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Illustrator and Cartoonist, Hrishiraj Gawali tells us about his art journey and it is a reflection of the society.

Hrishiraj Gawali - Art

Hrishiraj’s journey in art started with doodles on his bedroom wall as a child. With his passion he saw his career unfold in the creative field. He believes there is no end to this journey as it is ever evolving and expanding.

Hrishiraj Gawali - Art

Fortunately, for Hrishiraj his creative endeavours have been smooth and fruitful until now. He is enjoying his journey and hopes for it to continue this way. While creating his art, Hrishiraj is organic about his process. Instead of chasing theories and philosophies of art, he would rather dive into the work and see what appears on the canvas. He generally uses Photoshop to paint, but he also loves the traditional medium of paint on canvas, pastels and watercolours on paper, etc.

Hrishiraj Gawali - Art

The art that Hrishiraj creates is a reflection of the society, thus he draws his inspiration from the things he sees around him. His Transgender series is one such reflection. Transgender or eunuchs have been marginalised in India on many fronts.

Hrishiraj Gawali - Art

They have faced harsh discrimination in health, housing, education, employment, immigration and law. Yet, peculiarly, their blessings are considered very auspicious, and curse is one to avoid. This series illustrates some of the day to day aspects of their lives, right from dressing up for a function, to being shunned by the society.

Speaking of design trends, Hrishiraj believes the trend is moving towards making artwork quickly. And plenty of software technologies are being built to cater to this need.

Published in Issue 48

A Freelancer’s Life in India! Every day, with a dream of ‘Being Your Boss,’ many creative professionals jump into the pool of freelancing. But many are not well prepared for the life of the freelancer, which brings many challenges along with benefits. So to explore further, we interviewed many freelance illustrators and designers to get answers to the question you should ask before taking the final call of becoming your boss! So, if you are planning to or have already become a freelancer then this issue is a must-read for you.

 

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Creative Gaga - Issue 49

 

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Siddhesh Surve, created this advertising campaign for Strepsils as his final year project, which is an effective and impactful campaign.

Advertising Campaign

The Brief/ Challenge

As his final year project, Siddhesh was required to create an advertising campaign. He decided to create communication for Strepsils.

Advertising Campaign
Advertising Campaign

Strepsils is a line of lozenges used to relieve discomfort caused by mouth and throat ulcers. The ad campaign needed to create awareness and talk about the effectiveness of the product in an impactful manner.

Advertising Campaign

The Solution

Strong visuals are a terrific way to make an impact. Siddhesh made the strong visuals the centre piece of the campaign with the headline “Unfurl the Real You”, multiple characters have been created to depict people from different walks of life. The exaggerated caricatures and their over the top expressions capture the viewers’ attention. The detailing of the style and expression cannot be missed allowing viewers to truly connect with the discomfort of a sore throat.

Advertising Campaign

Siddhesh has used his colour palette very thoughtfully where tones like orange and yellow are used for the background and character, while the discomfort is depicted in the cool tone of blue. This presents a contrast directing one’s attention to the cause of the trouble, the throat.

The campaign created is a nice balance of visual and text, both conveying the message well.

Published in Issue 48

A Freelancer’s Life in India! Every day, with a dream of ‘Being Your Boss,’ many creative professionals jump into the pool of freelancing. But many are not well prepared for the life of the freelancer, which brings many challenges along with benefits. So to explore further, we interviewed many freelance illustrators and designers to get answers to the question you should ask before taking the final call of becoming your boss!

 

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LATEST RELEASE
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Creative Gaga - Issue 49

 

Annada Menon
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It is important to be motivated and be inspired as an illustration. Annada N. Menon shares some of the tried and tested way to keep creating and growing.

Illustration is one of the most expressive and experimental modes of design and/or art. As an illustrator myself I find it a medium to not just communicate a story of my own life but of others as well. There are times though that I am not able to do so or worry about how I will stretch my career as an illustrator over the next 30-40 years. If you have symptoms of sweaty palms, procrastination, clients who want you to work for exposure syndrome, competition and a shelf full of empty sketchbooks.

First, let me share a few things I did to motivate myself and hope these simple steps hopefully can help.

The most important thing, take it slow. There tends to be a point due to the influence of social media where most artists want to get famous too quickly. And also want to mint money within a month of making the decision to become an illustrator. Well it definitely doesn’t work that way. Mostly reduce their shelf life and the will to learn or experiment with techniques to execute work.

Motivated - Illustration by Annada Menon

So take sometime, every artist makes their mark if the process consists of patience and positivity. If you feel you can’t find your own way, join a studio, learn the tricks from a professional and discover yourself. You can also collaborate with fellow freelance illustrators.

Next, get inspired but don’t copy. I have observed that people tend to feel the need to follow market trends. Never churn your creative juices on something you don’t sympathise or empathise with.

For client work, stand your ground always on providing only original work. If it’s inspired from somebody’s work credit them if you post it on social media. Don’t obtain professional or personal gains through another person’s idea. The art world is chaotic already and you don’t need to throw in a copied work into the mix. The joy of creating something of your own makes your heart swell with joy and helps you move forward always.

Freelance - Annada Menon

This is one of my favorite points also something I am trying myself to achieve is to be versatile. I feel in the market today the biggest element that creates chaos or confusion is an artist wanting to find his/her own style. Finding your own style has its one pro that is you can turn your work into a unique language and you get recognised for it.

The con is it restricts you. One may become too comfortable with it. So indulge yourself in art books, movies etc to inspire yourself and constantly experiment with mediums to create an inventory of content and styles.

Know your worth. This is a climb of time and patience. Being offered too less for a project or nothing at all brings an artist down the most. As a freelancer, this is the most challenging and stressful part to figure out. Don’t shy away from getting help. Ask fellow artists on how to go about charging a client.

The guidance is a great push towards you ultimately landing a project of your choice and exclusive of bargains. Just keep this in mind, materials to execute your work digitally or traditionally have to be bought or maintained. Let’s keep general bills mind as well. Though it is a push towards making money but it’s a basic mode of motivation for any human.

Also, don’t forget to follow artists. I use to be slightly demotivated or envious of successful illustrators. I found a healthy way around this on how to get motivated by their art. My explanation here is purely based on the brilliance of their work and not on how many followers they garner in a month.

Freelance - Annada Menon

First, I look out for their process. How many hours they spend on their work. The materials they use and most importantly how they use it. Always watch videos of artists who inspire you. You tend to get a glimpse of their workspace. They create an environment that complements their nature of work. That is something even I have put to use and developed a small safe haven of my own to work within.

Finally, I would like to say, just be passionate and bold of what you do for yourself or for others to see. The field of illustration can get intimidating but its not impossible to make a mark. Hopefully these words were encouraging to help someone take a step closer to being original, experiment and practice in those empty dusty sketchbooks stacked away for months 🙂

Motivated - Illustration by Annada Menon

Published in Issue 48

A Freelancer’s Life in India! Every day, with a dream of ‘Being Your Boss,’ many creative professionals jump into the pool of freelancing. But many are not well prepared for the life of the freelancer, which brings many challenges along with benefits. So to explore further, we interviewed many freelance illustrators and designers to get answers to the question you should ask before taking the final call of becoming your boss!

 

Order Your Copy!
LATEST RELEASE
CURRENT ISSUE
Creative Gaga - Issue 49

 

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Rusbury is a great example of how to brand a sweet and savouries store in today’s contemporary times. Sukkrish AADDS, a Bangalore based creative agency founded by Shreesh Shankar, gives an interesting twist to the branding (visual identity).

Visual Identity

The Brief and Challenges

Rusbury is a sweets and savouries brand operating out of Bangalore. The brand needed a unique visual identity that would help it stand out from the clutter. The identity also needed to appeal to both, the existing customer and their target audience.

Visual Identity
Visual Identity

The Solution

When you think of a sweet and savouries store the image that comes to your mind is a traditional shop with all its aesthetics. Sukkrish AADDS decided to break away from convention to create a unique and contemporary identity for Rusbury.

Visual Identity

The bold yet simple logo and motif itself is a blend of western and Indian culture with the introduction of the Devanagari script. The colour palette is kept at a minimum with red, white and black. The majority usage is that of white and black, with the red colour judiciously added at places.

Visual Identity

The team makes great use of illustrations to create a feel and mood for the brand. The illustrations capture the very Indian vibrant and cheery vibe. Yet the balance of solid white and red keeps the overall branding contemporary and sophisticated.

Visual Identity
Visual Identity

The final visual identity is versatile allowing several possibilities and scope for play.

Published in Issue 48

A Freelancer’s Life in India! Every day, with a dream of ‘Being Your Boss,’ many creative professionals jump into the pool of freelancing. But many are not well prepared for the life of the freelancer, which brings many challenges along with benefits. So to explore further, we interviewed many freelance illustrators and designers to get answers to the question you should ask before taking the final call of becoming your boss! So, if you are planning to or have already become a freelancer then this issue is a must-read for you.

 

Order Your Copy!
LATEST RELEASE
CURRENT ISSUE
Creative Gaga - Issue 49

 

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An illustrator and cartoonist, Charbak Dipta gives us a peek into his world of inspiration and then how he transforms his ideas into mesmerising artworks.

Inspiration
Third World. The third world countries busy masturbating.

CG. What inspired you take up art/illustration as your profession?

Charbak. I believe one should always listen to his/her inner calling. Since childhood I enjoyed doodling on paper and walls. However, my parents wanted me to be a lecturer and singer. I stopped my art and earned a MA degree. I also pursued music. But destiny is such that I inevitably landed a job as an intern cartoonist in the ‘The Time of India’. There was no looking back from there.

The Sad Indian Alien. When the girlfriend leaves an alien to marry some other wealthier alien.
Inspiration
Blowing in the Wind. The ecstasy of blowjob.

CG. How would you like to define your style of art? Is there a specific name that you like to call your style by?

Charbak. My style is an amalgamation of the various schools of art which I have been inspired from. As a kid I used to copy whatever comics or cartoons I liked, for example, Phantom comics, Marvel, Tintin and Asterix. Later, with exposure to wider art styles, my style began to develop and take shape.

Inspiration
People 2. Different kinds of people and their actual face.
The Jorasanko Ghosts. Ghosts of Rabindranath Tagore and family in their house in Jorasanko.

CG. There seems to be a use of Bengali alphabets and words in a few of your creations. Is there a specific reason for it? Is culture an influence for your creations?

Charbak. I am a Bengali, thus Bangla culture is a big influence in art as well as the person I am. I grew up soaked in Bengali culture, literature, tradition, music and language. It reflects on my art and is an extension of my psyche. Bengali culture, attire and food keep appearing repeatedly in my art.

Harmonium Monster. The monster lives inside Harmonium comes out.
London Underground. World.

CG. Are your characters purely fictional? Or are they drawn from certain realities? And what is the intention of using of these characters together?

Charbak. The characters are used to depict the idea behind visible pictures. The Indian Alien series is an exception where the alien characters are purely imaginary. The other works show realistic humans too. I like layered art instead of direct communication. So my settings and characters too have different facets in their appearance that incorporate different social, historical or political references as well.

The Essential Family. A group image of a typical Bengali family stuck to one another.
Inspiration
Alien Uttam, Alien Suchitra. An alien avatar of Bengali matinee idols Uttam-Suchitra.

CG. Your artwork varies from showcasing realistic scenes to visualisations of imaginary concepts, covering an indefinite spectrum of situations. Yet there is uniformity all across your work. How do you maintain this universal language in your work?

Charbak. Uniformity is my style. Every individual has a way of thinking. My glass is tinted with a uniformity screen that filters my ideas and gives them a unique shape. For example, if you wore red spectacles, all objects would appear with a red tint, yet retain their original shape and function. Similarly I see objects through a this screen.

Ogres. Monsters. A set of ogres with equipment lose to a little girl.
Inspiration
The Mud House. Surreal Gujarati village houses.

CG. What are the mediums that you use to create your artwork? Is it hand-drawn, digital or a mix of both the mediums?

Charbak. The medium varies, some are hand drawn, others are digital. Often the best comes in a mix of both. For manual drawing I use Clutch and Pigma pencils. For digital, I use a range of software. I sometimes experiment with the drawing on different surface too, for example, paper, canvas, flex or plastic.

The Rain Water. Aliens. An alien who hates rain, submerges into rain water to avoid rain.
Inspiration
Machine Series. Arms are inserted into the peace machine that turns them into peace pigeons.

CG. Change is inevitable. So, 10 years down the line, what is the kind of art creations that world would be exposed to from your end? We would also like to know about your future endeavours in brief.

Charbak. I have moved from single artwork to writing full length books, art anthologies, illustrated books and graphic novels.

Inspiration
The Panama Papers. Drawn for a contest by 'The Times of India', Mossack Fonseca digs the money below the papers.

I have released 3 books so far. The first one was ‘The Art of Charbak Dipta’, an anthology of over 100 selected artworks of mine created between 2014 and 2017. The second is ‘Zero: An Indian Aliens Adventure’, which was a spin off from my earlier Indian Alien series of artworks. It throws light on India’s contributions to the world of science and invention. The third one is ‘Apes: An Indian Aliens Adventure’, a sequel to Zero.

Inspiration
Hutom. Bengali Literature. Based on the cult Bengali book ‘Hutom Pyachar Noksa’.

My fourth book is in production currently and will be out this year. In the coming 10 years I wish to write at least 10 more books. I have so much autobiographical and conceptual content, the challenge though is to put them on paper within limited time. I am also interested in web-comics. Hopefully sometime soon that takes off as well.

Inspiration
Relatives. Nature of blood relatives who bite back.

Published in Issue 48

A Freelancer’s Life in India! Every day, with a dream of ‘Being Your Boss,’ many creative professionals jump into the pool of freelancing. But many are not well prepared for the life of the freelancer, which brings many challenges along with benefits. So to explore further, we interviewed many freelance illustrators and designers to get answers to the question you should ask before taking the final call of becoming your boss! So, if you are planning to or have already become a freelancer then this issue is a must-read for you.

 

Order Your Copy!
LATEST RELEASE
CURRENT ISSUE
Creative Gaga - Issue 49

 

Chaaya Prabhat
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Chaaya Prabhat highlighting some of the challenges and advantages she feel are there for an independent illustrator working with Indian clients.

There are a lot of advantages and disadvantages of working independently as an illustrator in the creative field in India.

The advantages are plenty – In India, the need for illustration work has increased over the years so there’s definitely a lot of scope and demand for the work, and when you work independently you can work on multiple projects with various companies simultaneously, so it’s always creatively challenging.

illustrator

You also have a lot of the advantages that come with freelancing – flexible schedule, not being tied down to a 9-5 schedule, being your own boss etc. What I like about working independently as opposed to working in-house or as a part of a company is that I can be very hands-on with the work that I do, and be very involved from the start of the project to the end – whereas in a studio setting the work is usually split between multiple people or compartmentalised.

However the same independence can also work as a disadvantage – you often have to take care of everything on your own and wear multiple hats, which can be quite taxing. In addition to all the creative work that has to be carried out, you also have to have at least a basic knowledge of contract writing and reading, invoicing, accounting, etc.

In India, especially, companies and clients that hire illustrators are just starting to understand the amount of work that goes into illustration and the value that it adds to projects.

Published in Issue 48

A Freelancer’s Life in India! Every day, with a dream of ‘Being Your Boss,’ many creative professionals jump into the pool of freelancing. But many are not well prepared for the life of the freelancer, which brings many challenges along with benefits. So to explore further, we interviewed many freelance illustrators and designers to get answers to the question you should ask before taking the final call of becoming your boss! So, if you are planning to or have already become a freelancer then this issue is a must-read for you.

 

Order Your Copy!
LATEST RELEASE
CURRENT ISSUE
Creative Gaga - Issue 49

 

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Satish Gangaiah, a successful independent freelance illustrator and designer, teaches us a few tips and tricks of working in the creative field.

Herbs to Home Poster

CG. What was the inspiration for you to take up illustration as a career (freelance illustrator)?

Satish. During my childhood I occupied most of my time by drawing. My fascination for drawing has evolved through time. My inspirations have mostly been from the urban context or pop culture. Later during my career I was exposed to art from across the globe. This pushed me to further explore and understand international design trends.

Tik Tok lady, personal artwork
Welcome to the world of corporate culture, personal artwork

CG. Your artworks depict caricatures. Is that your style in general or do you use it for specific pieces of art? Are there any other styles also that you like to try out or that you follow?

Satish. My style is not exactly caricatures, instead it reflects a sense of lightness, and is aimed at easy communication. Stylisations often convey the message far better than realistic depictions. As an artist, I believe in being versatile in style and content. It is important to mold your work based on the requirement.

Republic Day Tableau, personal artwork

CG. Your artworks have a lot of Indian touch to them but projected in a very contemporised manner. Could you please tell us a little about this style?

Satish. I take great care to ensure that the style I create connects with the audience. The artworks of this particular style are based on the Indian context and are intended to give a local feel. They carry my lived experience, my influences and my inspirations. The added contemporary feel helps them resonate with the times we live in. They reflect the trends and sensibilities of today’s culture and society.

Chronicles Over Coffee
LDS Smile, personal artwork

CG. Your profile showcases an animated version of reality through your work. Is it a concept, scheme that you follow?

Satish. Most of my work draws from my experiences and attempts at thinking out of the box. They all have a common thread that reflects different fragments of my identity. Most of my personal artworks are inspired by things around me.

Good Morning

CG. What are the messages that you aim at bringing across through your artwork?

Satish. One common message is that of joy. I am neutral as far as identity politics goes. Instead, I create my characters in a utopian realm of happiness. My artworks are also a tribute the things that have shaped and inspired me. My messages are simple, minimal and relevant to us all.

Mahishasura
Auto Santa Claus

CG. Could you give an insight into your design process, from the beginning till the end to get the desired output.

Satish. I always begin with a systematic understanding of the requirement or the subject. The next step is research; it is vital as it helps me explore multiple possibilities in representation as well as making a delivery of content more efficient. It also gives a good foundation to base their concepts and ideas. After that I start compiling mood boards and inspirations for the ideas. I also start making key sketches in tandem. This helps me keep the idea fresh and innovative. I believe by giving this amount of time prior to making an artwork always adds value to it. The next process is all about developing the idea into an artwork

Bakasana, personal artwork

CG. In brief, what has your journey been like being a freelance illustrator?

Satish. My journey has had its ups and downs, in spite of that I have enjoyed it so far. Experience has taught me that the more planned and well managed the process is, the more sustainable and easy the journey becomes.

Swayamvara, personal artwork

CG. Being a freelancer yourself, what would be your words of inspiration and a few tips for the all the people wanting to start out a career in the field of illustration in today’s times?

Satish. The advice I can give to those who are starting their career is – always be passionate. Being passionate towards your art practice also builds empathy to appreciate good art and design. And always try to create your own identity. Success always follows slowly if you are focused and retain the passion to be creative.

Gravity, personal artwork

Published in Issue 48

A Freelancer’s Life in India! Every day, with a dream of ‘Being Your Boss,’ many creative professionals jump into the pool of freelancing. But many are not well prepared for the life of the freelancer, which brings many challenges along with benefits. So to explore further, we interviewed many freelance illustrators and designers to get answers to the question you should ask before taking the final call of becoming your boss! So, if you are planning to or have already become a freelancer then this issue is a must-read for you.

 

Order Your Copy!
LATEST RELEASE
CURRENT ISSUE
Creative Gaga - Issue 49

 

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When we look at great art we are amazed by its perfection. But what is carefully hidden from us is the toiling and hard work that goes behind the perfect piece of art. Chetan Patil unravels his thought behind the expressive caricature and his art in this insightful piece.

The Perfect Caricature
Hawaldar by Chetan Patil
The Perfect Caricature
HAMAL

Very few find their calling at a young age. The professional illustrator, Chetan Patil, is one such individual. Chetan has been enthusiastic about art since a childhood, and a further push by his school teacher, sent him rolling in the direction of the world of art. He went on to take professional training in the commercial field of art, and there was no looking back.

The Perfect Caricature
Kasai
The Perfect Caricature
Kamwali by Chetan Patil


Human Shapes Patterns

Chetan makes great use of expressions in his work. He believes attaching emotions to an idea makes it far more impactful and believable. In most of his illustrations and his caricature art he tries to create a connection by expressing his own emotions in the idea through appropriate visuals.

Human Shapes Patterns
Monday Love

Expressions, emotions and experiences are aspects that Chetan takes very seriously while creating his art. He pays a lot of attention to detail in his work and tries to make it as expressive as possible. Chetan believes that the quality of art and amount of work put into a project makes it a treat for the viewers.

Human Shapes Patterns
The Perfect Caricature
Chef by Chetan Patil


An underlying element in most of Chetan’s work is the exaggeration. For Chetan exaggeration takes art to the next level and gives it a larger than life feel. It intensifies the expressions of the subject and is great opportunity to demonstrate an entirely different perspective. A great story or a certain character can be represented only through exaggeration, believes Chetan.

The Perfect Caricature
COOLI by Chetan Patil
The Perfect Caricature
Garegewala

The Caricature Illustration Campaign

Chetan has created a spectrum of amazing work, but his caricature illustration campaign project is his favourite, which he did in college. The series illustrated common people from different walks of life, and he completed this series of 17 caricatures within a 10 day deadline. This particular project is special because it involved observations of different people – their daily life, habits, behaviours and professions.

The Perfect Caricature
Camera Boy

Chetan sees art and design emerging in India. Digital art is gaining traction and is rapidly developing. But still there is a long way to go before people truly understand the creative field, feels Chetan. There are plenty of opportunities to explore the creative industry in India, however, the focus should be design education awareness. The design field is constantly changing and evolving. Amazing art collaborations, conferences, creative events and discussions will certainly push the boundaries of the design world.



Pandit Shivkumar Sharma
Gulzar

In terms of technique and medium, Chetan loves both the traditional hand drawn and the digital one to create illustrations. Hand drawn techniques provide a wide canvas to explore. However, for professional speed and quality, Chetan prefers the digital medium.

Fauja Singh
Amitabh Bachchan

Inspiration is the backbone of creative work. Chetan draws his inspiration from nature, people, cultures, and every day events. He also takes inspirations from all that is related to the living and non-living. Some of the master artists that have been an influence on Chetan’s work are Steve Simpsons, Pascal, Jason Sellar and many others.

Malika Sarabhai
Drunk Man

Finally, the advice that Chetan would like to give the budding artists is that art is a never ending learning process. Whether it is college, a job, a freelance project; at every stage learning occurs. Hard work and being abreast with new techniques and technology is part and parcel of the creative journey. It’s also important to have a social media presence for your work. Looking at the bigger picture, taking risks and embracing setbacks will only build you as a professional.



Absolute Vodka

Published in Issue 48

A Freelancer’s Life in India! Every day, with a dream of ‘Being Your Boss,’ many creative professionals jump into the pool of freelancing. But many are not well prepared for the life of the freelancer, which brings many challenges along with benefits. So to explore further, we interviewed many freelance illustrators and designers to get answers to the question you should ask before taking the final call of becoming your boss! So, if you are planning to or have already become a freelancer then this issue is a must-read for you.

 

Order Your Copy!
LATEST RELEASE
CURRENT ISSUE
Creative Gaga - Issue 49

 

Art of Sool
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Art of Sool is a crew founded in 2010 by 3 Italian artists, Marco Cominini, Claudio Cretti and Nicola Fedriga. They have worked with several renowned brands like Pampers, Yamaha, Sony and more as storyboard artists and art directors for commercials. Art of Sool also collaborates with some recognised galleries like White Light Art Gallery, Key Gallery of Milan, and many more.


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A Freelancer’s Life in India! Every day, with a dream of ‘Being Your Boss,’ many creative professionals jump into the pool of freelancing. But many are not well prepared for the life of the freelancer, which brings many challenges along with benefits. So to explore further, we interviewed many freelance illustrators and designers to get answers to the question you should ask before taking the final call of becoming your boss! So, if you are planning to or have already become a freelancer then this issue is a must-read for you.

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Hrishiraj Gawali
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Hrishiraj Gawali is a creative storyteller working as an Illustrator & Cartoonist in Mumbai. He has graduated from Sir J.J. Institute of Applied Arts, Mumbai, India.


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A Freelancer’s Life in India! Every day, with a dream of ‘Being Your Boss,’ many creative professionals jump into the pool of freelancing. But many are not well prepared for the life of the freelancer, which brings many challenges along with benefits. So to explore further, we interviewed many freelance illustrators and designers to get answers to the question you should ask before taking the final call of becoming your boss! So, if you are planning to or have already become a freelancer then this issue is a must-read for you.

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Creative Gaga - Issue 49

 

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