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Known for his humour laced caricatures and cartoons, artist Uday Mohite voices his concerns as the pandemic ensues, the uncertainty reigns and the lockdown continues.

Uday Mohite - Lockdown
Hey Bro! Good Morning! People are in the cage and animals are enjoying their freedom

CG. How have you handled the lockdown? How you managed to stay inspired despite being forced to stay at home?

Uday. Since I am a freelance illustrator, my workspace is at home. I stopped working full-time around five to six months ago and decided to freelance full-time. Due to this, the lockdown did not hurt my work. An artist can work for hours irrespective of location.

Uday Mohite - Lockdown
Bharat Ratan. Ratan Tata group pledge Rs. 1,500cr in support of fight against COVID-19

CG. What are the struggles you’ve faced in maintaining your livelihood as an artist due to this lockdown?

Uday. The lockdown did not affect me initially since I had a few ongoing assignments. But as the pandemic intensified and only the essentials were delivered, I started witnessing a slowdown in my work. I seldom remember a day in the last 10-15 years that I did not have work at hand, but during the lockdown, the amount of work has gone down.

World Cartoonist Day. How can we celebrate Cartoonist day in restrictions?

CG. As an artist, how do you manage your workspace at home? Has this reflected in your productivity?

Uday. Working from home does have its drawbacks, and it can sometimes affect productivity. The internet might be slow, and getting in touch with the clients might be di cult; these are the everyday adversities I face. During such instances, one cannot help but think that things might go a lot smoother if we could just meet our clients. I work meticulously to avoid such problems.

Based on a true story. Work from home is not the same every time
Digital illustration and cartoon depicting those in need during this pandemic

CG. It is evident now that people seek solace through various forms of art when combating stressful times. Can we expect any long-lasting impact in this eld?

Uday. The current technological advancement has resulted in the evolution of art, as well. Earlier, the artists had to exhibit their works in galleries, but now with the advent of smartphones, we can showcase our works instantly to a broader audience. Hence, I believe that illustrators can have a long-term career in this eld.

Uday Mohite - Lockdown
Irrfan Khan. Legends Never Die. (irr’FAN’ Forever)

CG. Has the art community organised any fundraising activities for combating this pandemic?

Uday. The art community always contributes in times of crisis. In general, an art community appeals to fellow artists to o er discounts of 50% to 70% on their works and donate the 100% of the sale amounts to the affected population. A lot of communities have extended their hand during this pandemic, as well.

Uday Mohite - Lockdown
Health officials attacked by a mob in Indore. This is the fight against pandemic, not any religion!!

CG. How did your journey as an artist and as a caricaturist begin?

Uday. I visited Khalil Khan, a renowned artist’s exhibition in my village, Barshi, Solapur, when I was studying in class eight. I loved the artworks immensely. That’s when I began drawing caricatures every day; this was the beginning of my art journey. I later learnt the proper techniques, such as sketching life portraits, anatomy and then specialised in caricatures. I took up several freelance jobs as a caricaturist while I was studying in Mumbai; this allowed me to study faces and earn a little.

Uday Mohite - Lockdown
Dr B. R. Ambedkar. Watercolour portrait of the “Architect of Indian Constitution and founder of modern India”

CG. What is your message to aspiring artists and cartoonists?

Uday. Beginners must focus on basic sketching, at least ten to fifteen sketches daily. Mastering figure drawing and anatomy is a must, and the ability to handle various colours is essential. To become a good cartoonist, you must become a good artist first. It is rare to come across cartoonists who are great at drawing and possess a great sense of humour. Late Shri. R K Laxman, Late Shri. Balasaheb Thackeray, Late Shri. Mario Miranda are a few of these rare gems.

Uddhav Thackeray. Watercolour portrait of the Chief Minister of Maharashtra

Published in Issue 50

We all started this year anticipating many things, but nobody thought of life coming to a complete halt. The Coronavirus pandemic has forced every human to re-evaluate their attitude towards nature and life. We also have been forced to lock down in our houses. Though we are no more in the lockdown, still many unfortunate ones continue to lose their lives and livelihoods. This isolation has given many of us the time we needed to finish our long pending tasks. Some have turned to art and craft for peace and solace. While most got relaxed and enjoyed their time with family, others used the focussed time to prepare themselves for the life post lockdown. On the other hand, creative freelancers found it helpful for them to focus and produce more as their work setup usually is within their homes. So, to understand how all the creatives have handled the lockdown, we reached many who have been creating and sharing inspirational artworks during this time. So order your copy if you are looking for inspirational COVID lockdown artworks and some advice on how to handle the current slowdown more creatively!

 

Order Your Copy!
CURRENT ISSUE
Creative Gaga - Issue 49

 

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Vibrant illustrator Tania Yakunova talks about her life as an artist in quarantine and shares her hopes and fears as we all wrestle through this pandemic.

Tania Yakunova - Pandemic
Deadline. Corporate Illustration for Wirex, used in inner communication.

How are you faring in this quarantine? Is it difficult to find inspiration when we are forced to stay at home?

Tania. I’m used to working from home since I have been doing that even before this lockdown. I reinforce the energy and time spent on going out to develop home-based hobbies. Initially, the pandemic did not affect me as much. But now I can feel the stress building up, and it is taking a toll on my mental health; therefore, affecting my productivity. Since I find comfort and inspiration in travel, it is especially difficult.

Be Green project. Illustration for Christmas promoting sustainability, environmental awareness and peace.

How has this quarantine altered your perspective of life and art? Does it reflect in your current artworks?

Tania. There is a lot of uncertainty right now. But on the bright side, I feel well connected. It is evident how art helps people deal with stress, and this offers me motivation and reassurance. While a few of my projects got cancelled, I have been invited to work on several new ones dedicated to life during this pandemic. These projects are important to me, and I hope that my illustrations can ease people during these turbulent times

The Home is where the heart is. Part of the project about the organ donation awareness in times of COVID-19.

The pandemic has provided humanity with a challenge like never before. What are the setbacks you’ve faced because of the quarantine?

Tania. The biggest problem I faced is constant stress. High anxiety affects my ability to work, but art helps me stay mentally active. There are times when exhaustion hits me hard, and it gets difficult to stay productive. But I consider myself blessed to have a few great projects that survived the quarantine. I am worried about the future, as the pandemic is getting worse.

Anxiety. Personal illustration.

Artists often require their own space to create. It can be challenging to differentiate workspace from your home. Has your productivity been affected due to this?

Tania. Before the pandemic, I had planned to rent a studio. But now, the quarantine has motivated me to arrange my workspace at home better. My partner and I have divided our apartment into the work and the relaxation zone. An entire room is allocated as my studio, and I ensure that my work does not leave this space; this helps me relax better.

Tania Yakunova - Pandemic
Orchard. Illustration for Orchard home school planer depicting relaxation and nature.

Art provides comfort during these distressing times, and through this pandemic, we have witnessed just that. Do you believe that this cause irreversible change in the art field?

Tania. Personally, it rings true for me. We can observe the importance of art and the support it provides to humanity as more people lean towards it during this pandemic. People believe that this pandemic is causing irreversible changes to society; if so, then art will also change since art is merely a reflection of society.

Tania Yakunova - Pandemic
Novarize. Illustration for Novarize.

How has the art community planned to organise any fundraising for it?

Tania. Our art community in Ukraine is small but active. We organise online conferences, online talks and outdoor exhibits dedicated to the pandemic heroes. We are doing our best although a lot of artists are struggling due to sudden project cancellations and budget cuts. We don’t receive any noticeable financial support from the government as well.

Tania Yakunova - Pandemic
Late work. Style-frame concept.

How did your artistic journey begin?

Tania. I loved drawing since I was a child, but seven years of academic drawings tired me, and I gained a degree in social science, instead. At the age of 25, I began my studies on design and illustration. Following which, I quit my job and started my career as an illustrator.

Tania Yakunova - Pandemic

Your style of art is contemporary. Where do you draw your inspirations from?

Tania. I’m an ardent fan of Avant-grade art of the 20th Century, I enjoy the bold compositions and forms. Whenever I travel to a new city, I always make sure to visit the modern art museums. I think you can notice this in my works.

Be Green project. Illustration dedicated to sustainable living.

How do you manage to create complex and detailed artworks with the use of simple and most basic shapes? What is the role played by geometry in your artworks?

Tania. The contrast in geometry can add rhythm to the artworks. I create particular forms and compositions that are emotional yet straightforward; this is my process.

Be Green Project. An illustration depicting sustainability and unity.

The colour palette for most of your artworks is simple and limited. Does that have any particular significance?

Tania. I love vibrant colours and precise combination of Avant-grade art of the 20th Century. Colours were something I struggled with when I was in art school. When I studied design as an adult, I understood it better and started falling in love with it. I spend a lot of time working on colours and sometimes I even create 20 different colour versions of my artworks.

Tania Yakunova - Pandemic
The Lives of Christopher Chant. Book cover for the novel t by Diana Wynn Jones.

How do you develop illustrations for a particular concept? Could you kindly share your work process?

Tania. The project starts with a brief on my task and role as an illustrator. I then begin exploring different possibilities through rough sketches. After that, I develop a detailed design and work on the composition; this is the first draft. Following which, I digitise my artworks and work on colours. When I’m satisfied with the colours, I work on the details.

The Passenger

What are some of the crucial factors to remember whilst illustrating?

Tania. The most important element in the process of illustration is to understand why we are working on a particular piece. The next factor is the concept. An illustration is a communication; we must understand what we are trying to tell our audience. Then comes composition, which is the base to execute your ideas. If the base is weak, the art will fall apart.

Creativity

Published in Issue 50

We all started this year anticipating many things, but nobody thought of life coming to a complete halt. The Coronavirus pandemic has forced every human to re-evaluate their attitude towards nature and life. We also have been forced to lock down in our houses. Though we are no more in the lockdown, still many unfortunate ones continue to lose their lives and livelihoods. This isolation has given many of us the time we needed to finish our long pending tasks. Some have turned to art and craft for peace and solace. While most got relaxed and enjoyed their time with family, others used the focussed time to prepare themselves for the life post lockdown. On the other hand, creative freelancers found it helpful for them to focus and produce more as their work setup usually is within their homes. So, to understand how all the creatives have handled the lockdown, we reached many who have been creating and sharing inspirational artworks during this time. So order your copy if you are looking for inspirational COVID lockdown artworks and some advice on how to handle the current slowdown more creatively!

 

Order Your Copy!
CURRENT ISSUE
Creative Gaga - Issue 49

 

Arshad Sayyed

Arshad Sayyed Chief Creative Officer of Wallcano

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Pandemics have always forced people to break with the past and imagine their life anew. Recently the whole world has come under the siege of the Coronavirus. Resulting in every human is trapped in his house. “Trust no one, Did you wash your hands? I am unwell, am I infected?” such thoughts must be flocking your mind constantly. However, there are two sides of the same coin. Let’s have a look…

On the personal front, ‘Quarantine Time’ has turned into ‘Quality time with my family’ which is very surreal. Bucket list, box cricket, home decoration, hobbies have become the discussion points on the dining table. Not only this, but I have also become the ultimate master chef in the kitchen. However, this surely gives you an eerie feeling when you step out of the house to buy groceries and find silent streets, no children playing, no more groups of college students on couples strolling. And not to forget the biggest blessing in disguise is the gift on mother nature which is on her healing course. The much-underrated hand sanitizer has become the talk of the town.

The ‘Work From Home’ culture has become the new cool. WhatsApp, FaceTime & Zoom is dominating the once serious conference room. Online classes and payments with less personal contact are making us entirely tech dependant. Future upcoming offices might start using the ‘six feet concept’ where working desks will be kept six feet apart reminding people to distance themselves. Also, hand sanitizing stations and lesser full-time workforce will become a compulsion.

Whether this is a paradigm shift or just a passing phase is uncertain for now. I would like to collect whatever good we receive from this pandemic and put to use. Hence a lesson well learn. Remember we are all in this together! WE ARE CHANGE.

Published in Issue 50

We all started this year anticipating many things, but nobody thought of life coming to a complete halt. The Coronavirus pandemic has forced every human to re-evaluate their attitude towards nature and life. We also have been forced to lock down in our houses. Though we are no more in the lockdown, still many unfortunate ones continue to lose their lives and livelihoods. This isolation has given many of us the time we needed to finish our long pending tasks. Some have turned to art and craft for peace and solace. While most got relaxed and enjoyed their time with family, others used the focussed time to prepare themselves for the life post lockdown. On the other hand, creative freelancers found it helpful for them to focus and produce more as their work setup usually is within their homes. So, to understand how all the creatives have handled the lockdown, we reached many who have been creating and sharing inspirational artworks during this time. So order your copy if you are looking for inspirational COVID lockdown artworks and some advice on how to handle the current slowdown more creatively!

 

Order Your Copy!
CURRENT ISSUE
Creative Gaga - Issue 49

 

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Through original and vibrant illustrations, Ranganath Krishnamani captures the look and feel of Corona virus induced pandemic. Here is a conversation to unravel the art, colours, style and mindset of the artist battling the quarantine.

Corona Lockdown Illustration by Ranganath Krishnamani
Drying out our new accessories.

What are some of the unforeseen inspirations and problems you’ve stumbled upon during this lockdown?

Ranganath. I firmly believe that limitation is an excellent opportunity to kindle creativity. The confines of our home can urge us to be imaginative. My quarantine series is a self-initiated project where I attempt to capture urban life and its nuances during Corona virus pandemic. I captured our new normal by portraying human beings inside everyday objects, thus emphasising the current state. Creative inspirations can be found everywhere, outdoors or indoors, this project is an excellent example of that.

Corona Lockdown Illustration by Ranganath Krishnamani
Lights On. A salute to all the superheroes in the front line, fighting against all odds, serving people, saving lives.

Has this Corona virus pandemic changed your perception of the world? If yes, how has it affected your art?

Ranganath. The quarantine made me rethink about my choices and my lifestyle. I enjoy nature, and I understood the value of my freedom because of this lockdown. Corona virus pandemic has highlighted the unbeatable human spirit, this along with the new way of life are the themes I’m currently focusing on.

Together. A creative take on staying home with family and following some simple guidelines. Stay Home!

Art is not an essential service. Has this affected your work? How are you managing such an unprecedented situation?

Ranganath. Fortunately, neither my professional front nor my self- initiated art projects are affected due to Corona. Through art, we can communicate, educate and bring changes in the society. Art is the medium I use to convey my ideas. My objective is to engage the audience and bring positive changes.

Blending work. Video calls, mindfulness, fitness and experimenting with new flavours and recipes. The new norm!

What are your thoughts on work from home as an artist? What kind of impact does this have on your working process?

Ranganath. Studio or at home, it doesn’t make any difference to me. Creative work requires long hours of focus and deliberate practice, the place does not matter. The advantages of working from home is that because of current technology, we can meet our clients, share our work, get feedback and work on it without having to travel or wade through traffic.

Brewing work from home. Finding our own little comfort work corners at home to get work done!

Corona virus pandemic has made us realise that in trying times, people turn to art and literature. Do you think that this is going to create a lasting impression in the field of art?

Ranganath. Art and literature are great methods to unwind and deal with stressful times. People have returned to their hobbies, and they now understand the value of art and literature. I’m sure that this trend will continue. I hope this period help people realise their passion and dreams, giving them the confidence to take risks and try something new.

Corona Lockdown Illustration by Ranganath Krishnamani
Prioritising fitness. Making time for the much-needed physical activity during the week given the restricted access to outdoors.

How did your journey in art begin?

Ranganath. I’ve always nursed an affiliation towards art. I distinctly remember drawing on the walls of my house at the age of six. I began reinforcing my passion once I obtained formal education in art. My journey started with pencils, charcoal, acrylics and watercolours. And with the advent of digital art, I began exploring diverse fields within art and started experimenting with my style. I consciously attempt to create artwork with meaning and purpose that goes beyond aesthetics.

Corona Lockdown Illustration by Ranganath Krishnamani
Celebrating the extraordinary person called mother. Someone who motivates you to eat healthy, stay fit and take care of yourself.

From Kathakali dancer to Taj Mahal to still life, your artworks are varied and diverse. What is your creative process?

Ranganath. My creative process is to try and do something every day. Travel inspires me; I sketch the scenes and thoughts in my sketchbook, and once I start making connections with other elements and situation, I turn it into a series. I approach all my artworks as series since it helps me refine my perspective and dive deeper into the subject. My process begins with a simple exploration of ideas; this helps me develop a central theme and concepts for the series. I try to form a connection between objects, situation and scenario, thus narrating a story from my perspective.

Corona Lockdown Illustration by Ranganath Krishnamani
Social Distance - A great opportunity to revisit a hobby. Try something new, Stay safe.

How does culture influence your artworks?

Ranganath. Culture plays an integral role in my artworks. I try to capture the uniqueness of our culture, which is under threat due to globalisation. The setting, objects and costumes subtly contribute to the narration. My works are a reflection of my interpretation of all that fascinates me. Irrespective of the medium, the common thread which strings my artworks together are culture and identity.

Corona Lockdown Illustration by Ranganath Krishnamani
Celebrating the extraordinary person called mother. Someone who motivates you to eat healthy, stay fit and take care of yourself.

Could you shine some light on the techniques used and the process behind your colour selection?

Ranganath. My colour palette largely depends on the subject portrayed. It is generally minimal, ranging between three to four colours. Initially, I used to work with monochrome since it allowed me to focus on the form and composition. Colours have the power to change the overall mood of artwork; I started using it responsibly once I understood this. I first choose the colours I intend to work with, from there it is just a creative problem solving, where we manipulate the colours to arrive at the best possible outcome.

Corona Lockdown Illustration by Ranganath Krishnamani
Giving time a break - enjoying me time by the window, getting a glimpse of the outside world between online meetings and video calls

It is particularly intriguing to note that upon going through your artworks, most of them, though detailed, do not possess detailed facial features. Is there any significance for this?

Ranganath. I refrain from adding facial features since it deters the audience from the overall story of the artwork. Furthermore, the viewers can comfortably perceive themselves in the scene when the artwork is devoid of faces. However, this is a recent style; in the past, I have created artworks with facial features as well.

Enjoying the fresh summer showers from the confines of the patio.

Published in Issue 50

We all started this year anticipating many things, but nobody thought of life coming to a complete halt. The Coronavirus pandemic has forced every human to re-evaluate their attitude towards nature and life. We also have been forced to lock down in our houses. Though we are no more in the lockdown, still many unfortunate ones continue to lose their lives and livelihoods. This isolation has given many of us the time we needed to finish our long pending tasks. Some have turned to art and craft for peace and solace. While most got relaxed and enjoyed their time with family, others used the focussed time to prepare themselves for the life post lockdown. On the other hand, creative freelancers found it helpful for them to focus and produce more as their work setup usually is within their homes. So, to understand how all the creatives have handled the lockdown, we reached many who have been creating and sharing inspirational artworks during this time. So order your copy if you are looking for inspirational COVID lockdown artworks and some advice on how to handle the current slowdown more creatively!

 

Order Your Copy!
CURRENT ISSUE
Creative Gaga - Issue 49

 

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An interesting approach to creating illustrations, Osheen Siva finds inspiration in her own thoughts, dreams and even nightmares. Unique and quirky colour combinations and a distinctive style can be seen in all her artworks.

Artworks - Osheen Siva
Ramen On. “How to Deal”, this illustration depicts the different ways of dealing with a sticky situations of the mundane life
Bothai. The inspiration behind this illustration is the excessive screen addiction during lockdown. The Tamil word 'Bothai' translates to drunk or in a trance.

Luckily, Osheen Siva shifted back to Goa from Delhi just before the lockdown and currently engaging herself in embracing the sunsets on beaches as well as creating illustrations. Her way of coping up in quarantine is to put on her earphones, listen to podcasts and sketch simultaneously. To reduce the amount of stress and anxiety, she prepares proper schedules, however, the minute they may be.

Artworks - Osheen Siva
Artwork donated to Design Fights Covid to help raise funds for Makers Asylum in creating medical equipment (M19 face shields)
Floating on. The phenomenon of sleep paralysis and lucid dreaming, that makes Osheen feel being caught up in two worlds and not able to react

Going back to the traditional method of sketching, she has been expanding her sketchbook practices and trying out mediums like acrylic and oil on canvas. Pushing her boundaries even further, Osheen has been taking up online animation and inking classes which she finds extremely engaging. Apart from using her time wisely to sketch and create unique artworks, she has been loving the practice of cooking all her meals and keeping up with her loved ones.

Artworks - Osheen Siva
Most Mornings. Describing her long work days and stressful nights as a full time Graphic Designer before transitioning into a freelance illustrator
Seeing Things, strange dreams that manifest themselves during the uncertain and erratic times.

As an artist, Osheen has an interesting take on the future for designers and people in the creative eld. She feels that the creative industry is going to be much more collaborative post the pandemic, with more opportunities for shifting the work culture remotely and perhaps delving deeper into the virtual space

Artworks - Osheen Siva
Grow Grow Grow. Designed for the Earth Day, the artwork represents the need to grow with our mother Earth
Artworks - Osheen Siva
Created for Converse’s Create at Home campaign, Osheen developed this illustration to depict the stay at home phenomenon

Published in Issue 50

We all started this year anticipating many things, but nobody thought of life coming to a complete halt. The Coronavirus pandemic has forced every human to re-evaluate their attitude towards nature and life. We also have been forced to lock down in our houses. Though we are no more in the lockdown, still many unfortunate ones continue to lose their lives and livelihoods. This isolation has given many of us the time we needed to finish our long pending tasks. Some have turned to art and craft for peace and solace. While most got relaxed and enjoyed their time with family, others used the focussed time to prepare themselves for the life post lockdown. On the other hand, creative freelancers found it helpful for them to focus and produce more as their work setup usually is within their homes. So, to understand how all the creatives have handled the lockdown, we reached many who have been creating and sharing inspirational artworks during this time. So order your copy if you are looking for inspirational COVID lockdown artworks and some advice on how to handle the current slowdown more creatively!

 

Order Your Copy!
CURRENT ISSUE
Creative Gaga - Issue 49

 

GCD Studio
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Set up in 1997, Gopika Chow a Designs is now GCD Studio as it became a partnership in 2013. The studio specialises in high quality creative solutions for brands, marketing and communication.


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We all started this year anticipating many things, but nobody thought of life coming to a complete halt. The Coronavirus pandemic has forced every human to re-evaluate their attitude towards nature and life. We also have been forced to lock down in our houses. Though we are no more in the lockdown, still many unfortunate ones continue to lose their lives and livelihoods. This isolation has given many of us the time we needed to finish our long pending tasks. Some have turned to art and craft for peace and solace. While most got relaxed and enjoyed their time with family, others used the focussed time to prepare themselves for the life post lockdown. On the other hand, creative freelancers found it helpful for them to focus and produce more as their work setup usually is within their homes. So, to understand how all the creatives have handled the lockdown, we reached many who have been creating and sharing inspirational artworks during this time. So order your copy if you are looking for inspirational COVID lockdown artworks and some advice on how to handle the current slowdown more creatively!

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CURRENT ISSUE
Creative Gaga - Issue 49

 

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Sanket Wagh
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Sanket Wagh is a Director and Business Head of Cub Design, Pune, Maharashtra. Cub Design is a young branding and design studio consisting a group of enthusiastic designers bursting with creative and innovative ideas.


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We all started this year anticipating many things, but nobody thought of life coming to a complete halt. The Coronavirus pandemic has forced every human to re-evaluate their attitude towards nature and life. We also have been forced to lock down in our houses. Though we are no more in the lockdown, still many unfortunate ones continue to lose their lives and livelihoods. This isolation has given many of us the time we needed to finish our long pending tasks. Some have turned to art and craft for peace and solace. While most got relaxed and enjoyed their time with family, others used the focussed time to prepare themselves for the life post lockdown. On the other hand, creative freelancers found it helpful for them to focus and produce more as their work setup usually is within their homes. So, to understand how all the creatives have handled the lockdown, we reached many who have been creating and sharing inspirational artworks during this time. So order your copy if you are looking for inspirational COVID lockdown artworks and some advice on how to handle the current slowdown more creatively!

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CURRENT ISSUE
Creative Gaga - Issue 49

 

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Anjul Dandekar
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Anjul Dandekar is a freelance illustrator living in Mumbai, India.


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We all started this year anticipating many things, but nobody thought of life coming to a complete halt. The Coronavirus pandemic has forced every human to re-evaluate their attitude towards nature and life. We also have been forced to lock down in our houses. Though we are no more in the lockdown, still many unfortunate ones continue to lose their lives and livelihoods. This isolation has given many of us the time we needed to finish our long pending tasks. Some have turned to art and craft for peace and solace. While most got relaxed and enjoyed their time with family, others used the focussed time to prepare themselves for the life post lockdown. On the other hand, creative freelancers found it helpful for them to focus and produce more as their work setup usually is within their homes. So, to understand how all the creatives have handled the lockdown, we reached many who have been creating and sharing inspirational artworks during this time. So order your copy if you are looking for inspirational COVID lockdown artworks and some advice on how to handle the current slowdown more creatively!

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CURRENT ISSUE
Creative Gaga - Issue 49

 

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Binod Kumar
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From the land of God, Kerala, Binod Kumar is an artist whose mind is filled with creativity as he spends his time and energy meticulously creating beautiful illustrations.


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We all started this year anticipating many things, but nobody thought of life coming to a complete halt. The Coronavirus pandemic has forced every human to re-evaluate their attitude towards nature and life. We also have been forced to lock down in our houses. Though we are no more in the lockdown, still many unfortunate ones continue to lose their lives and livelihoods. This isolation has given many of us the time we needed to finish our long pending tasks. Some have turned to art and craft for peace and solace. While most got relaxed and enjoyed their time with family, others used the focussed time to prepare themselves for the life post lockdown. On the other hand, creative freelancers found it helpful for them to focus and produce more as their work setup usually is within their homes. So, to understand how all the creatives have handled the lockdown, we reached many who have been creating and sharing inspirational artworks during this time. So order your copy if you are looking for inspirational COVID lockdown artworks and some advice on how to handle the current slowdown more creatively!

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CURRENT ISSUE
Creative Gaga - Issue 49

 

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Abhinay Shirole
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Ater graduating from Sir J. J. Institute of Applied Art, Mumbai, Abhinay Shirole is currently freelance Illustrator and designer.


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We all started this year anticipating many things, but nobody thought of life coming to a complete halt. The Coronavirus pandemic has forced every human to re-evaluate their attitude towards nature and life. We also have been forced to lock down in our houses. Though we are no more in the lockdown, still many unfortunate ones continue to lose their lives and livelihoods. This isolation has given many of us the time we needed to finish our long pending tasks. Some have turned to art and craft for peace and solace. While most got relaxed and enjoyed their time with family, others used the focussed time to prepare themselves for the life post lockdown. On the other hand, creative freelancers found it helpful for them to focus and produce more as their work setup usually is within their homes. So, to understand how all the creatives have handled the lockdown, we reached many who have been creating and sharing inspirational artworks during this time. So order your copy if you are looking for inspirational COVID lockdown artworks and some advice on how to handle the current slowdown more creatively!

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CURRENT ISSUE
Creative Gaga - Issue 49

 

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