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The challenge of capturing the energy and excitement when illustrating for sport is difficult to achieve. Shreedhar Sutar’s illustrations not only achieve it but also appeal broadly with an optimistic tone. He dwells on his techniques of maintaining that energy in each sport star while bringing character to life. He takes us through his processes.

Energy

Step 01

Draw on a paper sheet to get the hint about the main force and structure of the drawing. Later took the rough drawing to Photoshop and starts working on light source and shadow in outline with the help of Wacom tablet.

Energy

Step 02

With calligraphy brushes applied basic shade for a base colour. Here it’s better to know a grey scale in detail, as the skin style will be very important for the final output. Skin tone is prepared by overlapping of multiple layers, which makes skin look more realistic. Used the same process for the hairs & clothes too, using dark and middle tones with some highlight. For beard used stippling style to get the realistic feel using both mouse and pen tablet.

Energy

Step 03

The clothes are as important as skin to create that realistic look. Drapery and fold have been achieved by creating shade and highlight. For bright reflections kept the path open with white colour. To make the clothes more appealing also embedded logo and text on the T-shirt. Also kept a single light source to create the depth in illustration. Used the same process for other objects like a hockey stick, socks and shoes. To work further merged all layers into one.

Step 04

Used smudge tool at 60% opacity to create stokes which shows the force behind the action. Outlines may look a bit blur after using the smudge tool, so created a black outline around to maintain the sharpness. Additionally applied a motion blur effect to half of the image to achieve speed.

Step 05

To make the illustration more believable used the watercolour splatters, droplets, flow and strokes to portray the sweat, as it would be an important part of the illustration. Applied watercolour flows and white spatters to merge the background and the character. Then finally applied shadows to create the depth.

Step 06

The final illustration achieved.

Published in Issue 28

This Illustration Special is best to know why and how illustration as a popular medium is taking the design world by storm! From evolution of illustrations to its place in the world today, renowned designers and illustrators like Abhishek Singh, Mukesh Singh, Archan Nair, Alicia Souza, Raj Khatri with some international talent such as Fil Dunsky from Russia, Iain Macarthur and Richard Field from UK, who live and breathe illustration, would be the right people to gain some insight from. With many more talents to explore with great insights and excellent techniques, again a fully packed issue is waiting to amaze you!

 

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We live in a world where everyone around is a character, playing a role for some reason. Art Director, Saurabh Chandekar, takes notice of every day people and reveals his interpretation of them using contorted and distorted illustration styles. Here he talks about this unique skill he’s got.

The Modern Buddha - Illustration Graphic Designing - Creativegaga
THE MODERN BUDDHA.
The Evil Spirit - Illustration Graphic Designing - Creativegaga
THE MODERN BUDDHA.
KAMALA - -Illustration Graphic Designing - Creativegaga
KAMALA. A gorgeous lady lotus seller standing with a sense of grace is “Kamala".

Making it More than Just a Hobby.

The first step for any artist or designer is to realise that they ha ve the skill. And if it is a yes, then you must evaluate how much you enjoy it. And depending on what your answers are, sets the course of whether you’ll be making it a profession or not. From drawing doodles in notebooks when we were kids, only some grow up to study design at university level. Once the platform is set, the world is all yours. Every designer must find a niche, whether it’s abstract or the real world around you, from the emotions in your heart to the very real fruit seller on the street, it’s all about how you want to represent the world through your designs.

Attitude Woman Illustration Graphic Designing - Creativegaga
A WOMAN OF ATTITUDE. Treading through a station like she owns the whole road. “A Woman of Attitude” triumphs all.
The Intertwined Chaos - Illustration Graphic Designing - Creativegaga
THE INTERTWINED CHAOS.
The Story of Long -Illustration Graphic Designing - Creativegaga
THE STORY OF LONG.

Exaggerate because the World Does So.

The world is full of exaggerations, so why not use that in your designs? We live in a world where people sometimes pretend to be more than what they are. A unique take on the world can be achieved by using illustrations to disclose the reality of exaggerations. It’s important to be mindful to not encroach into the caricature territory, as that form of design is all about appearance. Try and explore how every person is. Depicting that using contorted and distorted shapes is one way.

Chunky -Illustration Graphic Designing - Creativegaga
CHUNKY. “Chunky” is a fat boy walking on the street who goes ‘awe’ over a dog.
The Black Magician - Illustration Graphic Designing - Creativegaga
THE BLACK MAGICIAN.
The Sister Love - -Illustration Graphic Designing - Creativegaga
THE SISTER LOVE.
Iqbal Chacha -Illustration Graphic Designing - Creativegaga

Step Out of Structure.

Design comes from the heart irrespective of the place or ambience. Try not to stick to a particular canvas or tool. Be it a marker, a rotring pen or just a simple pen, it’s the idea and observation that creates.

Kashitrance -Illustration Graphic Designing - Creativegaga
Illustration Graphic Designing - Creativegaga

Illustrations are No Longer for the Back Pages of Your Pads.

In the net-savvy world, where it’s become to easy to obtain ready-made art, the scope of illustration has been the widest thus far. People, companies and brands understand the importance and value in investing in illustrations, and therefore hand crafted techniques are in demand.

KISHOR - Illustration Graphic Designing - Creativegaga

Read more Blogs On – Graphics Design

The Abstract Krishna -Illustration Graphic Designing - Creativegaga
Illustration Special - Issue 28 - Illustration Graphic Designing - Creativegaga

Published in Issue 28

This Illustration Special is best to know why and how illustration as a popular medium is taking the design world by storm! From evolution of illustrations to its place in the world today, renowned designers and illustrators like Abhishek Singh, Mukesh Singh, Archan Nair, Alicia Souza, Raj Khatri with some international talent such as Fil Dunsky from Russia, Iain Macarthur and Richard Field from UK, who live and breathe illustration, would be the right people to gain some insight from. With many more talents to explore with great insights and excellent techniques, again a fully packed issue is waiting to amaze you!

 

Order Your Copy!

After a diploma in Multimedia, Bachelor of IT and a diploma in special effects at MAYA, he has been using his knowledge to improve advertising in India. Working for brands like Kingfisher Beer, Royal Enfield, Peter England, CCD, East Bengal Football Club etc. have made him part designer and part artist, helping him at his current workplace namely furniture brand Urban Ladder.


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This Illustration Special is best to know why and how illustration as a popular medium is taking the design world by storm! From evolution of illustrations to its place in the world today, renowned designers and illustrators like Abhishek Singh, Mukesh Singh, Archan Nair, Alicia Souza, Raj Khatri with some international talent such as Fil Dunsky from Russia, Iain Macarthur and Richard Field from UK, who live and breathe illustration, would be the right people to gain some insight from. With many more talents to explore with great insights and excellent techniques, again a fully packed issue is waiting to amaze you!

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In a time when design and artworks surround us all, the importance of doing things differently is what counts. Illustrator, Iain Macarthur from England, discovered a unique way to marry pencil and pen to create intricate patterns and lines that result in surreal outcomes.

CG: Your designs are surreal and make use of carefully crafted patterns. What would you say is your illustration style and how did you work towards achieving it?

Iain: My surreal illustration style is very diverse, sometimes it can be a combination of elegant photo-realistic drawings or wildlife animals created in organic patterns. I began drawing in this style during my college years when I was experimenting pencil with other materials such as paint, charcoal and ink. When I introduced ink into my pencil drawings I immediately became addicted to using it into my work. The reason why I was experimenting pencil with other material is that I wanted to create a unique and unusual look to my work instead of just pencil all the time. The combination works magic.

CG: Your designs are dark and mysterious in appeal as well. What do you generally try and communicate through your designs? Is there a story involved in your illustrations or is it merely a depiction of your imagination?

Iain: Most of the pieces I make don’t necessarily have a story behind them. I get a lot of inspiration from nature, wildlife and traditional native patterns and weave them into my work. Women also inspire me, and I enjoy drawing their eyes to make them look mysterious. When I merge the patterns into my female subjects I like to create it as a decorative element like jewellery or a headdress as I think that form works really well with the pencil drawings.

CG: You seem to use simple tools while crafting your designs. Tell us about what tools and techniques you use in your designing process.

Iain: I mostly use pencils and ink, usually pigment liner pens such as Staedtler pens or Uni pens. They generate really thin and delicate lines that help me draw intricate patterns.

CG: How has illustration evolved over the years? What other potential do you see in this design form that hasn’t been discovered yet? How do you plan on using your illustrations to enhance user experience?

Iain: This illustration form can be used in many ways as it’s quite a decorative and presentable style in more ways than one. The style can be printed on products such as clothing, posters and skateboards and can also be used as tattoos, to name a few.

Published in Issue 28

This Illustration Special is best to know why and how illustration as a popular medium is taking the design world by storm! From evolution of illustrations to its place in the world today, renowned designers and illustrators like Abhishek Singh, Mukesh Singh, Archan Nair, Alicia Souza, Raj Khatri with some international talent such as Fil Dunsky from Russia, Iain Macarthur and Richard Field from UK, who live and breathe illustration, would be the right people to gain some insight from. With many more talents to explore with great insights and excellent techniques, again a fully packed issue is waiting to amaze you!

 

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In today’s international world, being a freelancer means being available to the entire world. No matter where you’re from, one needs to adapt to various clients and cultures to create a portfolio. Fil Dunsky, from Russia, with almost nothing Russian in his designs, uses humour and pun to make his illustrations work for brands all across. A little rendezvous gives more insight on how he creates what he does.

CG: Your illustrations are cartoonish in appeal. What is your style of illustrations? What would you call it? And what have been your inspirations during your design journey?

Fil Dunsky: For many designers, type of style is undefined. I don’ t know what my style is. All I know is that I put in a lot of love in my design, bake it and make it scrumptious so that the end user enjoys it. Through my design journey, my inspirations have been Oksana Grivina and Andrey Gordeev. Oksana was the first digital freelance illustrator I saw that mesmerised me. Ever since, I’ve been inspired by her work and learning her style and technique. And Andrey is my best friend who was the reason behind me leaving an office designer job to become a freelancer.

CG: From the look of it, your designs have a story. Where do you get such stories? 

Fil Dunsky: How designs manifest depends a lot on the task. Sometimes, the briefs are actually instructions that give less room for experimentation, and hence one simply has to recreate what the client imagines. No matter what the brief, the steps to arrive at an idea always remain the same. Boil the brief in your mind, sketch some ideas and then get one of them approved by the client before the chosen one is carefully finished. As for where I get my stories, well nature and creation are inspiring itself. Just look around. This world is so beautiful and full of stories, isn’t it?

CG: What would you say is ‘Russian’ about your illustrations? How has designing in Russia, enhanced your illustration style? How do you make your designs to relate to an international audience?

Fil Dunsky: I don’t think I have any Russian influence in my designs. I have never felt Russian, especially when the world has colluded and boundaries have been merged due to the internet revolution. Deep down inside, we are all international and there is no division that shows up in designs. Cultural influence comes from the client side at times, I feel. When I’ve drawn for clients from the UAE or China, they have specific cultural elements that need to be included. But that does not mean a designer needs to change his or her style.

CG: Your designs have a lot of elements in play. How do you create harmony amongst so many elements? How do you add your personal signature to all your designs?

Fil Dunsky: I’m just doing what I like, there is no struggle in that and nothing serious, pure humour and fun. I’m just playing.

Published in Issue 28

This Illustration Special is best to know why and how illustration as a popular medium is taking the design world by storm! From evolution of illustrations to its place in the world today, renowned designers and illustrators like Abhishek Singh, Mukesh Singh, Archan Nair, Alicia Souza, Raj Khatri with some international talent such as Fil Dunsky from Russia, Iain Macarthur and Richard Field from UK, who live and breathe illustration, would be the right people to gain some insight from. With many more talents to explore with great insights and excellent techniques, again a fully packed issue is waiting to amaze you!

 

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Nature is blessed with a wonderful variety of things and one that captures the eyes of many are the animals. Created in various forms and having unique patterns, Richard Field, illustrates them in his own style using worldwide cultural influences. He elaborates on his nature inspired designs.

inspired
The Dark Owl.
inspired
The Travelling Turtle.

CG: What is the story behind what you do? How did you discover your talent and how did you work towards making it more than that? What were your inspirations? What were some challenges you had to overcome?

RF: Field-inspired, a play on the words ‘feel inspired’, is my name as an Illustrator. Having been inspired by so many things, it’s nice to do some inspiring of my own. My collection started when I was trying to make a bit of extra cash selling flash sheets to tattoo parlors around South London. Tattooists are always on the look out for new artwork to display in their shops. I used to work on black and white illustrations inspired by a variety of cultures around the world. My Native American, Mãori and folk art inspired illustrations caught the eye of a few people on Facebook and I decided to start adding colours and working on a new collection inspired by some of the nature’s most iconic animals.

inspired
The Bull.
inspired
The Stag Prince.

CG: Animals play a central role in your designs. Can you throw some more light as to why? How did you find inspiration in animals and their patterns?

RF: Isn’t wildlife the most wonderful thing we have on this planet? I’ve definitely chosen the best subject to illustrate. The shapes and patterns that it forms never cease to amaze me. It’s a great achievement to be able to put your own stamp on animals we see so often. I enjoy trying to add a bit of personality to them – the ‘Wise’ Lion or the ‘Truthful’ tiger. Nature is full of so much hidden beauty, the idea is to try to encourage people to take a closer look at the artwork and look beyond to read the halftones and patterns.

inspired
African Buffalo.
inspired
The Mountain Ram.

CG: Your designs have a striking contrast against black, creating an illuminated look and feel. How does that enhance the design?

RF: In my current collection, I work on black using a similar colour theme across all prints. By using strong, bold colours on black I hope to encourage the user to look closer at the detail. It’s not easy working on black, sometimes the colours can get a bit lost during the printing process – but I love the end result. Hopefully, people like how the artwork jumps off the canvas.

inspired
The African Elephant.
inspired
The Truthful Tiger.

Published in Issue 28

This Illustration Special is best to know why and how illustration as a popular medium is taking the design world by storm! From evolution of illustrations to its place in the world today, renowned designers and illustrators like Abhishek Singh, Mukesh Singh, Archan Nair, Alicia Souza, Raj Khatri with some international talent such as Fil Dunsky from Russia, Iain Macarthur and Richard Field from UK, who live and breathe illustration, would be the right people to gain some insight from. With many more talents to explore with great insights and excellent techniques, again a fully packed issue is waiting to amaze you!

 

Order Your Copy!

Richard Field

Inspired by the beauty of the world around, Richard Field is an Illustrator from United Kingdom. In his latest collection, he puts his own stamp on some of the world’s most beautiful animals using layers of vector patterns and halftones.


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This Illustration Special is best to know why and how illustration as a popular medium is taking the design world by storm! From evolution of illustrations to its place in the world today, renowned designers and illustrators like Abhishek Singh, Mukesh Singh, Archan Nair, Alicia Souza, Raj Khatri with some international talent such as Fil Dunsky from Russia, Iain Macarthur and Richard Field from UK, who live and breathe illustration, would be the right people to gain some insight from. With many more talents to explore with great insights and excellent techniques, again a fully packed issue is waiting to amaze you!

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Faces are an interesting subject, and often we come across one that has an expression telling a story. Vivek Arvind Mandrekar saw one such story in  facial expression of Amitabh Bachchan and captured it by means of a digital painting. Below, he takes us through the various steps in order to tell and capture such tales.

Vivek_Feature - Amitabh Bachchan

SKETCH & BLOCKING

It is an important step to follow before starting any painting as the image size will be little heavy to change anything later. So firstly, a basic raw sketch is drawn on a colour background which is further blocked through flat colours for defining shadows and highlights in different layers while keeping sketch as a guideline. The required areas are then dabbed for a smooth blending.

Vivek_Feature - Amitabh Bachchan
Vivek_Feature - Amitabh Bachchan

SKIN

Step 01: This part is pretty straightforward, where blocked shadows and highlights are employed using basic selective skin tones.

 

Step 02: Further, various layers are painted using customised textured brush to obtain the final skin texture.

 

Step 03: The last thing missing from the skin is the realistic texture of pores and wrinkles. This is established using a scattered brush spread. Here, one must zoom in and out beyond actual pixels by studying the tiniest of areas to observe minute details with paint stroke of a customised textured brush. This is also one of the most time-consuming steps but makes all the difference.

Vivek_Feature - Amitabh Bachchan
Vivek_Feature - Amitabh Bachchan
Vivek_Feature - Amitabh Bachchan

BEARD

Step 01: The beard area is under painted by blocking the base with a hard brush. Each strand is then painted by changing the size, angle, roundness and hardness of the brush with each stroke.

 

Step 02: The same is continued by altering the opacity and dynamics of the brush and by zooming in further to work on individual hair strands. This is one of the toughest parts to execute.

Vivek_Feature - Amitabh Bachchan
Vivek_Feature - Amitabh Bachchan

HAIR

Step 01: For this part of the painting, both dark and light base is used as the base of the hair colour. Like the beard, here too each strand is stroked by changing opacity, angle and roundness of the brush.

 

Step 02: The base of each hair strand is then further built by applying a customised textured brush and painting each strand with a small hard brush to obtain the desired details.

Vivek_Feature - Amitabh Bachchan
Vivek_Feature - Amitabh Bachchan

HAND

Here, basic blocking with shadows and highlights is used followed by rendering to create soft focus effect with the help of a soft brush.

Vivek_Feature - Amitabh Bachchan
Vivek_Feature - Amitabh Bachchan

SHIRT

Once the beard and hands start taking shape, continue painting the shirt by filling in the creases with shadows and tones to achieve a proper compilation. Use light and dark tones to render the folds and blend with a soft brush. And finally, for thread stitch finish, use a medium hard sized brush.

Vivek_Feature - Amitabh Bachchan
Vivek_Feature - Amitabh Bachchan

EYES & SPECTACLES

Step 01: The eyebrows, eyelids, iris and pupils are painted using a basic brush by adding textures and colours. This is then blended with different layers and softhard brushes by masking the glass. The glasses are not painted in this instance. Instead, a pen tool is used to draw and clip mask, after which the edges of the glasses are painted.

 

Step 02: Once the eye basics are ready, the veins are painted and a sense of depth is added using a technique of zooming into each detail. Following this, the edges of the glasses are painted in. A great person to get inspired for spectacle painting techniques can be obtained by following the work of SheridanJ on her Deviantart page.

Vivek_Feature - Amitabh Bachchan
Vivek_Feature - Amitabh Bachchan

FINAL PHOTO

Once the painting of Amitabh Bachchan is ready, it is flattened and various dodge-burn tools have experimented for highlights and shadows. Furthermore, colour temperatures, balance and curves are also adjusted. Lastly, the background is worked upon through customised textured brushes and grading colours to a depth of field.

Vivek_Feature - Amitabh Bachchan

Published in Issue 28

This Illustration Special is best to know why and how illustration as a popular medium is taking the design world by storm! From evolution of illustrations to its place in the world today, renowned designers and illustrators like Abhishek Singh, Mukesh Singh, Archan Nair, Alicia Souza, Raj Khatri with some international talent such as Fil Dunsky from Russia, Iain Macarthur and Richard Field from UK, who live and breathe illustration, would be the right people to gain some insight from. With many more talents to explore with great insights and excellent techniques, again a fully packed issue is waiting to amaze you!

 

Order Your Copy!

Vivek Arvind Mandrekar

Vivek Arvind Mandrekar is a self-taught artist and a Senior Art Director for movie posters.


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This Illustration Special is best to know why and how illustration as a popular medium is taking the design world by storm! From evolution of illustrations to its place in the world today, renowned designers and illustrators like Abhishek Singh, Mukesh Singh, Archan Nair, Alicia Souza, Raj Khatri with some international talent such as Fil Dunsky from Russia, Iain Macarthur and Richard Field from UK, who live and breathe illustration, would be the right people to gain some insight from. With many more talents to explore with great insights and excellent techniques, again a fully packed issue is waiting to amaze you!

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In today’s digital world, traditional techniques and practices of illustrating and painting are getting lost. For example, who gets to see oil glazed on canvas in a design that is not antique? Anand Radhakrishnan, an illustrator, explores traditional mediums to express the mysteries and to enlighten the darkness that people and the world carry with them.

Illustrations from A personal project, Chaavi.
Ink drawing for inktober.

Let the subject take control.

Style of a designer is determined by the content and subject that the artwork contains. Most believe that designers have their unique style, which some have, but the idea is to not pick a style and stick to it through out, but to make it a journey of discovery and surprise.

Value study in graphite.

A designer is always attracted by expression.

An expression is what designers are looking for when it comes to feeling inspired and figuring out the soul of their design. Nothing can beat expressions that human faces and body radiate. Every little pose or nuance says something about the state of mind of that very person, and as a designer, it’s fun to play with it. Look anywhere and you will see the outside world connect with your inner-self and it’s when they meet, the best magic happens.

Cover image of my project called ‘III’.

Sometimes, the old is the way to go.

Digital has changed designers and the way people look at artworks these days. But often working with traditional media is favoured in order to break the clutter and stand out to enlighten. Oil, ink and graphite are some favourites that can be combined with techniques like hatching, alla prima painting using oil, glazing, collages etc.

Value study in graphite.

Messy is what they call neat.

Upon first glance, any subject one observes has a sense of mystery and unknown about them. Those dark hollow spaces that our minds can’t fill, translate into an uncomfortable feeling that can be pronounced in design using patchy and messy textures. So even if the subject in your artwork is communicating the same thought that designer wishes to portray, the way it is expressed also counts. This makes the artwork more tactile and organic, which enlighten the viewer.

Illustration for A college project. Chaavi.

Published in Issue 28

This Illustration Special is best to know why and how illustration as a popular medium is taking the design world by storm! From evolution of illustrations to its place in the world today, renowned designers and illustrators like Abhishek Singh, Mukesh Singh, Archan Nair, Alicia Souza, Raj Khatri with some international talent such as Fil Dunsky from Russia, Iain Macarthur and Richard Field from UK, who live and breathe illustration, would be the right people to gain some insight from. With many more talents to explore with great insights and excellent techniques, again a fully packed issue is waiting to amaze you!

 

Order Your Copy!

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