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Illustrator, Mohan Sonawane, takes us through the process it took him to find and create a portrait with just the right amount of depth and perspective, one that would go on to bring a character to life on the canvas.

Drawing a face, by itself, is not an easy task; let alone a portrait that is synonymous of not just the way a person looks, but, in fact, is a representation of the characteristics and traits of the individual’s personality. Now, that’s no easy mission to engage; yet, Mohan Sonawane did take that it was worth a shot, and came-up with this evocative portrait of actor Nawazuddin Siddique. He takes us through the moves it took him to reach the achieved execution.

Portrait

Step 1: Primary Concept

To start off with, the background was put into effect by the use of the given base colour – one similar to skin colour. Further, basic line anatomy was put into application, also keeping in mind the face structure and proportion, at the same time. This was all done in the Rapid style of sketching, quickly just going step after step, not paying much attention to detail at that stage or phase of the illustration.

Portrait

Step 2: Final Sketch

Following Rapid Drawing, final details were added into the sketch-work. For example, face expressions were introduced, which gave the subject the intense character and effective style. Something it is not only fundamentally essential to distinguish personality, but also necessary when one is trying to create distinct portraits. That is where an accurate face structure comes into shape.

Portrait

Step 3: Choosing Brush

After studying many brushes, one particular brush with a strong stroke, and the apt depth to it, was finalised and chosen. The conclusion was reached only after having tried out a variety of options; they all, however, lacked the primary quality and effect that was desired to create the intended production. Nonetheless, the right one was eventually found to execute the needed depth.

Portrait

Step 4: Primary Base Colour

At first, the basic middle tone colour was selected, followed by applying it to the whole drawing. Post that, the colours that were further used were selected as per natural colours. The whole intention was to be able to create an imagery that represented not just the face, but the very character itself that is synonymous of the person, so as to represent more than simply the face.

Portrait

Step 5: Occlusion Light and Primary Colour

With the help of basic colours, a dark tone was given to the portrait. Thereafter, the initial shades and tones were converted to dark-to-light shades. This was done with the primary goal of providing a realistic texture to the subject, one that would make it synonymous of real life.

Portrait

Step 6: Skin Texture and Details

After observing the skin texture, the Brush tool was brought into play, so as to give the much-needed set of details to the subject and his crucial character. In Photoshop, it is very easy to provide skin texture, as one can create whatever brushes one wants to apply in order to be able to achieve an accurate skin texture. That is what finally materialised or manifested into the evolution of the piece.

Portrait

Step 7: Details

After completing the basic colour sketch, it became very easy to add on a lot more of the face details – one could thus highlight them, as they were very much in the designer’s control, even though it also depends on the subject’s characteristics and expressions. The best way to overcome that challenge is to actually be observant, and take time to grasp them in all their depth.

Portrait

Step 8: Reflection Light

When we see an image that has surrounding lights reflection on it, the drawing looks natural due to the reflecting light. It adds a very natural feel to an image. The same very basic thing was also applied over here, allowing there to be a natural light on the face, which looks very attractive.

Portrait

Step 9: Final Compose

After completing the entire work, colour creation and background were further explored. Both aspects worked to create just the right amount of depth. And, finally, the ultimate picture starts taking solid root and shape. Due to this reflection of light, the desired output could be well achieved at the end.

Published in Issue 39

As the festivity is all around, every brand or business is trying to impress the Indian audience. But what really works for us Indians? What is an Indian design? And how we can make designs for India? To understand it, we interviewed some Indian creatives who are successfully creating designs for the Indian audience. 

This issue of Creative Gaga is a light read for someone looking for inspirations or insights on Indian design and how the Indian audience can be enticed. So go ahead and order your copy or subscribe if you want to keep receiving a regular dose of inspirations!

 

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Fascinated by Typefaces, Shibu P.G. guides us into the world of letters and fonts, where so much can be said even between the words.

The Oomph Factor.

Fonts have forged an almost unreal significance since the era of letter printing. There came the Serif, Sans Serif typefaces, which then evolved into Segoe, Frutiger, Univers, Helvetica and a multitude of other fonts that are presently innumerable. Inspiration from them to develop a new font was only found to be innate.

Finding New Font.

The font ‘Achi’ aims to outshine the regular fonts, radiating a unique style in the very first glance. The decision to choose only uppercase in the font stemmed from the desire to see it appear in bold and fascinating titles, phrases and of course brand names. With this in mind, the vision and purpose were
clearly set.

Carving a niche.

Creativity vocalises itself to each designer in its own specific manner, including through ink and paper – for example, letter-forming by hand being the first instinct. It is often the most simple of acts that finds itself being used as the common construction, shape or character, then applied to all letters in a font. In Achi’s case, it was the parallel line-formation and its spacing between each and every letter. Once a letter was shaped, the command over the font enabled executing an almost similar style to all other letters. Articulating the hand-drawn designs into the computer, using basic shapes and grids in Adobe Illustrator canvas, is time-consuming but effective, followed by polishing and tweaking as a final touch using Fontlab.

Published in Issue 39

As the festivity is all around, every brand or business is trying to impress the Indian audience. But what really works for us Indians? What is an Indian design? And how we can make designs for India? To understand it, we interviewed some Indian creatives who are successfully creating designs for the Indian audience. This issue of Creative Gaga is a light read for someone looking for inspirations or insights on Indian design and how the Indian audience can be enticed. So go ahead and order your copy or subscribe if you want to keep receiving a regular dose of inspirations!

 

Order Your Copy!

Visual Designer, Khushboo Shree, takes us through her process of doodling intricate patterns and connecting them to generate a larger image; one that depicts and symbolises the strength of their harmonious co-existence.

Always inspired by beauty and aesthetics as a concept, be it nature, people, patterns or poetry, Khushboo feels she’s just providing a hand-drawn pathway for others to experience a similar perception. Therefore, her idea behind the patterns and motifs is based on few simple elements like dots, border strings, tangles and their shared relationships.

There is no set process she follows. She first sketches with pencil, then starts the detailing process. The most crucial part though is ideation, which involves connecting various pieces together for a concept. Sometimes, she looks at a subject and draws; but mostly, it is part of her imagination.

Khushboo uses fine pigment pens to illustrate, and techniques like stippling and repetitive patterns to capture the details of a subject. The designs are a natural progression for her; once she’s drawn a basic framework in her mind, it all comes together during the execution, in a single flow.

Published in Issue 39

As the festivity is all around, every brand or business is trying to impress the Indian audience. But what really works for us Indians? What is an Indian design? And how we can make designs for India? To understand it, we interviewed some Indian creatives who are successfully creating designs for the Indian audience. 

 

This issue of Creative Gaga is a light read for someone looking for inspirations or insights on Indian design and how the Indian audience can be enticed. So go ahead and order your copy or subscribe if you want to keep receiving a regular dose of inspirations!

 

Order Your Copy!

The world of design is huge and every client’s need is different. As a versatile designer working for a broad spectrum with regards to commercial requirements, Rahul Arora is able to push his boundaries, explore more styles and learn in the process.

The ubiquity of the Internet and digital technology today has opened the door to the myriad of opportunities. As, the online platforms are transparent and great to showcase one’s work while discovering the work of others worldwide.

Versatile Designer
Koi Fish
Versatile Designer
Lazy Sunday Ride
Versatile Designer
Santa
Versatile Designer
Lovers

Style of the designer is a reflection of the client’s sensibility and vision. 

With diverse projects and context, each client has a different agenda and every script has its own requirements. Sometimes, the sensibilities of the clients vary too; some have a clear vision whilst some want to develop by working in tandem with the artist. Therefore, the foremost step is to discuss the script/ project with the art/creative directors to get an understanding of how they visualise the final product. Latching onto their concept, a versatile designer has to create styles portraying the same.

Versatile Designer
Castle on the rock
Versatile Designer
Sneeze

Characterisation is pivotal in a narrative. 

A characterisation is a gradual process that first involves understanding few pre-requisites before delving into its creation. As, context, appearance, ideology, and age are some of the factors that must be thought out prior to creation. So that, the exaggeration of these features amplifies the ‘key qualities’ which evoke interest. Relating the surrounding with desired detailing to enhance and portray the protagonist’s role conveys the storyline.

Versatile Designer
Minister of Universe
Versatile Designer
The butcher

Tackling different avenues.

Working on comics is like making a movie where you can convey stories through illustrations and words by generating it frame by frame. Studying the human anatomy and expressions is a must for a compelling narrative. Creating arresting illustrations that appeal to the readers, is challenging and a test for artist’s imaginations.

Versatile Designer
Drunken Monkey
Versatile Designer
Lift

Storyboards are the pre-visualisation of a story/film/ad-film. Here much importance is given to the character placements and the angles rather than the colour schemes in the suggested visuals.

 

Advertising, on the other hand, is completely distinct. With tight deadlines, the challenge is to prioritise and achieve the required quality in the given time frame.

Versatile Designer
The imp
Versatile Designer
Vampire

Colour schemes and mediums have their own charm.

They play a major role in bringing a story to life and convey the important aspects in the composition to set a mood of the narrative. Traditional mediums such as oils, poster colours, pastels, watercolours and pencil sketching often allow the designer to hone his skills and learn the intricacies.

 

When working commercially, a digital medium is much easier and straight-forward to execute. As you can easily start with a quick thumbnail that gives a glimpse of the idea which then can be elaborated to form the layouts and finally, pencilling and colouring it in Photoshop can be done post the client’s approval.

Versatile Designer
The Passenger
Versatile Designer
Demento

Published in Issue 39

As the festivity is all around, every brand or business is trying to impress the Indian audience. But what really works for us Indians? What is an Indian design? And how we can make designs for India? To understand it, we interviewed some Indian creatives who are successfully creating designs for the Indian audience. 

This issue of Creative Gaga is a light read for someone looking for inspirations or insights on Indian design and how the Indian audience can be enticed. So go ahead and order your copy or subscribe if you want to keep receiving a regular dose of inspirations!

 

Order Your Copy!

Design Stack owned by Anoop Patnaik and Priyanka Bhasin runs us through their approach, idea and process behind providing a concept-based branding solution to culinary experts, Bombay Brasserie.

Bombay Brasserie - The Indian Culinary Expert
Bombay Brasserie - The Indian Culinary Expert
Bombay Brasserie - The Indian Culinary Expert

Setting the Right Tone

Design Stack delivered a brand new visual concept infused with youth and energy for Bombay Brasserie, a restaurant that serves pan-Indian cuisine. While space is conceptually western, the food is distinctly pan-Indian, and the logo reflects the same. It initialises ‘Bombay Brasserie’, but with a twist, placing the Devanagri ‘Ba’ and its Roman counterpart side by side.

Bombay Brasserie - The Indian Culinary Expert
Bombay Brasserie - The Indian Culinary Expert
Bombay Brasserie - The Indian Culinary Expert

Creating a Connect

The personality of Bombay Brasserie is that of the intrepid traveller. The space graphics are thus multi-layered and diverse, taking you across India. Hints of geographical maps with coordinates trace the route from cuisine to cuisine. Regional recipes are personalised and rendered in water-colour, bringing them to life. The copy, in travelogue-style, celebrates each region’s culinary stereotypes, from the ‘Patiala Bar’ to the Red Hot Kerala Fish. The illustrations are a flavoured combination of ingredients, topography, and culture, while the typography is inspired by airport codes.

Bombay Brasserie - The Indian Culinary Expert
Bombay Brasserie - The Indian Culinary Expert
Bombay Brasserie - The Indian Culinary Expert

After all, it’s about the Representation

Every single piece of collateral, from what you see on the tables, to in-restaurant and promotional material, to takeaway packaging, extends the idea of travel and discovery of a confluence of culture and cuisine. That’s very much what the intention was, to create a designing initiative that was representative of the authentic diversity of the food.

Bombay Brasserie - The Indian Culinary Expert
Bombay Brasserie - The Indian Culinary Expert
Bombay Brasserie - The Indian Culinary Expert
Issue 39 - Indian Design Special

Published in Issue 39

As the festivity is all around, every brand or business is trying to impress the Indian audience. But what really works for us Indians? What is an Indian design? And how we can make designs for India? To understand it, we interviewed some Indian creatives who are successfully creating designs for the Indian audience. This issue of Creative Gaga is a light read for someone looking for inspirations or insights on Indian design and how the Indian audience can be enticed. So go ahead and order your copy or subscribe if you want to keep receiving a regular dose inspirations!

 

Order Your Copy!

Concept and 3D artist Bhaskar Rac, who’s been working extensively in character development, 3D sculpting and the likes, expresses how one can come up with and hone one’s own style, without needing to follow popular fads or trends.

Create Your Style
Turquoise
Create Your Style
The legend of Anarchy
Create Your Style
Untitled

Refreshing ideas is the intention.

The idea is the starting point; its nature, relevance, and quality come into play even before the stage of executing it through the medium. The intention is to bring freshness into the storytelling or characters.

 

To entertain people is quite a tricky task, and you have to have a fresh mindset to playfully bring something new to the table every time.

Create Your Style
Mandala
Create Your Style
The Maharaja
Create Your Style
The Gift

So, it’s always recommended to not just stick to any one style or idea for too long, as its magic starts to fade away after being over-repetitive.

 

The solution, thereby, is to not categorise oneself with a style or medium. When it comes to the major approach, it simply about has preliminary sketches from the brief, and collecting all the related references, structuring, line drawings and then rendering.

Create Your Style
One last bullet
Create Your Style
Create Your Style
Wicked Wazir

Striking the balance is of the essence.

Without expressions, figures are basically lifeless mannequins. So, it is always better to try and find a balance between simplicity and expressing with colours, feelings, emotions, lines, contours and the likes.

 

If everything is too saturated and complicated, the illustration starts to crumble. The old and prevalent idea is always to capture the main essence of the subject, and let loose off the other things in the background.

Create Your Style
Splinter Cell
Create Your Style
The Interrogation
Create Your Style
The Royal Guard

Colours, for instance, have their own importance in telling the difference between moods and temperature. At the same time, too many colours can be asking for too much attention, thus feeling overdone and confusing.

 

It doesn’t matter if one goes by the book, even when it comes to choosing colours if the process of drawing is dedicated to more attention and details. If the contrast or values are handled right, colours may not even be needed; it’s like expressing more with lesser words.

Create Your Style
Kolam
Create Your Style
Julius-Chopps

Do what matters.

The illusion of giving a good light takes the lion’s share in bringing the overall impact, whether it’s a simple line drawing or fully rendered artwork. Contrast and values are important to bring any photograph or illustration closer to its subject. If this fails, it’s hard to bring out what’s important against what’s in the background.

 

Depending on the composition, textures, surface material, shape or form of anything we are placing as a subject, there can’t be a simple preset to it. This has to have experimented at various levels.

Create Your Style
Kintsugi
Create Your Style
Crystals

There has to be a streamlined and thorough process to creating anything, else the result might be too chaotic in nature. The refreshing part of this industry, to succeed, no one has to copy others. Draw a lot; learn fundamentals; stay open to new techniques and technology, and keep experimenting.

Create Your Style
The Borrower
Create Your Style
The Rational Exorcist

Published in Issue 39

As the festivity is all around, every brand or business is trying to impress the Indian audience. But what really works for us Indians? What is an Indian design? And how we can make designs for India?

To understand it, we interviewed some Indian creatives who are successfully creating designs for the Indian audience. We support keeping ourselves connected with Indian cultures, languages, history, aspirations and more, will help find the Indian context in everything we create. This issue of Creative Gaga is a light read for someone looking for inspirations or insights on Indian design and how the Indian audience can be enticed. So go ahead and order your copy or subscribe if you want to keep receiving a regular dose of inspirations!

 

Order Your Copy!

Veteran Illustrator and designer, Anant Kulkarni, takes us through a visual journey by illustrating and explaining how imagery is a powerful tool of communication. He describes how one can keep an audience intact and engaged through the still medium.

Visual Communication - AnantKulkarni
Ganesha Design 4
Visual Communication - AnantKulkarni
Person
Visual Communication - AnantKulkarni
Bird Typo
Visual Communication - AnantKulkarni
Symmetrical Graphic design

CG. What is the main intention or idea you desire to achieve through your work?

AK. It is my responsibility to get as close as possible to the audience, communicating through visuals. So, I always keep myself engaged in creating visuals that are a part of my study, besides assignments. This practice really helps every creative person, whether a student or professional. I try to express my views through every picture, conveying the same message through different visual solutions and like to keep my audience engaged in the visuals, maintaining their curiosity. As every artist has his/her own way to express, in my case it is visuals, and visuals only. I look up to each day as a new challenge and start thinking of something new!

Visual Communication - AnantKulkarni
Ganesha Graphic Design 2
Visual Communication - AnantKulkarni
Icons
Visual Communication - AnantKulkarni
All About by Anant Kulkarni
Visual Communication - AnantKulkarni
Art Prints

CG. What role do aspects like geometry and symmetry play in your visual works?

AK. I’m always searching for new things to execute through visual forms. Geometrical design patterns are a part of my study – a technique developed over years of consistent practice. Though I don’t know much about technical geometry, except the basic shapes such as circles, squares, triangles, hexagons, lines etc. provoke me to explore them in all possible combinations. I started creating very simple forms, and it became a habit while trying to convert objects into forms, using geometrical shapes. Symmetry and asymmetry are principles of design, but I ignore these terminologies while working, as they may disturb my visual thought.

Visual Communication - AnantKulkarni
Food Typo
Visual Communication - AnantKulkarni
Visual Communication - AnantKulkarni
Icons
Visual Communication - AnantKulkarni
Visual Language.
Visual Communication - AnantKulkarni
Ganesha Graphic Design

CG. How do you choose your colours and apply them to be balanced across geometric patterns?

AK. Visual concepts and drafting are very important; colours come later. The use of colour has its own purpose, and it depends on various factors. Of course, it is a choice of the artist, as to which colours to choose as per the concept. If you observe, a lot of famous artists can be identified through their colour palette. The use of colours helps to enhance the beauty of your visuals. Some artists use and apply particular colours to convey messages and create moods. I try to keep my designs bright, eye-catching and more attractive, but I give maximum attention to the visual form. The only care I take while using colour is to not disturb the image.

Visual Communication - AnantKulkarni
City Life
Visual Communication - AnantKulkarni
Parrots
Visual Communication - AnantKulkarni
Scary Sketchbook
Visual Communication - AnantKulkarni
Ganesha Graphic Design 3
Visual Communication - AnantKulkarni
Bird Typo 2

CG. What, and how much, does proportion contribute to what you wish to execute?

AK. Proportions, in my illustration and compositions, play a vital role. They are a part of design principles, too. When I plan composition, I always think of it as a sequence – “What is going to be seen first? ‘What has more emphasis?’ I then think of other related visuals that would keep the audience engaged through the entire picture. Harmony, movement, and size of the forms are other important aspects of design.

Visual Communication - AnantKulkarni
Mug Design Applications
Visual Communication - AnantKulkarni
Crockery Design Applications
Visual Communication - AnantKulkarni
Tag Design Applications
Visual Communication - AnantKulkarni
T-shirt Design Applications
Visual Communication - AnantKulkarni
Coasters

CG. How necessary is the white of the background in your illustrations?

AK. It is very important. Positive and negative spaces are the two main important aspects of every composition. This helps you enhance and beautify your image. Leaving white spaces in design, or any picture or composition gives relief to the viewer to grasp the image very easily. White spaces help a lot in finding out the subject in a clear manner, even in text, if you have proper spacing; it helps in reading more comfortably. In the end, it provides the all-important visual comfort.

Visual Communication - AnantKulkarni
Pencil Typo
Visual Communication - AnantKulkarni
Bags

Cover Designed for Issue 39

As the festivity is all around, every brand or business is trying to impress the Indian audience. But what really works for us Indians? What is an Indian design? And how we can make designs for India? To understand it, we interviewed some Indian creatives who are successfully creating designs for the Indian audience. This issue of Creative Gaga is a light read for someone looking for inspirations or insights on Indian design and how the Indian audience can be enticed. So go ahead and order your copy or subscribe if you want to keep receiving a regular dose inspirations!

 

Order Your Copy!

Freelance illustrator, Pratima Unde, takes us on a journey of depicting human emotions on canvas. She thereby describes and provides insight on how it requires one to dive into the depths of the subject’s personality, so as to be able to aptly and accurately represent it.

Emotions
Monk.

CG. What fascinates you most about human expressions that you seem to choose them as your prime subjects?

PU. Even if you don’t know an individual personally, you can decipher a lot about that person just by looking at his or her face. Every day in our lives, we see hundreds of faces; each person wears a mask. But, if we get out of our own little selfish world and look carefully, the mask will disappear, and we’ll see a range of emotions on the person’s face – right from pain to happiness. I like taking off those masks through my illustrations.

Emotions
The Couple.

CG. What is your main intention that you wish to achieve or convey through your work?

PU. I try to bring out the emotions people go through; ones they subconsciously engage in, and which do not easily or readily show on their faces and in their expressions. The subjects I approach are very shy and prefer to keep everything to themselves, much like a secret or personal indulgence. I speak for them through my illustrations, bringing out what lays unsaid or unexpressed.

Emotions
Naughtiest.

CG. What are the most challenging aspects of portraying human emotions?

PU. People go through umpteen numbers of emotions, not only through the course of the whole day but also at single points of time. To select the one emotion that dominates or overshadows the others is a little tricky. I sometimes spend days observing the subjects, before I start to illustrate. It requires one to look beneath the surface and gauge at what lies underneath – just like an iceberg. That is the beauty and challenge of it – or, you can say, the beauty lies in the challenge.

Emotions
The Couple.

CG. How do you achieve representing your subjects wholly on the canvas?

PU. I usually sit face-to-face with my subjects and spend days with them. There’s always something new that I see in them each and every day – it’s like diving into the depth of the sea, inching deeper and deeper. A wrinkle, tear or smile can say a lot. So, I usually start with a rough sketch, using different mediums. I then keep making changes, until I’m completely confident and satisfied with what I’ve manifested on the canvas, is a true representation of the person.

Emotions
Addiction.

CG. What is the idea behind the textures you choose in your illustrations?

PU. ‘Giggling’ is the technique I use to highlight the facial expressions. I start with a simple dot that turns into a line which never ends. By going in a circular motion, I never actually realise where the line started, and where it ended. This style helps me provide a great amount of detailing to the illustration. It also helps me go in-depth to bring out their personalities precisely.

Emotions
The Villager.

CG. What do you enjoy most, in your work process?

PU. The final result is what I enjoy most about my work! I love it when people understand and relate or connect to my work. Conveying a lot about a person just through a glance is what I want to achieve through all my illustrations. When that happens, I feel happiness.

Emotions
Surprised.

CG. What would be your advice to others who wish to involve in a similar style of work as yours?

PU. Don’t try to emulate someone else, but choose a style that is solely yours, instead. That way, the work you create through it will be your personal best and most satisfying. Only you can create and execute your own trademark style. Trust me!

Emotions
Mother.
Emotions
Joyous Rajasthani.

Published in Issue 39

As the festivity is all around, every brand or business is trying to impress the Indian audience. But what really works for us Indians? What is an Indian design? And how we can make designs for India? To understand it, we interviewed some Indian creatives who are successfully creating designs for the Indian audience. Neha Tulisan, the founder of NH1 design, highlights to understand how we Indians live; how we grew up; and what moves us emotionally. Whereas Mira Malhotra, founder of Studio Khol, emphasises on the difference of Western and Indian Sensibilities. Also, we support keeping ourselves connected with Indian cultures, languages, history, aspirations and more, will help find the Indian context in everything we create. This issue of Creative Gaga is a light read for someone looking for inspirations or insights on Indian design and how the Indian audience can be enticed. So go ahead and order your copy or subscribe if you want to keep receiving a regular dose of inspirations!

 

Order Your Copy!

Anant Kulkarni

Having grown an interest in visual and pictorial forms while a student at the ‘Sir J.J. Institute of Applied Arts, Mumbai’, freelance Illustrator and Designer, Anant Kulkarni, went on to work with various publications. He further even became a professor at the same prestigious institute.


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Abhishek Bairwan

A young designer from Pune, Abhishek Bairwan is currently based in Mumbai, where he works for Star India Pvt. Ltd. Having studied BFA in Applied Arts, and specialising in illustration from Abhinav Kala Mahavidyalaya (Pune), he has experience as a creative designer across various platforms like Broadcast, Print, Motion, and Digital.


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As the festivity is all around, every brand or business is trying to impress the Indian audience. But what really works for us Indians? What is an Indian design? And how we can make designs for India?</p> <p>To understand it, we interviewed some Indian creatives who are successfully creating designs for the Indian audience. Neha Tulisan, the founder of NH1 design, highlights to understand how we Indians live; how we grew up; and what moves us emotionally. Whereas Mira Malhotra, founder of Studio Khol, emphasises on the difference of Western and Indian Sensibilities. Also, we support keeping ourselves connected with Indian cultures, languages, history, aspirations and more, will help find the Indian context in everything we create.</p> <p>This issue of Creative Gaga is a light read for someone looking for inspirations or insights on Indian design and how the Indian audience can be enticed. So go ahead and order your copy or subscribe if you want to keep receiving a regular dose of inspirations!

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