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Juan Casini is a multidisciplinary designer juggling various mediums and keeping his passion alive by traveling and designing. He is a free spirit who loves to draw, travel and experience new things. Here, he talks about his journey and inspirations of becoming a designer.

The Snow Island.
SkyMath - Educational App
The Turtle Island.

CG: How did your tryst with design begin?

Juan: I started working as a 2D game artist for a video game company while I was in the early years of college. I learned a lot there and it was the perfect way to start exploring the video game industry and understand how such a complex product as a game is made. I found that I could really use my illustrations skills there so I focused entirely in the video game field and I worked in more than 50 game developments since then.

 

Today, design for mobile apps is my main area of expertise, collaborating in small-scale game development for indie studios to major developments and educational apps.

Hanuman.
Ishtar. A personal project to show how animals can be gods for many cultures, mythologies and religions across the world.

CG: Any role models who inspired you early in life?

Juan: My father used to draw with me when I was a child and I’ve always been supported to get involved in artistic studies. I am very lucky for the education I got at such an important time of formation of a person, as is the childhood. But the most important thing is that they always encouraged me to do what I love. So I can definitely say that my parents are my role models

Space Cantina Game

CG: What influences you for your artworks?

Juan: I really like Japanese anime and the way they handle expression and visual impact. I’ve watched a lot of series and movies, thus animation and Manga are a great influence for me. I also believe nature is art in its pure form, so I keep traveling and constantly learning by watching and living on this beautiful planet.

Travel
Mammoth in Istanbul. A personal project, done when Juan started the freelance journey
Anunnaki. A personal project to show how animals can be gods for many cultures, mythologies and religions across the world.
Cebolla in Tokyo. A collection of postcards of our nomad journey with Flor Bisagno.
Live Forever. Contribution to a t-shirt design contest for Backseries (Spain).

CG: What do you want to express through your artworks?

Juan: I always try to give the best of me in all the projects I get involved in, and that means not only putting your best energy on it but also try to create a powerful and stimulating experience for the user or audience. So I try to keep the level of expression very high, adding many details and playing a lot with the colour palette, so no matter what the product is about, the eyes of the viewer can be positively affected in a more subtle and deep visual experience.

The Thunder Island.
The Rain Island.

CG: How do you avoid creative burnout or what do you do incase you feel creatively exhausted?

Juan: Initially during the early days of my freelance career I found myself working for too many hours on too many projects at the same time. Eventually, I realised that organisation and discipline are essential but it’s also important to take days off, rest well, go out and explore nature to have refreshing and exciting experiences as much as possible. It’s imperative to find your own rhythm, but most important, finding what you love to do and stop seeing your job as an obligation. It takes time and a lot of energy to stay away from the comfort zone, but if you can accomplish that I promise that it can change your life completely. Nowadays, a creative burnout with this nomad journey is really rare, when you are constantly discovering new places and cultures! It is just the best for your mind and soul

Crypto Tower Game
Crypto Tower Game

Published in Issue 33

We all face it! But everyone has their own unique way to come out of it, in this issue we try to explore different ideas of handling the ‘Creative Burnout’. The most common of all was #travelling, through everyone do it in their own unique style. Like Luke Ritchie from South Africa finds the nature and mountains as the best source of inspiration while Sushant Ajnikar says riding his bike and meeting four-legged loyal friends, dogs, on the way is the best way to learn. So, pack your bags and don’t forget to subscribe your copy before you leave!

 

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CURRENT ISSUE
Creative Gaga - Issue 48
Widget Image

 

Each illustration or work of design is a new process and a new insight. From the wide variety of design work that Creative Gaga feature each year, at the end of the year we take a moment to acknowledge all of them by highlighting top 10 featured Illustrators of 2017. Here we go.

Featured Illustrator - Nithin Rao Kumblekar

1. Nithin Rao Kumblekar

Nithin Rao Kumblekar is not only an illustrator but also an Art Director and Concept Artist who has illustrated for and brands such as OLX, Century Ply, and the likes, apart from having worked on a vast range of projects. In this assignment, conceived and executed for AVP, a pet food company catering to the likes of household dogs and cats. He represents a direct connection between these adored domestic companions and their very beloved treats, thus portraying the animals directly interacting with AVP in a fun, colourful and real-like animated setting.

More Project Illustrations are here


Featured Illustrator - Mukesh Singh

2. Mukesh Singh

Khyber Nights is a life-like and realistic story of survival, love and loss. Based on the unruly frontier surrounding the Khyber Pass during the Soviet war with Afghanistan in the late 80’s. This cover art for the intense tale was created by Marvel artist, Mukesh Singh, in an effort to summarise a gripping narrative that is about sisterhood and brotherhood winning over the politics of war. Using a strong sense of lighting and character expressions, he does indeed capture the tale in the frame.

Mukesh’s more illustrations are here


happiness-Lavanya Naidu

3. Lavanya Naidu

A graduate of the National Institute of Design, Lavanya Naidu is an Animator and Illustrator. Her style of work is a representation and expression of focusing on producing work that is personally challenging and cherished, rather than just going about creating ‘what is required as per the brief’. She uses a very fun and lively colour scheme that is both vibrant and subtle, very much like the characters, environments, settings, and characters she chooses to portray.

Featured Article:

Induce Happiness with Your Work!


Create Your Style

4. Bhaskar Rac

Bhaskar Rac is a self-employed Concept and 3D artist. A graduate of Delhi College of Art (Applied Art), he works extensively in character development, 3D sculpting, and the likes. As someone who trusts in honing one’s own style, instead of trying to imitate fashionable cult or style, nurturing and developing refreshing ideas is his primary intention. Here, he simply starts off with initial sketches, further gathering all the related references, structuring, line drawings and then rendering. Likewise, he finds a balance between minimalism and amplification through colours, emotions, lines, contours and the likes in order to capture the main essence of the subject.


5. Anna Dittmann

Graduating from Savannah College of Art and Design in Georgia,  Anna Dittmann is a freelance digital illustrator who tries to evoke different emotions through her portraits. Here, using subtle facets with natural fundamentals, she manages to capture the emotions of the viewer, thus mainly tapping into and drawing their attention to it. Gaining insight and motivation from movement and raw shapes by blending nonfigurative conceptual and innate elements, she created this soothing piece through an amalgamation of fictional and realistic elements. Using pastels, watercolours, and oils here, she tries to capture an impulsiveness in the artwork.


Ancient Future

6. Omar Gilani

From Peshawar, Pakistan, Omar Gilani is a Double-Masters in Robotics from Washington DC and has an eye for discovering the modern in the ancient, something that is purely a matter of enhanced or evolved vision. And, so, his desire to renew the old and transform what is considered obsolete or irrelevant into the opposition stems from his work, ‘Desret Warrior Aunty’. He predominantly uses lighting to determine the initial composition of a piece. Importantly, dividing the canvas into simple black and white shapes to see if all the various aspects are harmonious helps him achieve the final piece which is full of colour and life-like vibrancy.


Siddhi Ranade - tale-telling

7. Siddhi Ranade

With a Commercial Arts from L. S. Raheja School of Arts, Mumbai, Siddhi Ranade trusts that geometry, colour and the subject are crucial features. As someone who feels that design needs to be time relevant in constantly modifying times, he pays attention to every tool that he uses in the making of his work. Over here, for example, geometry, pattern, and proportion in symmetry are not just advantageous but the very fundamentals. ‘Line’, for example, is the primary factor to achieve without any compromise. Colours finally add a mood to it in a more theatrical and impressive way that further dictates or overpowers the final piece.


8. Juan Casini

Juan Casini is a designer of multiple disciplines who experiments and works through various mediums. He trusts that ‘nature is art in its purest form’, and thus takes a lot of inspiration from it, thereby representing elements of nature through a lot of his designs. For example, over here, he tries to create a powerful and stimulating experience for the audience. In an effort to keep the level of expression rather intense, he goes on to add multiple layers of detail while experimenting with the colour palette. What that helps him achieve is that, no matter what the product is about, the eyes of the viewer can be positively held by the artwork.

Featured Article:

Living the Nomad life


9. Rohan Dahotre

Rohan Dahotre is an illustrator who feels strongly about nature and gains inspiration from the beauty of it. The core of his work lies in making the complexities of nature simple – for example, turning complex organic forms into simple shapes. Experimenting with pictures from the wild – mainly animals – and giving them a new visual representation and overall look, he tries to display the real beauty that resides within the amazing bounty of forest animals, all so that people learn to appreciate and better treat and respect them and their habitat.


Indian thelas

10. Ranganath Krishnamani

Ranganath Krishnamani is a designer specialising in Illustration, User Experience and Art Direction. This piece of artwork is a personal or self-initiated project through which he finds connection with his own origin in the south Indian city of Bangalore in Karnataka, India. Through the means of this series, he intends to portray some of the most interesting and intriguing selling-carts from across the Indian subcontinent. The basic idea stems from his nostalgic memories of him running out onto the street upon recognising the arrival of assorted carts and their bearings, something commonly found through most of India.