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Arshad Sayyed
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A Mumbai based designer who captures local flavours in the complexity of a muted colour palette. After graduating from the Sir J.J. Institute of Applied Art, Arshad Sayyed  sharpened his skill set at various ad agencies before starting his own venture named “Wallcano” that specialises in brand identity environmental graphics, space branding and graffiti.


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We all face it! But everyone has their own unique way to come out of it, in this issue we try to explore these different ideas of handling the ‘Creative Burnout’. The most common of all was travelling, through everyone do it in their own unique style. Like Luke Ritchie from South Africa finds the nature and mountains as the best source of inspiration while Sushant Ajnikar says riding his bike and meeting four-legged loyal friends, dogs, on the way is the best way to learn. This issue is bundled with inspirations and suggests you to travel a lot. So, pack your bags and don’t forget to subscribe your copy before you leave!
We all started this year anticipating many things, but nobody thought of life coming to a complete halt. The Coronavirus pandemic has forced every human to re-evaluate their attitude towards nature and life. We also have been forced to lock down in our houses. Though we are no more in the lockdown, still many unfortunate ones continue to lose their lives and livelihoods. This isolation has given many of us the time we needed to finish our long pending tasks. Some have turned to art and craft for peace and solace. While most got relaxed and enjoyed their time with family, others used the focussed time to prepare themselves for the life post lockdown. On the other hand, creative freelancers found it helpful for them to focus and produce more as their work setup usually is within their homes. So, to understand how all the creatives have handled the lockdown, we reached many who have been creating and sharing inspirational artworks during this time. So order your copy if you are looking for inspirational COVID lockdown artworks and some advice on how to handle the current slowdown more creatively!

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Shantiniketan, Hyderabad and now in Scotland, traveling and working in this diverse environment have given Sukanto Debnath a vision to cater to a range of clientele and dip his feet into a global palette of art and culture.

Traveling - Sukanto Debnath
Dogs and People
People in Groups
People Walking
People in Groups. Capturing Hungarian locals with elaborate facial features along with their unique body language.
Traveling - Sukanto Debnath
Illustration for Caravan Magazine India

Not Staying Put

The best part about working in a creative field is coming to something new every morning; Sukanto Debnath has been fortunate enough to have carved his niche in India and abroad for his style of work, designs and unique approach. Starting his career in animation right after his formal education ended to a point where he freelances from Scotland. This global artist has been influenced by his changing surroundings (traveling) and exposure to different cultures.

Jump
Jump
Little Landscapes
Little Landscapes

To-Do or Not To Do?

The eternal question of how much detailing is too much to get simplified through Sukanto’s thought process and his extensively detailed yet sketchy illustrations. With a deep thought behind every piece, clearly represent an experienced animator who is showcasing some lesser-explored human behaviour and body language.

Traveling - Sukanto Debnath
Folk Dancers
Traveling - Sukanto Debnath
Folk Dancers

Traveling - Sukanto Debnath
Folk dancers in red
Traveling - Sukanto Debnath
Folk Dancers

Signature Sukanto

Every artist has his own signature style, something that sets him apart. Sukanto has evidently achieved that through his illustrations and completely understands his zone. Although his work comes under a particular shadow, there isn’t a shred of repetition or dullness. Yes, the tones are muted and there are a lot of portraits but the sheer excellence in capturing the typical human essence is commendable.

Traveling - Sukanto Debnath
Assassin Nuns of Pistachio. Illustration for the book “Assassin Nuns of Pistachio”
Traveling - Sukanto Debnath
Assassin Nuns of Pistachio. Illustration created for a book by Manish Anand, published under Penguin Books
Traveling - Sukanto Debnath
Boys, Tattoos and Wheels. A poster tribute to the cool boys!

Diversity, a True Teacher

Getting a formal degree in art got Sukanto a job as an animator but how he has developed over the years is what elevates him from the regulars; he believes that diversity in the form of travels and exposure to various folk arts and cultures can open up an artist’s mind to think beyond the usual and result in mature design. This particular trait has made him produce very unique characters that are simple and not overly dramatic.

Traveling - Sukanto Debnath
Design Sketches for Veen Land
Traveling - Sukanto Debnath
Design Sketches for Veen Land
Fehervari. Study of a group of people on a winter morning showcasing the dissimilarities
Viz Dev for 3D animated short Ad

Viz Dev for 3D animated short Ad

Survive the Dreaded Block!

Running out of ideas or getting stuck while developing a particular theme is a common challenge that has bothered artists since the beginning of time. Sukanto tackles these by regular breaks and indulging in other forms of art such as movies, which clears his head. He then comes back to his board with a fresh mind and ready to pen down his creative awesomeness! He believes art should be fun, challenging and demanding but still fun.

Traveling - Sukanto Debnath
Couples and Cellphones
Traveling - Sukanto Debnath
Couples and Cellphones
Illustration for Mailfold Blog
Traveling - Sukanto Debnath
Illustration for Mailfold Blog
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Sushant Ajnikar, who draws inspiration from the vivid display of India’s art and colours, a designer in his office, but a parent to homeless little pups on the road, a caring husband to a worried wife, and a rider on the road enjoying the journey, the beauty that is riding. He rides to connect to the reality and more to meet his four-legged friends on the road, who are forgotten and ignored. Hop on to enjoy the ride further!

The design is an amalgamation of myriad things born out of the million thoughts crammed in our gray cells, where inspiration takes form in different shapes and colours. You feed your brain with all kinds of stimuli and when you sit down to churn out something, you never know what may actually trigger a thought. Riding gives me every stimulus I may ever need and hones my creativity. And that’s just one thing.

1. Riding Teaches To Be Disciplined

Both on and off the road. Discipline doesn’t curb creativity but it makes sure that what you intend to do, actually sees fruition. Learn to have discipline in doing my research. Discipline in following a plan and going about it or atleast try to.


2. To Be Brave

Be brave enough to ditch routine, and take on a new route. Try something new. Learn something different.



3. To Be Flexible

I cannot ride with the assumption that my life’s going to be sorted with all the facilities I want. I have to be flexible enough to adjust to any kind of adversity or scenario or surprises. Bingo for design (a designer). Flexibility is creativity’s best friend and a creative person should always be ready to adapt.


4. To Get Hands Dirty and Be Humble

I cannot do 16,000 km without getting some elbow grease, without sitting in the mud on a hot summer’s day, drinking water from a tap. Similarly, I will never succeed as a designer if I don’t do the groundwork. I need to start at the bottom, to get to the very top. No shortcuts here.

5. To Accept Fears

I am human and being scared of the unknown is only natural. But I need to accept it so that I can resolve it. In design, if something is challenging enough to scare me, I should be able to address it, instead of sitting on it, pretending to be cool and making unnecessary mistakes, as no one likes a smartass who knows nothing.


6. Makes You A Keen Observer

I observe everything. I now notice things that I wouldn’t have earlier and there is such joy in observing. The more I observe, the better I am able to sketch my memories out, the more I am able to adapt them to the design, if at all.



7. Teaches To Embrace Failure

When you are on the road, you may have these goals that you set out to achieve. However, you may not see its fulfillment, and the reasons cannot be controlled. And that’s completely okay. The best part of failure is that you get a second chance to do it all over again. You know what to expect then, what to do or not do. The same applies to design rejection and failure is as much a part of this industry as glory is. I need to be able to accept, learn and move on. You almost always end up doing better.


8. Riding Teaches To Keep it Simple

Don’t complicate stuff. Ask any self-respecting designer what they think is the best design and simple will almost always being one of the words that will crop up. Simple isn’t boring, simple can be adventurous, simple can be fancy, simple can be exciting, simple can be anything, it’s just how simply you are able to convey or do what you want to do

Published in Issue 33

We all face it! But everyone has their own unique way to come out of it, in this issue we try to explore different ideas of handling the ‘Creative Burnout’. The most common of all was #travelling, through everyone do it in their own unique style. Like Luke Ritchie from South Africa finds the nature and mountains as the best source of inspiration while Sushant Ajnikar says riding his bike and meeting four-legged loyal friends, dogs, on the way is the best way to learn. So, pack your bags and don’t forget to subscribe your copy before you leave!

 

Order Your Copy!
LATEST RELEASE
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Creative Gaga - Issue 49

 

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Every designer develops a style, which can be seen through his or her work. No matter which medium you choose to work in, it is this unique point of view that gives an identity to the artwork. Shreya Gulati gives an insight about her bold and quirky work and delves deep into the process that helps her achieve this style.

Versatility
Versatility
Upstox Branding.

Deconstructing The Subject.

Shreya enjoys in fragmenting the illustration and having fun with each part as it allows her the freedom to create something different each time. Working on individual parts rather than the whole gives her the bold, clean and quirky style that is clearly visible in her illustrations. Bright colours, striking graphics and playful characteristics are synonymous with her style. She loves creating characters and building stories around them. Designing contains many permutations and combinations of applying art and problem solving methodologies. The vastness and the limitless possibilities fascinate her and this lends very unconventional and experimental expressions in her designs.

Versatility
Versatility
Still from the Video ‘Financial Management’.

Versatility is the Key.

She does not believe in any one particular style but likes to experiment with different palettes, treatments and line work according to the subject matter. Not being bound by any precondition and taking the flexibility to explore different mediums and have fun with it makes her each piece unique. Moving effortlessly through mediums her versatile style of work has taken her through illustrating a children’s book to designing an app for stock trading.

Versatility
Pseudo Sapera.
Versatility
Future is Female

Versatility
Pride

Inspiration from the Subconscious.

Inspiration is not something that is acquired but it is the objects, visuals, words or anything that influences you and seeps into your memory. She draws inspiration from memory, sometimes by referring to her Tumblr dashboard which is constantly evolving as she travels and records the inspiring things that she sees around her. Sometimes she also refers to the artworks of the artists she adores. She loves drawing human forms, especially female, mostly not clothed. Human anatomy and sex are the two subjects she enjoys exploring the most.

Versatility
Pop Stickers.
Musings

Design is Therapeutic.

She doesn’t have a defined design process but lays emphasis on research and scavenges for information. Whether it is watching a movie, reading an article or a book everything influences her in some way or the other. At times, the trigger is found right away if not then she analyses the data thoroughly and doesn’t stop till the cue is found. Solution lies in understanding the problem in depth and drawing a clear brief. It is sheer joy when your target consumer is happy with the product and you see your designs being accepted and becoming a part of your users. She enjoys designing thoroughly and finds it very healing and therapeutic.

Versatility
Obot Character.
Anamolies

Asia Map

Seeing Excellent Work Pushes.

In case of a creative burnout or when she feels creatively exhausted, she loves to surf the Internet to see some brilliant work. At times, images, visuals or powerful words that might not be directly connected but seem to have an impact, infuse great ideas. Being exposed to the great work being produced inspires and influences to push the bar further. Seeing good work inspires her but when she finds some extraordinary work it motivates her to push harder and work to achieve greater heights. The amazing and boundless world of design keeps unfolding in mysterious ways inspiring to work more and more.

Genesis
Imperator
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Harshvardhan Kadam faces multi-fold burnout; it can be creative, physical, mental and also sometimes emotional. He maintains, that burnout means you need an urgent break!

But a break from exactly what? Are you tired of working back to back? Or just low on enthusiasm? Or have nothing left to express? Or just a self-projected burnout? All these reasons are okay long as you know how to deal with it. Harshvardhan shares his ways to tackle the burnout.

I was really young when my father told me that whenever you get bored of academic assignments, which were very narrow for exploration and didn’t cater to your complete potential, then just switch to some other medium of expression.

This made me look at films, photography, adventure sports, biking and even cooking. And that simple advice makes me explore everything I find exciting. Which does not just enhance my personal work but also the kind of creative individuals I got connected with, the friendships and collaborations I’ve done so far, which are worth cherishing for rest of my life.


Nowadays, the Internet is as constructive as destructive it is,

One’s focus plays a vital role in increasing their powers of expression. But you lose your focus and you feel the burnout; it literally means to empty your learning and restarting afresh.

To keep up with the new interactive world, self-assessment of individual potential, self-critiquing and analysing old work, are some of the important steps in any artistic processes. These can be done alone or even with your trusted companion who can tell you that what you’ve made is a shit when it is, and you do not feel taken aback. As accepting your weakness is also a part of climbing the ladder of growth.


Burnout has taught me, to be honest, to be grounded and appreciate all the beautiful things in life.

For me, this phase is as good as the one in which I create. The universe of possibilities otherwise will remain less explored. I do not bind myself to a term of an artist known for just one thing. For me, achievement has never been an ambition. That has made me accept moments as they come.


So, whenever I’m done with murals I get back to my cave and illustrate digitally or sketch on paper and that’s how I keep my energy levels high.

I have a Jaw Harp that I play, to switch with some old and new tools like iPad, sketchbook, a few empty walls, canvases, a couple of apps and gadgets I have invested in and that is how the life goes on

Published in Issue 33

We all face it! But everyone has their own unique way to come out of it, in this issue we try to explore different ideas of handling the ‘Creative Burnout’. The most common of all was #travelling, through everyone do it in their own unique style. Like Luke Ritchie from South Africa finds the nature and mountains as the best source of inspiration while Sushant Ajnikar says riding his bike and meeting four-legged loyal friends, dogs, on the way is the best way to learn. So, pack your bags and don’t forget to subscribe your copy before you leave!

 

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LATEST RELEASE
CURRENT ISSUE
Creative Gaga - Issue 49

 

Arnab Biswas, a true citizen of the world, who was born near the Indian-Bhutan border, grew up in Kolkata, post graduated in New Delhi and currently living with his Polish wife in Germany, is fluent in English, Hindi, Bengali and learning German and know how to order his beer in Polish. He shares, how travel has helped him be what he is today!

Travel makes you more open-minded and hence a better person. The more I immerse myself into a completely different culture the more I feel the benefits of that interaction in my work. As an advertising professional, I always hunt for a human insight, the more diverse the better. You can’t just google it.

I believe, travelling should push your limits and put you in challenging situations, which teaches you to think creatively, especially if you don’t know the local language. In many ways, it helps you identify who you really are.

Travelling in a foreign country can be very eye opening. It is absolutely crucial for the creative growth. A changed environment stimulates your brain in ways, which wouldn’t be if you stayed in the same place. I definitely get revitalised by simply experiencing new things, culture, food etc. It’s also an easy way to get out of a creative block since a livelier mind is a more creative one.

I recommend you to get your hands dirty and go to an offbeat place, though chilling at a resort may help you unwind for a while, but mixing with the locals and completely immersing yourself in the culture is what really unlocks the creativity. In the best case, live in that country for a while. Although going abroad is obviously not a possibility for everyone but it doesn’t have to be, India is diverse enough, it does work as long as you keep an open mind.

Also before travelling, work delivery and deadlines always need to be sorted. As you can never be at peace if you have unfinished work back in office so try to complete it to the best of your abilities before leaving for a longer journey. I try to plan everything to the last detail but it is easier said than done because if you work in advertising, things are changing constantly. It also does help a lot if you have supporting colleagues/bosses who step in and help you out.

Published in Issue 33

We all face it! But everyone has their own unique way to come out of it, in this issue we try to explore these different ideas of handling the ‘Creative Burnout’. The most common of all was travelling, through everyone do it in their own unique style. Like Luke Ritchie from South Africa finds the nature and mountains as the best source of inspiration while Sushant Ajnikar says riding his bike and meeting four-legged loyal friends, dogs, on the way is the best way to learn. This issue is bundled with inspirations and suggests you to travel a lot. So, pack your bags and don’t forget to subscribe your copy before you leave!

 

Order Your Copy!
LATEST RELEASE
CURRENT ISSUE
Creative Gaga - Issue 49

 

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David Padilla enjoys creating the imaginary world, which comes from the reality. He is heavily influenced by photography and science fiction. He likes the fantasy world as it can help you turn your imaginary thoughts into a reality. He also talks about what inspires him to create this surreal world.

Alteration. It shows the decomposition happen inside someone’s head when facing a reality.

CG: How would you define your design language?

David. I mostly use photo manipulation techniques to build my scenes by combining different images and creating a composition that represents the idea. I also use 3D programs to add depth and that extra dimensión to my work.

fantasy
Halloween. A tribute to the day of Halloween.

fantasy
Brainstorm. An explosion of ideas happens inside us when we try to create something new.

CG: Any artist who has influenced your work over the years?

David. I am inspired by artists from all disciplines of art but photography is my prime source of inspiration as the play of light and composition are the key elements that helps me in creating the scenes. In the realm of digital art, few artists who have influenced me are David Fuhrer, Valp Maciej Hajrich, Niklas Lundberg, Stu Ballinger and Mart Biemans.

Death. Skeleton figure is decorated with shapes of colours and textures.

CG: What inspires you to create the fantasy world in your artworks?

David. In my opinion the inspiration comes from what we usually do, our routines and our lifestyle but what I really like about the fantasy world is tha it’s a way to express what we can think of even though it might not be real. I am influenced by movies and books; science fiction being my favourite genre.

Extraction Point. Inspired from the video game “The Division”. It represents chaos in a lonely city.

fantasy
Drone. An experimental artwork, character with vibrating textures and colours.

CG: What is your design motto that you live by?

David. My design motto is “Less is more”. Besides being an illustrator I’m also a graphic designer at Woka, a Spanish design agency, and I always take this motto into account. I believe that beauty lies in representing the idea in the most minimalistic way possible as trying to add extra elements only adds to clutter.

Distortion. An interpretation of deformation as a core element.

CG: How do you avoid creative burnout or what do you do in case you feel creatively exhausted?

David. Experiencing something new makes a difference here but what helps me the most is travelling. I love to break the routine and travel as it is a way to disconnect and experience new cultures and landscapes. This fuels my creative thinking and inspires me.

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Abhishek Sawant
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A ranker from Sir J. J. Institute of Applied Art, Abhishek Sawant has been using design for good since 2003 and worked with the well known creative minds in the industry like ‘Agnello Dias, Santosh Padhi, Bobby Pawar and Jigar Fernandes’. He has also won 15 abbys, 4 Spikes Asia, 2 Kyoorius blue elephant and a D&AD while working on many prestigious brands like Airtel, Pepsi, Nerolac, Burger King to name a few.


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We all face it! But everyone has their own unique way to come out of it, in this issue we try to explore these different ideas of handling the ‘Creative Burnout’. The most common of all was travelling, through everyone do it in their own unique style. Like Luke Ritchie from South Africa finds the nature and mountains as the best source of inspiration while Sushant Ajnikar says riding his bike and meeting four-legged loyal friends, dogs, on the way is the best way to learn. This issue is bundled with inspirations and suggests you to travel a lot. So, pack your bags and don’t forget to subscribe your copy before you leave!

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Sukanto Debnath
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After completing his BFA from Shantiniketan in the year 2000, Sukanto Debnath moved to Hyderabad, worked with DQ Entertainment International for a span of about 12 years; rising from animator to animation director to finally leading as a creative director. The newer part of his journey began in Hungary, where he has been satisfying the likes of Facebook, Coca Cola, Penguin Books, Adobe and Renault Portugal to name a few. Currently freelancing and living in Scotland, United Kingdom.


Featured In


We all face it! But everyone has their own unique way to come out of it, in this issue we try to explore these different ideas of handling the ‘Creative Burnout’. The most common of all was travelling, through everyone do it in their own unique style. Like Luke Ritchie from South Africa finds the nature and mountains as the best source of inspiration while Sushant Ajnikar says riding his bike and meeting four-legged loyal friends, dogs, on the way is the best way to learn. This issue is bundled with inspirations and suggests you to travel a lot. So, pack your bags and don’t forget to subscribe your copy before you leave!

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Find Sukanto Debnath Here


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CURRENT ISSUE
Creative Gaga - Issue 49

 

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Graduated as a product designer From Raffles School of Design and Commerce, Australia, and with a Masters in Science in Industrial Design from Art Center College of Design, California. Wishing to implement mechanical language in designing meaningful products, he has worked with a range of products including furniture, lighting, electronics, etc


Featured In


We all face it! But everyone has their own unique way to come out of it, in this issue we try to explore these different ideas of handling the ‘Creative Burnout’. The most common of all was travelling, through everyone do it in their own unique style. Like Luke Ritchie from South Africa finds the nature and mountains as the best source of inspiration while Sushant Ajnikar says riding his bike and meeting four-legged loyal friends, dogs, on the way is the best way to learn. This issue is bundled with inspirations and suggests you to travel a lot. So, pack your bags and don’t forget to subscribe your copy before you leave!

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Find Him Here


LATEST RELEASE
CURRENT ISSUE
Creative Gaga - Issue 49

 

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