seeing an actual thela!

Indian thelas

Inspired by the imbalanced and irregular environments, Satish Gangaiah expresses his interpretation of this traditional world by placing his protagonist in this pandemonium. He uses an urban-influenced illustration style in his digital art and the colours add a realistic touch to the frame.

Wonderfully Chaotic

Read the detailed article on Capturing Wonderfully Chaotic World of Today!

Digital v/s Traditional Art

Switching over to digital art does not mean that the importance of traditional art forms of painting and sketching is lost or being forgotten. In fact, the truth is that the traditional technique of hand painting and sketching is what forms the base for digital artworks. A good command over hand drawings gives an artist the necessary push to explore the hidden treasures of digitalising their illustrations.

Pavan Rajurkar, a freelance Mumbai based illustrator has captured some of the very typical traditional scenes of the Indian culture like a fish market in his digital paintings, yet conveying the essence that a traditional painting would.

Get a clear understanding on Traditional vs. Digital, Sides of The Same Coin

When it comes to the world of contemporary art exhibitions, hand-art has taken a back-seat paving way for the digital art, which has a magical effect on its viewers. It is growing tremendously, in terms of the message it wants to convey and also in terms of the size of the art, ranging from a small screen of a smartphone to being projected on huge walls in museums and art expos and also experiencing it through the medium of virtual reality.

 

With the growing awareness of people and the pace at which digital art is sprouting, clients definitely want the latest and original. Working for a wide range of clients demanding diverse typologies, Rahul Arora, a digital artist is a living proof that versatility can definitely up one’s game in the field.

Versatile Designer

Brands like OLX are definitely breaking the traditional stereotypical thought process and moving forward with time by hiring digital artists like Nithin Rao Kumblekar to do a campaign for their advertisements rather than doing an actual shoot!

advertising

The advantage of being digitally artistic is that it opens a lot of doors to try out new things and create versatile outputs, visualise your imagination in different styles and modify all of this instantaneously with just a few clicks.

The Scope of Digital Art in India

The introduction of the pen tab has made life much easier for these artists as it gives the same feel of drawing on paper, but electronically!

 

The variety of styles explored in digital art is tremendous. The styles of digitalising vary from two-dimensional still-drawings on pen-tabs, graphic illustrations, photo-montaging paintings with images and creating image collages to graphics animations for multi-functional uses and are further extended to three-dimensional digital canvases using software like Corel-draw, Cinema-4d and possibilities of virtual reality.

Artist Medha Srivastava defines her style as realistic with a tint of stylization and conceptualization. She picks up on things she sees in her vicinity like shapes, colors, patterns and textures for the visual representation of her digital masterpieces.

An Indian-origin Germany-based illustrator Archan Nair’s digital artwork is influenced by the mysteries of our everyday existence and has also extended out to the realm of virtual reality.

The scope of digital at in India is not just limited to using digital tools to create paintings to be hung on walls, but is reaching out to the everyday life objects used at home. Illustrationists are being hired right at the start of a project to create customised digital designs in tandem with the overall scheme of a project.

For instance, Chumbak as a brand in collaboration with various artists has digitalised India’s environment through colourful and playful illustrations adaptable to various products ranging from home décor items like coasters, mugs, bags, cushion covers and laptop sleeves to personal products like t-shirts, accessories and even footwear! The digital art here gave it a scope to reach out to everyone through its online and offline medium.

Digital Art India

Digital art in India isn’t just a platform for the upcoming generation of artists to reach new horizons with their talent but also gives an opportunity to the tradition established artists to try out new things with the latest digital tools. In a way, it is a medium to revolutionalise the art industry of the country by representing the minds’ visions through a merger of the traditional techniques of art with the digital media.

 

With the digitalisation of everything in the future, this art form will surely go a long way in encouraging talents of all age-groups to expose their creativity. Social platforms like Behance, Instagram and Facebook are motivational and promotional sources for artists to publish their digital work, get noticed and step into the present day market of art and its likes.

 

Digital art today has captured the world in its long and stretched arms of beauty and creativity. The present level will definitely be escalated to newer heights in the future making each and every being its captive.

 

So strap your seat-belts and be ready for an enjoyable roller-coaster ride in this new realm of creations and explorations.

Each illustration or work of design is a new process and a new insight. From the wide variety of design work that Creative Gaga feature each year, at the end of the year we take a moment to acknowledge all of them by highlighting top 10 featured Illustrators of 2017. Here we go.

Featured Illustrator - Nithin Rao Kumblekar

1. Nithin Rao Kumblekar

Nithin Rao Kumblekar is not only an illustrator but also an Art Director and Concept Artist who has illustrated for and brands such as OLX, Century Ply, and the likes, apart from having worked on a vast range of projects. In this assignment, conceived and executed for AVP, a pet food company catering to the likes of household dogs and cats. He represents a direct connection between these adored domestic companions and their very beloved treats, thus portraying the animals directly interacting with AVP in a fun, colourful and real-like animated setting.

More Project Illustrations are here


Featured Illustrator - Mukesh Singh

2. Mukesh Singh

Khyber Nights is a life-like and realistic story of survival, love and loss. Based on the unruly frontier surrounding the Khyber Pass during the Soviet war with Afghanistan in the late 80’s. This cover art for the intense tale was created by Marvel artist, Mukesh Singh, in an effort to summarise a gripping narrative that is about sisterhood and brotherhood winning over the politics of war. Using a strong sense of lighting and character expressions, he does indeed capture the tale in the frame.

Mukesh’s more illustrations are here


happiness-Lavanya Naidu

3. Lavanya Naidu

A graduate of the National Institute of Design, Lavanya Naidu is an Animator and Illustrator. Her style of work is a representation and expression of focusing on producing work that is personally challenging and cherished, rather than just going about creating ‘what is required as per the brief’. She uses a very fun and lively colour scheme that is both vibrant and subtle, very much like the characters, environments, settings, and characters she chooses to portray.

Featured Article:

Induce Happiness with Your Work!


Create Your Style

4. Bhaskar Rac

Bhaskar Rac is a self-employed Concept and 3D artist. A graduate of Delhi College of Art (Applied Art), he works extensively in character development, 3D sculpting, and the likes. As someone who trusts in honing one’s own style, instead of trying to imitate fashionable cult or style, nurturing and developing refreshing ideas is his primary intention. Here, he simply starts off with initial sketches, further gathering all the related references, structuring, line drawings and then rendering. Likewise, he finds a balance between minimalism and amplification through colours, emotions, lines, contours and the likes in order to capture the main essence of the subject.


5. Anna Dittmann

Graduating from Savannah College of Art and Design in Georgia,  Anna Dittmann is a freelance digital illustrator who tries to evoke different emotions through her portraits. Here, using subtle facets with natural fundamentals, she manages to capture the emotions of the viewer, thus mainly tapping into and drawing their attention to it. Gaining insight and motivation from movement and raw shapes by blending nonfigurative conceptual and innate elements, she created this soothing piece through an amalgamation of fictional and realistic elements. Using pastels, watercolours, and oils here, she tries to capture an impulsiveness in the artwork.


Ancient Future

6. Omar Gilani

From Peshawar, Pakistan, Omar Gilani is a Double-Masters in Robotics from Washington DC and has an eye for discovering the modern in the ancient, something that is purely a matter of enhanced or evolved vision. And, so, his desire to renew the old and transform what is considered obsolete or irrelevant into the opposition stems from his work, ‘Desret Warrior Aunty’. He predominantly uses lighting to determine the initial composition of a piece. Importantly, dividing the canvas into simple black and white shapes to see if all the various aspects are harmonious helps him achieve the final piece which is full of colour and life-like vibrancy.


Siddhi Ranade - tale-telling

7. Siddhi Ranade

With a Commercial Arts from L. S. Raheja School of Arts, Mumbai, Siddhi Ranade trusts that geometry, colour and the subject are crucial features. As someone who feels that design needs to be time relevant in constantly modifying times, he pays attention to every tool that he uses in the making of his work. Over here, for example, geometry, pattern, and proportion in symmetry are not just advantageous but the very fundamentals. ‘Line’, for example, is the primary factor to achieve without any compromise. Colours finally add a mood to it in a more theatrical and impressive way that further dictates or overpowers the final piece.


8. Juan Casini

Juan Casini is a designer of multiple disciplines who experiments and works through various mediums. He trusts that ‘nature is art in its purest form’, and thus takes a lot of inspiration from it, thereby representing elements of nature through a lot of his designs. For example, over here, he tries to create a powerful and stimulating experience for the audience. In an effort to keep the level of expression rather intense, he goes on to add multiple layers of detail while experimenting with the colour palette. What that helps him achieve is that, no matter what the product is about, the eyes of the viewer can be positively held by the artwork.

Featured Article:

Living the Nomad life


9. Rohan Dahotre

Rohan Dahotre is an illustrator who feels strongly about nature and gains inspiration from the beauty of it. The core of his work lies in making the complexities of nature simple – for example, turning complex organic forms into simple shapes. Experimenting with pictures from the wild – mainly animals – and giving them a new visual representation and overall look, he tries to display the real beauty that resides within the amazing bounty of forest animals, all so that people learn to appreciate and better treat and respect them and their habitat.


Indian thelas

10. Ranganath Krishnamani

Ranganath Krishnamani is a designer specialising in Illustration, User Experience and Art Direction. This piece of artwork is a personal or self-initiated project through which he finds connection with his own origin in the south Indian city of Bangalore in Karnataka, India. Through the means of this series, he intends to portray some of the most interesting and intriguing selling-carts from across the Indian subcontinent. The basic idea stems from his nostalgic memories of him running out onto the street upon recognising the arrival of assorted carts and their bearings, something commonly found through most of India.

Gone are the days when Illustrators used to take the back seat in the advertising world. With things today, they’re emerging as the forerunners of some amazing and memorable communication that is being recognized. No doubt, clients, like OLX and Docomo, are exploring this valuable asset with Nithin Rao Kumblekar.

advertising
advertising

Contacting an illustrator for a TVC shoot might not be something we hear of everyday, but when OLX got in touch with Nithin Rao, it was a wise decision. The client wanted a campaign that would carry forward in print as well, and thus, saving time and cost, decided to get the shoot illustrated. Simple to look at, but the task was a challenging one for the artist. The OLX team had asked him to create every object separately in the layout so that they could pick each one later, according to their needs. Thus, the illustration required Nithin to create every object completely even if it was overlapped by the objects.

advertising

When Docomo demanded an illustration route for its exciting print campaign ‘The bedtime stories’, Nithin knew it would be storytelling through single visuals. Without over complicating the visual, he worked carefully with shadow and light to establish humor and wit using relatable scenarios. To give the story a setting, subtle placement of props were used, like the placement of a kid’s drawing book, school bag and water bottle with a fish on it.

advertising

Published in Issue 24

Gone are the days when Illustrations would take a back seat. Now, they are becoming more proactive and are evolving the way we communicate. This time, Creative Gaga focuses on how the advertising world is opening its doors to this exciting form of design. Featuring renowned Illustrators like Chris Beatrice, Nasheet Shadani, Vijay Kumar, Gabriel Mareno and much more, this issue promises to leave no page unturned!

 

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Though we are a country full of festivals all around the year, but this special time of year when not only you change your calendar but also the gifts, family dinners, celebrations and new year resolutions all makes it a special time in everyone’s life. Nithin Rao Kumblekar decided to capture this memorable time for the cover of Creative Gaga. Here he explains his thought process and step by step tutorial.

For any painting, to begin with, sketching is not only the most basic but the most important thing. The whole painting depends on it and can be considered as the backbone of any painting.

 

Here, I have focused on the subject from the top angle with slight fisheye effect. I did some scribbles first and then fine tune the outlines to make the subject clearer for the next stage. For sketching, I use Adobe Photoshop with Wacom Cintiq monitor and several different brushes which give the real feel of sketching with the pencil.

I normally use “Hard Round Pressure Size” brush by enabling brush pressure as well as thickness buttons in the top brush control panel. This will serve the purpose of getting the pencil sketch effect. This feature is also useful while colouring.

I have kept the main source of light from top hence the play of light and shadows are pretty simple in this illustration. Also, the characters expressions play very well depending on how we choose to place the light source.

Here, I wanted to get the festive feel in the entire colour tone. So I chose to get the orange and yellow tone which gives a warm feeling in the environment. The final colour tone can also be achieved even at the last stage by adding just a flat colour layer on top of all layers and then by trying different mode options in the layer pallet. But here, I chose to set the colour tone layer by layer. I did not use any colour filters, as I mostly knew which tone the final illustration should have.

The character colouring steps

To avoid any spill of colours at this stage, start by creating the characters and the props in different layers. And If you want to colour a specific part without disturbing the nearby object then you need to create each and everything in different layers and then group it under the character or the object name.

 

For example, in this illustration, I’ve created layers for the skin and clothes within the characters. And for the background, there are many layers for all the objects and that is where you may get confused.

 

When you have multiple layers then the convenient way to work on the desired layer is to hold the control/command key and then click on the part of the illustration that you want to select. The correct layer will be selected and then for colouring, again hold the control/command key and click on the selected layer under the layer panel, this will highlight/select the layer with selection marquee and you can begin the colouring. There won’t be any spill of the colour outside this selection.

After all the characters and objects are coloured it is time for the background light fixes. In these images, you can see the difference as I’ve added slight glow as well as little shadows to make the characters stand out. And finally after completing everything sometimes you might want to change the size of some objects or change few colours. Since we had everything in layers it is easier to do these minor adjustments even at the final stage. I had increased the size of the boy by about 15%. And we have reached the final illustration.

I almost forgot to mention one important thing that to always save the file and keep duplicating it. As sometimes, the file might get corrupted due to some system error or something else. But If you have duplicate files then you don’t have to begin the illustration from scratch. So saving is a good habit but duplicating the files is even better. Good Luck!

Published in Issue 35

The season of the festival has started and everyone is preparing to have a unique one this time with less cash and more fun. We interview many creatives who creates promotional or calendar design each year. As most of the thing around us had shifted to digital, even calendar design and the promotion has shifted. But Yorick Pintos, a strategic consultant at studio Kohl suggests that best option would be to a mix of both, the traditional and digital media. Digital Illustrator Nithin Rao Kumblekar also shared his love for the printed calendars and emphasis on the effectiveness of it. If you are interested in print design & want to understand the future of the same. So, go ahead and order your latest issue copy!

 

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Freelance illustrator, Nithin Rao Kumblekar, felt the need to look at life positively, especially the days ahead (which people generally are anxious about). What resulted was a lively and lighthearted calendar with fun images and engaging colours.

days ahead
days ahead

The Brief.

Calendars, in general, are mostly boring, drawing an unexciting or rather tedious perception of the days to come. In contrast to these standard, typical and monotonous patterns, the intention was to create a positive-feeling calendar that would radiate a sense of exuberance and liveliness as one looks through the days ahead and schedules priorities or the likes.

days ahead

The Concept.

The approach thus involved simply creating colourful and playful imagery for every month of the year; ones that would cheer-up and bring a smile upon the viewer, instead of causing a sense of seriousness or grimness. This required bright colours, fun settings and depictions of quirky characters in positive fantasy worlds.

The Outcome.

Projected images featured an otherwise irksome traffic jam, a common situation on Indian roads, in a happy context, providing an upbeat view into everyday life. Likewise, images ironic to India yet funny, such as a Santa funnily sunbathing at a beach, found their way in. Yet, the calendar avoids necessarily adopting a month-specific illustration, considering that the weather across India is not very distinct as it is in western countries.

Published in Issue 35

The season of the festival has started and everyone is preparing to have a unique one this time with less cash and more fun. We interview many creatives who creates promotional or calendar design each year. As most of the thing around us had shifted to digital, even calendar design and the promotion has shifted. But Yorick Pintos, a strategic consultant at studio Kohl suggests that best option would be a mix of both. If you are interested in print design & want to understand the future of the same. So, go ahead and order your latest issue copy!

 

Order Your Copy!

Nithin Rao Kumblekar

Having begun his career as an Art Director in the advertising agency, working for agencies like McCann, Ogilvy and Triton, Nithin Rao Kumblekar has been freelancing as an illustrator for the past 6 years.


Featured In


The season of the festival has started and everyone is preparing to have a unique one this time with less cash and more fun. We interview many creatives who creates promotional or calendar design each year. As most of the thing around us had shifted to digital, even calendar design and the promotion has shifted. But <span class="il">Yorick</span> Pintos, a strategic consultant at studio Kohl suggests that best option would be to a mix of both, the traditional and digital media. Digital Illustrator Nithin Rao Kumblekar also shared his love for the printed calendars and emphasis on the effectiveness of it. With many unique inspirations, advice and project showcase this issue is a must have if you are interested in print design & want to understand the future of the same. So, go ahead and order your latest issue copy!

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