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The magic of Indian mythology and its epic tales takes people by awe and surprise all throughout the world. They are intrigued by it in a way which makes them believers and followers of the same.

Indian Mythology

Considering Indian mythology as an ontological cosmological model, Giampaolo feels that it describes human sense in a poetic manner expressible by art.

 

Kamala Subramaniam’s colourful version of the Mahabharata, explaining the tragic attempt of humanity to elevate themselves from lower individual consciousness to a universal spiritual liberated condition, inspired Giampaolo to create his illustrative versions of the Mahabharata.

Indian Mythology

Before illustrating characters, Giampaolo does an intense research and study about them. He combines the understandings of the characters and the scenes from the explanations of the Mahabharat, descriptions from Bhaktivedanta and Srimad Bhagavatam’s texts and also the interpretations of a sanyasi as some of the information is purely from oral traditions.

Indian Mythology

To have a better understanding of the Indian culture and mythology, he even visited India in 2011. He spent some time at the School of Drama, New Delhi where he had the opportunity to go through the texts about history of Indian costumes. He returned back to Italy with his mind impregnated with details from the past.

Indian Mythology

Hand-Art: An Exclusivity

The difference between hand-made art and digital art is extremely similar to meeting people in actuality and meeting people over social networking sites. The coming in of digital art has not washed away the other forms of art. In the past, there has been a wide variety of expressions using various techniques and these pieces of art have been more dominant than the present day art pieces, barring a few. The beauty of the hand-made art lies in the human touch it has, which is missing from the digital art. It is exclusive in the way that one can feel the surface and texture of the hand-made painting by touching it and also feel the gestures and the strokes used by the artist to create the master piece.

Indian Mythology
Indian Mythology

The Emotional Attachment With the Illustration

Choosing the scene to illustrate is an emotional process for Giampaolo. When reading the book, he reads it rationally while understanding the plot, the tales, the intricate relations and the feelings that the scene expresses. This helps him visualise the story in his mind simultaneously while reading. He illustrates the scene that moves him the most on an emotional front. For instance, the end of Bhishmadev Pitamah on the bed of arrows was something that Giampaolo did not wish to illustrate, but the emotional sentiment that the incident has, which explains the characteristic of a great warrior that Bhishma was, is what moved the artist and got him visualising this scene.

Indian Mythology

Art is Self-Rewarding

He is immensely submerged in a continuous cycle of art production to create works to be exhibited at the end of a cycle. At present, he is working around the idea of “order and chaos”, which starts from a chaotic distribution of colors, followed by carving figures of women, animals etc to re-establish the lost consciousness on known models to overcome the terror of the unknown. A big fan of Indian mythology, he is soon going to start illustrations on the epic story of Ramayana.

 

He believes that one always learns from their mistakes and that practice is the best teacher!

Indian Mythology
Indian Mythology
CURRENT ISSUE
Creative Gaga - Issue 49

 

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Creating Illustrations on a real-life situation with a personal point of view can turn out as the most difficult learning for an artist. But illustrationist Uday Mohite has mastered this art over the years and now is on his finger-tips.

Illustrations
Ramdev baba proposing to legalise weed as it is natural healer by Uday Mohite.
Illustrations
A portrait dedicated to his Uday's favourite actress, Deepika Padukone, on Women’s Day.
Illustrations
Ranveer Singh

As a kid, Uday was fascinated by the cartoons and caricatures published in books, newspapers and journals accompanying a story but was never really interested in reading the story. This worked as a motivation factor for him to work in a field where it was possible to develop and explain a story just through drawings and cartoons, without the use of any words and so he chose to specialize in the line of illustration.

Illustrations
Proposing the laddus of achhe din will help them secure votes to win the 2019 elections
Illustrations
Irfan khan. A water colour portrait dedicated to Irfan Khan on his birthday.
Illustrations
Gungi Gudiya to Goddess Durga. Indira Gandhi was a shy kid not wanting to talk, but when elected as Prime Minister, a huge crowd gathered to hear her.

As much as the cartoons and journals inspired him to become an illustrator in his childhood days, some world famous illustrationists and cartoonists have worked out as his motivational sources and have had an equal amount of influence on him while Uday still is developing and becoming better and better in his field.

Illustrations
A portrait dedicated to Nawazuddin Siddiqui on his birthday.
Illustrations
Rashtrapti is busy. One of Rahul Dacuna’s story is about how the president is busy, having the only work of inaugurating different functions by Uday Mohite.
Illustrations
Writer Rahul Dacuna’s story expressing the fact that he wasn’t invited to Virat and Anushka’s wedding inspite of him having a passport!

Self-Learning, a Trick!

Somethings aren’t taught in school but are self-learnt by following other peoples’ work. Following this methodology got him calls from various newspapers at an early stage in his career and also motivated him to start freelancing alongside.

Illustrations
Bahubali-2
Illustrations
This piece of art was in awe of the work of Anushka Shetty after seeing the trailer of Bahubali 2: The Conclusion.
Illustrations
Alauddin Khilji A portrait of Ranveer Singh in the character of Alauddin Khilji from Padmaavat.

Trying to understand how humor is defined in illustrations and how it can be developed to get it across to people in simple ways, Uday has always held his seniors from the field in high regard. Some of his inspirationists include Jack Davis, Pascal Campion, Mario de Miranda, Tom Richmond, Wally Wood and Paul Coker, who are all international fame illustrations. Also, cartoonists like David Low, Bal Thackeray and R.K Laxman, just to name a few, have really helped him learn the tricks of the art and master it.

Illustrations
Lobo lobo in the city. A character from writer Rahul Dacuna’s story who is always angry, doesn't like anything bad that happens and is against the system.
Illustrations
Arun Jaitley preparing for the 2019 elections and proposing that Union Budget 2018 will have achhe din
Illustrations
Bromance. While on his world tour, Prime minister Narendra Modi would greet the dignitaries with a hug by Uday Mohite.

The Twist!

When it comes to deciding upon the content of the illustration, Uday prefers to choose subjects based on real life. If his subject is an individual person or an actual situation that needs to be portrayed, he talks to the subject himself in order to understand the situation in depth. He gathers all the information including small details which he thinks is necessary to illustrate the subject close to perfection.

Illustrations
Balasaheb Thackeray’s Birthday. A hand done illustration dedicated to Balasaheb Thackeray.
Illustrations
Jassus Jagga and us. A scene from writer Rahul Dacuna’s story including Virat Kohli, Jassus jagaa, Ravi Shastri and Pahlaj Nihalani.
Illustrations
Lobo Lobo appeared at my doorstep this morning carrying eggs in a brown paper bag. "Thanks Thelonious, for this lovely gift of eggs on Easter."

Illustrations are something where the reader understands the situation from the viewpoint of the artist. And so it is important to aptly choose the theme and style for the illustration.

Illustrations
Today’s generation. Today girls take selfies in innumerable different and weird ways.
Illustrations
Alauddin Khilji
Gangubai Kathiawadi

The theme and style for the illustration are developed based on the kind of message that is to be conveyed. With a special liking for caricaturing, Uday creates caricatures for a funny situation as caricatures have a tint of humor in them. He prefers to make funny situations stylish and colorful compared to giving a rough, black and white look to a criminal story.

Illustrations
No words. There are a lot of words in India which aren’t available in a dictionary!
Illustrations
Writer Rahul Dacuna received a call from Tipu Sultan, Gabbar Singh and Akbar asking him for an answer who are the people staying illegally on the land.
Uddhav Thackeray & Aditya Thackeray

The Top Of The World!

For Uday, in order to remain in the market, he feels that knowing the works of people from the field is important. Not only knowing their work but also understanding their style of doing it helps an artist to learn. It is also necessary to know what is that the customers are looking for. Merging the market demands and the artists’ personal style together can help the artist remain afloat.

Illustrations
Dedicated to Mr. Atal Vajpayee on his birthday, an attempt to capture his andaaz of reading out poems.
Illustrations
Laali
Uddhav Thackeray
CURRENT ISSUE
Creative Gaga - Issue 49

 

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Just like the cosmos, when you see India for the first time everything seems chaotic and yet every Indian person finds his/ her own order in that hustle which all goes in tandem. Pavan Rajurkar a freelance illustrator based out of Mumbai, capture this Indianness perfectly in his illustrations for many different brands and studios. Some of his recent illustrations have been displayed here.

Natural Ice Cream

Ice Cream from Colaba

Illustrations

Title: Natural Ice Cream

Studio: Drink Water Design, Mumbai

 

The Illustration was created for Natural ice cream, Colaba, Mumbai. As they wanted to capture the feel of Mumbai’s famous place Colaba. For that, the Colaba Causeway has been kept at the centre of the illustration and around it used other monuments like Gateway of India, Taj hotel, and some vintage jewellery shops with details of the architecture.

Also included some of the element which helped in capturing the feel of Colaba like photographers at the Gateway, Parsi people, tourists, pigeons, cats, ferryboats, painters at Colaba and many more small elements. A limited colour palette with a flat colour style has been chosen to create a harmony between so many elements.


Society Masala Tea

The Masala of Indianness

Illustrations

Title: Society Masala Tea

Studio: Black Swan Life, Mumbai

 

The client asked to capture the cacophony of India in a single visual with a unique style of illustration. The illustration highlights the everyday life of India and the contrasting cultures, landscapes, people, actions, cities, flora & fauna of India.

The illustration has been used for Society Masala Tea’s print & outdoor communications of ‘Masala of Indianness’ campaign. The illustration not only sucks you in to find many relatable elements but also perfectly capture the order in a chaos of Indian life.


Culture Trip

City Scene of Mumbai

Illustrations

Client: Culture Trip, London

 

The Culture Trip, London approached to create a timeless illustration of Mumbai for their location webpage of Mumbai. Being a notable landmark or architecture of Mumbai, chose the Chhatrapati Shivaji Terminus (CST) as the central point of the illustrations. The life movement around is being captured with the help of people from different walk of life doing regular chores, buses and taxis and more. Being the busiest time of the city, the dusk is chosen as the time of the day!

The colour palette has been kept limited as a lot going on in illustration. The tone and style are inspiring, immersive, atmospheric and timeless as the illustration could be displayed for many years.

Latest Issue

Published in Issue 49

The Design in 2020! Each year starts with many predictions, anticipations and a lot of hope for bad things to go out and good things to come in our life. The year 2020 has already started with eventful initial months and may hold more surprises in coming times. To understand what’s coming from the design perspective, we featured some of the best design projects from last year. Also discussed a few broad questions like how minimalism will affect our designs or what all an illustrator to keep in mind to be successful and much more.

 

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Creative Gaga - Issue 49

 

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NH1 Design takes us through its approach behind freshly branding a local Indian street food outlet while ensuring that it retains an identity credible of being authentic, fun, young and affordable.

Brief

The Ahmadabad market had been selling anything but authentic Vada Pav (typically, a local Mumbai delicacy); brands were serving it with cheese, Spinach, and cholle (a form of peas). The essential idea for Majja, a quick-service restaurant selling Indian street food as a branded and hygienic experience, was thus to reinforce the delicacy’s authenticity. Targeting the youth and office-goers, who prefer a quick snack at an affordable price, the challenge was to create a brand synonymous with authentic taste, fun, young and affordability.

NH1 - Vada Pav

The Concept

The word Majja (fun) is commonly used across India, especially in Gujarat. We created a fun verbal brand language that could be easily understood across different languages and cultures – a friendly tone of voice that completely aligned with the brand ethos.

The Solution

The visual story was inspired by the street life of Mumbai. The use of illustrated stories of people and the streets of Mumbai further emphasised the authenticity of the Vada Pav.

NH1 - Vada Pav
NH1 - Vada Pav
NH1 - Vada Pav
NH1 - Vada Pav
NH1 - Vada Pav
NH1 - Vada Pav
NH1 - Vada Pav
NH1 - Vada Pav
NH1 - Vada Pav
NH1 - Vada Pav
NH1 - Vada Pav
NH1 - Vada Pav
NH1 - Vada Pav

Together, the visual and verbal language established a consistent set of assets for the brand. Every touch-point was meticulously detailed. Applications included signage, environmental graphics, packaging, stationery, website, adverts, tent cards, floor graphics, social media posts, uniforms, food trucks, menu, danglers and others.

NH1 - Vada Pav
NH1 - Vada Pav
NH1-Vada Pav

Published in Issue 38

This issue, we try to explore different views from many well-known studio owners and senior designers. While Anthony Lopez of Lopez Design shared tips on what a studio looks for in a designer, Mohar Ray from Codesign highlights the key aspects that play a significant role and make the difference in whether you are hired or not as a promising designer. Also, this issue has an insightful article on ‘Branding with reason and love’ from Itu Chaudhuri, founder ICD (Itu Chaudhuri Design) along with Siddhi Ranade, explaining his tools of story telling through his unique style of illustrations. This issue is a must read for a talented graduate to a branding expert. Order you copy and enjoy reading it!

 

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Creative Gaga - Issue 49

 

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As designers, ordinary events shouldn’t be ignored, for in them lie inspirations and insights that everyone saw but never noticed. How good you are with tuning your eyes to your mind is what counts, believes Karthik M. He makes some interesting points that translate into how to notice things so that people can take notice of your work.

Periods
First Coffee
Poster for Easy Cabs
Adoption
Vichar (thoughts)

Beauty Lies in The Eyes of the Observer

Any creative journey starts with observation; the ability to see beyond what is visible and read between the lines. Different designers will have different tones in which they try and communicate what they perceive, whether it’s through mockery, humour or abstract routes. What’s important is to find a unique connection inside what you observe and bring that to life in a personal way.

Road Ritual
Government Job

One will realise that over the course of time, doing justice to yourself will help bring recognition, as your designs make way into websites, blogs and so on. Create work that instigates discussion. And advertising is a good place to learn how to do that because it always keeps you curious and makes you dig for insights.

Life. An everyday situation, shown with a unique connotation; one that instigates the viewer to think beyond what they see.
Apocalypse. An everyday situation, shown with a unique connotation; one that instigates the viewer to think beyond what they see.
Grope Spot. An everyday situation, shown with a unique connotation; one that instigates the viewer to think beyond what they see.

As Every Sight has an Insight

Pretty much so. Inspirations are many and they are hiding everywhere. It could be in a fight you’ve had with your partner that might trigger a chain of thought or sometimes as simple as how your pet curls up and sleeps It’s funny how something so small are like blips on a radar screen and which actually have the potential to manifest into great ideas. The underlying element is of course to constantly look for inspirations to invent and create.

Connect. A series of illustrations exploring grey areas of life in black and white.

For Illustrators, Advertising is the Best School

There are probably millions of people out there who can draw, who can illustrate. They love to tell stories, share concepts via striking visual form. For them, and their audience, it’s something that never gets dull. And that’s why, advertising is the perfect launch pad for great talent. It not only allows you to do what you do best, but also teaches you other key traits that are vital for someone in a creative profession.

Cover for Helter Skelter Book
Editorial Design for Helter Skelter Book, Hands
Editorial Design for Helter Skelter Book, SpeakingTongues

Advertising, helps designers see a bigger picture; one beyond the edges of their canvas. It not only lets you make things but also teaches you how to present your idea to the world. It makes you a thinker, a creator, most importantly, it makes you a doer.

Sorry State
Silent Killer
Smirking Salary. Sometimes, words can be great visuals as well, demonstrates this tongue-in-cheek design.

Published in Issue 24

Illustration For Advertising Special! Gone are the days when Illustrations would take a back seat. Now, they are becoming more proactive and are evolving the way we communicate. This time, Creative Gaga focuses on how the advertising world is opening its doors to this exciting form of design. Featuring renowned Illustrators like Chris Beatrice, Nasheet Shadani, Vijay Kumar, Gabriel Mareno and much more, this issue promises to leave no page unturned!

 

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Creative Gaga - Issue 49

 

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Childhood memories and stories are two things we can never let go of. Giving form to characters and shape to fairytale stories, US illustrator Chris Beatrice is the hand behind those wondrous drawings that we read instead of the words themselves. He talks to us about his style and shares his journey.

Feeding Time
Freedom
Moon Path
KooKoo Train Station

CG: We’ve all probably read books that had covers designed by you. What lead to your fascination for fairytales and fictitious characters?

Chris: Really just reading stories as a kid and having them read to me. I still like illustrated stories, even if the only illustration is the cover, because you get a blend of the artist’s vision and your own, both inspired by the actual story. It’s amazing how a great book cover can actually make a mediocre book a bit more enjoyable, because you get some personal identification with the characters and environments in the book.

Down in a Hole
Kolsch Dog
Cicero

With children’s picture books we go a step further and really try to tell the story with the pictures, often adding elements that don’t literally appear in the text, or which hit you more viscerally than the corresponding words.

Lecture at the Swamp
Gulliver
The Skunk

CG: What excites you most about what you do? What homework and brainstorming exercises do you carry out before having a fair idea of what you wish to execute?

Chris: Part of me loves the science of light, form, anatomy, etc. – just using my brain to make something real and tangible on a 2D surface, making real, believable creatures out of a bunch of little marks. The other part that’s fascinating is learning about history, costume, animals, architecture, whatever. I want my pictures to be completely sound in terms of historical accuracy, even if 99% of the audience wouldn’t know the difference. There is so much misinformation out there that I at least want my stuff to be reliable.

Henry
Welcome
Science Room

I also love the feeling of going on a somewhat open ended journey. I never know 100% what I am going to get. I know the kind of feeling I want to evoke, and the story that the picture needs to tell, but it’s not always clear how that’s going to happen. To call it trial and error would be misleading, but it really is like you just need to jump into the picture, try stuff, and respond to what’s happening, what’s working and not working, as well as the entirely new things that happen magically and you’re lucky just to see them and be able to keep them.

Caught
Leaving The Swamp
Gladiator

CG: The stories that you’ve portrayed are famous not just in USA, but worldwide. How do your illustrations and designs cater to the world audience? What elements do you use in order to relate your designs to them?

Chris: I’ve noticed that my work seems to resonate equally in the U.S. and Europe at least. Part of that is as I draw a lot from European folk tales, which is really my favorite source of inspiration. I’m not as into fantasy as I used to be, and though I love reading comics I don’t really want to make them. So my work comes across as kind of classic.

Uncle SamB
Penny waking up late
Penny on the stairs

I just do pictures that I would want to see when reading these stories. But I do very much respect the integrity of different cultures and am extremely sensitive to not simplifying or caricaturing them. If I’m doing an Indian folk tale you can bet I’m going to find out how people in India, at the time and place the story is set, dress, wear their hair, etc., right down to the professions of the characters, their economic status, and so on.

Soccer Girl
Flying Window
Surprise Party

CG: What has your experience been with the advertising industry?

Chris: Believe it or not advertising is some of my favorite work to do. The process is fast and dynamic, and most importantly perhaps, I feel like I am making an image that is going to be around for a long time, and seen by a lot of eyes. We try things, see what works, and if it doesn’t work we talk about exactly why. Often with books, authors think the image is just supposed to literally represent part of the story, but if that’s the case, it’s really not adding anything. Sometimes it’s hard for certain authors to really home in on what a ‘picture’ should be saying.

Stage Fright
Afternoon

CG: Apart from book covers, gaming and packaging designs, how do you plan to take your skill forward into other dimensions? What is your dream project that’s still waiting to happen?

Chris: That’s a tough one! Maurice’s Valises kind of is my dream project. As a commercial artist there is a wide range of possibilities, from being a small part of a huge team (e.g. a concept artist on an animated movie), to being half of a small team (e.g. illustrating a book). I’ve been doing the latter for quite a while now, but at some point I will probably drift back to a larger more collaborative venue. It’s kind of impossible to mix those two – you can’t, for example, animate a feature film by yourself, and you can’t use a huge team to illustrate a picture book.

Alfred
Swamp Things
After the Snow

Published in Issue 24

Illustration For Advertising Special! Gone are the days when Illustrations would take a back seat. Now, they are becoming more proactive and are evolving the way we communicate. This time, Creative Gaga focuses on how the advertising world is opening its doors to this exciting form of design. Featuring renowned Illustrators like Chris Beatrice, Nasheet Shadani, Vijay Kumar, Gabriel Mareno and much more, this issue promises to leave no page unturned!

 

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CURRENT ISSUE
Creative Gaga - Issue 49

 

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Vijaya Laxmi exhibits the power that a woman possesses through her illustration series, ‘Devi’, ‘Shiva-Shakti’ and various other series, all are an exploration of her mythological concepts allowing viewers to see beyond the obvious.

Obsession with drawing and painting is Vijaya Laxmi’s genetic code. Pursuing art as a free-time hobby flowered into a passion of extremes where she could forgo sleep to complete canvasses and thus began her creative journey as a professional artist.

 

Also practicing clay modelling, she credits herself with a substantial part in promoting the concept of ‘Green Ganeshas’.

Vijaya Laxmi - Devata or Devi | Creative Gaga
Shivgami

Themed Concepts of the Modern Divine

Sensing and feeling divinity within her and outside of her, she has explored this divinity through her artwork in a modern and contemporary manner. Her work is mostly figurative created using oil and acrylics on canvas in subtle blues and greys, attempting to convey a story.

Vijaya Laxmi - Devata or Devi | Creative Gaga
Saraswati

According to Vijayalaxmi, the female form has allure, grace and beauty emerging from the gentleness of form, the curves – be it the nose, the neck, the torso, the bosom, the waist; the softness of lines of fingers and toes convey a sense of movement. There is remarkable strength in what to the eye looks merely dainty.

Vijaya Laxmi - Devata or Devi | Creative Gaga
Shivaay

Vijaya Laxmi - Devata or Devi | Creative Gaga
Towards Peace

The Devi Series

To convey the message that each female has a different rupa, she has created a series, Devi, which is a reflection of her unhappiness where people see a woman in goddess but not the other way round. Unlike calendar art, she has depicted the various Devi in a simple manner, without the much elaborate attributes of goddesses with heavy ornamentation.

Vijaya Laxmi - Devata or Devi | Creative Gaga
Kaali
Vijaya Laxmi - Devata or Devi | Creative Gaga
Durga

She says that simplicity is itself the beauty of a message: ‘Here She is – now you draw your own meaning, interpret it, but here are my guidelines.’

 

Laxmi in her work is depicted as smiling – as everyone wishes to be blessed by her bounteous grace. Devi Kali’s face projects the anger or rage at injustice. Like Kali, Durga too has a more chiseled face, emphasising their strength, both destructive and creative.

Vijaya Laxmi - Devata or Devi | Creative Gaga
Shivalankaar

The Shiv-Shakti

The Shiv-Shakti series is where she sees Shiv and Shakti as one – separate and together but spiritually one. It is a glorious representation of souls, their quest for merger and the attainment of the moment when they are immersed into each other.

 

Viajaya Laxmi sees Shiva not just in a male form but also a female – the ardhanarishwar. He manifests himself in a complex dual form; the two forms merged in a manner where it is difficult to point where the male form ends and the female begins.

Vijaya Laxmi - Devata or Devi | Creative Gaga
Shiva-Shakti

Vijaya Laxmi - Devata or Devi | Creative Gaga
Shivangini

She has showcased the constant effort of Shakti to merge with Shiva in the He-She element through a series of paintings like Shakti seeking his attention; Shakti with the power of her will, she herself transforms into Shiva in the posture of meditation, but with her feminine physical attributes intact; Shakti trying to create a Shiva into whom she can merge.

Vijaya Laxmi - Devata or Devi | Creative Gaga
Natsati

Traditional is Evergreen

For Vijaya Laxmi, the visual language on the canvas is the marriage of an idea, a thought, the medium and the expression using the mediums. Even an ordinary thing has to be beautified or the art is lesser for it.

Vijaya Laxmi - Devata or Devi | Creative Gaga
Prayers

For her, digital art is flat and does not reflect the energy that the strokes of a brush provide, imparting life into a work of art. The computer screen’s size and the size of her canvases are of no comparison. Working on an actual canvas scale is a stupendous realisation that the good old brush can turn a trick or two which machines may not be able to.

Published in Issue 46

We all design for different audiences and always keep trying to figure out what they would need and how will they react to our designs? But, one audience who is the youngest of all and most difficult to predict is ‘Kids’. So, to get more clarity, we focused on animation design, an extensively used medium to influence these young ones. This issue is full of veterans advice and a lot of inspirations throughout for every creative soul. So, go ahead

 

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Creative Gaga - Issue 49

 

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Everything around us is the result of a design thought, conscious or unconscious. Diving deep into the story behind its creation inspires original creativity. Ruminates the young and promising illustration & design studio, LOCOPOPO, founded by Lokesh Karekar.

Illustration for Royal Stag Whisky packaging Design
Illustration for Royal Stag Whisky packaging Design
Illustration for Royal Stag Whisky packaging Design

We Live in a Designed World

There is design in every object or thing around us. From a bus ticket to apparels, from roads to an entire city, and every single thing around us is designed. Good or bad, it has been “designed” by somebody. The environment that we grow up in defines our choices of colours, patterns, purposes and forms. As consumers we prefer for a certain kind of design. And as creators, we subconsciously play the role of a designer, conceptualizing a product according to our choices. This is the most fascinating fact about the world around us.

Illustration for Taj Vivanta
Identity design for Myoho - a fashion apparel brand
Identity and label design for SIX FIELDS wheat beer

Creating is The Best Way to Get Inspired

Inspiration can come from anywhere. That’s the most heard statement in the life of a designer. What we do with it shape up our creativity. Travelling is just a beginning to imbibe ideas. Scribbling, doodling, clicking photographs, recording incidents is the next step. As creative minds, we need to keep dabbling with the triggers so as to come up with our own ideas. This is what keeps the mind of an artist fresh, original and prolific.

Identity design for Mango Pickle
Collateral design for Mango Pickle
Collateral design for Mango Pickle
Coaster design for Mango Pickle
Collateral design for Mango Pickle

Our Roots Define Our Identity

Our culture has a rich reservoir of forms and content. As designers we should search within and dig out references that are related to our roots. But the quest doesn’t stop there. Being part of the larger global family, our job is to merge our design sensibilities with the international one. Keeping the composition and colour preference modern and the choice of figures and patterns Indian, or vice versa, we are actually contributing our bit to make our own art socially appreciable. It’s time we simplify, modify, create shapes and motifs inspired from Indian traditional styles and implement them correctly with proper use of colours.

Brand illustration language created for festival mailers for Aditya Birla Capital
Brand illustration language created for festival mailers for Aditya Birla Capital
Brand illustration language created for festival mailers for Aditya Birla Capital

Illustration is an Illusion

And of course, a beautiful one. It’s wonderful to observe how it seamlessly integrates into the central thought of the project at hand. Ranging from minimal and form based work, where the whole charm is concentrated in one form to very detailed, sometimes bright and vibrant imagery, illustrations are carriers of ideas and have no existence of their own. Trying to define style through one’s illustration abilities is a wrong approach. Rather, one should focus on one’s communication abilities and explore the preferred design tools.

Illustration for Jack Daniels
Packaging Design for Jack Daniels
Play card Design for Jack Daniels
Play card Design for Jack Daniels

Every Medium has an Inherent Wit

As designers our job is to give a contextual twist and make the humour relevant to the design. There is fun around us. We don’t even have to search for it. If our process of getting inspired is right, it automatically transforms into our works. Be it illustration, collage, clay modeling or even product design, the medium inherits this wit and automatically gets translated through the specific language of the medium. The human figures in my work often follow a feeling of caricature as that is what I imbibe from the human faces around me.

How the stability of the Indian Rupee affects industries like infrastructure, automobile and banking. Created for Moneycontrol.com
How the stability of the Indian Rupee affects industries like infrastructure, automobile and banking. Created for Moneycontrol.com

Be Original

Look around and you’ll find your voice resonating in one of the elements of your root, your own culture. Get inspired from it, and embark on the journey of finding your own language.

Illustration created for LAKME - Absolute Salon advertising campaign
Lifestyle Illustration created for Lodha Bellissimo

Published in Issue 04

This is a Inspiration Special. The issue with the best insights from some of the top space designers and advertising tips from Happy Creatives with some exclusive mix of media experiments in type and digital art.

 

 

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Creative Gaga - Issue 49

 

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Snow, rain, forest, desert – nature never followsany particular style. Graphic design studio, Prasun Mazumdar Design believes in a similar variety. Inspired by nature, it likes to work with natural tools, the hands, to create artworks that are organic and free-flowing, just like nature itself.

Design
Installation art for DLF Promenade
Design
Shiva Illustration

Nature is the Best Reference.

Wings of a butterfly. Tail of a peacock. The sunset sky. The veins of leaves. Nature is full of such beautiful designs and v aried display of creativity. The idea is to make a regular morning walk in the park seem like a walk through an art gallery. Spend more time with nature. Register natural patterns and forms. That’s how you’ll gradually realize that lessons from a book don’t help as much as dir ect interaction with life and nature.

Design
Illustration for Rajesh Pratap Singh, Rock Collection
Design
Designed for Royal Enfield

Variety Makes This World an Exciting Place.

Graphic designers must learn this from nature. Everything that exists around us has been designed for a particular purpose. Designs should also have a similar aim, an appropriate purpose. Nature is a live demonstration of the various simulations and executions of the same subject. Like that tree in front of your home. It’s the same tree that looks different in the morning sunshine as compared to its dark shadows dancing on a wall at night.

Pundits. A mixed visual language, showing the musical combination of heavy classical notes backed by electronic beats
Through the Words of Mr. Bond. Illustration for ‘The Kashmiri Storyteller’ by Ruskin Bond
Should start again? The world after the apocalypse with the crow holding a hope in the form of a seedling
Jim. Tee and denim design, inspired by Jim Morrison, showcases his persona using shapes and colours

Design Should Not Be What You Want It To Be, But Rather What it Should Be.

The main problem these days is that many designers are creating artworks that ‘appeal to the masses’. That’s usually because clients want it that way. In a world where everyone interprets art differently, such works of art are ineffective. Moreover, they are detrimental to the diversity that is inherent in nature and society. As a result, the whole world of art and design is getting formulated. The philosophy should be to do good designs and make them for what they are meant to be.

Metamorphosis. Inspired by constellations and night sky phenomenon, the design shows metamorphosis at different levels around us
Metamorphosis. Inspired by constellations and night sky phenomenon, the design shows metamorphosis at different levels around us

Nature Gave Us Tools.

We decide its use. Like our hands. It gives one a lot of options to experiment with allowing for new outcomes every time. Technology has helped graphic designers immensely. However, working with hands is a different feeling altogether. The idea is not to be different, but to feel your work as you make it. Those pencil impressions on the thumb, the colour and ink stains on the palm, the aching joints of the finger s, are all signs of raw and fresh work.

Tanabana. The word ‘tanabana’ means matrix. This illustrative book cover was made with a thread like effect
Packaging for Smuze

Your Design is an Ecosystem.

If trees, rivers, animals, birds, insects, soil and rocks were design elements, a forest would be the artwork. It’s for a designer to bring together unrelated elements to make it seem like one harmonious family. Singling out one element and making it rich can disturb the balance of the overall layout later on. Hence, the bigger picture should always be kept in mind.

Design
Packaging for Spichi
Design
Packaging for Spichi
For Royal Enfield

Evolution is a Way of Survival.

Mutation, we all know, is what keeps life going. Nature has an appropriate solution for revival and survival. The same concept can be applied while making identities. Using the right fonts, understanding them and their usage, can create identities that can stand the test of time. Experiment with fonts, mutate them. But before all that, know the surroundings, that is, the philosophy of the brand, its placement in the market and various other factors affecting the brand. Keeping all this in mind, make necessary changes to the font to get a desired result.

Rebranding for Erna’s Gourmet
Rebranding for Erna’s Gourmet

Self Belief Leads to Adaptation.

While starting off as an independent venture, don’t narrow the choices. Try your hands on everything. Be everything. Don’t restrict your capabilities. Of course, the change from a protected environment to the wilderness is not easy. But if you’re good, nothing can stop you.

Designed for Jawa

Published in Issue 11

This is a Design in India Festival Special! This issue also explored the Jewellery Design & Wedding Photography with some cool techniques to learn from experts in Gyaan section.

 

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Creative Gaga - Issue 49

 

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Whether a mystery is intriguing or not depends a lot on how you tell it. “Abstract ideas, when combined with the correct medium, give rise to captivating artworks” says illustrator Saloni Sinha. She shares some secrets on how to attain the idea-medium sync.

Saptan Stories, Illustrative Story
Saptan Stories, Illustrative Story

It’s a no chicken or egg analogy.

The idea comes first. Period. The medium gives a vent to portray the context like in ‘Skating Glory’, an installation made for NID Bangalore’s annual fest. For this artwork, illustrations using poster paints were made on corrugated sheets which were later cut into skateboard shape so as to give it a fun and raw college-like look.

Skating Glory
Saptan Stories, Illustrative Story
Saptan Stories, Illustrative Story

At times, the medium participates in the idea as in the case of the glass etched illustration ‘Evolve’. The creature that is depicted is embedded rather than staying in its free form, implying the translucency of the creature’s existence.

Evolve
Cornucopia, Event Poster

Mix it up to sort it out.

Mixed media works best when it comes to abstraction of ideas. The traditional style of inking, when later coloured digitally, helps give the artwork a modern philosophical look. The idea in ‘Escapism’ is all about observing, guarding and the dilation of these when observed from a different perspective. And the digital aspect, like the hazy boundaries and the surreal surroundings, help dramatise the theme.

Escapism
Amogh Symphony - IV, Album cover art
YSP - Chaos // Despair, Album cover

A mix is also noticeable in ‘Droid in Process’ that has an illustration against a digitally created futuristic background, giving it a unique appeal.

Silver Tears - Ensnared, Album cover

While working with mixed media, it’s important to not let the medium disrupt your idea. The medium should enhance the thought. Like in ‘Profanity’, digital tones of light and dark are used to showcase the power of the illustrated dark lord.

Profanity
Eastern Ghats Wildlife Society, Branding and Educational Posters

Colour code the thoughts.

Though colour patterns vary from medium to medium, the basic fact remains that colours are selected keeping in mind the mood of the context. The saturated ones suggest vigour and powerful ideas as in ‘Bloom’. The creature’s bright green dress gives a vive of purity and harmonistic perspective of nature. Her bright red hair gives the feeling of passion and joyousness that nature has to offer.

Bloom, depicts the comfort and the bloom of the nature

On the other hand the dull colours talk about the subtleness or the illusive nature of the idea. ‘The Grand Escape’ stays in the grey zone to highlight the underlying theme. The artwork suggests the collision of thoughts in an abstract way which leads to the breakfree of a mind that then spreads into a different zone.

The Grand Escape
Practo, UI/UX

Symbolisms, metaphors and analogies are also mediums.

Abstraction involves disguising plane visions. The illustrated mechanical hand of Frankenstein in ‘Bring Me to Life’ depicts the conscious idea of destruction by our own. But the twist in observation here is that the posture of the hand is not threatening in any sense, rather it is playful. The ugly mechanical hand tries to explore the beauty of the butterfly in a way he isn’t aware of, as he was never taught the love behind his creation. The underlying thought, is that the ugliness we are born with doesn’t traverse if the love and care doesn’t.

Bring Me to Life

In ‘Tangles of Insanity’, the creature, its lustrous outgrowths and the dark background can be compared to the mind and mood of the artist who spreads the brushes rhythmically on to the canvas, creating a dilemma for itself and plunging into