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Harshvardhan Kadam faces multi-fold burnout; it can be creative, physical, mental and also sometimes emotional. He maintains, that burnout means you need an urgent break!

But a break from exactly what? Are you tired of working back to back? Or just low on enthusiasm? Or have nothing left to express? Or just a self-projected burnout? All these reasons are okay long as you know how to deal with it. Harshvardhan shares his ways to tackle the burnout.

I was really young when my father told me that whenever you get bored of academic assignments, which were very narrow for exploration and didn’t cater to your complete potential, then just switch to some other medium of expression.

This made me look at films, photography, adventure sports, biking and even cooking. And that simple advice makes me explore everything I find exciting. Which does not just enhance my personal work but also the kind of creative individuals I got connected with, the friendships and collaborations I’ve done so far, which are worth cherishing for rest of my life.


Nowadays, the Internet is as constructive as destructive it is,

One’s focus plays a vital role in increasing their powers of expression. But you lose your focus and you feel the burnout; it literally means to empty your learning and restarting afresh.

To keep up with the new interactive world, self-assessment of individual potential, self-critiquing and analysing old work, are some of the important steps in any artistic processes. These can be done alone or even with your trusted companion who can tell you that what you’ve made is a shit when it is, and you do not feel taken aback. As accepting your weakness is also a part of climbing the ladder of growth.


Burnout has taught me, to be honest, to be grounded and appreciate all the beautiful things in life.

For me, this phase is as good as the one in which I create. The universe of possibilities otherwise will remain less explored. I do not bind myself to a term of an artist known for just one thing. For me, achievement has never been an ambition. That has made me accept moments as they come.


So, whenever I’m done with murals I get back to my cave and illustrate digitally or sketch on paper and that’s how I keep my energy levels high.

I have a Jaw Harp that I play, to switch with some old and new tools like iPad, sketchbook, a few empty walls, canvases, a couple of apps and gadgets I have invested in and that is how the life goes on

Published in Issue 33

We all face it! But everyone has their own unique way to come out of it, in this issue we try to explore different ideas of handling the ‘Creative Burnout’. The most common of all was #travelling, through everyone do it in their own unique style. Like Luke Ritchie from South Africa finds the nature and mountains as the best source of inspiration while Sushant Ajnikar says riding his bike and meeting four-legged loyal friends, dogs, on the way is the best way to learn. So, pack your bags and don’t forget to subscribe your copy before you leave!

 

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Arnab Biswas, a true citizen of the world, who was born near the Indian-Bhutan border, grew up in Kolkata, post graduated in New Delhi and currently living with his Polish wife in Germany, is fluent in English, Hindi, Bengali and learning German and know how to order his beer in Polish. He shares, how travel has helped him be what he is today!

Travel makes you more open-minded and hence a better person. The more I immerse myself into a completely different culture the more I feel the benefits of that interaction in my work. As an advertising professional, I always hunt for a human insight, the more diverse the better. You can’t just google it.

I believe, travelling should push your limits and put you in challenging situations, which teaches you to think creatively, especially if you don’t know the local language. In many ways, it helps you identify who you really are.

Travelling in a foreign country can be very eye opening. It is absolutely crucial for the creative growth. A changed environment stimulates your brain in ways, which wouldn’t be if you stayed in the same place. I definitely get revitalised by simply experiencing new things, culture, food etc. It’s also an easy way to get out of a creative block since a livelier mind is a more creative one.

I recommend you to get your hands dirty and go to an offbeat place, though chilling at a resort may help you unwind for a while, but mixing with the locals and completely immersing yourself in the culture is what really unlocks the creativity. In the best case, live in that country for a while. Although going abroad is obviously not a possibility for everyone but it doesn’t have to be, India is diverse enough, it does work as long as you keep an open mind.

Also before travelling, work delivery and deadlines always need to be sorted. As you can never be at peace if you have unfinished work back in office so try to complete it to the best of your abilities before leaving for a longer journey. I try to plan everything to the last detail but it is easier said than done because if you work in advertising, things are changing constantly. It also does help a lot if you have supporting colleagues/bosses who step in and help you out.

Published in Issue 33

We all face it! But everyone has their own unique way to come out of it, in this issue we try to explore these different ideas of handling the ‘Creative Burnout’. The most common of all was travelling, through everyone do it in their own unique style. Like Luke Ritchie from South Africa finds the nature and mountains as the best source of inspiration while Sushant Ajnikar says riding his bike and meeting four-legged loyal friends, dogs, on the way is the best way to learn. This issue is bundled with inspirations and suggests you to travel a lot. So, pack your bags and don’t forget to subscribe your copy before you leave!

 

Order Your Copy!

David Padilla enjoys creating the imaginary world, which comes from the reality. He is heavily influenced by photography and science fiction. He likes the fantasy world as it can help you turn your imaginary thoughts into a reality. He also talks about what inspires him to create this surreal world.

fantasy
Brainstorm. An explosion of ideas happens inside us when we try to create something new.
Alteration. It shows the decomposition happen inside someone’s head when facing a reality.

CG: How would you define your design language?

DP: I mostly use photo manipulation techniques to build my scenes by combining different images and creating a composition that represents the idea. I also use 3D programs to add depth and that extra dimensión to my work.

fantasy
Halloween. A tribute to the day of Halloween.

CG: Any artist who has influenced your work over the years?

DP: I am inspired by artists from all disciplines of art but photography is my prime source of inspiration as the play of light and composition are the key elements that helps me in creating the scenes. In the realm of digital art, few artists who have influenced me are David Fuhrer, Valp Maciej Hajrich, Niklas Lundberg, Stu Ballinger and Mart Biemans.

Death. Skeleton figure is decorated with shapes of colours and textures.
fantasy
Drone. An experimental artwork, character with vibrating textures and colours.

CG: What inspires you to create the fantasy world in your artworks?

DP: In my opinion the inspiration comes from what we usually do, our routines and our lifestyle but what I really like about the fantasy world is tha it’s a way to express what we can think of even though it might not be real. I am influenced by movies and books; science fiction being my favourite genre.

Extraction Point. Inspired from the video game “The Division”. It represents chaos in a lonely city.

CG: What is your design motto that you live by?

DP: My design motto is “Less is more”. Besides being an illustrator I’m also a graphic designer at Woka, a Spanish design agency, and I always take this motto into account. I believe that beauty lies in representing the idea in the most minimalistic way possible as trying to add extra elements only adds to clutter.

Distortion. An interpretation of deformation as a core element.

CG: How do you avoid creative burnout or what do you do in case you feel creatively exhausted?

DP: Experiencing something new makes a difference here but what helps me the most is travelling. I love to break the routine and travel as it is a way to disconnect and experience new cultures and landscapes. This fuels my creative thinking and inspires me.

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A ranker from Sir J. J. Institute of Applied Art, Abhishek Sawant has been using design for good since 2003 and worked with the well known creative minds in the industry like ‘Agnello Dias, Santosh Padhi, Bobby Pawar and Jigar Fernandes’. He has also won 15 abbys, 4 Spikes Asia, 2 Kyoorius blue elephant and a D&AD while working on many prestigious brands like Airtel, Pepsi, Nerolac, Burger King to name a few.


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We all face it! But everyone has their own unique way to come out of it, in this issue we try to explore these different ideas of handling the ‘Creative Burnout’. The most common of all was travelling, through everyone do it in their own unique style. Like Luke Ritchie from South Africa finds the nature and mountains as the best source of inspiration while Sushant Ajnikar says riding his bike and meeting four-legged loyal friends, dogs, on the way is the best way to learn. This issue is bundled with inspirations and suggests you to travel a lot. So, pack your bags and don’t forget to subscribe your copy before you leave!

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After completing his BFA from Shantiniketan in the year 2000, Sukanto Debnath moved to Hyderabad, worked with DQ Entertainment International for a span of about 12 years; rising from animator to animation director to finally leading as a creative director. The newer part of his journey began in Hungary, where he has been satisfying the likes of Facebook, Coca Cola, Penguin Books, Adobe and Renault Portugal to name a few.


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We all face it! But everyone has their own unique way to come out of it, in this issue we try to explore these different ideas of handling the ‘Creative Burnout’. The most common of all was travelling, through everyone do it in their own unique style. Like Luke Ritchie from South Africa finds the nature and mountains as the best source of inspiration while Sushant Ajnikar says riding his bike and meeting four-legged loyal friends, dogs, on the way is the best way to learn. This issue is bundled with inspirations and suggests you to travel a lot. So, pack your bags and don’t forget to subscribe your copy before you leave!

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Graduated as a product designer From Raffles School of Design and Commerce, Australia, and with a Masters in Science in Industrial Design from Art Center College of Design, California. Wishing to implement mechanical language in designing meaningful products, he has worked with a range of products including furniture, lighting, electronics, etc


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We all face it! But everyone has their own unique way to come out of it, in this issue we try to explore these different ideas of handling the ‘Creative Burnout’. The most common of all was travelling, through everyone do it in their own unique style. Like Luke Ritchie from South Africa finds the nature and mountains as the best source of inspiration while Sushant Ajnikar says riding his bike and meeting four-legged loyal friends, dogs, on the way is the best way to learn. This issue is bundled with inspirations and suggests you to travel a lot. So, pack your bags and don’t forget to subscribe your copy before you leave!

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Shreya Gulati

An illustrator and animator, graduated from the Institute of Design, Pune. She is currently working as the Head of design at RKSV. Shreya has settled in Mumbai where she is busy eating street food, ogling old English architecture, playing with stray cats and aggressively avoiding rush hour traffic.


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We all face it! But everyone has their own unique way to come out of it, in this issue we try to explore these different ideas of handling the ‘Creative Burnout’. The most common of all was travelling, through everyone do it in their own unique style. Like Luke Ritchie from South Africa finds the nature and mountains as the best source of inspiration while Sushant Ajnikar says riding his bike and meeting four-legged loyal friends, dogs, on the way is the best way to learn. This issue is bundled with inspirations and suggests you to travel a lot. So, pack your bags and don’t forget to subscribe your copy before you leave!

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A graphic designer and illustrator from Buenos Aires, Argentina. He has been working as a freelance designer since ten years after quitting his job from a video game design company. He realised that he could combine his two passions: travel and art. Thus in 2015, he along with his partner Flor left home and started leading a nomadic life, traveling and working from around the world.


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We all face it! But everyone has their own unique way to come out of it, in this issue we try to explore these different ideas of handling the ‘Creative Burnout’. The most common of all was travelling, through everyone do it in their own unique style. Like Luke Ritchie from South Africa finds the nature and mountains as the best source of inspiration while Sushant Ajnikar says riding his bike and meeting four-legged loyal friends, dogs, on the way is the best way to learn. This issue is bundled with inspirations and suggests you to travel a lot. So, pack your bags and don’t forget to subscribe your copy before you leave!

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Founder of Studio ABD, a Bangalore-based design consultancy firm that specialises in innovation, packaging and environment design, with the intention of creating meaningful and memorable design solutions. Over it’s span of 10 years, the company have worked with various brands such as Colgate, Titan, Fastrack and the likes.


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We all face it! But everyone has their own unique way to come out of it, in this issue we try to explore these different ideas of handling the ‘Creative Burnout’. The most common of all was travelling, through everyone do it in their own unique style. Like Luke Ritchie from South Africa finds the nature and mountains as the best source of inspiration while Sushant Ajnikar says riding his bike and meeting four-legged loyal friends, dogs, on the way is the best way to learn. This issue is bundled with inspirations and suggests you to travel a lot. So, pack your bags and don’t forget to subscribe your copy before you leave!

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Shirin Kekre

A pass out from Sophia Polytechnic, Shirin Kekre started working at BBH, where her mentors helped in developing her work and further moulded her into an idea generator. She continues to experiment with different themes, styles and thoughts while keeping her finished product slightly raw


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We all face it! But everyone has their own unique way to come out of it, in this issue we try to explore these different ideas of handling the ‘Creative Burnout’. The most common of all was travelling, through everyone do it in their own unique style. Like Luke Ritchie from South Africa finds the nature and mountains as the best source of inspiration while Sushant Ajnikar says riding his bike and meeting four-legged loyal friends, dogs, on the way is the best way to learn. This issue is bundled with inspirations and suggests you to travel a lot. So, pack your bags and don’t forget to subscribe your copy before you leave!

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