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Tapping into adversities our society faces on a day-to-day basis, Siju RS art directs a campaign that attempts to call out to the conscience of the onlooker and prompts for an action. The Winter Collection campaign draws public attention and interest to a raging issue.

Winter is the most difficult time for the underprivileged in India. And after the long and hot summers, the homeless and especially the children, are the most affected by the harsh weather conditions.

Winter collection
Newspaper - Winter Collection campaign for New Ark Mission of India by Ogilvy & Mather

Winter collection
Sack - Winter Collection campaign for New Ark Mission of India by Ogilvy & Mather

The campaign innovatively tackles this social issue. With street children posing as models and adorned in clothes made from discarded newspapers, sacking and cardboard, the campaign satires a fashion shoot. This juxtaposition succeeds in making people stand up and notice the plight of the less fortunate and donate clothes to help them. The sophisticated look and feel does not shout to sensationalize but creates enough room for curiosity and learning, while being packed with a punch. Thus, articulating what they call in advertising – success.

Winter collection
Cardboard - Winter Collection campaign for New Ark Mission of India by Ogilvy & Mather

Published in Issue 12

The first interactive issue of Creative Gaga with Augmented Reality features. This issue focuses on the transition of Advertising from real to virtual and blurring the boundaries of both at the same time. Also bundled with lots of interesting articles and interviews.

 

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CURRENT ISSUE
Creative Gaga - Issue 48

 

Sabeena Karnik

Sabeena Karnik has a degree in Applied Arts with a major in typography. She joined an ad agency straight after graduation and started designing paper products. She is now a paper typographer and an illustrator.


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The first interactive issue of Creative Gaga with Augmented Reality features. This issue focuses on the transition of Advertising from real to virtual and blurring the boundaries of both at the same time. Also bundled with lots of interesting articles and interviews.

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If it was only about needs, everyone would be sitting in similar chairs and drinking coffee and wine in the similar glasses. Desires are just as important. And to make these two meet, a product needs to be balanced, following a rational process. Product design studio, ‘Design Gandhi’, founded by Hardik Gandhi, lists down eight basic elements whose combination ensures people are wooed by its beauty and surprised by its functionality.

Product Design
Product Design
Xcent Multipurpose Stool

1. Define, derive, delight

That’s the process a product designer should follow to arrive at richly thought out designs and products that are just as ingenious as resourceful. Once you have thought of the idea, the next thing is to figure out how to manifest it. That requires a good understanding of material properties and their behavior in various contexts. What you have in the end is a tangible token of what used to be only an idea, something that makes the user smile and feel special.

Product Design
D MUG. Inspired from how one holds the coffee mug naturally.
Product Design
Knowledge Tree. Modified bookshelf that stores books in angles.

2. Keep it less to achieve more

In today’s cluttered and busy life, minimal designs can surely stand out. It’s important to understand that a product is a simple solution to an everyday problem. And minimal in no way means boring. In fact, minimal is something that one won’t ever get tired of seeing every day. In order to achieve that, you have to keep your designs colourful and dynamic, using appropriate materials and processes. That’s how products with an uncluttered and effortless appeal become hot favorites as they reflect clarity of thought and idea.

Product Design
Product Design
Zigzag Floor Covering. Multisegmented floor covering.

3. Observe, observe and only observe

Getting ideas is no big deal if you have your senses open. Inspirations can come from almost anything around you. From a roadside ‘jugaad’ furniture to a tree to a flower petal, India is a beautiful source of ideas. Sometimes really insignificant objects are the most inspiring. As a designer, the next job is to transform them into something beautiful, and there you have your design.

Product Design
Product Design
AER CLICK
Product Design
Home and Car Fragrances

4. Form and function go hand in hand

Marrying form and function might seem to be a tough part only if you consider them as two separates. The relationship between the two is not linear and one doesn’t come before the other. They come together in the form of an idea, when you are thinking of something new. Design is art with a purpose. Therefore, holistic thinking is the key to an innovative idea. Well, that’s also the difference between a designer and a decorator.

Product Design
Product Design
Product Design
Product Design
Jaipur pottery

5. A canvas means opportunities

Space is a very important aspect of product design and you must ensure the product demonstrates the best utilization of space. Space is your context and also the content. As designers we should realize how people love it when a design manages to do a lot in less space.

Product Design
Jaipur pottery

6. It can do this, this and this! 

Multiple usage of a product is a fancy bonus for the consumers. So think of ideas and designs that can be re-arranged to cater to multiple wants. After all, who wouldn’t be amazed at something that’s a bookshelf, a stool and a great looking storage space? Remember, people like to be unique and that’s why they buy things that are unique.

Product Design
Product Design
Product Design
Product Design
Aquarius

7. Show your funny side

Adding an element of humour in your designs helps create works that are more interactive, refreshing and young. Because you’re not giving your design just a utility, but also an experience. Incorporate an element of fun in your designs and consider them sold.

Product Design
ZigZag Modular Unit
Product Design
Kings Rolls

8. It’s common sense that’s not so common

Product design is no rocket science that involves design fundamentals or elaborate researches. At the end of the day, you are also a consumer and a human. And it’s common sense that helps generate newer ideas for spaces, thereby giving vent to intelligent creations.

Product Design
King’s Rolls Environment Graphics

Published in Issue 12

The first interactive issue of Creative Gaga with Augmented Reality features. This issue focuses on the transition of Advertising from real to virtual and blurring the boundaries of both at the same time. Also bundled with lots of interesting articles and interviews.

 

Order Your Copy!
CURRENT ISSUE
Creative Gaga - Issue 48

 

Hardik Gandhi

Started by Hardik Gandhi, a graduate in Interior Architecture and a post graduate from NID, Ahmedabad, Design Gandhi is a multi-disciplinary design studio with a modern and futuristic approach.


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The first interactive issue of Creative Gaga with Augmented Reality features. This issue focuses on the transition of Advertising from real to virtual and blurring the boundaries of both at the same time. Also bundled with lots of interesting articles and interviews.

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Creative Gaga - Issue 48

 

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There are stories hidden in faces and bodies. Exaggeration brings them to the fore. A good caricaturist lives the subject and discovers the multiple facets that make the story. Caricature artist Manoj Sinha reflects while talking about his design process.

Manoj Sinha - Caricaturist
Donald Trump, courtesy Hindustan Times Group
Manoj Sinha - Caricaturist
PM Narendra Modi, courtesy Hindustan Times Group by Manoj Sinha
Manoj Sinha - Caricaturist
Captain Amarinder Singh, courtesy Hindustan Times Group by Manoj Sinha

To watch is to learn.

Keep your eyes wide open. Watch every character and everything about them. Absorb yourself into your characters and feel their presence around. Understand their behaviour, attitudes, experiences, and temperament. There is a story made by all these elements. Observe their actions, as they often determine the story. And then exaggerate all these through your strokes to re-tell the story.

Manoj Sinha - Caricaturist
Daroga ji, courtesy Hindustan Times Group by Manoj Sinha
Manoj Sinha - Caricaturist
Om Puri, courtesy Hindustan Times Group


Manoj Sinha - Caricaturist
Aamir Khan, courtesy Hindustan Times Group
Manoj Sinha - Caricaturist
Raj Babbar, courtesy Hindustan Times Group

Mind precedes the pen.

Forget paper and pencil for some time. Take mental notes of their personality, work, and gestures, creating images in your mind, that’ll eventually come out in the form of caricatures. A caricaturist not just observes, but dissects. Study not just the character of every person, but the characteristic features as well. Generally, subjects have distinctive features that instantly catch the eye of an artist. In such cases, it becomes easy to exaggerate them and create the caricature. In other cases, the artist needs to dig deep into the subject and find out which feature or aspect to play with.

Manoj Sinha - Caricaturist
Virat Kohli, courtesy Hindustan Times Group
Manoj Sinha - Caricaturist
Harmanpreet Kaur, courtesy Hindustan Times Group
Manoj Sinha - Caricaturist
Kapil Dev, courtesy Hindustan Times Group

A caricaturist not just observes, but dissects. Study not just the character of every person, but the characteristic features as well. Dig deep into the subject to find out features to play with.


Manoj Sinha - Caricaturist
RONALDINHO, courtesy Hindustan Times Group
Manoj Sinha - Caricaturist
Danny Boyle, courtesy Hindustan Times Group

Fun is inbuilt.

One needs to know the nuances of the subject to add to the appeal of the artwork. Read and analyse everything about your character. It will automatically develop a personal opinion about the person. As a caricature artist, the opinion is often laden with humour. Put the character in focus and the fun in the story will come out automatically. The more colourful a personality, the more fun you have doing the caricature.

Manoj Sinha - Caricaturist
A P J Abdul Kalam, courtesy Hindustan Times Group
Manoj Sinha - Caricaturist
Pranb Mukharjee, courtesy Hindustan Times Group


Manoj Sinha - Caricaturist
Jayalalithaa, courtesy Hindustan Times Group

Caricature is not fiction.

Almost every time, a caricature is about a real personality and the story attached. It is the duty of a caricaturist to portray the true character of the subject chosen. Therefore it is important to understand the thin line that separates humour from sarcasm. The key lies in creating insightful humour and most importantly, being true to the character. That is why one needs to spot the “LOL” factor in everything around. You never know, what strikes off the next story.

Manoj Sinha - Caricaturist
George W. Bush, courtesy Hindustan Times Group
Manoj Sinha - Caricaturist
Bal Thakrey, courtesy Hindustan Times Group by Manoj Sinha


Manoj Sinha - Caricaturist
Dalai Lama, courtesy Hindustan Times Group
Manoj Sinha - Caricaturist
Barack Obama, courtesy Hindustan Times Group

A story is timeless.

A good caricature starts a relationship, between the story and the viewer. Media, today, is moving at an astonishing rate. Therefore it is important to choose topics that are not going to be forgotten at the next ‘Breaking News’ segment. The importance of a story lies in the fact that it brings education along with fun. This way, the news may become redundant but the awareness of the change that the news brings to the daily lives of the people, lingers on

Manoj Sinha - Caricaturist
Steve jobs, courtesy Hindustan Times Group
Manoj Sinha - Caricaturist
Mark Zuckerberg, courtesy Hindustan Times Group
Manoj Sinha - Caricaturist
Sunder Pichai, courtesy Hindustan Times Group

Published in Issue 12

first interactive issue of Creative Gaga with Augmented Reality features. This issue focuses on the transition of Advertising from real to virtual and blurring the boundaries of both at the same time. Also bundled with lots of interesting articles and interviews.

 

Order Your Copy!
CURRENT ISSUE
Creative Gaga - Issue 48

 

Manoj Sinha, a visual artist who specialises in drawing cartoons. Having started his journey from his native land, Ranchi, he is presently based in Delhi, working at the Hindustan Times Group. He has also served various organisations as a cartoonist and animator for various projects.


Featured In


The first interactive issue of Creative Gaga with Augmented Reality features. This issue focuses on the transition of Advertising from real to virtual and blurring the boundaries of both at the same time. Also bundled with lots of interesting articles and interviews.
Every year brings many opportunities and hopes along with celebrations. For this issue, we reached many visual artists and designers to know their expectations from the year 2018. This issue’s cover designer, Shreya Gulati is exceptionally impressed by the advancement of technology in design, especially how VR & AR has impacted new ways of creating. Whereas Seerow Unni, a digital artist sees the simple and minimal design is here to stay for long. On the other hand, Caricature artist from Barcelona (Spain), Ernest Priego Martin is really satisfied with his techniques and materials and doesn’t want to see much change in this year. Honing and learning new skills is always a quest for every creative. So, whether you have many or none expectations for the year, this issue is a must-read. Go ahead and order your copy here or subscribe to not miss any future issues!

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Creative Gaga - Issue 48

 

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