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It needs passion. It needs commitment. Patience as well. Product design requires a designer to make a promise with one’s own self in order to create promising designs. Products might be non-living things, but according to industrial designer Subinay Malhotra, they do have feelings and emotions of people living in them. More on how you can turn that little crush for product design into a full-fledged relationship.

Product Design
Product Design
OQLAR - Personal Sir Sanitizing System
Product Design
Product Design
Flasso – Milk Flask. Made using borosilicate glass, PC plastic, glass blowing and injection molding techniques

For most Designers, it all starts very Young 

Most design journeys start from childhood, whether it was drawing or dismantling toys in order to know what’s happening inside. Product design is all about growing up to understand the needs, target clients, various environments and create a customized solution so that people learn and discover their own demands in a very unique manner. It’s that end result which matters all the time and drives you towards it.

Product Design
Product Design
Retro Rubik’s

Something new makes Hearts beat Faster

It’s something new that gets people excited and sweeps them off their feet. Focusing on form and function will not quite get you there. Research is what forms the base of it all. After a concentrated research has been performed, only then one can start to apply ergonomics and take the project towards the best material approach. Research allows a product designer to stay updated on what has already been created in that niche, and work towards new possibilities and creations. Of course, human psychology and trend is another thing a product designer must be constantly conscious of while creating something functional yet aesthetically appealing.

Product Design
Product Design
Product Design
Lash – Portable night light for Graffiti artists.

When Design Software play Cupid

They help materialize what you have in mind. They help your ideas meet their materialization. For product designers, the concepts of physics and dynamics are definitely a must to know, but through the use of prototyping and 3D printing software, one can work virtually with their ideas. The only way a designer can benefit from such software is when they practice. It allows you to tease the limits of your imagination, giving you a future never imagined.

Product Design
Product Design
Plexus – Protection Gear for Skateboarders.
Product Design
DUSK. The portable device uses ergonomics and wireless technology.
Product Design
Product Design
Drill Master – A designer mechanical device

Half a heart won’t keep the Designer in you alive for long

It’s important to be passionate and interested in what you chose to do and learn. Give it your hundred percent and learn with the best of concentration. Keep in mind that one either needs to be really happy with what they are working on or be very angry with it, to reach places.

Product Design
Product Design

Published in Issue 20

Pencil or stylus? Paper or touch screen? This is just a start to the long list of questions that are swimming in every designer’s mind today. They say change is the only constant but has digitalisation really taken over the traditional methods? Would there be a time when the pencil will be forgotten forever like writers have forgotten a fountain pen? We discuss the issue with famous Indian designers and try to understand what they think. This issue also has some very talented and unique designer like Sachin Puthran, Raghava KK, Ramanjeet Kaur and Pavan Rajurkar got featured along with much more. Mr. Xerty and Amrei Hofstatter came with unique interpretation in our MadeIn section.

 

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With an engineering degree from Bharati Vidya Peeth College, Subinay Malhotra went on to pursue his second degree in product design from an international college. Working on various projects, from furniture, lighting, electrical, transportation, spatial and sustainable design.


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Pencil or stylus? Paper or touchscreen? This is just a start to the long list of questions that are swimming in every designer’s mind today. They say change is the only constant but has digitalisation really taken over the traditional methods? Would there be a time when the pencil will be forgotten forever like writers have forgotten a fountain pen? We discuss the issue with famous Indian designers and try to understand what they think. This issue also has some very talented and unique designer like Sachin Puthran, Raghava KK, Ramanjeet Kaur and got featured along with much more. Mr. Xerty and Amrei Hofstatter came with unique interpretation in our MadeIn section.

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Creative Gaga - Issue 49

 

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Brice Chaplet aka Mr.Xerty is a self-taught freelancer graphic-designer and Illustrator based in Paris, France. Having decided to go independent in 2007, he quit his job as a junior graphic designer at an automotive company and today specializes in digital art and mixed media artworks, importantly turning his passion into his job.


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Pencil or stylus? Paper or touch screen? This is just a start to the long list of questions that are swimming in every designer’s mind today. They say change is the only constant but has digitalisation really taken over the traditional methods? Would there be a time when the pencil will be forgotten forever like writers have forgotten a fountain pen? We discuss the issue with famous Indian designers and try to understand what they think. This issue also has some very talented and unique designer like Sachin Puthran, Raghava KK, Ramanjeet Kaur and Pavan Rajurkar got featured along with much more. Mr. Xerty and Amrei Hofstatter came with unique interpretation in our MadeIn section.

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Creative Gaga - Issue 49

 

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Sachin Puthran was there when it all happened. It was 1995; the time of hand-drawn illustrations, airbrushed finished images and cut-paste typesetting. Digital was slowly coming in, bringing with it a generation gap. There was an air of fear in the older Art Directors as the younger generation, fascinated by Mac user interface, was already learning software. Below, he takes us on the journey of an Artist, from then to now.

Art From Pencil to Stylus
The Yakshangana Performer

The Analog Age

The earlier generation was blessed with the passion and experience of using the tactile medium. It gave the true satisfaction of working on various surfaces using different media and styles. Everybody knows art back then was a luxury, a rich passion. “It was larger than life,” says Sachin “where expressions were a physical manifestation of the artist’s vision. People travelled to view art in public spaces. Getting to see and meet the artist was truly an experience of joy and inspiration. Nothing came easy.”

Art From Pencil to Stylus
The Coconut Tree

Art for Art’s Sake

According to Sachin, traditional artists still swear by the smell, the touch and the feel of the traditional medium. That’s because they seemed to have understood the sensitivity and developed a purist approach to Art. They were the ones who stuck to the medium and rejected the so-called ‘digital medium’ that was going to take them by surprise in a few years. But the fear had set in.

Art From Pencil to Stylus
Waiting

 The Advent of Computers

The arrival of first generation computers in the early 90s opened a Pandora’s box for visual artists to explore the slow but responsive medium. Reminiscing about those days. Softwares were slowly heading towards capturing the artist’s imagination. Suddenly the advantages and disadvantages of painting digitally were getting clearer. The needs and demands of clients started changing fast. For the first time, the clock was ticking digitally. Everything that was wanted tomorrow was being delivered today.

Art From Pencil to Stylus
Ramanuj

The Magic of Cinema

This was the time when technology was ahead of its users. Hollywood started using high-end Visual Effects or VFX and changed the art of storytelling. “There was only a thin line of difference between science fiction and realism. Software and hardware could now do magic. The Internet made downloading a popular new phenomenon. Suddenly there was a paradigm shift.” During that period, the world was changing and not everybody was able to keep up with it.

Art From Pencil to Stylus
Work in progress Mumbai

The New Millennium Generation

A creative visualising power was not enough to survive in this era. Art Directors were required to know paint and design software as well. That’s how visual grammar changed over the years, as designers incorporated photo manipulation techniques and digital retouching to create surreal imagery. “Every software upgrade brought in more features and capabilities,” says Sachin, “so much so that one day, artists were lost and filters were in.”

Art From Pencil to Stylus
JijamataUdyan Mumbai

More Clutter

The designer was engulfed by the software in the next few years, as they relied more on software and less on their skills. “Ideas were driven by styles that were possible quickly on digital. Tactile sensitivity was lost and the rat race had truly begun.” Sachin tells us. “Social media added to the confusion, as it allowed designs to be circulated and critiqued by everybody.”

Art From Pencil to Stylus
Indian Wedding

Art gets Interactive

Slowly, design in digital was opening out and was exploring new ways of touching people. The design didn’t just involve the designer, but his audience as well. New media and installation art were new storytelling techniques. Tagging and annotating gave new dimensions to Art. “Suddenly so much more could be done.” He adds.

Art From Pencil to Stylus
Waiting

The Birth of the New Artist

“Equipped now with the latest gadgets, the artist was truly getting the best.” says Sachin. iPads and ‘apps’ for almost anything you wanted to do; from calligraphy to typography, were a finger click away. Everything was on the ‘cloud’ and the artist was now ‘virtual’.

Art From Pencil to Stylus
Daily Hard Work

So, Where Next?

Now is the time to think beyond. If you can imagine it, you can create it. There are endless possibilities and that should keep us all busy for a long time. But the trick today is to be open to the world and yet always do your own thing.

Published in Issue 20

Pencil or stylus? Paper or touch screen? This is just a start to the long list of questions that are swimming in every designer’s mind today. They say change is the only constant but has digitalisation really taken over the traditional methods? Would there be a time when the pencil will be forgotten forever like writers have forgotten a fountain pen?


We discuss the issue with famous Indian designers and try to understand what they think. This issue also has some very talented and unique designer like Sachin Puthran, Raghava KK, Ramanjeet Kaur and Pavan Rajurkar got featured along with much more. Mr. Xerty and Amrei Hofstatter came with unique interpretation in our MadeIn section.

 

Order Your Copy!
CURRENT ISSUE
Creative Gaga - Issue 49

 

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Traditional vs. digital; it’s the debate of the century. According to young illustrator, Pavan Dashrath Rajurkar, both are winners. Believing that both are like sides of the same coin, he tells us why it’s impossible to do without the other.

Traditional vs. Digital
Fish market
Traditional vs. Digital
Smoker

Knowing how to draw is most important.

Drawing is an art which will fade with time if one does not practice it regularly. It’s important to constantly keep in touch with that skill because the mind is directly connected to the hands. Nothing can create something as raw as the hands. Tools are used for getting different outputs while one is drawing, and design software is simply one of those tools. One shouldn’t feel any less if one does not know it.

Traditional vs. Digital
Red life

Traditional vs. Digital
The bird

Digitalisation adds another dimension to design, that’s time.

Digitalisation is the need of today. It can’t be ignored. It has enabled designers to increase output, where they can create multiple options in less time. Everything evolves with time and so has designed. Being a designer twenty years ago would mean facing greater difficulties in finding a platform and exposure as compared to today. In those days the process of artistic growth would have been really slow. We should make the most of the available sources.

Traditional vs. Digital
Bappanshi Gappa
Traditional vs. Digital
Krishna

Formal education sets in you a process that helps you approach your design.

It’s what they teach in all schools- research the subject before you romance it. An artwork starts from collecting a brief about it. It gives one the understanding to be able to visualise in context. India’s education doesn’t introduce technology right at the beginning, fearing that students will become dependent on it and won’t realise their own potential. A good example is how mental math is preferred over the use of a calculator in schools even today. Similarly, many designers today need a pencil and paper to sketch rough ideas and brainstorm. It’s a healthy habit. Finally, when you have the basic structure and elements of your design, you can work with technology, imparting flexibility and variation to your design.

Traditional vs. Digital
Pandit.

Traditional vs. Digital

Inspirations are not all.

Not just Indian, but even international designers are drawn to seek inspirations from our rich history, mythological stories, beautiful architecture and mesmerizing illustration styles. Taking these things as a base, many creative experiments can be undertaken and few have and are taking place. But unfortunately, many talented folks in India fail to receive a good platform for their work. The unfortunate reality is that many artists are lost due to lack of exposure. Hopefully, we will see that change soon.

Traditional vs. Digital
Shiva
Traditional vs. Digital

Published in Issue 20

Pencil or stylus? Paper or touch screen? This is just a start to the long list of questions that are swimming in every designer’s mind today. They say change is the only constant but has digitalisation really taken over the traditional methods? Would there be a time when the pencil will be forgotten forever like writers have forgotten a fountain pen? We discuss the issue with famous Indian designers and try to understand what they think. This issue also has some very talented and unique designer like Sachin Puthran, Raghava KK, Ramanjeet Kaur and Pavan Rajurkar got featured along with much more. Mr. Xerty and Amrei Hofstatter came with unique interpretation in our MadeIn section.

 

Order Your Copy!
CURRENT ISSUE
Creative Gaga - Issue 49