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Warner Media recently merged with Discovery forming Warner Bros. Discovery.

Image: courtesy Chermayeff & Geismar & Haviv/Warner Bros. Discovery

A mock-up logo design for Warner Bros. Discovery, a new partnership between Warner Bros. and Discovery, Inc, was leaked. The golden design received plenty of criticism, with people saying that the design looks like it was made with Microsoft’s WordArt. But now, Warner Bros. has finally revealed the actual design. The audience may not be satisfied with it but they are certainly relieved.

The mock-up logo [Image: Warner Bros . Discovery]

Designed by Chermayeff & Geismar & Haviv, who explains that the rebranding reflects Warner Bros. Discovery’s goal “to establish a creative powerhouse that builds on its history as well as its unmatched talent and vision for the future”.

The new logo features a minimalistic design with a simplified wordmark. The designers have worked to take the overall look in a modern direction. Creating more symmetry between the letters was one such tweak. Without the ribbon of text across the middle traditionally usually used in the shield, the size difference between W and B is more obvious.

Image credit: Chermayeff & Geismar & Haviv/Warner Bros. Discovery

“Creativity, storytelling, longevity . . . all of these qualities are built already into that shield,” says Sagi Haviv, partner and designer at Chermayeff & Geismar & Haviv.

Image: courtesy Chermayeff & Geismar & Haviv/Warner Bros. Discovery
CURRENT ISSUE
Creative Gaga - Issue 54

 

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Tawainese computer hardware company, Asus launches two new Zenbooks accompanying a new logo.

Asus New Logo
Image credit: Asus

The new Zenbooks launched just this week are direct competitors of Macbook Air, featuring OLED displays and ultra-light and portable designs. The AMD Zenbook 13 S joins Asus’ growing lineup of 13-inch OLED laptops, and the Zenbook Pro 15 Flip OLED is a convertible laptop that is powered by the 12th-Gen Core processors and an Arc GPU.

Old (left) vs new (right) (Image credit: Asus/Future owns)

Instead of the word ‘Asus’ on the lids of other laptops, these two additions will have a new arrow-shaped logo. This is certainly an upgrade from the company’s previous boring old wordmark.

Netizens reacted to this major change to the company’s look by pointing out that the new logo looks rather like the Starfleet Insignia from Star Trek.

The Starfleet insignia (Image credit: TrekCore)

Adding to that, it seems the new Asus monogram logo isn’t entirely new, it had appeared on the company’s Behance page and at the Computex Taipei International Computer Show in 2019 celebrating the company’s 30th Anniversary with in addition to many new products. But this is the first time we’ve seen it on any of Asus’s cheaper consumer devices.

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American ice cream chain Baskin Robbins, which has had a fresh logo in the works for a while, finally replaces the old ‘pink and blue’ for a little more succinct one.

The previous Baskin Robbins logo had a playful and ‘childish’ typeface with a hidden ‘31’ claiming that they had 31 ice cream flavours – one for each day of the month. The rebrand covers all elements of Baskin-Robbins’ visual identity from the employee uniforms to the packaging.

Baskin Robbins New Logo

Also adding three new limited-time flavours: One is Non-Dairy Mint Chocochunk, another is Totally Unwrapped, made with peanut butter and chocolate ice creams, caramel swirls, fudge-covered pretzels, and fudge and caramel covered peanuts.

While addressing customer feedback the Baskin Robbins leadership team heard some customers felt very attached to the brand, which they associated with childhood trips with parents or grandparents. But they also heard that there were “some opportunities in being more relevant,” said Jason Maceda, Baskin-Robbins president to CNN.

Baskin Robbins New Logo

While it’s important for brands like Baskin-Robbins to gain traction with people who remember them from their youth, they also need to keep in mind the new customers coming in. The redesign is all set to redefine the company’s tagline, ‘seize the yay’, which aims to “turn fans of yesterday into brand loyalists of today and capture Gen Z’s heart with everyday moments of ‘happy’,” according to the agency behind the makeover.

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One of the most distinguished finance giants, Visa recently collaborated with branding consultancy Mucho to come up with a new brandmark and brand symbol.

Visa Unveils a Fresh Look for their Logo!

In an attempt to be seen as ‘more than just a credit card company’, Visa refreshed its iconic vibrant blue and yellow logo with the instantly recognisable bold Myriad font. Although the new look still focuses on their blue and yellow colour scheme, the colour palette has been updated slightly, with the new brandmark now in a new typeface and the shade of blue clearly brighter than the previous one.

At the first glance, it may not look like a lot has been changed because the old logo is not obviously different from the new one but it has some slight adjustments that make it special. Visa has created a cohesive set of illustrations, graphics, motions and even a new colour palette to help convey its message. The new logo has been altered to resemble an equals sign, to signify a new company belief that “economies that include everyone everywhere, uplift everyone everywhere”. And the tricolour brand symbol is said to represent Visa’s three purposes: access, equality and inclusion.

Despite the changes being subtle, they successfully represent Visa with a fresh look.

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Swedish automotive manufacturer, Volvo recently updated their new logo, from the iron, men and Mars-based logo to a minimalist looking 2D logo

Volvo, a renowned automotive manufacturer just announced another upgraded version of its ‘Volvo’ script and bar version, which was first revealed in 1930. The initial production of vehicles featuring the new design is said to be launched in 2023 sported by the successor of large SUV XC90.

A creation of Swedish design agency Stockholm Design Lab in collaboration with Tröllback & Company, ” Volvo needed a redesign of the iron mark, optimized for communication and versatile for all types of applications,” the agency writes on its website. “The logo has been simplified in its purest form and conveys the brand’s vision; to be the world’s most progressive and desirable premium car brand.”

The new design was publicized this week on the brand’s website and social media pages and retains the ‘iron mark’ signature with a diagonal arrow affixed to a hollow circle – but removes the contrasting bar across the centre, with the ‘Volvo’ text ‘floating’ in the circle. The shape of the arrow has also been tweaked along with a different typeface, a new flat finish.

“An updated version of the Volvo Iron Mark will be used exclusively on products and in small digital spaces when clear visibility of the Volvo spread word mark can’t be ensured,” a Volvo Australia spokesperson told Drive and added “The change will be gradual. We started by rolling out the updated identity on our main website, main social media platforms and in the new Volvo Cars mobile app. The updated iron mark will be rolled out in other areas step by step, and the first car with the updated iron mark will be launched in 2023. The old iron mark will be phased out over time.”

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CURRENT ISSUE
Creative Gaga - Issue 54

 

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In a want to make the UI and the internal functionality of the brand as easy as the services the brand provides to its users through its app, Uber teamed up with Wolff Olins to create their dream brand system through rebranding process.

Brief

Uber is a tech start-up connecting riders and drivers that turned into a global mobility platform in a short and quick span of only eight years.

 

Having embraced new and future modes of transportation—from bikes, to tuk-tuks, to flying cars, it needed a holistic brand system that was instantly recognizable, works around the world and was efficient to execute, accommodating all of its needs and services within.

Brand System

Solution

Wolff Olins partnered with Uber to reimagine how the world moves, creating a system that connects with all modes of transportation, in all places, for all people—including internal Uber teams. The project was an intensely collaborative effort between Wolff Olins, the Uber Brand Experience Team, and MCKL Type Foundry.

Brand System

For All Places

With Uber operating in 660+ cities and having its highest growth areas in regions outside of the US, such as Latin America and India, the brand had to have a system to be able to work globally.

 

Keeping this in mind, Wolff Olins adapted a universal ‘beyond-simple’ global brand instead of pursuing a complex identity system, localized through colour and pattern. This universal system gave teams the freedom to make it relevant to their audiences with culturally specific content.

For All People

With a new wave of leadership at Uber came a renewed commitment to safety which until now was product-driven. But safety was a much larger context. It was the brand’s need and requirement to speak equally to riders, drivers, and employees, which led to answering the question, “What does safety mean for different people at different times?”

 

This resulted in the introduction of Safety Blue to the colour palette. It’s unique to Uber and meant to be used sparingly to indicate important moments of support, care or connection between the user and the brand.

Brand System

For All Teams

The decentralized nature of Uber’s operations meant the company needed a system that could be easily implemented by a wide range of practitioners around the world in a broad spectrum of digital and physical applications. The system isn’t just for marketing designers, but for product teams, customer service, and beyond. Its success depends on how useful teams find it.

This required brand system of Uber is made up of nine elements, each one explained below.

Logo

A wordmark instead of a symbol, the logo is approachable, easy to read, and takes full advantage of the name recognition. Optical kerning, refined weight, and defined clear space, as well as well-delineated placement in relation to other content, all help to make it as instantly recognizable as possible.

Brand System

Composition

The composition system is elegant in its sheer simplicity of use — it creates a subtle “U” wherever it appears.

 

By defining the grid based on the logo, the system stays flexible and beyond easy to apply. The U-frame optimized for content is used for hoardings, billboards and other advertising formats.

Typography

The typography is as unique and easy to use as Uber is.

 

Inspired by the world’s best used transportation examples, it was designed to maximize its impact across all applications while keeping it easy to read, own-able, and highly recognizable.

Iconography

The icons are inspired by global transportation iconography and drawn from the same shapes as their typeface, creating a seamless system from text to icon.

 

The arrow is part of the iconography but can be used in copy as a shorthand between destinations, whether geographic or states of mind.

Brand System

Colour

A tight colour palette, dominated by black and white, draws on the colours used in global navigation.

The high contrast of black and white, the primary colours of Uber’s palette, make the text as legible as possible.

The use of a set of bright secondary colours makes the UI interesting.

 

The Safety blue, unique to Uber is used sparingly to call out moments of support, assurance and other important interactions between a user and the brand.

Motion

The motion system expresses the simple and easy movement that Uber makes possible. In an attempt to create a completely own-able motion system, the broadcast packages and the key motion states within the product are aligned in a manner to have just one set of motion principles and base motion states.

Photography

The photography inspires Uber’s audience of young and old, partners and customers, local and global. It builds on how it feels to move from motivation at point A to the emotional payoff of arriving at point B.

Illustration

The illustration draws from Uber’s logo and the transportation language inspiration of the typeface. Simple shapes, clean lines, limited colour and heightened reality give the illustrations a branded feel and make it easy to understand at a glance.

Tone of Voice

Uber’s global tone of voice focuses on the mindset they share with their users: they see the world as it could be and work to make it a reality. Beyond word choice and style choices, Uber’s tone of voice focuses their belief in putting their audience first.

Conclusion

Built from stakeholder input from around the world and tested on the ground with creative teams, Uber’s brand system is simple, flexible, and globally recognizable.

 

The learnings of what the business needed globally during a period of transition were used to drive their work of creating a brand that both served their business and engaged the audience.

CURRENT ISSUE
Creative Gaga - Issue 54

 

Dunkin’ is a now single as ‘donuts’ has officially been dropped off from its previous name. Nevertheless, the team of Jones Knowles Ritchie put their creative caps on and worked hard towards transforming the brand in such a way that the exclusivity remains pristine.

Dunkin

Brief/ Challenge:

A company that is a synonym for providing the best coffees and donuts all over the world, for over 50 years, knocked at the door of Jones Knowles Ritchie for a re-establishment of its brand. While the font and the pink and orange colors make the branding unique, it was a challenge for the team to revamp the brand in a way that the distinctiveness remains intact.

Dunkin
Dunkin

Solution:

Along with tweaking the overall look of the brand, the company even dropped ‘donuts’ from its name and switched it to just “Dunkin”. Just like coffee is associated with donuts, sweet with savory, cream with sugar, Dunkin’ is associated with its signature Frankfurter font and pink and orange colors. Acknowledging the importance of these prime features, the team of Jones Knowles Ritchie struck upon an idea to update the font itself.

Dunkin
Dunkin

They developed a custom update of Frankfurter called Dunkin Sans by adding a serif inspired by Dunkin’s use of Souvenir in the 1970’s. A combination of this newly customized typography and the old colors resulted into a new presentation of the brand by giving a modern twist to the former logo. While the team wondered as to why Dunkin’ even required that bit of jolt, they were quite successful in creating something that captured the nostalgia of the brand which lies in the hearts of millions of Dunkin’s loyal fans.

Dunkin

“America runs on Dunkin” turned out to be amazingly true when over one billion impressions in the first 24 hours of the release of the amplified brand, helped Dunkin’ become a US trending topic on Twitter. Jones Knowles Ritchie was a major source that assisted Dunkin’ to get on “First Name Terms with America” which also resulted in immense coverage that included The Late Show with Stephen Colbert on CBS, The New York Times, Esquire, The Guardian, Buzzfeed, Forbes and more.

Dunkin