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A few of 2018’s still making it big and some new additions to the list, the trending trends of 2019 predicted by designers from different fields are put together here just for you.

It is said that change is the only constant and with each passing year graphic design trends prove this right. Be it packaging and illustrating for products or a promotional campaign for a brand, the design trends influencing each field have become a must-know today.

 

Will the previous years’ trends will be an influence on the upcoming years’ trends or will the two be complete opposites?

To get an answer, we have creatives from different sectors of the design industry enlightening us about the graphic design trends of 2018 and putting forth their predictions for 2019’s trends.

Job

Anthony Lopez
Award-winning designer, Anthony Lopez is the founder of Lopez Design.

Mira Malhotra

Mira Malhotra
A graphic designer, visual artist and the founder of Studio Kohl.

Design Stack

Design Stack
A Branding & Design firm that builds, strengthens and nurtures brands.

Sonia Tiwari
Pursuing a PhD in Learning Design and Technology from Penn State University.

Aaron Pinto

Aaron Pinto
Commonly known as Kidsquidy, is not only a graphic designer and illustrator but also the drummer for two Mumbai based metal bands, Providence and Gutslit.

WowMakers

WowMakers
A digital experience studio that provides from animated explainer videos, branding, documentaries and corporate video production to UI/UX design.

Anix

Anix
Anix has twelve years of experience in the world of graphics. He has worked with brands in India and abroad. He is creative director at Adaar.

To get a fair idea about what design will look like in the 19th year of the 21st century, read through!

BRANDING TRENDS

2018 Highlights

Brands are switching over to the social and digital media by cutting through the traditional medium of print to be used as their promotional and communication strategies.

According to Inderpreet Singh Seehra from Design Stack2018 saw simplification, strong colours and symbols that stood out in digital mediums as the key features for major branding projects. The brand identity of SBI (a complete case study here) created by them is an example.

SBI-Rebranding
New-Logo

The use of gradients, motion design and experimental typefaces was a ubiquity of 2018. The Identity for Fakultet for kunst, musikkog design, UiB, by Uniform, as a dynamic brand in motion; and Baboon by Sagmeister and Walsh, for its approach to colour and its humour logotypes showed the brands walking towards a more dynamic approach to differentiate themselves from the competition, says Mira Malhotra, the founder of Studio Kohl.

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Brand Identity for Baboon
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Not all changes are on the positive side. She has brought forth a noticeable change in the fashion industry to go for lifeless, characterless logotypes in the name of minimalism. Burberry was probably the most disappointing of them all.

This was a gist of 2018. It’s now time to leave the past behind and peep into the future and see what is going to be trending this year.

1. Ownership to Users and Personalisation

According to Anthony Lopez, branding systems are becoming very fluid and are designed to go beyond the logo. Branding has to be ambidextrous and the identity has to be able to adapt itself in multiple ways for different situations.

An example of the Partners’ Forum 2018, which was held in New Delhi. The identity takes on varied forms, manifesting in appropriate ways across collaterals. Further, we take the branding forward through products that reflect the identity, making it memorable for the future. The mission of the Forum stays with its participants, for a long time after.

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(The 3D Pipli logo animation was created by Studio Eeksaurus who collaborated with Lopez Design, celebrating the message of the Partners’ Forum.)

Talking of personalisation, brands will be seen as containers – people can put in what they want to express themselves through the brand. Eventually, the brand starts to become an extension of an individual.

Also, Anthony mentions that putting design in the hands of the customer and encouraging them to take ownership has led to people creating their own graphics besides photographs. For example, on Instagram, the user can add many icons and can also have a poll. Others provide stickers with a product to place it on anything the user wishes to put on.

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Design Stack highlights that people always relate to design or products that invoke positive feelings in them. For instance, a fortune cookie or a name on the bottle of coke is quite relatable to a consumer. Customising the logo with the name may or may not trend in 2019, but customising the logo with quotes, jokes, city names or graphic elements that people can relate to will continue to be used for a long time by designers.

2. Less is More 

The ‘less is more’ ideology has always been the underlying principle of design and will continue to play a vital role in the future too, says Design Stack. For an increased response on social networks and effective and aesthetical communication, brands will make use of simpler forms, clean shapes, bold colours, motion graphics and videos.

Not wanting to add unnecessary frills and fancies in a logotype has been an upward trend since Turner and Duckworth’s famous stripping down of the Coca Cola brand, says Mira Malhotra. Following the trend of less is more, there’s a chance one can go too far, cut out all frills and have a logo in a banal, forgettable neutral typeface, resulting in a sameness across brands and their identities.

 

But she’s also of the opinion that the trend of less is more can also work wonders for a brand’s visual identity differentiating it from the rest, if worked on smartly! Animated logotypes will be a resort for many.

According to Anthony Lopez, graphics is only one component of branding. The brands of the future need to be flexible across all aspects, influencing a user’s experience by drawing their attention to the brand’s character, behaviour, a tone of voice, influencers, associations and endorsements. Graphics, in such cases, is the mechanics used with adherence to the framework of the brand guidelines. When all this is done with precision, the concept of conveying ‘more with less’ becomes a possibility.

 

Motion graphics including multi-dimensional graphics will definitely become a lot more common in the future.

3. Typeface Experimenting – going back to the roots

Anthony Lopez voices the fact that a large part of branding is about strategy and delivery of content through various means, and typefaces are just one part of this contributing to the visual medium. For multi-device existence the typeface design will include the factor of scale-ability and the flexibility of the digital medium, in particular, will allow for easy and varied versions of the designed font including features like effects to type, highlighting, shading, colour options and animation.

According to Mira Malhotra, going beyond designing the logo for the brand and experimenting with typefaces to grant a uniqueness to the brand will be new in. With Google fonts and so many free quality typefaces infiltrating the mainstream, (when free, it becomes mainstream easily) people, especially clients will have a better taste in typefaces, hopefully implementing daring decisions by clients in terms of typefaces.

Design Stack points out that 2019 will be the year where the designers will want to strike a balance between the old and the new, recalling the importance of the roots and fusing them in with the trending styles. For this, the Indian type foundries are creating contemporary regional scripts which will play a big role in the coming age of Indian design. Versatile fonts that work well on both digital and traditional media will be sort after.

Bombay Brasserie - The Indian Culinary Expert
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4. Sophistication and Boldness

Design Stack predicts brands experimenting with logos and colour schemes. A bold yet sophisticated palette is what is intended as the yielded result.

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Mira Malhotra also foresees boldness in the upcoming year. Whether its bright colours, pastel neutrals, or just black and white, anything that stands out bold will make it to the brand collaterals across various mediums.

Anthony Lopez sees 2019 as a year of logos becoming more and more fluid, vibrant and versatile. Brands may launch sub-brands, but the prime brand logo is what will go across the face of the brand. Logos inherently need to be simple for high recall. However, within the face of the logo, more permutations and combinations will be observed. This allows the brand to cater to varying clientele and different platforms.

ANIMATION AND MOTION GRAPHICS

Highlights of 2018

Anix, the creative director of Adaar mentions that 2018 was a phenomenal year for animation and motion graphics witnessing trends like seamless transitions, liquid motion, digital-surrealism, isometric design, a combination of 2D and 3D, big, bold typography complicated visual effects, 3D pastels and photorealistic rendering to name a few.

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2018 saw a refreshing visual representation of strong female leads with powerful accessories and expertise in a specialisation (vs the stereotypical princess/Damsel in distress) like Mrs Incredible from Incredibles, Mai from Next Gen, She-Ra from Netflix’s reboot of the popular 80s cartoon, and Shank from Wreck-it Ralph 2, says Sonia Tiwari.

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Mrs. Incredible from Incredibles
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Mai from Next Gen
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She-Ra
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Shank from Wreck-it Ralph 2

Sonia also observed interactive animations, in general, becoming subtle in action, pastel colour blocked and with cleaner backgrounds, a trend that originated from the iconic game Monument Valley 1 in 2014 and Monument Valley 2 in 2017. She cites INTURN’s webpage as an example to follow.

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INTURN

WowMakers describe 2018 as a year of rapidness. Videos had fast cuts and rapid edits, bright pop colours, neon moods and colour gradients. Vertical viewing and videos for the same rose in prominence as mobile platforms recorded the most screen time. An ‘In Your Face’ attitude permeated all forms of visual media far beyond animation and motion graphics, reeling the viewer in.

In an attempt to engage the viewers, the visual representation followed the ‘Bigger is Better’ or the ‘Go Big or Go Home’ philosophy. The text was bigger and bolder than ever, constantly changing and creating new text out of the shells of the old. 2018 saw the ‘Glitch effect’ gaining popularity. ‘Morphing’ that has been around for a while also topped the charts last year, creating magical illusions through seamless transitions.

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Anix explains that with media, connectivity and its scope of influence, availability and reachability, motion graphics is taking over the prevalence of still graphics. From commercials to product shots, marketing campaigns, sale presentations and game design, animated and motion graphics endow an astonishing display and communicate the product’s prowess in a way that would be impossible to communicate otherwise.

Samsung

Let’s take a look at what 2019 has in store:

1. Animating the Education

According to Sonia Tiwari, simple, iconic, vector-based motion graphics will overpower contemporary educational content, because of the large amount of content to be covered through the browser and mobile platforms that require optimised performance, seamless integration with Learning Management Systems (LMS) and keeping up with the refined design sensibilities of young millennials. A few good examples of this visual style and animation are Kurzgesat in a Nutshell series and Lumosity.

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2. Purpose Over Design

For Sonia Tiwari, the UX is like our brain or heart, built on the logic and feelings, and the UI is the face or skin, the outer layer that connects the user to the inner workings of a product. This distinction is important to understand that the trendy-animation and visual design must not be shallow or cosmetic, but really try to serve a purpose.

For example, a medical application that can use interactive animation to locate/define a problem through an interface – sounds useful. But interactive animations over a wireless setup app with buttons that liquid morph into new shapes sounds pointless.

 

WowMakers say that the shift from UI to UX is evident, and it is now time to cater to modern users with short attention spans and being bang on-point. ‘We don’t create a product and wait for customers to come. We create a product based on the customer’s wants and needs.’ Because not incorporating the market demand will result in a loss of clients.

For example, vertical videos have been the rage of late, and true to that, there has been an increase in requests for vertical videos or adaptable videos that could work well in both horizontal and vertical dimensions. Animation and motion graphics will have to adapt to multiple platforms without losing its core message.

3. VR & AR Carving Their Way

According to the team at WowMakers, animation and motion graphics in a VR and AR setting opens up a host of different possibilities and increases the scope for imaginative ideas that could work wonders on immersive platforms.

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Courtesy: Atlassian

As per Anix, the creative director of Adaar, the rise of Virtual Reality from being a gaming-focused ambitious fantasy in 2012 into an actual medium utilised by multi-national corporations and organisations around the world is in itself is a great example. Alternatively seen, purpose over design is now trending everywhere!

He also mentions that micro-interactions are subtle animations that enrich user experience and allow the user to engage with an interface in a single moment. Micro-interactions are possibly one of the biggest UX trends to date and are growing enormously. They are a focus point for the digi-sectors to up their game.

4. Fiction v/s Realism?

Fiction and Realism will both have their place in animated media, says Sonia Tiwari. The director’s vision, needs of the brand, likes of the audience, budget and timelines etc. will be the deciding factors for one of the two to surface at the top.

She has observed that the educational children’s media has had a very long history of fictional characters/plots to keep the narrative or moral of the story more relevant than realistic details of the characters like race, ethnicity, culture, religion etc. From Sesame Street to Curious George, fictional characters in children’s educational media are a “forever trend”.

 

While representing real issues like child labour, poverty and family health, she brings to notice that animated media uses some element of realism to keep the message focused or help establish a clear correlation with the narrative and content.

An example is Eeksaurus studio’s recent PSA for WHO that features Pipli art style human characters, which hits right in the middle of fiction and realistic spectrum, presenting real issues/human characters in a fantastical way.

The WowMakers’ team believes that with technology growing by leaps and bounds, magical realism can represent how technology interacts and changes human lives. At the same time, realism can be used to show the human face of technology.

5. Kinetic Typography

2019 will be a year enthralling the audience in a sober manner. WowMakers voice that the kinetics of type will be put in use, similar much to the process of animating characters or an object, like stretching, distorting, jumbling, twisting or making it disappear. Seamless transitions, much in fashion, will ensure a smooth video without jumpy transitions and cuts that can disorient the viewer.

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ILLUSTRATION TRENDS

With characters and entire backgrounds rendered by just a few lines and shapes, according to Aaron Pinto, Minimalism was one of the main themes for illustration in 2018. Also, the 90’s made a huge resurgence with retro, cyberpunk, glitch and neon colours being some of the mainstays of this style.

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The forecasted illustration styles surfacing 2019 will be following:

1. Raw and Unprocessed

These days the work shared online is very processed and digital, says Aaron Pinto. They are basically collages that are composited aesthetically for Instagram. But 2019 will see less processed and more organic designs being back in fashion. Hand-drawings and rough sketches are expected to take centre stage.

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2. God is in the Details

With a quantitative increase in the making of superhero movies and the release of a number of series, there has been a steady demand of comic book type illustrations. Also, detailed black and white inked illustrations are making a comeback. 2019 might just see it peak.

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3. Being the Attention-seeker

We live in a day and age, where there is an overload of content that is being consumed at an unprecedented pace.

 

To stand out from the crowd, a good visual is a great way of engaging or gaining the interest of the consumer while scrolling through the vast barrage of content being thrown at them. And more often than not a great illustration will do that job better than a photograph or even typography.

4. Complications Subjected to Simplifications

With monotones and monochromatic themes having showcased their presence in 2018, 2019 is sure to be a witness to these themes surfing the waves of illustration styles.

 

Aaron Pinto has mentioned that a lot of illustrators are trying to bring simplicity in their colour schemes as opposed to their normal saturated style.

Fluid shapes are catching on slowly. Geometric patterns and halftones seem like a good bet as well.

 

Also, simple seems to be a growing trend in general. So why not in illustrations!

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Illustration

Hope this article helped you to know and grab those key factors of graphic design that will be trending in 2019 to differentiate you from the rest.

CURRENT ISSUE
Creative Gaga - Issue 48

 

In the world of innumerable artists and their brilliant artwork, inspirations are everywhere. Follow the top 30 Indian illustrators and be a go-getter!

With digital art and illustrations picking up rapidly in the market, its time to be updated with it and know some of the masters performing it beautifully in their own unique styles.

 

Read through the list of best 30 Indian illustrators, know their styles and get inspired!

1. Aaron Pinto

The senior designer for MTV India, Aaron Pinto is a multi-talented young lad, commonly known as Kidsquidy. He is not only a graphic designer and an illustrator, but also a drummer for two Mumbai based metal bands, Providence and Gutslit.

 

A true lover of music and an ever-ready challenge acceptor, he works with different bands helping them recreate visions to go hand-in-hand with the type of music they make, designing the brand merchandise for them and their album art work as well.

 


character-abhishek-singh

2. Abhishek Singh

A graduate from NID Ahmedabad, Abhishek Singh is an artist, graphic novelist and an animation film designer. He has worked for animation projects with Cartoon Network, a series of Virgin Comics and UTV in collaboration with Shekhar Kapoor and Deepak Chopra.

 

He believes in the fact that an illustration is all about a story and the story-tellers. For him, the character is the plot and the plot is the character. You can discover a character to tell your story by knowing his insights and following his tips here.

 


3. Aditya Chari

An illustrator, character designer and a concept artist, Aditya Chari, a B.F.A graduate from Sir J. J School of Art, has been on the team of many different movies for character designing. Not only is this, he has created artworks of varied kinds ranging from photoshop and demo portraits to nudes and rapid sketches.

 

Aditya has designed and made illustrations for major brands and big advertising companies like, Forbes, Mudra, O&M, MTV Asia and Leo Burnett to name a few. With a count of more than 1500 portraits tagged to his name, he is also the author of two art books, Portrait techniques made easy and Figure study made easy, used as study guides by students.

 


4. Alicia D’Souza

Exposed to many different cultures, Alicia Souza is a freelance illustrative designer residing in Bangalore. Loving to draw and never stopping, Alicia successfully and very easily transformed her passion for art into her profession of illustration and comic art. Her work has appeared internationally in children’s books, magazines and news-papers.

 

After having worked for many different brands of reputed honor like Google, Yahoo, Tanishq and The Times of India to name a few, Alicia moved on to set up her successful quirky business venture to create a happy business that makes you smile wide!

 


AnandRK - Enlighten

5. Anand Radhakrishna

Anand Radhakrishna is a freelance Mumbai-based illustrator. For him, the artwork is not about picking up a style and sticking through it, instead, he makes his artwork as a journey of surprises and discoveries.

 

His passion for storytelling in any medium got him to explore traditional mediums to express the mysteries and to enlighten the darkness that people and the world carry with them. His inspiration comes from masters like Moebius, Alphonse Mucha etc.

 


Visual Communication - AnantKulkarni

6. Anant Kulkarni

Having grown an interest in visual and pictorial forms while a student at the Sir J.J. Institute of Applied Arts, Mumbai, freelance Illustrator and Designer, Anant Kulkarni, went on to work with various publications and later taught as a professor at the same prestigious institute from where he graduated.

 

His art follows a simple ideology of engaging visual communication through basic shapes. Transforming objects into forms using geometrical shapes, he keeps his audience engrossed in the visuals, maintaining their curiosity.

 



7. Arshad Sayyed

Capturing local flavours in the complexity of a muted colour palette, Arshad Sayyed is a Mumbai-based designer and illustrator, graduated from Sir. J.J School of Applied Arts. Following his belief, “To fill every heart with art”, Arshad has been successful in setting up his own venture, Wallcano, specialising in environmental graphics, space branding and graffiti.

 

He feels that for a designer it is important to stick to the roots while following the aspirations and moving closer to ones’ dreams.

 


Freelance

8. Ashish Subhash Boyne

A fresh graduate from Sir JJ Institute of Applied Art, Ashish Subhash Boyne is an Illustrator and Graphic designer based in Mumbai who started freelancing while still at college. According to him, the world is full of opportunities, one just needs to know which and when to take one.

 

He has own mantra for a bright freelance career and ascertains the fact that showcasing everyday stories in a refreshing manner can open doors to a ‘not so every day’ life!

 


Illustrating for a Publication

9. Gajanan D. Nirphale

Participating in state-level drawing competitions and winning trophies worked wonders for Gajanan D. Nirphale and served as his inspiration to earn a degree in Applied Arts and jump into the field of illustration.

 

Being a part of different publication houses like DNA and Zee Media boosted his confidence in experimenting with different styles across a wide range of projects like building storyboards, character designing and portraits.

 

An optimist by nature, he takes up challenges and considers them to be advantages as they help him up his skills in this fast-growing world, both personally and professionally.

 


10. Harshvardhan Kadam

Harshvardhan Kadam conceives, perceives and executes his experiences through visuals. He has illustrated characters for graphic novels and children’s books and has also served as an Art Director for animation and live-action films for various production houses across India. 

 

His artwork and illustrations are not just limited to books and papers but goes out to reach the community through one of most effective means, which is mural and wall art.

 


happiness-Lavanya Naidu

11. Lavanya Naidu

A graduate from the National Institute of Design, Lavanya Naidu is an illustrator and animator. She has had the opportunity to have been a part of the designing team at Google, Ted X, Cartoon Network and the likes.

 

An optimist about almost everything in her life, the same is reflected in her artwork as well. She wishes to spread the positive energy and induce happiness through work. She believes in taking up the work one is passionate about and allows for a persons’ growth, both professional and personal.

 


12. Lokesh Karekar

Founder-director of LOCOPOPO Design Studio, Lokesh Karekar is a visual artist specializing in illustration and design. Having worked for design firms like Grandmother India and Alok Nanda, he likes experimenting with new tools and techniques like paper-art, collage, clay-modelling and others.

 

Lokesh’s LOCOPOCO Studio believes in discussing the idea rather than too much referencing. The focus is on identity design, to create images and illustrations for a simple and luxury design.

 



Goddess Durga

13. Lovely Kukreja

With his career beginning as a computer operator, Lovely Kukreja did not give up hope and pursued his passion as a commercial artist. Now, with over twelve years of experience in Game Art and Content Management, he runs his own gaming studio, White Mice Media. He is also an independent art and design consultant with a specialisation in childrens’ books illustrations.

 

In addition to his gaming studio, he paints different aspects of Indian mythology and sells merchandise products. While illustrating, he follows the principle of 3M’s: Meditation, Motivation and Manifestation.

 


Mansi Parikh - Digital Illustrations

14. Manasi Parikh

A graduate from NID in Animation Film Design, Manasi Parikh now experiments with illustrations, animations, textiles, painting, sculptures and spaces.

 

Fascinated by the fact that how everything in the world is woven together to create the existing social fabric, she loves understanding stories around her and documenting the same through her drawings.

 

Art and drawing for Manasi never called for a conscious effort to make things relevant, it all just fell into place, organically. She proposes that one should let the inner-self flow through illustrations.

 


Meroo Seth

15. Meroo Seth

Meero Seth is a trained graphic designer from MIT Institute of Design, Pune. Her excellent skills in the field of illustrations got her an opportunity to intern at one of the in-demand brands, Chumbak. Presently, she is working in a Motion Graphic Design studio, Breakfast of Champions.

 

She follows trails of fun, curiosity, happiness and playfulness when working on her illustrations and feels that emotions are the most important factors to consider while creating balanced colour palettes. Her style is all about mixing the right colours.

 


16. Mira Malhotra

A designer, visual artist and illustrator, Mira Malhotra is a NID, Ahmedabad graduate who started her boutique studio, Kohl, in 2013 which reflects Indian culture and heritage in all of its works.

 

Following the idea of ‘Glocal’, she merges the local content with a global treatment to contemporarize it, yet allowing the design to openly speak Indian. The thought that cultures cannot be preserved in glass cases, got her moulding them in a way that they remain to continue in a time-relevant manner.

 


Portrait

17. Mohan Sonawane

Graduated in Bachelor of Fine Arts from Sir J.J Institute of Applied Arts, Mohan Sonawane has received various awards for his excellence in the field of illustration and graphic designing. His desire and passion for the field got him to develop his skills as a concept artist and also as an illustrator.

 

Spreading his knowledge of art with the world, he has shared a step by step tutorial on how to create a portrait with perfection.

 


18. Parvati Pillai

Parvati Pillai discovered her passion for illustration during her Bachelors of Animation which got her working for Chumbak and Tinkle. She pursued her Masters’ from Finland which opened up may doors for her to be a part of publications and brands like Google and its likes.

 

She believes in the fact that trying out new styles and forms of illustration are key for a designer to grow at one’s craft. She is ever-ready to take up challenges and perform story-telling through different styles of illustration.

 


19. Pooja Bhapkar

Pooja Bhapkar is an illustrator and graphic designer, experienced in branding and packaging, who now works in finding motion graphic solution with a UK based studio.

 

If understood in depth and detail, the Hindu mythology is informative and scientific. According to Pooja, history and mythology relate to our present and it is an illustrators’ task to modernise the traditional in a creative form, for it to become a story to be understood by everyone.

 


20. Prakash Thombre

Design entrepreneur, artist and Motorcycle nomad, Prakash Thombre captures a whole lot of views during his travel-times and later uses them as references to create the masterpieces seen in his portfolio.

 

His 25-year career spans an array of various media & industries, blending UX design, visual design, branding and technology to create compelling user experience across form factors.

 

He believes in finding spontaneous narratives in real life personalities and loves developing them on his canvas.

 


Pracheta Banerjee - Beauty

21. Pracheta Banerjee

A self-taught painter, painting since she was only 11, Pracheta Banerjee is a young, Kolkata-based illustrator and comic book artist, currently pursuing a Bachelor’s degree in Multimedia at St.Xavier’s College.

 

Obsessed with the eerie side of beauty, which leaves a heavy and mysterious impact making one curious about the unknown, her works are inspired from Greek Mythology and basic human emotions. Always exploring ways to convey stories through her works, she feels that the Dark Causes Delight to Create Eerie Beauty!

 


Concept

22. Priyanka Karyekar

Graduated in Communication Design from Abhinav Kala Mahavidyalaya, Priyanka Karyekar is an illustrator and designer based out of Pune. She believes that for an artist to truly evolve, one must follow the 3 H’s which are the Head, the Heart and the Hands, symbolically representing ideation, empathy towards people and skills to execute ideas respectively.

 

She uses a concept-based approach for her artwork as she theorizes that there needs to be a strong concept behind every illustration.

 


Versatile Designer

23. Rahul Arora

Rahul Arora is a Mumbai based freelance digital illustrator. Believing in the fact that being versatile is a game changer in digital art, his spectrum of working typologies in the field of design is pretty wide, varying from illustrating for advertising to character designing, story-boarding, environment designing and comic books illustrations.

 

Keeping his clients in the centre of any project, Rahul feels that the designer is responsible for conveying the idea of the client through the creation of styles matching the needs of the clients; thus the style of the designer is a reflection of the clients’ sensibility and vision!

 


Single Frame

24. Ritaban Das

A character designer, illustrator and storyboard artist, Ritaban Das has an experience of working in the animation & gaming industry for almost 9 long years and is presently working as an Art Director at Sparky Entertainment, an animation studio in Chennai.

 

His work is mostly character driven, where he blends in humour and graphic designing, wanting to convey a story with every character that he creates. Ritaban as a visual communication artist feels that it is important to portray a complete story or image to the reader and keeping this in mind he tries to narrate stories in a single frame.

 



25. Rohan Dahotre

An animation designer from Symbiosis Institute of Design, Rohan Dahotre is a Pune-based illustrator who has an experience of working in the animation and gaming industry for about 2 years and is currently working with Chumbak.

 

Greatly inspired by nature, Rohan adds depth and detail through shapes and patterns to animal photos to give it a new identity.

 

Through his illustrations, Rohan attempts at enhancing the magnificence of the natural world, hoping that people will understand and respect these creatures and their habitat.

 


26. Sameer kulavoor

Producing work which is the result of the intersection of contemporary illustration, graphic design and art, Sameer Kulavoor is a Mumbai-based designer and visual artist. He is the founder and director of Bombay Duck Designs, an independent illustration design studio and self-publishers.

 

Featured and interviewed by many different publications, he has been on the list of GQ India – 50 most influential men for two consecutive years of 2015 and 2016 and he also made it to Forbes India – 30 Under 30 in 2013.

Siddhi Ranade - Art

27. Siddhi Ranade

With a Commercial Arts degree from L. S. Raheja School of Arts, Mumbai, Siddhi Ranade explored new styles and developed a taste for stories while working with Ravi Jadhav Films. Siddhi’s illustrations are an art of tale-telling expressed through the use of colors which he derives from the life of his subjects.

 

His take on the field is that an artist needs to be up-to-date with the industry and that the artwork.

 


28. Shaivalini Kumar

A Visual Communication Designer, Shaivalini Kumar primarily works with illustration and typography. She specializes in “illustrated type”, an avenue of type design which combines the fields of illustration and graphic design. She is a firm believer of the fact that extraordinary designs are created by finding magic in the ordinary and mundane!

 

Through her work, she has been able to connect and communicate with people, engaged in different fields, from all over the world and has also been featured in many different publications. Confident about her work, she believes that you can judge books by the cover!

 



Versatility

29. Shreya Gulati

Shreya Gulati is an illustrator and an animator who graduated from the Institute of Design, Pune and is presently working as the head of design at RKSV. She is a person who enjoys a variety of things like eating street food, ogling old English architecture and playing with stray cats and she also brings this versatility in her work. 

 

For Shreya, inspiration is not something that is acquired but it is the objects, visuals, words or anything that influence a person and seep into ones’ memory. She is of the opinion that versatility and having a unique point of view goes hand in hand!

 


masterpiece

30. Yogesh Bhusare

Graduated from D.Y. Patil College of Applied Arts & Crafts, Pune, illustrator Yogesh Bhusare dreamt of creating master pieces and hitting it big early by working towards his design and product brand since the day he graduated.

 

Working with various companies, he picked up tricks of the trade and was successful in launching his design and product brand AWWSOME. Loving to try out different and new styles, Yogesh feels that experimenting brings you closer to your masterpiece.

 


CURRENT ISSUE
Creative Gaga - Issue 48

 

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All that is glitters (read foreign) is not gold. So believes, Studio Kohl, a boutique studio, founded by Mira Malhotra, that reflects the Indian culture and heritage in all of its works. After all, home is where the heart is, isn’t it?

MMMPop! Studio Kohl's Diwali greeting, 2015. The Diwali traditions of gifting sweets and playing with fireworks are combined in this little box full of crackling candy.

CG. You use a lot of Indian symbolism in your works. What is your idea behind that?

SK. It isn’t an idea, as much as a result, of a conscious decision to be inspired by what is around. Years ago, when I found myself fighting the urge to mimic western music artists, I realised that I needed to ‘think local’, and only then it’d be convincing to others. I am mainly influenced by local products, novelty items, the bazaar and folk arts. There is little use in re-doing what other people have done before, in a market that is not ours. We also have a pretty rich visual culture and a unique approach, so why forgo it? Instead, Americans and Europeans seem to value it more than we do. My biggest influence in this regard is Japan. They have a range of unique contemporary aesthetics and treatments; a visual culture all of their own, grown independently from western influences that are ever-changing

Diwali Lakshmi. A golden engraving of the Indian goddess, Lakshmi, also considered the deity of wealth. Depicted here amidst Diwali, the festival synonymous of light and prosperity.

CG. How do you apply these traditional elements, such that they suit contemporary styles of presentation?

SK. I think of it as ‘global treatment; local content’. I am not oblivious to the steady stream of modern inspiration around me, but I like to tweak it a little; we either use content that’s local, or scripts, or even inspiration from folk art. It could be switching around a colour palette; smoothening outlines that are usually brush-stroked, or being minimal. A lot of unknown illustrators from India in the 50s to the 70s, that get little credit today, are also responsible for the influences – such as Deenanath Dalal – and make excellent sources of contemporised Indian work.

EAST INDIA DEZIGN CO. (2015). Proposed branding for EIDC, a brand of luxury Indian goods. The glory of the maharajas in a contemporary global format representing luxury.

CG. What are the challenges that cause a hurdle in balancing the Indian and modern feel, and how do you tackle them at Studio Kohl?

SK. I think it comes rather naturally to me, as I am practiced in it, but it was tougher earlier. I think, just by the fact that one can use digital modes of reproduction and interpret what you have already seen through these modes, one can create something really interesting and balanced. We don’t realise it, but a lot of the so-called visual trends are actually inspired by how one uses software or technology to achieve a visual concept. It later defines what we call ‘new’ or ‘trendy’. So, by simply using vectors, or by a certain photoshop brush or print method, the demands of those technologies contribute to something age-old and seen before, but giving them a contemporary look.

GRAZIA YOUNG FASHION AWARDS 2013. A playful and trendy illustration for GYFA 2013.

CG. How do you see Indian elements contributing to modern-day design?

SK. I try to insert Indian elements to revive a dying culture and to preserve it. Cultures cannot be preserved in glass cases; they need to be moulded, continued and extended to remain relevant; otherwise, they are certain to die out.

ZOMBA.IN (2012). With the logo already in place, the visual language was built to showcase activities representing the B-Boying culture, with a distinctively old-school flavour.

CG. What would be the Studio Kohl’s advice to other designers who are trying to create a similar style of work as yours?

SK. ‘Don’t just create your own work’; instead, delve into history, local crafts, etc. Let your inspiration be a journal or camera you take on your travels around India or your everyday lives. Invest in learning more about the Indian approach. You might find it rather fascinating and nothing like you’ve ever seen. Don’t continually repeat the work of foreign illustrators.

Published in Issue 35

The season of the festival has started and everyone is preparing to have a unique one this time with less cash and more fun. We interview many creatives who creates promotional or calendar design each year. As most of the thing around us had shifted to digital, even calendar design and the promotion has shifted. But Yorick Pintos, a strategic consultant at studio Kohl suggests that best option would be to a mix of both, the traditional and digital media. Digital Illustrator Nithin Rao Kumblekar also shared his love for the printed calendars and emphasis on the effectiveness of it. If you are interested in print design & want to understand the future of the same. So, go ahead and order your latest issue copy!

 

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