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From mountains to rivers and deserts to seas, the beauty that nature presents before us is mesmerising. At times jaw-dropping and other times breathtaking, landscape photographer Ron Kahlon shows us how he captures the most photogenic model in the world – Mother Earth.

Landscape Photography
Landscape Photography

Capture Varying Attitudes Of Longitudes And Latitudes.

Landscape photography is a great way to bring the world to people. Many wishes to travel, however, it’s only a hand few that are able to travel extensively to see the world for what it is. Capturing the Earth in its pure and natural form is surprising for the audience because there will always be something they would never have seen. Like a shipwreck by the side of the beach or a melting glacier that’s constantly moving at 4cm/s. There are so many costumes the Earth likes to flaunt; whether it’s creased mountains to glittering waves, there is never a landscape photo that will look the same.

Landscape Photography
Landscape Photography

A Patient Eye Makes One Go My My!

One of the greatest virtues of a landscape photographer is patience. The patience to wait for the clouds to clear to reveal the sun-kissed mountain top or to wait for the moment when the pastels in the sky are just right at sunset. Nature is forever changing its poses, giving you surprising shots to capture. Once in the wild, you can’t plan. It can start to rain or you’ll have a flat tyre. It’s all about timing. For example, if you’re clicking Mount Cook in New Zealand, you need to spend several hours trying to get the best shot. And you need to do that every day, till you’re satisfied you’ve got a shot that captures the landscape with a dramatic story. You need to change the way you look at the subject It’s a wrap then.

Landscape Photography
Landscape Photography

It’s Like A Picture Book.

The composition is probably one of the most critical factors in landscape photography. You don’t just capture a tree but the tree in its surroundings. That’s how the story happens. One can use composition techniques like rule of thirds, leading lines and even patterns to capture nature’s plot. Timing, especially capturing landscapes during the golden hour helps establish drama and character

Landscape Photography
Landscape Photography

Get Into The Right Gear.

Landscape photography utilises great skill of the photographer and the camera as well. Using professional full-frame DSLR with a 16-35mm wide angle lens is one great way to start a photography journey. Using low ISO ranging between 100-300 and a small aperture between F9-F16 during daytime is one way to get apt images. For nights, using an ISO of around 800 is ideal. Focusing manually via the live view of the scale on the lens on hyperfocal distance and not focusing on optical infinity is one way to go as well. Photography techniques like applying focus stacking or vertical panorama (refocusing in different frames) are also some ways to enhance the landscape experience. For instances where the land is dark, it’s best to expose the land separately and then merge it with the background using Mask in Photoshop.

Landscape Photography
Issue-37

Published in Issue 37

The issue includes interactions with Preeti Vyas from VGC on ‘How to pitch for clients or retain the existing one’ and Ashish Deshpande from Elephant on ‘Challenges of working with a startup’, along with some best freelancers like Archan Nair, Shreya Shetty and Paul Sandip, sharing their knowledge of working with various clients. Also, Sachin Puthran from Thatzit.com gave a 10-point no-nonsense guide for studios to handle their finances. A must read, if you are planning for the financial year ahead or worried about your handling your money matter, this issue can give you much-needed insight and guide you to a better financial health of your business or freelancing. 

 

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Self- taught Visual Artist, Illustrator and Digital Artist, Archan Nair, describes how tagging along with one’s heart and going by what one knows within, helps to create one’s best works and let the best within them flourish

ATONAL. 3D DIGITAL ART. A notorious play of plain and colours.

CG. What role do you feel the expressive use of colour plays in what you intend to convey?

AN. I don’t think of colours too much. If they need to happen, they automatically get translated into the work. And, if the visual does not require any, that too flows out. Though, I love how at the end, colours fuse together to create layers of storytelling, mystery and fascination.

Archan Nair heart
JNANI. 3D DIGITAL ART. A rather lively, vibrant stage, indeed!

CG. What idea/intention forms the core of what you depict, and which elements do you feel are essential to manifest them?

AN. My work has been a reflection of my journey, and that journey is deeply fascinated by the mystery we call existence – how everything interacts and reacts with each other, and where we all originate from; how things are not what they seem, and the more we dig deeper, the more weird and bizarre simple things seem to become, all at the same time. I love that reality cannot be understood, and the attempt to understand it is constantly showcased into what I create.

Archan Nair heart
SUBMERGED. A psychedelic illustration via Mixed Media Digital Illustration.

CG. What qualities do you feel are essential in a designer (especially, a freelancer) to regularly garner commissions/clients?

AN. Just be yourself. Do what you love; create to your heart’s content. I don’t think there is any particular way of getting clients, or any fixed method. If your work is true and original, and someone likes it so much so that it would enhance their project, they would definitely hire you. It’s very simple, I deeply believe, in my experience.

PSYMBIONIC. Digital Illustration of human and the subtler elements of being human.

CG. How do you choose your clients? Or clients choose you?

AN. It’s a two-way process, I think. Many-a- times, there are enquiries from potential clients who want to hire you because they like your work, but want something entirely different for themselves. At this point, I understand the direction and then take a call. If it is absolutely different from my direction of work, I would not like to continue. So, yes, it has to be a mutual collaboration between both sides to make it really exciting.

Archan Nair heart
OTHER SPACES. Digital Illustration of the ferocious tiger.

CG. What do you feel is the balance between marketing, portfolio and quality of work when it comes to acquiring work? Do you think there’s anything more a designer needs to do?

AN. I just feel that the only thing required is to create from your heart. The rest are just human-made ideas and concepts, which will anyway happen on their own. There is no need to focus on anything but create and share what you like. Whatever else needs to happen, will happen. We tend to focus too much time on constructing strategies, but nothing works unless you love what you are doing, and that is all that one needs to do.

IGNITE. Digital Illustration of an Owl, a symbolically mysterious creature.

CG. What would be your advice to freelance illustrators on getting clients without needing to be pitch-oriented?

AN. One needs to just focus on their heart and practice their own work, and not follow any trend, look, style or direction. If your work speaks to potential clients, they would definitely love to work with you.

SHAMAN’S WHISPER. Digital Illustration of the majestic wolf.
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Published in Issue 37

The issue includes interactions with Preeti Vyas from VGC on ‘How to pitch for clients or retain the existing one’ and Ashish Deshpande from Elephant on ‘Challenges of working with a startup’, along with some best freelancers like Archan Nair, Shreya Shetty and Paul Sandip, sharing their knowledge of working with various clients. Also, Sachin Puthran from Thatzit.com gave a 10-point no-nonsense guide for studios to handle their finances. A must read, if you are planning for the financial year ahead or worried about your handling your money matter, this issue can give you much-needed insight and guide you to a better financial health of your business or freelancing. 

So Order Your Copy Now!

 

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Hailing from Manipur, Thokchom Sony celebrates the natural beauty, customs and traditions of his hometown through his work. Inspired by patterns from Indian handloom and textile design, he combines it with his illustrations, which ultimately brings out the unique characters.

Manipur
Wild orchid

The magic of Manipur

“I love nature” says designer, Thokchom Sony, and we don’t doubt it! Nature is celebrated through strong themes and yet he is rooted in his hometown. The beautiful Manipuri fabric patterns weave a story with portraits as he imparts socially relevant messages.

Manipur
Indian Ballerinas.

Drawing major inspiration from Potloi, a cylindrical skirt worn by the brides and dancers in Manipur and the flowers from the state result in unique characteristics or a personality that are detailed extensively. Working in details, especially with hair, eyes and skin textures Thokchom finds natural skin tones with freckles, moles and blush so beautiful. Incorporating traditional elements like chandon on nose, tanakha on cheeks helps in bringing out the originality and ethnicity in the characters.

Manipur
Dance of Freedom.
Lily girl.
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Published in Issue 37

The issue includes interactions with Preeti Vyas from VGC on ‘How to pitch for clients or retain the existing one’ and Ashish Deshpande from Elephant on ‘Challenges of working with a startup’, along with some best freelancers like Archan Nair, Shreya Shetty and Paul Sandip, sharing their knowledge of working with various clients. Also, Sachin Puthran from Thatzit.com gave a 10-point no-nonsense guide for studios to handle their finances. A must read, if you are planning for the financial year ahead or worried about your handling your money matter, this issue can give you much-needed insight and guide you to a better financial health of your business or freelancing. 

So Order Your Copy Now!

 

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Tasneem Syed and Gauri Arora share their idea of niche, worthy packaging for traditional Punjabi Juttis, a traditional hand-crafted footwear that is very much an intrinsic part of North Indian culture.

Punjabi Jutti

Brief

A Punjabi Jutti is traditional hand-crafted North Indian footwear. Like any other footwear, they are generally presented to customers in simple shoe boxes, or sometimes even in the newspaper. The idea, thus, was to retain their elegance into traditionally authentic packaging, representing the roots they stem from.

Punjabi Jutti

Concept

The packaging of Punjabi Jutti – The sole of Punjab, should be compact and unique, just like the Punjabi Juttis. The hexagonal shape makes it convenient for storage, as it consumes little space, while it is also easily stackable when displaying in stores and transporting in bulk. The box can be used for display, which doubles-up as the packaging. It also comes along with a jute string attached, to make carrying the shoes more convenient.

Punjabi Jutti

Outcome

This is taking a step away from the conventional shoe boxes, and towards enhancing the whole experience of selecting, buying, packing and taking home a pair of Punjabi juttis, making it a memorable one. The transparent lid enables a person to have a look at the design of the jutti inside the box, without having to open it, and even allows the shopkeeper to pull out the desired Punjabi jutti while it is stacked on the shelf.

Punjabi Jutti
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Published in Issue 37

The issue includes interactions with Preeti Vyas from VGC on ‘How to pitch for clients or retain the existing one’ and Ashish Deshpande from Elephant on ‘Challenges of working with a startup’, along with some best freelancers like Archan Nair, Shreya Shetty and Paul Sandip, sharing their knowledge of working with various clients. Also, Sachin Puthran from Thatzit.com gave a 10-point no-nonsense guide for studios to handle their finances. A must read, if you are planning for the financial year ahead or worried about your handling your money matter, this issue can give you much-needed insight and guide you to a better financial health of your business or freelancing. 

So Order Your Copy Now!

 

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Priya Amrut Shinde has followed a simple guiding principle through her art; love is supposed to complement. Through her unconventional interpretations of age old love stories, she has created minimal illustrations of Indian love stories of deities.

love
Infinite Love (Radha Krishna)

Contemporary traditions

Starting with traditional forms of Gods and Goddesses, Priya transformed them using contemporary design elements. Subtly doing so, she has retained parts of the originality while minimising unnecessary details thus resulting in a vibrant and youthful canvas.

 

In an attempt to accessorise the artwork while maintaining a focus on the key characters, she has used motifs that are generally associated with the characters. Hence, you find minimalistic elements like flowers, mountains, and waves serving as backdrops in each artwork.

love
Eternal Love (Lakshmi Narayan)

Seamlessly integrating the male and female deity was a challenge, solved by the colour blue which is evidently a common theme across all artworks as the ‘Neelkanth’ is another name for Shiva, Vishnu rests underwater and Krishna has often been represented in the colour blue. So while the blue symbolises the men in all three couples, it is the other half that brings more colours and variety to the artwork.

Affectionate Love (Shiv Shakti)
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Published in Issue 37

The issue includes interactions with Preeti Vyas from VGC on ‘How to pitch for clients or retain the existing one’ and Ashish Deshpande from Elephant on ‘Challenges of working with a startup’, along with some best freelancers like Archan Nair, Shreya Shetty and Paul Sandip, sharing their knowledge of working with various clients. Also, Sachin Puthran from Thatzit.com gave a 10-point no-nonsense guide for studios to handle their finances. A must read, if you are planning for the financial year ahead or worried about your handling your money matter, this issue can give you much-needed insight and guide you to a better financial health of your business or freelancing. 

So Order Your Copy Now!

 

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Loris F. Alessandria, an Italian freelance illustrator who loves Lego and dogs, feels that inspiration is not in and for chosen few, but all around for us to recognise, acknowledge and appreciate. He goes on to expound on his own insightful findings owing to being open to them along the way.

CG. Having a strong sense of design and the ability to put yourself out there, where do you see yourself in the next couple of years?

LA. Thank you. I am working hard to improve my skills, and to find some new ways to communicate. In the next couple of years, I’d like to see myself as a trusted freelancer; one who gets the opportunity to work with very cool people around the globe.

Editorial illustration commissioned by RCS for Mediapower Linc Magazine.

CG. How is your approach different from others around you? What is the inspiration for the same?

LA. I do not know if my approach is different or not, but I personally think it is not. The chosen approach depends on the project at hand i.e. what is required and apt for it so that it comes into effect in the best way possible. Usually, though, I like to make use of expressive characters and even play with a lot of colours. My inspiration comes in different forms and mediums; they could be in the form of illustrated books, graphic design projects or animated movies as well. I’m always inspired by the thousands of talented people around me.

CG. How do you narrow down to a specific element and work on making it more important? How does your core thought (the subject of your work, or the way it is executed) make its way from sketches to the final render?

LA. Usually, the final illustrations are really similar to my sketches; more like an extension of the sketches. It’s a little different when I sketch for storyboards; in this case, it’s more important for me to focus on actions instead of the design by itself.

Loris F. Alessandria - Inspiration
Editorial illustration for Sport Magazine, UK.

CG. Your illustrations seem to be woven around a lot of colours; a relatable character and, essentially, human-based themes. How do you manage to tell this story in a stationary frame?

LA. Well, that’s the hardest part of our job. I try to give personality and temperamental qualities to my characters. Likewise, I also make an effort to create a good environment that stays in sync with the characters, so that the two elements gel well with one another and produce an impactful effect, in turn. The focus of attention is laid upon the action or the message that the illustration is intended to convey to or bring about in the audience

Beedrill is the whacky, fun-looking Pokèmon for The Pokèdex Project.

CG. Do you consider technology a big part of art today, and its impact on constantly changing trends? What inspires your work and keeps you updated on modern techniques and styles?

LA. I think technology is a big player in today’s times and era, whether it is in the form of the wide and diverse range of tools one has at disposal, or of the innovative ways you can stay connected with other creatives. I usually use Tumblr and Instagram to find inspirational things, and they also prove to be helpful mediums to keep updated every day.

CG. We live in a multi-media world where people want fast information and fast response rates. How has this turned creative business trends into essentials?

LA. Everything is fast. The world of communication, too, is affected by this rhythm. Most of the times, my commissions have very tight timelines, and that can sadly cause some loss in terms of quality. Sometimes, using simple images is the best way; sometimes it’s not.

Loris F. Alessandria - Inspiration
Jacala. Is a white monkey in a contrastingly colourful and mystical jungle. Made as a personal project in 2016.
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Published in Issue 37

The issue includes interactions with Preeti Vyas from VGC on ‘How to pitch for clients or retain the existing one’ and Ashish Deshpande from Elephant on ‘Challenges of working with a startup’, along with some best freelancers like Archan Nair, Shreya Shetty and Paul Sandip, sharing their knowledge of working with various clients. Also, Sachin Puthran from Thatzit.com gave a 10-point no-nonsense guide for studios to handle their finances. A must read, if you are planning for the financial year ahead or worried about your handling your money matter, this issue can give you much-needed insight and guide you to a better financial health of your business or freelancing. 

So Order Your Copy Now!

 

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Kartik Iyer

Kartik Iyer graduated with a BSc in Visual Communication, Advertising, Film and Graphic Design. Currently CEO of Happy Mcgarrybowen in Bangalore, he’s donned various hats in Brand Building, Advertising, Creative direction and the likes.


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Recent demonisation and changing Taxes has pushed most of us in planning our finances more seriously. So to answer some of the basic questions for designers, freelancers and creative studios, we interviewed some of the creative legends to guide and share their wisdom. The issue includes interactions with Preeti Vyas from VGC on ‘How to pitch for clients or retain the existing one’ and Ashish Deshpande from Elephant on ‘Challenges of working with a startup’, along with some best freelancers like Archan Nair, Shreya Shetty and Paul Sandip, sharing their knowledge of working with various clients. Also, Sachin Puthran from Thatzit.com gave a 10-point no-nonsense guide for studios to handle their finances. A must read, if you are planning for the financial year ahead or worried about your handling your money matter, this issue can give you much-needed insight and guide you to a better financial health of your business or freelancing.

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Praveen Das

With more than 17 years of experience in advertising and design, Praveen Das is Managing Director at Happy Mcgarrybowen. Previously at JWT, Lowe Lintas and O&M as a designer and art director, he’s worked with a range of brands such as Ola, Fast Track and Flipkart.


Featured In


Recent demonisation and changing Taxes has pushed most of us in planning our finances more seriously. So to answer some of the basic questions for designers, freelancers and creative studios, we interviewed some of the creative legends to guide and share their wisdom. The issue includes interactions with Preeti Vyas from VGC on ‘How to pitch for clients or retain the existing one’ and Ashish Deshpande from Elephant on ‘Challenges of working with a startup’, along with some best freelancers like Archan Nair, Shreya Shetty and Paul Sandip, sharing their knowledge of working with various clients. Also, Sachin Puthran from Thatzit.com gave a 10-point no-nonsense guide for studios to handle their finances. A must read, if you are planning for the financial year ahead or worried about your handling your money matter, this issue can give you much-needed insight and guide you to a better financial health of your business or freelancing.

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Last few years, India has seen a steady rise in design consulting needs from new mushrooming businesses, commonly referred as ‘Startups’. These are not necessarily the love child of newbies but also some industry veterans or serial entrepreneurs taking on new business challenges, who understands the importance of design. Here, Ashish Deshpande explains the pros & cons of designing for startups.

startup
ASAP. CIIE-IIM-A incubated Bangaluru startup that created this “on the go” snack, design helped strategise and communicate a differentiating visual story. Pic by Elephant

A motivating enterprise environment in India, propelled by several industry & government initiatives has helped create a breed of entrepreneurs high on enthusiasm, technology savvy and willing to take the risk on new product service formats. Design is playing a crucial role in their journey as well as successes and there is increasing acceptance to the use of design in building a resounding brand & quality of product or service application. Paperboat is great example of a recent startup success story where one can observe design playing a key role. However, working with startups has its own unique hiccups and thrills.

startup
Paperboat. A memory drinks based startup where design added emotive value to the brand, identity, language, pack form function. Pic by Elephant

• CHALLENGES with Startups

1. MULTI-ROLE INVOLVEMENT

Let’s face it! Startups are ultra lean. Aligning business & technology solutions to a consumer-focused approach needs to be done at multiple levels. Since most startups, unlike the well-established corporate world, cannot afford multiple experts & agencies, a designer is seen as a ‘fix all’ for several needs. Involvement of a designer or design firm goes beyond a specific design assignment. Designer ends up playing a strategic role, trying to balance business strategy with design, brand image, product, pack, quality, vendor development, applications and point of sale, with key design language & marketing messages.

2. DISTINCT SOLUTION

Most startups are either technology or business focused. Design is a weakness and so is the ability to profile and understand end consumer. Startups tend to get committed too early to a particular tech or proposition without ascertaining appropriateness, uniqueness and distinction of their offering. Despite a new idea, most times, the end offering is neither distinct enough, nor is perceived value appreciable. This grave omission places the fledging business at risk from the word go.

3. INCREMENTAL APPROACH

Paucity of key in-house expertise & resources, especially funds, forces design to be undertaken in an incremental manner, stretching across months at times. Design implementation also takes place at a slow pace so it is difficult to see the full picture or measure the impact of design. A healthcare start up, setting up new format of hospitals launched the service care product with just the new brand identity, However, the hospital experience that would resonate with the brand was placed on hold due to lack of funds. The result was apparent. Customers never experienced the distinction in the hospital value proposition and never understood as to why they should adopt this new hospital chain.

design
SynPhNe. Singapore based technology startup where design helped cutting edge tech become human through Industrial Design of Wearable stroke rehabilitation device focused on needs of patients. Pic by Elephant

• ADVANTAGES with Startups

1. CONTAGIOUS ENERGY

Startups are a happy lot. Usual work culture is hands-on and people come across eager to learn, share and help. It is great to work with synergies of such teams and be part of an exciting journey. The results reflect on the design output. Client meetings are less of drudgery, are participative and consequently more productive.

2. WILLING EXPLORERS

This is one place where Startups score. They are willing to play along as you explore, experiment & test. There is negligible blame game, no departmental silos or ‘mother of all’ presentation to the King of the corporate. Results are quick and decisions are usually part of a co-creative play. Funds are the only constraint but then frugal approach and ‘jugaad’ prototypes are more than welcome. This approach works wonders for the confidence of the design team.

3. CREATIVE SATISFACTION

Many startups are working in the healthcare, social impact, agri-tech and energy space. Just the sense of what your work will potentially achieve can layer the designer in you with goose bumps. Each startup is a new challenge, whether it is B2B or B2C, it gives a sense of new purpose and when design helps enable such opportunities, the result is very satisfying. Design as core to startups is understood by the fact that many new enterprises have designers as co founders. Designers in India will have to quickly adapt to this new scenario and draw out a process to work with the Startup eco system. This culture is here to stay.

startup
Plezmo. IOT based education platform that helps you learn program logic while you have smart fun. Pic by Plezmo
design
Plezmo. IOT based education platform that helps you learn program logic while kids have smart fun. Pic by Plezmo
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Published in Issue 37

Recent demonisation and changing Taxes has pushed most of us in planning our finances more seriously. So to answer some of the basic questions for designers, freelancers and creative studios, we interviewed some of the creative legends to guide and share their wisdom. The issue includes interactions with Preeti Vyas from VGC on ‘How to pitch for clients or retain the existing one’ and Ashish Deshpande from Elephant on ‘Challenges of working with a startup’, along with some best freelancers like Archan Nair, Shreya Shetty and Paul Sandip, sharing their knowledge of working with various clients. Also, Sachin Puthran from Thatzit.com gave a 10-point no-nonsense guide for studios to handle their finances. A must read, if you are planning for the financial year ahead or worried about your handling your money matter, this issue can give you much-needed insight and guide you to a better financial health of your business or freelancing.

 

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Animator and Illustrator, Lavanya Naidu, expresses how one can find more room to grow, not only professionally but also personally, by focusing on producing work that is rather challenging and cherishing at the same time.

happiness-Lavanya Naidu
Art made for TEDx Bangalore’s annual event.

CG. All your illustrations are fun, represent happiness. How do you choose your characters and topics of illustration?

LN. I try to be an optimist about most things in life. I guess my work too in many ways, reflects the same. I want to be able to induce happiness in my audience, I want to be able to share that positive energy. A lot of my work, characters and environments are based on simple joys and human emotion. I draw inspiration from my relationships; my friendships; the people (and sometimes animals) I see around; everyday moments worth freezing on canvas; worth appreciating and taking a second look at.

An illustration created for a friend celebrating her relationship.

CG. You use a very lively colour scheme that is, both, vibrant and subtle. Could you please tell us how you arrive at it?

LN. My colour scheme has developed over time, and still has a long way to go! I began asking myself why does the sky have to be blue when it really isn’t always blue? There are a myriad of colours that we can play with. I began experimenting with different palettes, and started understanding how the absence and presence of light changes colour. It’s an ongoing journey, and tremendous fun!

A Flamingo in My Garden. A beautiful diversity of birds of the Indian subcontinent come together in this lovely story. By Deepak Dalal, illustrations by Lavanya Naidu.

CG. What is your approach towards acquiring clients, and how do you fulfill their needs?

LN. I have been extremely lucky to have had some wonderful clients. Most of my clients have approached me, having had looked at my work on Behance or my blog. I make sure to keep all of my pages updated with new projects, as soon as I can. I respect another person’s time and money as I would expect that in return, so it is of utmost importance that I deliver on or before a reasonable deadline. I usually take on work that I know, I would love to do, so that I can be true to that commitment. Professionalism is key, it helps you filter out the unnecessities and focus on the actual task at hand.

Flamingo in My Garden. A beautiful diversity of birds of the Indian subcontinent come together in this lovely story. By Deepak Dalal, illustrations by Lavanya Naidu.
The Dark Glen. Cover art for Tinkle Comics. What started off as a cover, soon turned into a comic inside as well!

CG. What do you feel is the balance between marketing, portfolio and quality of work when it comes to acquiring work? Do you think there’s anything more a designer needs to do?

LN. We live in an age where there is endless choice, and it gets harder and harder to make an impact on your audience. Our attention spans are fleeting. However, if you love what you do, and you can put that into your work, people can feel it. If, instead of focusing solely on staying relevant, we can focus on producing work that challenges us and that we are passionate about, it gives us more room to grow both personally as well as professionally.

Something fishy. No Smoke Without Fire – a personal short animation film. Background explorations for an upcoming personal short in progress.

I would say that quality of work is usually the most important aspect when acquiring work, followed by sharing it on different forums, where peers and professionals can see and critique your work, as well as sharing it on more public forums where people can relate and experience your work too. The learning never stops, so ask questions and keep at it.

The Bookworm. A personal illustration dedicated to my best friend, a voracious reader, even in dim lighting.
Lulu and Jazz Sticker set for Google Allo. Sticker pack for Google’s new messaging service. Project commissioned by 'Anyways London'.

CG. What inspires your style of work?

LN. I am an avid observer and am stimulated by those around me; by everyday interactions, sometimes more complex emotion, or relevant subjects around the world that resonate with me. There is so much we have in common, so much to share, so much that can bring us together, that is what inspires me.

To the Future. Personal art dedicated to my best friend and our enormous love for dogs.
CreativeGaga.com 27 Issue 37 You Came. Personal work Concept art for an upcoming personal animation film.
client

Published in Issue 37

Recent demonisation and changing Taxes has pushed most of us in planning our finances more seriously. So to answer some of the basic questions for designers, freelancers and creative studios, we interviewed some of the creative legends to guide and share their wisdom. The issue includes interactions with Preeti Vyas from VGC on ‘How to pitch for clients or retain the existing one’ and Ashish Deshpande from Elephant on ‘Challenges of working with a startup’, along with some best freelancers like Archan Nair, Shreya Shetty and Paul Sandip, sharing their knowledge of working with various clients. Also, Sachin Puthran from Thatzit.com gave a 10-point no-nonsense guide for studios to handle their finances. A must read, if you are planning for the financial year ahead or worried about your handling your money matter, this issue can give you much-needed insight and guide you to a better financial health of your business or freelancing.

So don’t wait, just order your copy NOW!

 

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