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It’s a digital age, one doesn’t need a subject to pose before them for hours, simply a photograph is enough. Graphic design student, Sri Harsha Andukuri takes us through a step by step guide on making a digital portrait of any famous celebrity, in this case, Hollywood’s own Scarlett Johansson.

Step 1

Fixing the Canvas and Preparing the Outline

The process of portrait begins by fixing of the canvas. This is achieved through Photoshop, where a new file is opened with an A3 size. This is followed by creating an outline of the image using a red colour, on a new layer. The colour red is selected because it highlights profiles and edges in the middle of the painting. Then, marking of highlights and shadows in a new layer using red colour and a textured brush with opacity 7% and 14%.

Step 2 

Filling Base Colour for Skin

Once the above step is completed to satisfaction, a colour palette of shades, tints and neutrals are made for the skin. A new layer is then added and a neutral colour with full opacity is used as the base colour for the body. At this point, any colour exceeding outlines is erased.

Digital Portrait of Scarlett Johansson

Step 3 

Detailing the Face

This is then followed by creating a new layer yet again, where the base colour of the eyes is filled using a brush with full opacity. Here, colours exceeding any outline are erased. Subsequently, a new layer is created for highlights, shadows and details for the eyes. The next step requires painting in highlights and shadows of the nose and other facial areas using a colour palette with a textured brush bearing 7%, 14% and 21% opacities.

Step 4 

Detailing the Lips

Following the fixed colour palette, a base colour is filled with 100% opacity first for the lips. Highlights and shadows of the lips are drawn in a new layer with a small size textured brush with 7% opacity. Using a small brush at this point enhances precision and detail.

Step 5 

Painting Rest of the Skin 

Going further down, shadows and highlights of the neck area, collarbone and chest are painted using the colour palette for the skin.  Used a textured brush of opacity 7% and 14% in a new layer.

Step 6 

Painting the Dress 

In a similar way, the base colour, shadows and highlights of the dress and its drapes are painted. Here too, a separate colour palette is fixed for this.

Step 7 

Painting the Hands 

Keeping shadows and highlights in mind, the arms are also painted in a similar way as in step 5.

Step 8 

Detailing the Hair 

The most challenging part of the portrait is a painting of the hair. The most time-consuming step; a new layer is filled with the solid base colour of hair, taken from a selected colour palette. Carefully then, hair is divided and marked into different parts according to its flow. This is followed by the creation of another new layer in which a number of strokes are drawn along the flow of hair in each and every part which is marked. A new layer over this one is then added which is used to blend all these parts using a brush with less opacity, in order to link the hair flow.

Step 9 

Fixing the Background

Finally, a new layer is added below all of these layers and filled with a solid colour. A shade of the base colour is selected, as in the palette, and is painted in a new layer to create a vignette feeling to the background. Another layer is subsequently added in which a 30% opacity gradient of black colour in multiple modes is employed. Upon completion, save the file as a jpeg and open in Adobe Lightroom where the portrait can be post edited for the desired outcome.

Published in Issue 25

Creative Gaga kicks off the year with an issue that asks the important questions, is it the web that’s leading the brands or the other way around? With 2014 witnessing an increase in brands investing in digital marketing, 2015 will only be bigger. We can say India has accepted the revolution, where more and more people are opening browsers to e-commerce, literally window shopping, and setting up shops online as well. The issue brings together renowned designers with digital experience, who discuss and throw light on the pros and cons of this change and where we possibly are headed with this in the future.

 

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Sri Harsha Andukuri

Born in May 1991, Sri Harsha Andukuri studied graphic design from IIT Guwahati. Specializing in UI/UX illustration and digital paintings, this architect graduate from NIT Patna, is also a keen traveler and soccer fan.


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Creative Gaga kicks off the year with an issue that asks the important questions, is it the web that’s leading the brands or the other way around? With 2014 witnessing an increase in brands investing in digital marketing, 2015 will only be bigger. We can say India has accepted the revolution, where more and more people are opening browsers to e-commerce, literally window shopping, and setting up shops online as well. The issue brings together renowned designers with digital experience, who discuss and throw light on the pros and cons of this change and where we possibly are headed with this in the future.

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Aman Chotani

Aman Chotani, a professional travel photographer was recently selected in the Nat Geo Covershot 2014 Tv Show. His work has found acclaim across major exhibitions and brands. He believes in travelling to beautiful, rusty and adventurous locations to capture untold stories, unseen traditions and unprecedented experiences


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Creative Gaga kicks off the year with an issue that asks the important questions, is it the web that’s leading the brands or the other way around? With 2014 witnessing an increase in brands investing in digital marketing, 2015 will only be bigger. We can say India has accepted the revolution, where more and more people are opening browsers to e-commerce, literally window shopping, and setting up shops online as well. The issue brings together renowned designers with digital experience, who discuss and throw light on the pros and cons of this change and where we possibly are headed with this in the future

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The barriers have broken and the people unified, all thanks to the World Wide Web. This, for designers is nothing less than a revolution. British freelance graphic designer, Chloe Galea, who now lives in Berlin, has made the most of this invention to provide modern designs for clients situated worldwide. Here, in a conversation with Creative Gaga, she tells us more about how she reaches out to the wider audience with her design and technology.

CG: Your designs seem very systematic, columned and well-organised. Is this your style? How do you and your design sense and techniques change when designing for the web, as compared to other canvases?

Chloë: Order and space are vital components in digital designing. I think it is aesthetics that I appreciate in many aspects of my life. As my flat is certainly bright, airy and decorated in a fairly limited palette. Plus, I think that my continued interest in print and editorial design has meant that I am always working with grids and looking at how best to structure the content I am given. The basics don’t change much when it comes to designing for digital or web either. The style still employs a grid, where careful attention is paid to typography and its hierarchy. At the same time, it is vital to strike a visual balance that makes the design look right. There are obviously different restraints that must be taken into account when working on print or digital design, but other than these technicalities, nothing much changes.

CG: Being European, where art and design are culturally embedded and dates back to memorable artists and evergreen creations; how are brands, clients and audience taking to the present web activity?

Chloë: It’s like homogeneous mixture, where it’s hard to separate both. There are certainly a few established brands I have worked with in London that have struggled to keep up with all the new technological and social developments. But I think everyone knows just how important it is now to have an intelligent curated presence online, to actively engage with the audience and stay up-to-date with the latest digital and web trends. That all said, the print isn’t going anywhere; it is ever evolving and finding new ways to remain relevant.

CG: As a designer, how do you stay abreast of latest design happenings and creations? How do you reach out to the world? How much do you depend on the web and how much does the web depend on you?

Chloë: There is no rocket science involved. Reading is important, spending time online is important. I lose hours to Pinterest as well as get out of the house, walk around the city, meet up with like-minded people and make a point of attending industry talks and events. While it would be a mistake to rely on the internet for all creative inspiration, I think no one would deny just what an amazing resource it is. It’s also a boon for freelancers out there as it facilitates promotion and communication with clients regardless of where they are in the world.

CG: What would be some traits and qualities that you feel should be present in a designer to be ready to create for the times of today? Have you had the opportunity to visit or work with any Indian clients?

Chloë: I went to a talk recently at Betahaus, Berlin and the speaker said there are three things a designer needs to be: talented, punctual and likeable. In terms of Indian clients, no I haven’t worked with any. However, I have spent some time in India and would love the opportunity to go back!

Published in Issue 25

Creative Gaga kicks off the year with an issue that asks the important questions, is it the web that’s leading the brands or the other way around? With 2014 witnessing an increase in brands investing in digital marketing, 2015 will only be bigger. We can say India has accepted the revolution, where more and more people are opening browsers to e-commerce, literally window shopping, and setting up shops online as well. The issue brings together renowned designers with digital experience, who discuss and throw light on the pros and cons of this change and where we possibly are headed with this in the future.

 

Order Your Copy!

Chloë Galea is a British graphic designer, currently living and working in Berlin, Germany. After a number of years working at Pencil Agency in London, she now works as a freelancer. Her skills encompass both print and digital, with the majority of clients coming from the fashion, luxury and lifestyle industries.


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Creative Gaga kicks off the year with an issue that asks the important questions, is it the web that’s leading the brands or the other way around? With 2014 witnessing an increase in brands investing in digital marketing, 2015 will only be bigger. We can say India has accepted the revolution, where more and more people are opening browsers to e-commerce, literally window shopping, and setting up shops online as well. The issue brings together renowned designers with digital experience, who discuss and throw light on the pros and cons of this change and where we possibly are headed with this in the future.

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