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Living the old culture and traditions of the past through your own family is a rarity today. Shreyank Naik, an illustrator is lucky to have experienced this and shows us how it influenced his work.

 

Shreyank’s exposure to his uncles’ abstract paintings impacted his thought process in a way that he chose to major in the field of art at a very young age. The culture of arts and traditions that he was exposed to since a kid has helped him shape his career in this field.

 

With a passion to explore how the traditional art and techniques of art can be expressed in a digital manner, Shreyank likes being old-school and uses the age-old methodology of sketching on paper and sorting patches according to various design elements, followed by their digitalisation to explore new styles and their variations. He chooses the styles that are representative of him in terms of his thinking and his mind.

 

With his creative mind bent towards liking extremes, Shreyank’s major project, Amanav is based on the lifestyle of Aghoris as it is a topic of immense discussion in the society.

 

His series called ‘Real life illustrations’ defines abstract art by the exaggeration of the basic shapes of life, with a bit of influence of fictional stories.

 

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Traditions and Culture
Music. Description of fun but with an Indian twist.
The Chain Smokers.
Pet Lover. Illustration for Basic Shape of Life.
Traditions and Culture
Office life taking break for a coffee.
Traditions and Culture
Tradition of Fun. Enjoying life.

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We go through many interesting design projects each day and find them inspiring enough to be shared further. Projects which have the potential to inspire and spark multiple ideas. So, here are few selected one for this week’s design inspiration, enjoy!

Indian Princess Series by Nithin Rao Kumblekar

Branding, Stationery & Website Design for dots&dash by Aditi Dash

12 illustrations for summer Coca-Cola collection by Tania Yakunova

3D Illustration for Mastercard & Changi Airport by Petar Tarka

Illustration for British Council India by Studio Kohl

Website/Animation for IOCO/Biocomputer by Mike

Packaging for Country Chocolates by Muhammed Sajid

Packaging for Säpp by Leta Sobierajski and Wade Jeffree

Illustration for Two Fresh Creative by Prateek Vatash

Actors Illustration by Ricardo Polo

Editorial Illustration for Elle Magazine by Aditi Dash

Packaging for Agua Bendita by Futura .

Illustrations for Dogs for arTTask by Marina Okhromenko

Casual (Character Illustrations IV) by Omar. Aqil

Identity design for Arkom group of the companies by Natli Dreval

If you have any of your design project or someone else’s, which is equaliy inspiring for fellow creatives, then share it with us on contribute@creativegaga.com

CURRENT ISSUE
Creative Gaga - Issue 49

 

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Snow, rain, forest, desert – nature never followsany particular style. Graphic design studio, Prasun Mazumdar Design believes in a similar variety. Inspired by nature, it likes to work with natural tools, the hands, to create artworks that are organic and free-flowing, just like nature itself.

Design
Installation art for DLF Promenade
Design
Shiva Illustration

Nature is the Best Reference.

Wings of a butterfly. Tail of a peacock. The sunset sky. The veins of leaves. Nature is full of such beautiful designs and v aried display of creativity. The idea is to make a regular morning walk in the park seem like a walk through an art gallery. Spend more time with nature. Register natural patterns and forms. That’s how you’ll gradually realize that lessons from a book don’t help as much as dir ect interaction with life and nature.

Design
Illustration for Rajesh Pratap Singh, Rock Collection
Design
Designed for Royal Enfield

Variety Makes This World an Exciting Place.

Graphic designers must learn this from nature. Everything that exists around us has been designed for a particular purpose. Designs should also have a similar aim, an appropriate purpose. Nature is a live demonstration of the various simulations and executions of the same subject. Like that tree in front of your home. It’s the same tree that looks different in the morning sunshine as compared to its dark shadows dancing on a wall at night.

Pundits. A mixed visual language, showing the musical combination of heavy classical notes backed by electronic beats
Through the Words of Mr. Bond. Illustration for ‘The Kashmiri Storyteller’ by Ruskin Bond
Should start again? The world after the apocalypse with the crow holding a hope in the form of a seedling
Jim. Tee and denim design, inspired by Jim Morrison, showcases his persona using shapes and colours

Design Should Not Be What You Want It To Be, But Rather What it Should Be.

The main problem these days is that many designers are creating artworks that ‘appeal to the masses’. That’s usually because clients want it that way. In a world where everyone interprets art differently, such works of art are ineffective. Moreover, they are detrimental to the diversity that is inherent in nature and society. As a result, the whole world of art and design is getting formulated. The philosophy should be to do good designs and make them for what they are meant to be.

Metamorphosis. Inspired by constellations and night sky phenomenon, the design shows metamorphosis at different levels around us
Metamorphosis. Inspired by constellations and night sky phenomenon, the design shows metamorphosis at different levels around us

Nature Gave Us Tools.

We decide its use. Like our hands. It gives one a lot of options to experiment with allowing for new outcomes every time. Technology has helped graphic designers immensely. However, working with hands is a different feeling altogether. The idea is not to be different, but to feel your work as you make it. Those pencil impressions on the thumb, the colour and ink stains on the palm, the aching joints of the finger s, are all signs of raw and fresh work.

Tanabana. The word ‘tanabana’ means matrix. This illustrative book cover was made with a thread like effect
Packaging for Smuze

Your Design is an Ecosystem.

If trees, rivers, animals, birds, insects, soil and rocks were design elements, a forest would be the artwork. It’s for a designer to bring together unrelated elements to make it seem like one harmonious family. Singling out one element and making it rich can disturb the balance of the overall layout later on. Hence, the bigger picture should always be kept in mind.

Design
Packaging for Spichi
Design
Packaging for Spichi
For Royal Enfield

Evolution is a Way of Survival.

Mutation, we all know, is what keeps life going. Nature has an appropriate solution for revival and survival. The same concept can be applied while making identities. Using the right fonts, understanding them and their usage, can create identities that can stand the test of time. Experiment with fonts, mutate them. But before all that, know the surroundings, that is, the philosophy of the brand, its placement in the market and various other factors affecting the brand. Keeping all this in mind, make necessary changes to the font to get a desired result.

Rebranding for Erna’s Gourmet
Rebranding for Erna’s Gourmet

Self Belief Leads to Adaptation.

While starting off as an independent venture, don’t narrow the choices. Try your hands on everything. Be everything. Don’t restrict your capabilities. Of course, the change from a protected environment to the wilderness is not easy. But if you’re good, nothing can stop you.

Designed for Jawa

Published in Issue 11

This is a Design in India Festival Special! This issue also explored the Jewellery Design & Wedding Photography with some cool techniques to learn from experts in Gyaan section.

 

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CURRENT ISSUE
Creative Gaga - Issue 49

 

Freelance designer and minimalist illustrator Prathamesh Shedge talks about his urge to explore and how circumstance dictate his style.

Prathamesh has always been driven by the urge to explore. Discovering new methods and concepts, has always fascinated him. Thus, in this art series, he has experimented with a minimalist vector style, in contrast to the usual forced and enhanced detailing that is expected with the sports genre. He decided to approach the simplicity and flow of the sport, as opposed to its intensity.

 

With minimalist design, still flatness is the norm. Prathamesh however went for a route that is an amalgamation of multiple design styles, with a tin-tone colour palette. He also chose to not give the characters a specific skin tone, instead manipulating the colour palette to enhance and highlight the expressions.

 

In his design process, Prathamesh lets the circumstance dictate his style. He works in both traditional and digital mediums. But he prefers the traditional medium, simply because of how organic the process can be. Prathamesh first lays down his designs in sketch, before proceeding to convert them to digital to further enhance, a simple yet effective process.

 

One approach that Prathamesh sticks to, is not using the eraser too much, instead simply adapting and designing with the mistakes. He believes a mistake is merely a design anomaly that can become design idea

 

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Minimalist Illustrator Captures the Flow of Sport!
Minimalist Illustrator Captures the Flow of Sport!
Minimalist Illustrator Captures the Flow of Sport!
Minimalist Illustrator Captures the Flow of Sport!


Minimalist Illustrator Captures the Flow of Sport!
Minimalist Illustrator Captures the Flow of Sport!
Minimalist Illustrator Captures the Flow of Sport!
Minimalist Illustrator Captures the Flow of Sport!


Minimalist Illustrator Captures the Flow of Sport!
Minimalist Illustrator Captures the Flow of Sport!
Minimalist Illustrator Captures the Flow of Sport!

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For people, in this case Indians, who spend a considerable part of their lives abroad, what makes for a home? The search for the Identities of the diasporic Indian population prompted Meera Sethi to undertake this series, Foreign Returned.

 

Influenced by her visual backgrounds of medieval India and contemporary contexts, Meera set out to capture mixed identities through time and space, inspired by her own experiences across India, Canada and Australia. Each figure carries objects, images and personal histories of belonging and dislocation. Each figure is searching for something, perhaps it is home, perhaps it is a place to put down the suitcase.

 

Although these are portraits of contemporary wanderers, the clothing is inspired by Rajput and Mughal miniature paintings as this is how the experience of migration from India to the west can be visually depicted. The radical juxtaposition of aspects of one’s self show collapsing of time and space, of identities past and present. By creating a contradiction between what is worn and what is held, the intention is to suggest the ways history interrupts and/or creates our journeys.

 

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Parminder Sandhu (Paul)
Sudha Subramanium (Sue)
Mohammed Abdelrahman (Mo)
Anamika Sengupta (Ann)
K. Swaminathan (Sam)
Mariam Maharaj (Mary)

Extravagance can be deceptive. Three art forms – photography, styling & illustration – are thus merged to create The Bizarreness Called Beauty by Lucky Dubz Trifonas, a visual portrait of the unfavourable side of contemporary fashion industry.

Uncovering Realities

The attempt was to break the veil that exists between the fact and fiction of fashion business. Sexualising and objectifying models are practices that are sustained casually off and through the ramp. Shaking away this indifference, these realities are openly brought to the forefront.

Saying the Truth

Bad dreams, sinful desires and strange fashion statements have been constantly represented throughout the series. Precise photography and loud hairstyles provide a conducive environment to depict these representations.

The Disillusioning

What resulted was a not-so-pretty picture of what is otherwise posed as charming. Pronouncing loudly the uncharismatic in a brave tone, this depiction is a pointed stare into the ugly traditions and practices thriving within the fashion world.

 

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Fashion
Fashion

Consistency is imperative while creating a series. This can be achieved through the use of line style, tone, colour palette, a specific art form, etc. Here is an illustrations series created for The Lily News by Ana Duje, an Argentinean graphic designer and illustrator who currently works between Hong Kong and Barcelona. What makes this unique is the minimalistic art style, the starkness of the white lines and bright pop of colours against the pitch black background.

 

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Illustrations
Illustrations
Illustrations

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Nature is blessed with a wonderful variety of things and one that captures the eyes of many are the animals. Created in various forms and having unique patterns, Richard Field, illustrates them in his own style using worldwide cultural influences. He elaborates on his nature inspired designs.

inspired
The Dark Owl.
Aiyana
inspired
The Travelling Turtle.
The Night Owl

CG: What is the story behind what you do? How did you discover your talent and how did you work towards making it more than that? What were your inspirations? What were some challenges you had to overcome?

RF: Field-inspired, a play on the words ‘feel inspired’, is my name as an Illustrator. Having been inspired by so many things, it’s nice to do some inspiring of my own. My collection started when I was trying to make a bit of extra cash selling flash sheets to tattoo parlors around South London. Tattooists are always on the look out for new artwork to display in their shops. I used to work on black and white illustrations inspired by a variety of cultures around the world. My Native American, Mãori and folk art inspired illustrations caught the eye of a few people on Facebook and I decided to start adding colours and working on a new collection inspired by some of the nature’s most iconic animals.

inspired
The Bull.
Giraffe
The Aware Wolf
inspired
The Stag Prince.

CG: Animals play a central role in your designs. Can you throw some more light as to why? How did you find inspiration in animals and their patterns?

RF: Isn’t wildlife the most wonderful thing we have on this planet? I’ve definitely chosen the best subject to illustrate. The shapes and patterns that it forms never cease to amaze me. It’s a great achievement to be able to put your own stamp on animals we see so often. I enjoy trying to add a bit of personality to them – the ‘Wise’ Lion or the ‘Truthful’ tiger. Nature is full of so much hidden beauty, the idea is to try to encourage people to take a closer look at the artwork and look beyond to read the halftones and patterns.

inspired
African Buffalo.
The Crowned Crane
The Last Black Macaque
inspired
The Mountain Ram.

CG: Your designs have a striking contrast against black, creating an illuminated look and feel. How does that enhance the design?

RF: In my current collection, I work on black using a similar colour theme across all prints. By using strong, bold colours on black I hope to encourage the user to look closer at the detail. It’s not easy working on black, sometimes the colours can get a bit lost during the printing process – but I love the end result. Hopefully, people like how the artwork jumps off the canvas.

inspired
The African Elephant.
The Last Lion
Zebra
inspired
The Truthful Tiger.

Published in Issue 28

This Illustration Special is best to know why and how illustration as a popular medium is taking the design world by storm! From evolution of illustrations to its place in the world today, renowned designers and illustrators like Abhishek Singh, Mukesh Singh, Archan Nair, Alicia Souza, Raj Khatri with some international talent such as Fil Dunsky from Russia, Iain Macarthur and Richard Field from UK, who live and breathe illustration, would be the right people to gain some insight from. With many more talents to explore with great insights and excellent techniques, again a fully packed issue is waiting to amaze you!

 

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CURRENT ISSUE
Creative Gaga - Issue 49

 

Prasun Mazumdar - Brand
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Experience definitely counts. Prasun Mazumdar is here to share tips with the young, aspiring designers and to guide them in setting-up their own little studio and coverting it in a brand.

Prasun has a mixed take on the new-age designers of the current generation! Some would like to be independent designers and fit into the requirements as they come, some would want to use their remarkable skill to generate a style that is their very own and work as an independent design supplier, with social media helping them get the applause they want and also it would extend to real profits and then there are some who have long-term thinking and plans who wish to and will set up their own studios (brand).

Prasun is a supreme believer of the fact that everyone is different and has different life experiences. Hence the way of approaching a challenge and delivering it varies tremendously from person to person.



Having said this, he still feels that there are certain common aspects needed to be kept in mind to run an independent design studio.

01. Setting-up

The first challenge for setting up a studio is the space, as it has a major role to play in the initial years of a design studio. It considerably influences the evolution of thought process and allows designers to think with a free mind.

 

As for Prasun, personally, the new concepts of co-working space, is not a very ‘design studio’ thing as designers are a crazy breed, they need to talk but they also need to be in complete isolation at times.


02. The Driving Force

The urge and the push to work is the next most important thing. Post setting up the studio, the idea of just doing minimum work should not be the sole or pivotal idea. The project loads go up & down with market trends and requirements but to have the eagerness to do more is always good for a design studio as it keeps the spirit going.



03. Time Management

Managing time is quite a challenge during the days of establishment. Balancing between client and self-projects, allotting a good 20% to 30% of your total time to personal projects proves to be of great help.

04. Client Relationships

Building good and healthy relationship with your clients is always a plus as it helps in carrying the project further even after the defined work is finished. With the designer thinking in depth about the project and the client being ready to accept the suggestions, provided they are practical and propose a profitable angle to their business, it is a win-win situation for both parties, solely built on the established relationship between the two.



05. Eclectic Mix of Skills

For a stronger team and the studio’s organic growth, it is of much value to have a versatile group of designers, rather than having all good at one or similar skills.

Issue 44 - Creative Gaga

Published in Issue 44

Yourself as a Brand! Who doesn’t want to become famous, when everyone knows your name and especially for us designer, it is the basic dream every design student or young artist dream. But behind every successful studio, artist or designer there are stories of challenges, struggles and their unique solutions to these. With this issue, we interviewed many well-known names from the creative industry and found their different learnings and experiences behind making their own self as a brand. Though they all have a different take on this topic, still they all unanimously emphasise on focusing on their skills and quality delivery of the final outcome. So, if you are looking to establish yourself as a brand in the creative market or already in the process of it, this issue is a must-read.

 

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CURRENT ISSUE
Creative Gaga - Issue 49

 

The human face communicates, even if it’s not talking. The eyes and expressions tell a story like pages of a book. Dominated by emotions and such human elements, Artist Alpa Mistry takes us through some of her depictions.

 

A face is a visual communicator, and thus Alpa’s designs are characterised by the use of facial elements. Because expressions can convey a thousand different stories, her designs use that aspect to portray various feelings and personalities. The use of vibrant colours helps mellow down negative connotations of the central element, bestowing a ‘ying-yang’ dynamism to the final outcome whenever acrylic meets the canvas. What starts as a random unconscious sketch is built upon spontaneously by addition of elements, and at the end you have an artwork that relates back to life.

 

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Face
Glory
Face
Faces
Face
Answers
Face
Colors
Face
The Turban
Coming Together
Connections