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Established illustrator Samji provides exciting insights regarding the eld of illustration, sharing his techniques, tips and tricks, while also opening up about the challenges and hurdles presented by this pandemic.

An elegance, in her pyjamas, moving through her backyard in a parallel world.
Freedom of expression.

Samji’s fondness for art was carefully nurtured since childhood. His first step into the realm of art was through the field of animation. “It was not a particularly successful stint. I began doing a few odd jobs to keep myself afloat. Following which, I took up BFA in Applied Art. But I had to drop out from that course in my third year, thus putting an end to my formal art education,” said Samji. After several years of exploration, he realised that his true love lies in the field of illustrations and thus began his career as a freelance illustrator.

A personal project titled Be Different

Brilliant, vivid colours, the gorgeous textures and zealous energy exuded by the artworks are key signatures of Samji’s illustrations. Through years of experimentation and exploration, Samji developed a distinct style, thus establishing himself as a talented illustrator in the industry.

A personal project titled Freedom of expression.
Package illustration done based on Ekpe masquerades culture
An illustration representing the research wing of Terra Money.

The bright, rich colours set Samji’s illustrations apart and give the pieces a burst of energy. “I used to work with a minimal set of colours. The hues you see in my work now are the ones I used to stay away from, simply because I was afraid of using them. I was not comfortable using highly saturated and vibrant colours. Then one day, I found the courage to get out of my comfort zone and experiment; and that made all the difference,” explained the artist.

Illustration by Samji
Mermay challenge
Illustration by Samji
Themed on Christmas

The richness and brilliance of the colours in an illustration are attained by adjusting and experimenting with the hues, saturation and brightness of a tone. “My process varies according to need. If the work is for a client, I follow the brand guidelines and other factors to set the colour palette. For personal projects, I start with random colours. I use complementary colours to differentiate between subject and background. After which, I keep experimenting till I hit the mark. In fact, HSB (Hues, Saturation and Brightness) is one of my favourite tools that I constantly use in my works,” shared Samji, illuminating the process behind his illustrations.

Illustration by Samji
Illustration by Samji
‘Me and Caverito’ based on my pet cat.

Lighting is another crucial factor in an illustration. “When it comes to lighting, I focus on highlights. I save it for the end because highlights are to an illustration what a soul is to a body; it provides life to the image,” commented the illustrator.

A podcast illustration themed on the power of music.

But the colours in our lives dulled at the wake of Coronavirus pandemic which shook this world. Our lives were drastically altered, and the pandemic affected various walks of life in various degrees. Hence, it is but natural to strive to understand the extent of its effect on the art industry in India. “The pandemic could have had monstrous effects on the art industry if not for the Internet and social platforms like Instagram. As with any change, adapting can take time, and it can affect your mental health. This is especially true for artists who are constantly seeking to get inspired, be it by taking a walk or talking to a person’s face to face. It is challenging for an artist to keep his creative juices flowing when his wings are cut,” commented Samji.

Illustration by Samji

A significant part of the art industry is freelancers. Providing critical insight into the lives of the freelancers, the illustrator observed, “As a freelancer, I’m used to working from home; hence I didn’t find much of a difference. The mass layoffs resulted in an increase in the number of freelancers which in turn led to more competition within the industry. The only way for us to keep up is by carving a niche and standing out in professional platforms, which is difficult to many, including me.

Illustration by Samji
Annoying Colleagues
Illustration by Samji
A digital artwork illustrated to be the cover art for a podcast.

It is quite a challenge to produce quality works and maintains your visibility in social media at the same time,” said Samji. And to cope with these sudden changes, artists devised various methods to stay active professionally. “I marked my presence in platforms where I could get potential work enquiries or opportunities. These included social media like Instagram, where we have to constantly stay engaged and be easily available,” explained the artist.

Illustration by Samji
This was inspired by a photograph that I had seen in Fubiz page.

But it was not all grey and dreary, the pandemic also resulted in positive changes and improvements. “The work inquiries, collaborations and potential clients increased during this pandemic for me. I am not sure of the exact reason – perhaps it is because of my improved effort at the online presence or the lack of full-time employees in firms and a higher rate of outsourcing to freelancers,” said Samji.

Illustration by Samji
One of the figure illustration done for a company based in U.K

With proper planning and smart management, it is indeed possible to cope with the hurdles of the pandemic. Offering invaluable strategies, the artist shares his suggestions, tips and tricks to fellow illustrators and freelancers. “We have proved that it is possible to work from home without any hassle. The next step is to maximise our visibility and availability across all platforms, especially if you are a freelancer. Another important step is to build a reliable community since we cannot downplay the extent of security that a well-built community can bring in a situation like this. So, I’d suggest that we all make an effort in bringing this community up. At the same time, please take care that you do not overwhelm yourself with the use of social media by comparing your work with someone else’s. Try to limit your use to get inspired or promote your work and not bring yourself down”.

Illustration by Samji
Fenix Getting ready for Halloween
UnibroW

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Encouraging us to make the best out the situation, Febin Raj cheers us to turn our obstacles into opportunities as the world fights this deadly pandemic.

Pandemic - Febin raj

Q.
What inspired you to take up art as your profession?

Febin. I loved drawing even as a child, and it has only grown stronger over the years. Hence, when it came to choosing a profession, there was no second choice. I consider myself blessed to be living my passion and making a career out of it.

Pandemic - Febin raj
Pandemic - Febin raj

Q.
Though your art journey began in watercolours, your current works are extensively digital. What is it about digital painting that draws you to it?

Febin. It is necessary to stay updated in this fast-paced world. Digital art provides us with a wide range of opportunities to challenge ourselves and explore new dimensions of art, while also making our work a lot easier compared to conventional methods. But nothing can replace the satisfaction of painting with watercolours on a piece of paper.

Pandemic - Febin raj

Q.
Your current digital artworks possess a specific style and geometric flair. Kindly share the artistic process with us.

Febin. My style has evolved over the years, and it is not done consciously or with any plan. I execute my ideas rather spontaneously and draw inspiration from what I see around me.

Q.
Your art pieces seem to possess a strict colour palette. How do you select the colour scheme for each piece?

Febin. My works are inspired by nature, and hence, the colours are a reflection of what we can observe around us. The colour palette goes in sync with the intricate hues of nature, and I try my best to do justice to this beautiful swirl of colours around us and keep my works natural.

Pandemic - Febin raj
Pandemic - Febin raj

Q.
Your artworks reflect your love for travel and nature. How did this pandemic challenge your creativity and artwork, especially since we were required to stay at home?

Febin. This pandemic did not challenge my creativity. I tried to see this as an opportunity to explore my limitations and push my boundaries. It is indeed true that we were all confined within the four walls, but our creativity and ideas were never confined. Even with these limited resources, I tried to bring out the best in me.

Q.
What are the effects of the pandemic on the art industry? Were there any unexpected hurdles?

Febin. The art industry, just as all the other industries, faced certain setbacks due to this pandemic, but it is slowly picking up the pace. If we convert every hurdle we face into an opportunity, I’m sure we’ll thrive. That is what I’m trying to do right now.


Q.
Freelancers are some of the most affected by this pandemic. What is the market like for freelancers now?

Febin. Just as in all the other professions, freelancers have faced some difficulties too. The market is not as commendable at this point in time, but the situation is undoubtedly improving. Personally, the pandemic has only brought new opportunities and fabulous projects for me.

Pandemic - Febin raj
Pandemic - Febin raj

Q.
How are the art agencies and studios coping with the pandemic? How are they supporting the freelancers through this crisis?

Febin. Art agencies and studios are indeed going through a difficult situation due to this crisis, but I believe that they are extending every possible support to freelancers. During the pandemic, I got the chance to collaborate with a few international studios.

Q.
When ‘Work From Home’ is the new norm, do you see any long-term changes in the way freelancers work?

Febin. The profession of freelancing, as we see it today, has evolved over the years. Any and every change is gradual. Hence, it is tough to predict how the concept of freelancing would be perceived in the future. But as of now, freelancing is linked to freedom and that would remain the same, regardless of any change.

Pandemic - Febin raj


Pandemic - Febin raj

Q.
Has the working style of art agencies and studios changed? Do you think this change will last post-pandemic?

Febin. The working style has definitely changed into a whole new dimension since the resources are limited. This pandemic proved to us that whatever the situation may be, there is always a way out. Perhaps some of the positive aspects of this new working style might stick with us post-pandemic.

Pandemic - Febin raj

Q.
Would you like to say a few words to your fellow artists and freelance who are fighting their way through this pandemic?

Febin. Make every obstacle your opportunity. Remember that these struggles, this crisis is not here to stay; this too shall pass. So, make the best out of the time you’ve been given, as creativity knows no bounds.

Pandemic - Febin raj

Published in Issue 51

TBusiness, studios, agencies, freelancer all have different perspectives to handle the pandemic and hurdle it brings. While some find pandemic an obstacle which will soon fade away and on the other hand, few saw opportunities in the same. Many creatives used the past few months to reflect on their styles and horn their art. Many utilized it for collaboration opportunities with national and international creatives. This issue is a must-read if you are looking for insights, inspirations and ways to bounce back in this unlocking phase.

 


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CURRENT ISSUE
Creative Gaga - Issue 54

 




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The brand identity of ‘The Earth Collective‘ created by Manav Sachdev Design Studio (MSDS). The Earth Collective brings premium haircare range inspired by the goodness of nature. Believing in the process of finding beauty in everything around us, this brand has conducted extensive research and study to develop products with organic and natural ingredients, since it is their firm belief that hair care is an integral part of human existence.

Brand Identity of The Earth Collective

Brief

 

‘The Earth Collective’ required a visual identity that had to be designed from scratch. The visual identity of the brand includes brand logo, illustrations, packaging and website. The essence of the brand and their morals had to be brought out through fresh, unique and creative visuals which connected with the consumers instantly. The brand’s integration of nature and science must be showcased through its visual identity.

Brand Identity of The Earth Collective


Brand Identity of The Earth Collective

Challenges

The brand’s visual identity needs to stand apart from the others in the market, which is already cluttered with several similar products. The identity must also speak for brand and all that they stand for, which include the glorious union of nature and science. The rare and natural ingredients used in the product must be present in the brand’s visual identity. It is also crucial that the brand’s essence, which is nature coming together, must be represented strongly.

Solution

The brand strategy was focused on hair care inspired by nature. To signify this, the studio incorporated the five elements of nature in the logo, which resemble hair strands that make a solution for healthy hair. The logotype also signifies the earth’s hemisphere, which contains the rare and natural ingredients for the products. The team also represented the unique union of nature and science, which resulted in these products. Elements of the logo have been illustrated on the packaging. The brand’s identity has been kept elegantly minimal with a carefully handpicked pastel colour palette.

Creative Gaga - Issue 51

Published in Issue 51

Business, studios, agencies, freelancer all have different perspectives to handle the pandemic and hurdle it brings. While some find pandemic an obstacle which will soon fade away and on the other hand, few saw opportunities in the same. Many creatives used the past few months to reflect on their styles and horn their art. Many utilized it for collaboration opportunities with national and international creatives. This issue is a must-read if you are looking for insights, inspirations and ways to bounce back in this unlocking phase.

 


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CURRENT ISSUE
Creative Gaga - Issue 54

 




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Arjun Parikh’s creative and artistic journey reflects in his detailed illustrations. Animal portraits and ‘art with deeper meaning’ is what his portfolio showcases!

Illustrations by Arjun Parikh
The Man Who Felt Too Much

Illustrations by Arjun Parikh
Unfold

Illustrations by Arjun Parikh
Labyrinth

Detailed, bold and narrative, is what Arjun Parikh’s art represents. A professional illustrator and graphic designer based in Los Angeles, his artistic roots go back to his childhood days when he would adorn his books with doodles and drawings! These experiences pushed him to follow his passion and pursue a degree in Graphic Design which was followed by a Master of Fine Arts degree in Illustrations.

Isolated



The Threat

While Arjun has a fondness for creating hand-drawn art, for the digital medium he prefers Adobe Photoshop and Illustrator. Beginning his design process with a solid brief putting all the key information in one place, he assigns specific words to his design and creates a bunch of thumbnail sketches. Converting these into compositional drawings, Arjun believes in keeping the client in the loop throughout the process to gather their perspective and inputs. Hoping to be an educator someday, Arjun is inspired by the works of Takehiro Nikai and Aaron Horkey amongst others.

Making Peace

Creative Gaga - Issue 51

Published in Issue 51

Business, studios, agencies, freelancer all have different perspectives to handle the pandemic and hurdle it brings. While some find pandemic an obstacle which will soon fade away and on the other hand, few saw opportunities in the same. Many creatives used the past few months to reflect on their styles and horn their art. Many utilized it for collaboration opportunities with national and international creatives. This issue is a must-read if you are looking for insights, inspirations and ways to bounce back in this unlocking phase.

 


Order Your Copy!

CURRENT ISSUE
Creative Gaga - Issue 54

 




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What sets apart successful designers from the rest? In our hunt for this answer we came knocking at the doors of Simoul Alva, an up and coming yet very successful Visual Designer and Art Director. Simoul gives us a peek into the behind the scenes of her success.

visual designer
Fortune India

visual designer
Adobe. A part of a series which re-imagines 20th Century Fine Art through 3D

Crystal clear clarity is a critical ingredient while striving to achieve our big dreams. An exemplar of pristine clarity is the up and coming Visual Designer, Simoul Alva.

Even before completing her Undergrad degree from the National Institute of Design, Ahmedabad, Simoul had already bagged projects and freelance work from renowned organisations. Her journey has been a mix of reaching out for things and sometimes things reaching out to her. She believes it is important early on in one’s career to keep trying different things. Owing to her openness, Simoul has always learned something from each project like a new visual design skill, research, strategy, time management, the history of the craft, etc.

visual designer
Doodh Branding

Packaging concept for Doodh Branding

Simoul has won numerous awards to date, the first being the Ratan Tata Scholarship for standing first in the entire foundation program. The Patrick Kelly Scholarship by the One Club for Creativity and The Art Director’s Club is special because she was the first person from outside the United States and the first Indian to win these awards. She was also delighted to win a Kyoorius Young Blood In-Book award.

Type Specimen for Vixen Display

visual designer
3D illustration for Hello 6E, Indigo Airlines

Speaking of her experience in international competitions, Simoul explains that she simply applies to relevant competitions if she thinks she has a chance to win. Often in competitions, the work is judged without the presence of participants to explain. This taught Simoul to ensure that presentation and communication are clear. The competition experience also taught her to take things positively when she did not make the cut. It also allows for great exposure to creatives from different parts of the world.

visual designer
Client, The Atlantic



visual designer
Illustration for the cover of the Thursday Styles Section in November 2019

Working with different people and under different mentors certainly presents opportunities for great learning. One such important lesson for Simoul is to keep doing what she is interested in, and investing in her ability even if she doesn’t get to use all of her skills every day. Time and investment will come in hand one day, and things will soon fall in place. She also believes in the power of reaching out. At first, she was shy of emailing people she wanted to work with or learn from, but later learned that one response or feedback at the right time can change your life. Working with different people also taught her the importance of communicating effectively and not being scared of asking questions.

visual designer
Spread from Defying Death Project. Created at ESAD, France

visual designer
Defying Death

When asked about current work, Simoul elaborated that she recently wrapped up an exciting project for Adobe with the Adobe Dimension team based out of San Francisco. She has been currently working in 3D and using it for storytelling and editorial illustration. She is now looking to explore strategy and visual system design in future.

visual designer
Defying Death

Simoul has mixed feelings for the current situation of the Pandemic. It is a painful, difficult and uncertain time, for everyone and her too. But she is grateful that she could stay connected with the people that she love.

visual designer
Creative Gaga - Issue 51

Published in Issue 34

Business, studios, agencies, freelancer all have different perspectives to handle the pandemic and hurdle it brings. While some find pandemic an obstacle which will soon fade away and on the other hand, few saw opportunities in the same. Many creatives used the past few months to reflect on their styles and horn their art. Many utilized it for collaboration opportunities with national and international creatives. This issue is a must-read if you are looking for insights, inspirations and ways to bounce back in this unlocking phase.

 


Order Your Copy!

CURRENT ISSUE
Creative Gaga - Issue 54

 




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Tobias Saul, lettering artist and illustrator, shares secretes and throws a light on the realm of lettering and effects of the pandemic on Germany’s art and design community.

By Lettering Artist Tobias Saul
Created for Schee shop

Lettering and calligraphy are taking the internet by storm, filling our social media feeds with delicate swirls of alphabets. But illustrating letters is no simple feat, and there is a little more than what meets the eye.

By Lettering Artist Tobias Saul
It's Never Too Late

From ornate vintage style to clean modern looks, Tobias Saul can design wonderous hand letterings and illustrations. Having graduated in graphic design at a college in Düsseldorf, Germany, Saul’s shift to lettering was not a conscious decision. “By the end of my studies, I began working for a print magazine called ‘The Heritage Post’, founded by Uwe Van Afferden. He gave me the task of illustrating from time to time and saw some talent in me, especially in drawing letters. This was the starting point for me to dive into the world of hand lettering,” said Saul. But this field was not as popular as it is today

By Lettering Artist Tobias Saul
I don’t want to go to heaven – Oscar Wilde. An illustration from the artist‘s personal work

Hand-drawn lettering artwork for the Coffee Roasting Company “Austin Roasting Co.“ from Austin, Texas

“You really had to dig deep to find some good contemporary artists in this niche. I think my first discoveries were Jon Contino, Jessica Hische and David A. Smith, all super talented. I totally fell in love with the decorated and hand-drawn type, and it was like a fever. I started drawing letters all day long, in every free minute. This was the moment when I felt comfortable in the world of design for the first time,” recollects Saul.

Amsterdam Dandy Logotype for Barber Birdman

By Lettering Artist Tobias Saul
A decorative logotype for the Tattoo studio Crimson Veil, Texas USA

Just as any other realm in design, lettering requires a keen eye, immense practice and a thorough knowledge of shapes. “I think it is all about training your eyes. The more you draw, and the more you look at other designers work, the better you get. In my opinion, a good font has a stringent system of reusing shapes. I think this is the most difficult thing you have to understand and learn because the more letters you have, the harder it gets to make them all look like they belong together,” explains the designer.

By Lettering Artist Tobias Saul
To Create we must Destroy, T-Shirt Design

Hence, it is pertinent for any lettering enthusiast to study and research old vintage labels, book covers and packaging designs with unique letterforms since they form the base to build a concept for a font. “So, in the next step, I define the characteristics which should give a font its identity. After that, I create all characters using these characteristics I have defined. What follows is a lot of testing, fine-tuning, kerning and spacing to complete the font,” said Saul, sharing his process behind font development.

By Lettering Artist Tobias Saul
Logo Sketch for Bixby Barber Company

But as hand-lettering is gaining popularity, so are the availability of fonts and styles, especially with the ease and accessibility of the internet and social media. It becomes a necessity for a lettering artist to remain fresh and develop exclusive font. “Fonts are similar to illustration and fashion, there are always new trends arising.

By Lettering Artist Tobias Saul
An illustration from the artist’s personal project

If you spot a new tendency early enough, or even better, if you can start a trend, then you have a good chance to establish a fresh and exclusive font. If you are aware of design trends, you can find good indications for creating fresh and useful fonts,” explains the artist.

Inspired from the Edward Sharpe & The Magnetic Zeros song ‘Better Days’

By Lettering Artist Tobias Saul
Every Little Thing. This poster was part of my sunday quote project

Just like every other industry, the realm of design suffered severely during the Coronavirus pandemic. The quarantine and other restrictions affected artists and art galleries all over the world since lack of exhibitions would mean that neither the gallery owners nor the artists could sell any artworks. “But, in my case, work-wise, the pandemic has not changed anything dramatically.

Baltimore Magazine – Big Fish



I have started my own company, Heritage Type Co. in 2019 with a good friend. We focus on selling design resources such as vintage fonts, illustrations and more. As we are selling globally and digitally, we are a bit protected from all the local restrictions and associated cancelled projects in the design industry. We had a lockdown for about two to three months, so on the creative side, I could discover and learn new things,” said Saul.

Better Call Saul.
An illustration from the artist’s personal project

Providing critical insights into the art community in Germany, the artist observed, “There were some financial aid packages, to prevent artists as well as other businesses to go bankrupt, which helped a lot. After the lockdown, galleries and exhibitions reopened quickly but under strict restrictions on the number of visitors. One of the biggest challenged was the abrupt switch from collective work in one space to a system of people working from home. Structuring projects and connecting all the people is difficult, and the bigger an agency is, the more complex is the communication structure between all employees. I think the surprisingly potent digital communication and home office will change the way of working for a lot of companies in the future.”

By Lettering Artist Tobias Saul
Book cover illustration for a lovely German children’s book

The pandemic took us all by surprise and served a critical blow to most of us. We need to hold on to hope during these dark days. Sharing strategies and suggestions, Saul says “I would recommend businesses to start thinking and working globally. Use the internet to get clients or sell products worldwide, this helps because not all countries are affected by the pandemic equally. Use the time to learn new things. Being at home can be frustrating, but in my experience, learning something new is good medicine, and it keeps your creative spirit alive”.

By Lettering Artist Tobias Saul
Stay Home. Stay Safe. Stay Positive


Published in Issue 51

Business, studios, agencies, freelancer all have different perspectives to handle the pandemic and hurdle it brings. While some find pandemic an obstacle which will soon fade away and on the other hand, few saw opportunities in the same. Many creatives used the past few months to reflect on their styles and horn their art. Many utilized it for collaboration opportunities with national and international creatives. This issue is a must-read if you are looking for insights, inspirations and ways to bounce back in this unlocking phase.

 


Order Your Copy!

CURRENT ISSUE
Creative Gaga - Issue 54

 




ad here

Chennai based illustrator, Bhavya Desai, sketches the beauty of those fleeting moments of life, which we often overlook. Indulge yourself in illustrations made out of not just brilliant colours, but also of love, magic and just a little bit of quirkiness.

Illustrations
Gas Cylinder Delivery

Babulal Momo shop

Stories can be told through any means, and Bhavya Desai narrates his tales through quirky, colourful characters as he draws his inspiration from the people and the life around him. His lively, energetic illustrations portray the wildness and vividness of city life, be it travelling in a crowded train or the hustle and bustle of a market with heavy foot traffic. Through keen observation, Bhavya illustrates pieces and moments of life, which all of us can relate too.

Illustrations
Tea seller

Bhavya worked in an architecture firm as a 3D Visualiser for over four years and started taking up projects pertaining to illustration since the year 2015. “I recall drawing consistently. Over time, people around me started noticing my illustrations. I remember drawing during tea breaks and lunch breaks, working on smaller sketches. In time, I observed that I was more productive when I worked independently and thus began taking up projects. It has been an exciting journey since then,” said Bhavya, reminiscing.

Illustrations
Knife Sharpene

Illustrations

Working primarily on character development, Bhavya is quick to observe and note the beauty of little moments from daily life. When asked about his muse, Bhavya stated, “Just things around me, really. I find inspiration from domestic settings and everyday life activities; these are the things that excite me the most. People watching helps me understand the characters better.”

Illustrations
Shivshankar Banarasi Pan

Illustrations
Egg-crobatics at 5:30am

When it comes to designing characters, there is more to it than what meets the eyes. “Before starting the sketch, I usually do a little background check on the character that I am developing,” said Bhavya, sharing his techniques. “I usually weave a small background story for the character and ask myself a few questions, such as: ‘Where is the character located?’, ‘What is the mood?’, ‘Have I seen a similar character in real life that I can refer to?’. These help me decide the environment and expression.” Following this process, the illustrator lays the foundation for the character using basic shapes and lines. “In my experience, I believe that the posture makes a lot of difference in terms of how dynamic a character is,” explained Bhavya.

Illustrations
An illustration from the series, 'While you were asleep'

Illustrations
Fishermen and Net

The lockdown provided the artist with an excellent opportunity in terms of creative projects. “With many commercial projects on hold, I had the time to think and reflect on my personal illustrations. During the lockdown, I came up with a series titled ‘While you were asleep’. This project focuses on people who work in the early hours of the morning and are the backbone of a city, such as sanitation workers, LPG gas delivery man, milk delivery person, among several others. Since the streets were deserted, I found myself creating an extra imaginative and quirkier illustration.”

Illustrations
While you were asleep, the watchman transferred his night duty to his dog



“When questioned on the impact of this new normal, Bhavya noted, “Personally, I think this situation has brought a positive impact to the industry. People are rethinking about their design strategy; this is an observation that I’ve made among a few of my clients. The lockdown gave people the time to take another look at their branding and marketing materials.”

Initial Lockdown Days

The quarantine impacted all the aspects of our lives. Talking about the impact of quarantine on the illustrator’s relationship with art, Bhavya observed, “The quarantine helped me look at objects in greater detail. Since we had a lot of time in our hands, I found myself digging deeper into the subjects of interest.”

Illustrations
Sanitation Worker

Mahatma Gandhi

All of our lives have been reshaped to a certain extent due to this pandemic. Our relationships with each other, with work, career and passion has undergone some change, be it drastic or infinitesimal. It is up to us to focus on the positives and highlight all that is beautiful in life, much like Bhavya Desai’s illustrations.

A ride to the vegetable shop

Creative Gaga - Issue 51

Published in Issue 51

Business, studios, agencies, freelancer all have different perspectives to handle the pandemic and hurdle it brings. While some find pandemic an obstacle which will soon fade away and on the other hand, few saw opportunities in the same. Many creatives used the past few months to reflect on their styles and horn their art. Many utilized it for collaboration opportunities with national and international creatives. This issue is a must-read if you are looking for insights, inspirations and ways to bounce back in this unlocking phase.

 


Order Your Copy!