1

ad here

We all know product design is the seamless fit of form and functionality. But it’s not just about how closely you look but also about how far you can see, believes young industrial designer Parin Sanghvi. “Looking in a direction no one has before is what can lead to the creation of life-changing products for millions of people.” Here, he tells us things that should never be missed.

Pocket Light. Used as a torch, lantern, desk lamp or ambient light
Product Design
This multi-situation lighting device can be taken anywhere

Just because it’s never been done, doesn’t mean it can’t be.

An interest in learning and finding out something should be the basis of your drive. It’s important to strike that balance between functionality and aesthetics, however, you can get as fanciful as you want as long as the design is practical and well-thought-out enough to actually be possible. How do you do that? Well, grab a pencil and start sketching. Develop your ideas first by putting down feasible thoughts. This is followed by creating a 3D CAD model that helps you understand your product visually in terms of proportions and form of design. It helps to keep going back and revisiting the problem statement to make sure the design meets the needs of the users. It’s often useful to create a prototype as well. This can be done through 3D printing or make the parts in a CNC machine. The process is quick and the outcome is accurate.

SoundBOX - wireless portable speakers
Product Design
Chair Story doubles as a desk and a sketchpad, achieving both a creative outlet for kids

Products and Emotions go well together.

Of course, products are created to make life easy and comfortable for a user. But ‘product design’ is slightly different. Jonathan Ive once said, “Design is a word that’s come to mean so much that it’s also a word that has come to mean nothing. We don’t really talk about design, we talk about developing ideas and making products”. That’s why it’s important to add an element of surprise through the design. Surprise the user like the ‘ChairStory’ does. Not only does that give the user a physical bene t but also an emotional one. It’s a great feeling to see products you design connect with the buyers on a personal level that become a part of their everyday lives.

Product Design
Handbag. A simple and innovative paper bag that transforms into a clothes hanger and vice-verca.
Product Design
The concept proposes a solution to reduce waste and promote recycling

The users are the pivot point for any design.

No doubt the process varies a lot depending on the type of project. If it’s a large and complex project like redesigning a baby incubator, you will need to invest a lot of time in research and understanding the product before you get on with designing. On the other hand, if it’s something like designing a ‘Pocketlight’ for which you instantly have an idea, you can get down to its representation and dimension. but so do the target audience. But no matter what project it is, what always remains the same is the need to understand the target audience. Whether it’s furniture or a gadget, defining the target audience is critical for the design revolves around them. That’s why gathering user insights is also a necessary raw material that helps designate purpose to the product before you start designing it.

Product Design
Product Design
Neobirth Infant Incubator. A unique bubble-shaped incubator design that helps parents bond with their premature baby
Forced - Entry Tool. Inspired from Mantis Shrimp, this forced entry tool delivers powerful strikes to break walls and doors during times of natural disaster

A chair with no legs?

Quite possible. Through product design, you actually have the opportunity to change the archetype even though it’s challenging and happens rarely. Strive on possibilities. Think of things that no one ever has before. Merge various needs and create something new. Who knows, maybe in your head is an idea that may assist millions of people on a daily basis. It’s a great way of contributing to society and making a real impact on people’s lives. Go ahead, start observing and start creating.

Product Design
Product Design
Internship project - Kitchen Appliance
A self Initiated project aimed at enhancing the experience and communication of a blood donation bag for people with haemophobia

Published in Issue 21

Branding With Packaging Special! They say not to judge a book by its cover. But they also say that exceptions are always there. There’s no doubt, branding and packaging are the faces of any business and product. They decide the way people will receive the brand; whether they will accept it or reject it. To understand and gain more perspective on this much-unsolved mystery, we invited many branding and packaging experts who throw light on the topic.

 

Order Your Copy!
CURRENT ISSUE
Creative Gaga - Issue 49

 

Parin Sanghvi
ad here

An industrial designer passed from MIT Institute of Design, Pune, Parin Sanghvi is a lifelong learner and strives to make meaningful impacts through his work. Worked for design studios like Empoise in Bangalore, Rubberband in Goa, Continuum in Massachusetts, United States and many more.


Featured In


Branding With Packaging Special! They say not to judge a book by its cover. But they also say that exceptions are always there. There’s no doubt, branding and packaging are the faces of any business and product. They decide the way people will receive the brand; whether they will accept it or reject it. To understand and gain more perspective on this much-unsolved mystery, we invited many branding and packaging experts who throw light on the topic.

Related Posts



Find Parin Sanghvi Here


CURRENT ISSUE
Creative Gaga - Issue 49

 

POST TAGS:

Uttara Ghodke

ad here

A dreamer, thinker and designer, Uttara Ghodke always try to provide solutions to her audience in a simplified manner. She started her career by pursuing Product Design course at the MIT Institute of Design, India. She has also spent 6 months in London as a scholarship exchange student at the University of Creative Arts. After working in the Design industry for more than 3 years, she did her masters in Inclusive Design from OCAD University, Toronto, Canada.

Featured In


Branding With Packaging Special! They say not to judge a book by its cover. But they also say that exceptions are always there. There’s no doubt, branding and packaging are the faces of any business and product. They decide the way people will receive the brand; whether they will accept it or reject it. To understand and gain more perspective on this much-unsolved mystery, we invited many branding and packaging experts who throw light on the topic.

Related Posts



Find Her Here


CURRENT ISSUE
Creative Gaga - Issue 49

 

POST TAGS:

ad here

Every invention sparks from a problem that needs to be solved. Product designer Uttara Ghodke feels though a good product is simply a unique combination of science, technology and creativity. “But the real job of a designer is to create a solution that simplifies the life of the user, because that makes for intimate and memorable designs.” More on her way of doing things.

Poppin, a board pin dispenser designed by Pranali Linge and Uttara Ghodke
Spepper, a stapler and punching machine designed by Pranali Linge, Uttara Ghodke and Viraj Joshi

Be guided by the holistic approach.

A good product is born when a designer learns to establish a perfect balance between technology and creativity. Since the very beginning of our education we have be tutored to do so. The biggest hurdle every product designer has to overcome is to follow the product design process while always being aware of the technology that could make it better.

Mychai, an electronic tea bag
Good Product
Cubix, a Blender inspired from the design language of Braun products, designed by Uttara Ghodke and Viraj Joshi

Design can be construed as ‘Beautiful Solutions’.

Designs should serve the user’s needs in the best possible way. That means being constantly aware of their needs and behavior and dedicating the smallest of all details in the product to them. One must remember that the recipe to any smart product lies in its technology as well as its aesthetics, and not merely making the product a visually alluring experience.

Clothes Dryer. This clothes dryer and iron, which can be hanged anywhere
Murphies, eco-friendly take-away packaging for jacket potato restaurant from recyclable paper pulp material

As the great dieter Rams says ‘Good design is unobtrusive’.

Products fulfilling a purpose are like tools. They are neither decorative objects nor works of art. Their design should therefore be both neutral and restrained, to leave room for the user’s self-expression.

Link Bell, The product is designed to differentiate between room cleaning & personal care. Designed by Pranali Linge and Uttara Ghodke
Link, a live UI/UX and Product Design project in collaboration with Gupte Hospital, Pune. Designed by Pranali Linge and Uttara Ghodke

A designer should concentrate on the simplicity, aesthetics, understandability, innovation and uniqueness in his/her products. To achieve a perfect blend of all of this is a challenge in itself. Also, the design should make an important contribution to the preservation of the environment. A good design is environmentally friendly and a good designer is one who always sticks to this principle.

Good Product
Clinncut, a cutting board slice grater which has a expandable food storage drawer
Good Product
Aqua Grow, an indoor aquaphonic system inspired from the form and functioning of a jellyfish reproduction cycle.

India is a little too technical when it comes to product design.

Not a doubt that product design in India is developing rapidly, however, we tend to concentrate more on the tiny details of every product. We turn more towards the technical aspect of the product. Designers from the rest of the world work more intricately towards the aesthetic aspects of products.

The Smile Vial, a tiny magnetic vase for flowers and small plants designed by Uttara Ghodke and Tom Korzen
The Smile Vial, a tiny magnetic vase for flowers and small plants designed by Uttara Ghodke and Tom Korzen

Published in Issue 21

Branding With Packaging Special! They say not to judge a book by its cover. But they also say that exceptions are always there. There’s no doubt, branding and packaging are the faces of any business and product. They decide the way people will receive the brand; whether they will accept it or reject it. To understand and gain more perspective on this much-unsolved mystery, we invited many branding and packaging experts who throw light on the topic.

 

Order Your Copy!
CURRENT ISSUE
Creative Gaga - Issue 49

 

ad here

Everyone notices a unique look and style. It’s the same for a logo or branding. “They are the face of a brand.” says Ketaki K, founder of Cub Design Studio. “And the industry is all about uniqueness, memorability and connect.” Here, she takes us through some simple remedies that can brighten your skills.

Branding for Simpli Eat
Branding for Simpli Eat
Branding for Rosy Bow Fashion

Change is the only Constant.

Every brand has diverse challenges and needs customised solutions. This means that the thought process has to be different for each brand. Designs have to be unique for each brand and are never repeated as they are a result of brainstorming, discussions and experimentation. However, what remains consistent with every project is a trendy fresh look for each design.

Branding for Krushnai
Branding for Krushnai
Branding for Glorious

How far you can imagine starts from how closely you observe.

A brand’s design is its identity. It’s very important that the design does justice to the brand- that’s exactly what its meant for! The briefing is most important, as getting a good understanding of the client’s requirements and the brand’s personality is key. As that is what will catapult your imagination when you get to work.

Packaging for K n U
Stationery design for K n U
Product Design
Branding & Packaging for LivRaw

Less Goes a Long Way.

A logo is the face of the brand. And in order for it to stand the test of time and become the brand itself, it needs to be simple and devoid of any complications. It must be easy to handle so that over time, it can be placed on any medium, from paper to billboard or from fabric to mugs. Consider the logo of Nike; a simple ‘tick mark’ that has worked so well for the brand.

Logo Design for Panditji - Veg Restaurant
Branding for Panditji - Veg Restaurant
Branding for Panditji - Veg Restaurant
Stationery for Panditji - Veg Restaurant

It’s all about what people remember.

The growth of a brand to a considerable extent depends on brand recall. Unique designs ensure people and consumers remember and recollect the brand and its design. Panditiji and Head Safe brandings are funky, playful and strongly distinctive. The client expects a ‘unique’ brand, the brand demands a ‘recall’ value and the target audience looks for a ‘connect’ while a designer needs to ensure all the above are met seamlessly. Nothing brings more joy than creating a lasting value.

Branding for Head Safe
Branding for Head Safe
Stationary for Bake Factory
Branding for Bake Factory

Design is everything.

Though branding can have different perspectives, any good branding should be simple and yet bring out the connect in an interesting manner. Understanding the product/service and then solving the problem is crucial. Always remember, design is a solution for a brand and not just a mere decorative thing. If you do this every day, you’ll never go wrong

Branding for Bake Factory
Packaging for Bake Factory
Logo Design for Vasundhara Jewellers

Published in Issue 21

Branding With Packaging! They say not to judge a book by its cover. But they also say that exceptions are always there. There’s no doubt, branding and packaging are the faces of any business and product. They decide the way people will receive the brand; whether they will accept it or reject it. To understand and gain more perspective on this much-unsolved mystery, we invited many branding and packaging experts who throw light on the topic.

 

Order Your Copy!
CURRENT ISSUE
Creative Gaga - Issue 49

 

ad here

Imagination is the greatest form of flattery and for a designer; it doubles up as a way to pay homage to legends, icons and inspirations. Illustrator Shesh Kiran created the caricature portrait of flute maestro Pandit Hariprasad Chaurasia. He explains how.

Portrait
Portrait

Step 1

Started the rough sketching with new file of 300 dpi resolution. I used the tablet pen for this sketch with the various brush sizes from 25 to 30.

Step 2

Create a new layer below the sketch layers and filled it with black colour. Kept the fill opacity to 62% which makes the rough sketch partially visual.

Step 3

Added a new layer and started filling the flat skin colour in this layer. Also added another layer for colouring the clothes.

Step 4

Used new traditional texture brushes to detail the hair, eyes and skin tone. Airbrushes were used to bring shades and highlights of skin.

Portrait

Step 5

Further worked on the skin using ‘transform’ from the brush presets to lighten the skin and to create the softer tones using airbrush.

Portrait

Step 6

From the reference image collected the cloth colour palette to bring the real life feel. With the airbrush started detailing the clothes with the selected colour palette.

Portrait

Step 7

Gave a final touch to artwork using various opacity and ‘flow’ on hands, fluet and background as per the requirment to bring the depth and lighting. Hence arrive at the final portrait artwork.

Tools Used:

• Adobe Photoshop

• Wacom Bamboo tablet

• Airbrushes & round brushes for painting.

Published in Issue 21

Branding With Packaging Special! They say not to judge a book by its cover. But they also say that exceptions are always there. There’s no doubt, branding and packaging are the faces of any business and product. They decide the way people will receive the brand; whether they will accept it or reject it. To understand and gain more perspective on this much-unsolved mystery, we invited many branding and packaging experts who throw light on the topic.

 

Order Your Copy!
CURRENT ISSUE
Creative Gaga - Issue 49

 

Shesh Kiran
ad here

Shesh Kiran, a Bangaluru based illustrator and animator who loves to create caricatures & cartoon characters and worked with many multimedia companies in his 10 years of experience.


Featured In


Branding With Packaging! They say not to judge a book by its cover. But they also say that exceptions are always there. There’s no doubt, branding and packaging are the faces of any business and product. They decide the way people will receive the brand; whether they will accept it or reject it. To understand and gain more perspective on this much-unsolved mystery, we invited many branding and packaging experts who throw light on the topic.

Related Posts



Find Him Here


CURRENT ISSUE
Creative Gaga - Issue 49

 

POST TAGS:

ad here

It’s not just the design, the elements or the colours in an artwork that blow us away. It’s the concept; a force that resonates from the designer to the audience. Edmundo Moi-Thuk Shung, a graphic designer from The Netherlands, believes cracking a creative concept is the most important step in branding design. He speaks to us to throw more light on his approach.

Branding Design
What are u Doodling

CG: Branding and packaging is a very competitive sphere of design to be working in. What are the principles that dictate your designs?

Edmundo: There are three things that I constantly make sure I am aware of while designing – they have to be unique, meaningful and easy to understand.

Branding Design
Poppy Red Stickerpack

CG: Designs need to be creative and at the same time practical. How do your designs balance both the requirements? What are the challenges you face in day-to-day work? What do you enjoy the most about what you do?

Edmundo: Well, the most important part is to make sure the concept is clear and useful to others. This, for most of the time, also covers the creative part of the whole process. Concentrating on the job is the hardest part for me as I was diagnosed with Attention Deficit Disorder that hinders the thought and concentration process of the mind. I overcome this by doing exercises to clear my mind. You’ve got to figure out your own tricks to overcome whatever it is that distracts you from the job.

Branding Design
Poppy Red Stickerpack

I get the most enjoyment out of concept designing, like doodling in my moleskin and working them out digitally. It’s also refreshing to put your thoughts on paper and work these out.

DIY-HMZ. Some self-branding on various mediums and accessories can help gain exposure in the outside world
MOKKACCINO. These business cards in the shape of coffee cups that can be left behind on the train for travelers to pick up

CG: Branding requires a good understanding of the product/client. How do you then take it forward? Can you take us through your design process?

Edmundo: Once I’ve accepted the assignment, I make sure to gauge the client’s vision by asking them questions to rule out what they expect from me. From then on, I usually make a “plan of approach” that describes the needs, planning and requirements for the assignment. This helps put everything before me so that I can connect the dots through creative ideas and concepts. Afterwards I pitch my ideas to the clients and decide what direction I should take.

MIXWELL. A mix of street and graffiti art, this hiphop styled design uses audio and design supplies to infuse life into a concept
KOFI & AYU. A character getting ready to head a soccer ball, while Ayu the female character wants to check her camera lenses

CG: In your experience, how receptive are brands/clients and audiences to something new? Are people willing to take risks or do you feel they still prefer to play it safe?

Edmundo: The demand in today’s time is to create something that is ‘unusual yet affective’. I guess that means people are willing to take risks as long as the concepts are effective and don’t differ too much from already existing products.

Branding Design
SMOOTHIE POSTER. Designed for The Pepin Press Company the design uses relevant elements to bring together a concept
LOGOS. These logos designed for clients and the artist himself communicate and symbolise unique character for each

CG: You use the Indian symbol of a Yogi in your branding design for Mellow. Can you tell us more about the project and how you arrived at that idea? How do international elements feature in your designs? How do the local audience adapt to something foreign?

Edmundo: It all started with an old sketch of a Yogi which I stumbled upon while going through all of my drawings. The project was a mother’s day gift and I related the element to the fact that she does yoga. That’s when I came up with the idea to make something by myself using an old duffle bag and other stuff lying around my house and created several products out of it. Since Yoga originates from Ancient India, the logo was apt. The project was received well by people with different backgrounds perhaps because our world is getting more multi-cultural.

MELLOW. Symbolism in a logo makes it memorable as this yoga branding suggests
MELLOW. Symbolism in a logo makes it memorable as this yoga branding suggests

CG: Brandings can’t be static. How do you create designs that can be worked upon and taken forward as the brand evolves? How do you give it that flexibility?

Edmundo: I make sure the logo I design isn’t too complicated. Ofcourse a lot depends on the kind of brand and the brief, but I usually give it a visual reference for what the company stands for. It gives it the advantage to become memorable and the ability to evolve easily as the time passes on.

MELLOW BASIC YOGA POSTER. Displaying basic yoga poses, this design also translates onto a scroll that can be used as a handy guide for some yoga practice

Published in Issue 21

They say not to judge a book by its cover. But they also say that exceptions are always there. There’s no doubt, branding and packaging are the faces of any business and product. They decide the way people will receive the brand; whether they will accept it or reject it. To understand and gain more perspective on this much-unsolved mystery, we invited many branding and packaging experts who throw light on the topic.

 

Order Your Copy!
CURRENT ISSUE
Creative Gaga - Issue 49

 

Edmundo Moi-Thuk Shung
ad here

Based in the Netherlands, Edmundo Moi-Thuk-Shung is a graphic designer that chooses to work with vectors. He has worked for various brands in his design journey like Colgate, Palmolive, Douwe Egberts, Ziggo Zakelijk, and Hansens  Naturals.


Featured In


They say not to judge a book by its cover. But they also say that exceptions are always there. There’s no doubt, branding and packaging are the faces of any business and product. They decide the way people will receive the brand; whether they will accept it or reject it. To understand and gain more perspective on this much-unsolved mystery, we invited many branding and packaging experts who throw light on the topic.

Related Posts



Find Him Here


CURRENT ISSUE
Creative Gaga - Issue 49

 

POST TAGS:

Ad Here

In such complicated times, it’s all about being simple. Simple is effective when it comes to design, believes Lundgren+Lindqvist, a Swedish design studio. It’s all about saying a lot more with a lot less. Engaging in a conversation, they tell us more on how they create effective and memorable design.

Design
Varvet - Visual Identity, Stationary and Sinages
Varvet - Visual Identity, Stationary and Sinages
Design
Varvet - Visual Identity, Stationary and Sinages

CG: Describe your journey as Lundgren+Lindqvist. What have been your accomplishments?

LL: When we started Lundgren+Lindqvist in 2007, our primary goal was to do what we love and stay afloat doing so. Now our ambition has grown along with our team, but we still want to do the best possible work. Over the years, we have had the opportunity to work with a great number of amazing clients, creating work that we can all be very proud of.



O/O-Brewing Baltic Porter-Packaging Design

CG: Your designs appear simple, effortless and smooth; however that is probably not the case behind the scenes. What all do you have to go through to arrive at the final design outcome?

LL: Simple is hard. Every project starts with a coconut. We use fine grain sandpaper to peel off layer by layer until we expose the core. That’s because we believe in honesty. Achieving that means removing the make-up to expose the bare, naked truth.

Design
Akademi valand photography next to the ocean exhibition catalogue covers

CG: What inspirations are included in your design? How does your background reflected in your designs?

LL: Like most in our line of business, we take an active interest in neighbouring creative fields; such as the arts and architecture. It is hard to judge as to what extent our Scandinavian background has influenced us. Of course, the legacy of great designers and thinkers such as Paul Kjaerholm, Olle Eksell and Alvar Aalto continue to inspire.

O/O - Brewing - Carismatico - Packaging and Visual Identity


O/O-Brewing Bangatan

CG: You work across various mediums. How working on paper differ from working for the digital space?

LL: Paper is definite, in that a printed piece is final. On the other hand, the digital space is an indefinite, organic medium. Both mediums offer unique possibilities. While conscious of this, we try to build each project around a concept and an idea rather than on the media of choice.

Maria Sole - Ferragamo, Visual identity and packaging
Design
Maria Sole - Ferragamo, Visual identity and packaging

CG: Designs have to look amazing and at the same time solve a problem and fulfil a greater purpose. How do you balance your and your client’s views?

LL: A good designer-client relationship is, like any relationship, based on trust. When there is a lack of trust from either side, the outcome will suffer.

Design
Critical Mass Studio Document Holder
Design
Critical Mass Studio Document Holder


Critical Mass Studio Pencils
Critical Mass Studio Poster
Critical Mass Studio The Totebags

CG: The world of design is constantly evolving. How do you keep up with the change?

LL: Although times are indeed changing, certain truths will remain. Our inherent curiosity and thirst for knowledge allows us to stay updated in a very natural, organic way. We visit exhibitions, read and travel a lot. Staying updated is nurturing our interests, which is the fuel we use for our daily (and sometimes nightly) design and development work.

A Sense of Place, Refugees welcome poster book
Design
Recto Verso Mirror


Design
Recto Verso Spread

CG: What other countries would you say are very prominent when it comes to design? What are your views on Indian design? Anything Indian that has caught your eye?

LL: In terms of graphic design, our neighbours Norway and Finland are definitely countries to watch out for as they are challenging those with a traditionally strong graphic design output such as Switzerland, England and the Netherlands. In terms of India, we are shamefully aware of the fact that we know very little about the country’s design scene. Perhaps Creative Gaga Magazine can put an end to our ignorance.

O/O - Brewing - Packaging and Visual Identity
O/O-Brewing-AW-2016-Packaging and Art Direction

Published in Issue 21

Branding With Packaging! They say not to judge a book by its cover. But they also say that exceptions are always there. There’s no doubt, branding and packaging are the faces of any business and product. They decide the way people will receive the brand; whether they will accept it or reject it. To understand and gain more perspective on this much-unsolved mystery, we invited many branding and packaging experts who throw light on the topic.

 

Order Your Copy!
CURRENT ISSUE
Creative Gaga - Issue 49