1

ad here

The new Euro Cup logo is out. Recently launched in the virtual space through social media, UEFA made its call for a non-racist 2024 Euros loud and clear.

After the 2022 football World Cup, the 2024 Euros is the next big football carnival the UEFA is already preparing for.
Set to take place in Germany, the new Euros logo is already out on social media. Along with a light show at the Olympiastadion in Berlin, unity and inclusivity were presented as the main theme of the logo redesign.
The symbol had been based on the European flag colours, in the shape of the host Olympiastadion in Berlin. The logo still features the traditional Euro Cup, along with the use of bold colours and a new oblong shape. Meanwhile, the ‘O’ in Euro, represents the Olympiastadion.
EURO2024 Logo
The unleashing video reads ‘Everyone is invited to bring their colours.’ UEFA also go on to say in the video “For all generations, all voices and all of us, united by football.”

The animated video has over 350k views on YouTube. The colours of the logo appeal to every nation in Europe instead of solely Germany’s black, red and yellow, thus representing “a ‘EUROS for ALL’.

The logo makes it clear as can be that the upcoming Euros is meant to be an occasion that connects people and communities through compassion, diversity and integration. A lesson to build on from the racist outlast following the previous Euro finals.

CURRENT ISSUE

 

POST TAGS:

ad here

A logo is the face of any brand. And who better knows the importance of a logo in branding, like Canva? The graphic design tech giant has come up with a new logo for their own brand recently.

New Logo of Canva

In today’s digital world, brand identity is the only unique language you can use to distinguish your position from others. Canva has recently brought up a change in their logo, which might have been missed by most people. This itself shows success in how much the brand has established its identity. The logo no longer remains in the icon format like before. Nevertheless, it is consistent in using the same radiant turquoise to a purple gradient that goes well with the existing brand language.

New Logo of Canva

Canva believes that design should be easily accessible and understandable no matter where the onlooker comes from. Their collective mission as a company has always been to empower the world to design. Design plays a key role in everyone’s lives and Canva has just helped us see it in a different light. Their brand has definitely evolved from their initial days, and their perspective has now changed to embrace flexibility. They claim that the reason for the change was to be easy enough to use across all mediums alike.



Canva has made it very clear that this is not a case of rebranding, but refining their existing brand image. Their product offers simplicity and accessibility to design, and that is exactly what their logo represents. This logo has first been iterated by Rob Clarke, a famous type designer and lettering artist. The company claims that this can be designed by their platform as well. This version of their logo that is hand-drawn as well as optimised for the screen shows how creativity is for all.

New Logo of Canva
CURRENT ISSUE



 




POST TAGS:

ad here

Swedish automotive manufacturer, Volvo recently updated their new logo, from the iron, men and Mars-based logo to a minimalist looking 2D logo

Volvo, a renowned automotive manufacturer just announced another upgraded version of its ‘Volvo’ script and bar version, which was first revealed in 1930. The initial production of vehicles featuring the new design is said to be launched in 2023 sported by the successor of large SUV XC90.

A creation of Swedish design agency Stockholm Design Lab in collaboration with Tröllback & Company, ” Volvo needed a redesign of the iron mark, optimized for communication and versatile for all types of applications,” the agency writes on its website. “The logo has been simplified in its purest form and conveys the brand’s vision; to be the world’s most progressive and desirable premium car brand.”



The new design was publicized this week on the brand’s website and social media pages and retains the ‘iron mark’ signature with a diagonal arrow affixed to a hollow circle – but removes the contrasting bar across the centre, with the ‘Volvo’ text ‘floating’ in the circle. The shape of the arrow has also been tweaked along with a different typeface, a new flat finish.

“An updated version of the Volvo Iron Mark will be used exclusively on products and in small digital spaces when clear visibility of the Volvo spread word mark can’t be ensured,” a Volvo Australia spokesperson told Drive and added “The change will be gradual. We started by rolling out the updated identity on our main website, main social media platforms and in the new Volvo Cars mobile app. The updated iron mark will be rolled out in other areas step by step, and the first car with the updated iron mark will be launched in 2023. The old iron mark will be phased out over time.”

Click for more News here

CURRENT ISSUE



 




ad here

Tokyo’s Musashino Art University students design huge animated creatures (Sculptures) from straw to bring back lost practice of using remains from rice harvest in Japan.
Image credit: Wara Art Festival

Leftover straw post the harvesting season of rice in Japan has found a rather innovative and creative use. Huge, gigantic structures (Sculptures) of various animals and mythological characters have been created from the same, be it the mighty Gorilla or popular character, Amabie.

Image credit: Wara Art Festival

“Wara,” as it is known traditional in Japan, are remains from the process of extracting rice off the crop. Generally, it is put to use for the purpose of building roofs, tools of different kinds and even footwear. In fact, it has typically been put to use even to improve the fertility of the soil, alongside being utilised as feed for cattle and raw material formats of all sorts.



Image credit: Wara Art Festival

Sculptures
Image credit: Wara Art Festival

However, this practice had lost its popularity in recent times. Since 2008, though, the Wara Art Festival has been regularly held at Niigata’s Uwasekigata Park to revitalise and bring back this form of traditional Japanese art among the masses.

Image credit: Wara Art Festival

Designed by students from Tokyo’s Musashino Art University and thereby exhibited in the form of art installations through collaboration with local residents in Niigata, the festival portraying these giant straw figures is currently in its 13th year. Local craftsmen and farmers are the ones who bring the idea into physical reality through a hard technique called “Toba-ami.” Expected to last until the 31st of October, this year’s edition comes after a year of setback due to the Covid-19 pandemic not allowing for gatherings and events to be organised on a large scale.

Image credit: Wara Art Festival

The hope or purpose of this effort is mainly for the practice of using “wara” to be embraced and acknowledged once again.
CURRENT ISSUE



 




POST TAGS:

ad here

Hope 21 – A National Cartoon and Caricature Online Competition conducted by Unfold Dreams Private Limited has now reached its completion.
With actor and philanthropist Sonu Sood being the subject for the challenge, ‘Online Zindagi’ was the theme set for the event, serving as a platform that both “amateurs” and “professionals” could share-alike.
Open to both professional and non-professional artists, ‘Originality and Creativity’ were the criteria to choose winners across various categories from a multitude of participants across the diversity of India, vying for prizes worth rupees one lakh.
The countrywide contest of caricature and cartoon had commenced since the acceptance of entries began on the 29th of July 2021 with the last date of submission being 10 August 2021.

Non-Professional Caricature Category

Hope 21 Caricature & Cartoon Competition
Karan Aggarwal - 1st Prize

Hope 21 Caricature & Cartoon Competition
Lalit Parmar - 2nd Prize

Hope 21 Caricature & Cartoon Competition
Arjama Bandopandhyay - 3rd Prize

Hope 21 Caricature & Cartoon Competition
Sweta-Singh-Consolation

Hope 21 Caricature & Cartoon Competition
Sakshi Gupta - Consolation

Hope 21 Caricature & Cartoon Competition
JagJeevan - Consolation

Hope 21 Caricature & Cartoon Competition
DYAVANAPALLY SHANKAR - Consolation

Hope 21 Caricature & Cartoon Competition
Arushi Sharma - Consolation

Karan Agarwal (Maharashtra), Lalit Parmar (Jharkhand) and Arjama Bandyopadhyay (West Bengal) earned pole positions in that order in the Non-professional Caricature category.

Professional Caricature Category

In the professional Caricature section, it was Varad Mestry (Maharashtra), James Vaz and Raghupati Sringeri from Karnataka who emerged victoriously.
Hope 21 Caricature & Cartoon Competition
Varad Mestry - 1st Prize

Hope 21 Caricature & Cartoon Competition
James Vaz - 2nd Prize

Hope 21 Caricature & Cartoon Competition
Raghupathi Sringeri - 3rd Prize

Hope 21 Caricature & Cartoon Competition
Gurudayal Pancheswar - Consolation

Hope 21 Caricature & Cartoon Competition
Manu Mohan - Consolation

Hope 21 Caricature & Cartoon Competition
Sajit Minz - Consolation

Hope 21 Caricature & Cartoon Competition
Remy Fernandes - Consolation

Vivek Prabhukeluskar - Consolation




Non-Professional Cartoon Category

Santha Kumarbabu - 1st Prize

Tuniki Bhupati - 2nd Prize

Lakshmana Rao Sadasivuni - 3rd Prize

Vithal Mootupuru - Consolation

Rajesh Kumar Dubey - Consolation

Neeraj Joshi - Consolation

Neeraj Joshi - Consolation

Aprajita Sharma - Consolation

Likewise, it was Santha Kumarbabu (Andhra Pradesh), Tuniki Bhupathi (Telangana) and Lakshmana Rao Sadasivuni (Andhra Pradesh) who won in the Non-professional Cartoon category.

Professional Cartoon Category

Siva KM - 1st Prize

Hope 21 Caricature & Cartoon Competition
Vikram Nayak - 2nd Prize

Manoj Chopra - 3rd Prize

Jairaj TG - Consolation

Hope 21 Caricature & Cartoon Competition
Uday Mohite - Consolation

Hope 21 Caricature & Cartoon Competition
Vaddepally Venkatesh-Consolation

Amol Sawant - Consolation

Amit Kumar - Consolation

In the professional Cartoon section, it saw Siva KM of Kerala, Vikram Nayak from Uttar Pradesh and Manoj Chopra of Jammu & Kashmir take the win.
CURRENT ISSUE



 




POST TAGS:

ad here

The Eisner Award, founded by American comic editor, Dave Olbrich are given out annually and this year Indian graphic designer Anand Radhakrishnan won an award in the Best Painter/Multimedia Artist (interior art) category.

Graphic Designer

Anand Radhakrishnan, a 32-year-old from Mumbai was recently recognized by the Eisner Awards and the graphic designer describes it as ‘a great validation’. He worked together with UK based colourist John Pearson on a graphic novel ‘Blue in Green’ by UK- based author Ram V, which was released in October 2020.



The novel’s graphics touched upon themes like ‘existentialism’ and ‘sadness’ and are mixed-media images, created using pencil, ink and acrylic paint. These have been described as ‘hauntingly realistic’ portrayals of a young musician’s self-doubt and struggles in pursuit of creative success.

In addition, Radhakrishnan also believes that graphic novels have the potential to be as big in India as Manga is in Japan. He is currently working on another graphic novel with Ram V called ‘Radio Apocalypse’, the tale of a radio station and crew that have survived the apocalypse which is set to be released in October.

CURRENT ISSUE



 




ad here

Maintaining the classic Helvetica simplicity, the latest launch gives new designers the opportunity to be more flexible and express themselves with digital versatility.

The Monotype Studio just released a variable version of the world’s most popular font, which provides the audience with millions of fonts in one file. Unlike the new one, the previous font formats required each style in a family to have a separate file whereas Helvetica Now Variable wraps the DNA for each style into one tiny package.



Designers now have the freedom to blend weights, from hairline to extra black and optimal sizes, four-point to infinity and use new compressed and condensed widths for huge flexible typographic expression. They can also move through the entire sequence to seamlessly mix, match and custom create millions of variations on the theme.

Image resource: Monotype

This also allows designers to add in an extensive width axis to help them fit more into less space. This serves as a responsive design for the web or for small supports like smartwatch screens or micro packaging.

Image resource: Monotype

Helvetica Now Variable Pro Roman and Pro Italic can be found via Monotype Fonts, or you can get it from MyFonts.com priced at $299 or €329 each. The Helvetica Now Variable Family Pack costs $499 or €549, although there’s an introductory offer of 60 percent off until 27 August 2021.

CURRENT ISSUE