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Illustrations with a human touch are what people look for and designer Ashwani Nagar understands that concept very well. His illustrations maintain the feel and emotion that resonate with people which in turn help them connect to the artwork at first sight.

 

Inspired by mundane events and interesting everyday people, one of his projects called Life in a Metro, Airport Swag depicts his acute sense of observation of how people behave and react while undergoing their daily journey to and from work to home. Collaborating with art partner Manish Minglani, the series of 12 posters offer a microscopic view on peoples’ everyday actions and behaviour. Made using sketchbook, Photoshop and Illustrator, this artwork symbolises how humour can help educate and create positive change in society.

 

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Illustrations
Airport Swag
Illustrations
Airport Swag
Illustrations
Airport Swag
Illustrations
Airport Swag
Illustrations
Alien Attack, Life in Metro
Illustrations
Taak Jhaak, Life in Metro
Illustrations
Loot Sako toe Loot lo, Life in Metro
Illustrations
Khaao aur khaane do, Life in Metro
Mast Malang, Life in Metro
Laila Majnu, Life in Metro
Hum Saath Saath Hain, Life in Metro
Dharna Pradarshan, Life in Metro
Asiye na mujhe tum dekho, Life in Metro
Show Stopper, Life in Metro
Super Power, Life in Metro

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Gone are the days when Illustrators used to take the back seat in the advertising world. With things today, they’re emerging as the forerunners of some amazing and memorable communication that is being recognized. No doubt, clients, like OLX and Docomo, are exploring this valuable asset with Nithin Rao Kumblekar.

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Namaste India Milk, Agency: ADK Fortune Communications Pvt. Ltd.
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Urbanrise, Agency: One MG, Chennai
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Contacting an illustrator for a TVC shoot might not be something we hear of everyday, but when OLX got in touch with Nithin Rao, it was a wise decision. The client wanted a campaign that would carry forward in print as well, and thus, saving time and cost, decided to get the shoot illustrated. Simple to look at, but the task was a challenging one for the artist. The OLX team had asked him to create every object separately in the layout so that they could pick each one later, according to their needs. Thus, the illustration required Nithin to create every object completely even if it was overlapped by the objects.

Wall graphic for Sulekha.com
Wall graphic for Sulekha.com

Wall graphic for Sulekha.com
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When Docomo demanded an illustration route for its exciting print campaign ‘The bedtime stories’, Nithin knew it would be storytelling through single visuals. Without over complicating the visual, he worked carefully with shadow and light to establish humor and wit using relatable scenarios. To give the story a setting, subtle placement of props were used, like the placement of a kid’s drawing book, school bag and water bottle with a fish on it.

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Client: Killer dryShampoo, Agency: Makani
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Client: Killer dryShampoo, Agency: Makani
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Client: Killer dryShampoo, Agency: Makani
advertising

Published in Issue 24

Gone are the days when Illustrations would take a back seat. Now, they are becoming more proactive and are evolving the way we communicate. This time, Creative Gaga focuses on how the advertising world is opening its doors to this exciting form of design. Featuring renowned Illustrators like Chris Beatrice, Nasheet Shadani, Vijay Kumar, Gabriel Mareno and much more, this issue promises to leave no page unturned!

 

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Freelance illustrator, Pratima Unde, takes us on a journey of depicting human emotions on canvas. She thereby describes and provides insight on how it requires one to dive into the depths of the subject’s personality, so as to be able to aptly and accurately represent it.

Emotions
Monk.

CG. What fascinates you most about human expressions that you seem to choose them as your prime subjects?

PU. Even if you don’t know an individual personally, you can decipher a lot about that person just by looking at his or her face. Every day in our lives, we see hundreds of faces; each person wears a mask. But, if we get out of our own little selfish world and look carefully, the mask will disappear, and we’ll see a range of emotions on the person’s face – right from pain to happiness. I like taking off those masks through my illustrations.

Emotions
The Couple.

CG. What is your main intention that you wish to achieve or convey through your work?

PU. I try to bring out the emotions people go through; ones they subconsciously engage in, and which do not easily or readily show on their faces and in their expressions. The subjects I approach are very shy and prefer to keep everything to themselves, much like a secret or personal indulgence. I speak for them through my illustrations, bringing out what lays unsaid or unexpressed.

Emotions
Naughtiest.

CG. What are the most challenging aspects of portraying human emotions?

PU. People go through umpteen numbers of emotions, not only through the course of the whole day but also at single points of time. To select the one emotion that dominates or overshadows the others is a little tricky. I sometimes spend days observing the subjects, before I start to illustrate. It requires one to look beneath the surface and gauge at what lies underneath – just like an iceberg. That is the beauty and challenge of it – or, you can say, the beauty lies in the challenge.

Emotions
The Couple.

CG. How do you achieve representing your subjects wholly on the canvas?

PU. I usually sit face-to-face with my subjects and spend days with them. There’s always something new that I see in them each and every day – it’s like diving into the depth of the sea, inching deeper and deeper. A wrinkle, tear or smile can say a lot. So, I usually start with a rough sketch, using different mediums. I then keep making changes, until I’m completely confident and satisfied with what I’ve manifested on the canvas, is a true representation of the person.

Emotions
Addiction.

CG. What is the idea behind the textures you choose in your illustrations?

PU. ‘Giggling’ is the technique I use to highlight the facial expressions. I start with a simple dot that turns into a line which never ends. By going in a circular motion, I never actually realise where the line started, and where it ended. This style helps me provide a great amount of detailing to the illustration. It also helps me go in-depth to bring out their personalities precisely.

Emotions
The Villager.

CG. What do you enjoy most, in your work process?

PU. The final result is what I enjoy most about my work! I love it when people understand and relate or connect to my work. Conveying a lot about a person just through a glance is what I want to achieve through all my illustrations. When that happens, I feel happiness.

Emotions
Surprised.

CG. What would be your advice to others who wish to involve in a similar style of work as yours?

PU. Don’t try to emulate someone else, but choose a style that is solely yours, instead. That way, the work you create through it will be your personal best and most satisfying. Only you can create and execute your own trademark style. Trust me!

Emotions
Mother.
Emotions
Joyous Rajasthani.

Published in Issue 39

As the festivity is all around, every brand or business is trying to impress the Indian audience. But what really works for us Indians? What is an Indian design? And how we can make designs for India? To understand it, we interviewed some Indian creatives who are successfully creating designs for the Indian audience. Neha Tulisan, the founder of NH1 design, highlights to understand how we Indians live; how we grew up; and what moves us emotionally. Whereas Mira Malhotra, founder of Studio Khol, emphasises on the difference of Western and Indian Sensibilities. Also, we support keeping ourselves connected with Indian cultures, languages, history, aspirations and more, will help find the Indian context in everything we create. This issue of Creative Gaga is a light read for someone looking for inspirations or insights on Indian design and how the Indian audience can be enticed. So go ahead and order your copy or subscribe if you want to keep receiving a regular dose of inspirations!

 

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An illustrator and cartoonist, Charbak Dipta gives us a peek into his world of inspiration and then how he transforms his ideas into mesmerising artworks.

Inspiration
Third World. The third world countries busy masturbating.

CG. What inspired you take up art/illustration as your profession?

Charbak. I believe one should always listen to his/her inner calling. Since childhood I enjoyed doodling on paper and walls. However, my parents wanted me to be a lecturer and singer. I stopped my art and earned a MA degree. I also pursued music. But destiny is such that I inevitably landed a job as an intern cartoonist in the ‘The Time of India’. There was no looking back from there.

The Sad Indian Alien. When the girlfriend leaves an alien to marry some other wealthier alien.
Inspiration
Blowing in the Wind. The ecstasy of blowjob.

CG. How would you like to define your style of art? Is there a specific name that you like to call your style by?

Charbak. My style is an amalgamation of the various schools of art which I have been inspired from. As a kid I used to copy whatever comics or cartoons I liked, for example, Phantom comics, Marvel, Tintin and Asterix. Later, with exposure to wider art styles, my style began to develop and take shape.

Inspiration
People 2. Different kinds of people and their actual face.
The Jorasanko Ghosts. Ghosts of Rabindranath Tagore and family in their house in Jorasanko.

CG. There seems to be a use of Bengali alphabets and words in a few of your creations. Is there a specific reason for it? Is culture an influence for your creations?

Charbak. I am a Bengali, thus Bangla culture is a big influence in art as well as the person I am. I grew up soaked in Bengali culture, literature, tradition, music and language. It reflects on my art and is an extension of my psyche. Bengali culture, attire and food keep appearing repeatedly in my art.

Harmonium Monster. The monster lives inside Harmonium comes out.
London Underground. World.

CG. Are your characters purely fictional? Or are they drawn from certain realities? And what is the intention of using of these characters together?

Charbak. The characters are used to depict the idea behind visible pictures. The Indian Alien series is an exception where the alien characters are purely imaginary. The other works show realistic humans too. I like layered art instead of direct communication. So my settings and characters too have different facets in their appearance that incorporate different social, historical or political references as well.

The Essential Family. A group image of a typical Bengali family stuck to one another.
Inspiration
Alien Uttam, Alien Suchitra. An alien avatar of Bengali matinee idols Uttam-Suchitra.

CG. Your artwork varies from showcasing realistic scenes to visualisations of imaginary concepts, covering an indefinite spectrum of situations. Yet there is uniformity all across your work. How do you maintain this universal language in your work?

Charbak. Uniformity is my style. Every individual has a way of thinking. My glass is tinted with a uniformity screen that filters my ideas and gives them a unique shape. For example, if you wore red spectacles, all objects would appear with a red tint, yet retain their original shape and function. Similarly I see objects through a this screen.

Ogres. Monsters. A set of ogres with equipment lose to a little girl.
Inspiration
The Mud House. Surreal Gujarati village houses.

CG. What are the mediums that you use to create your artwork? Is it hand-drawn, digital or a mix of both the mediums?

Charbak. The medium varies, some are hand drawn, others are digital. Often the best comes in a mix of both. For manual drawing I use Clutch and Pigma pencils. For digital, I use a range of software. I sometimes experiment with the drawing on different surface too, for example, paper, canvas, flex or plastic.

The Rain Water. Aliens. An alien who hates rain, submerges into rain water to avoid rain.
Inspiration
Machine Series. Arms are inserted into the peace machine that turns them into peace pigeons.

CG. Change is inevitable. So, 10 years down the line, what is the kind of art creations that world would be exposed to from your end? We would also like to know about your future endeavours in brief.

Charbak. I have moved from single artwork to writing full length books, art anthologies, illustrated books and graphic novels.

Inspiration
The Panama Papers. Drawn for a contest by 'The Times of India', Mossack Fonseca digs the money below the papers.

I have released 3 books so far. The first one was ‘The Art of Charbak Dipta’, an anthology of over 100 selected artworks of mine created between 2014 and 2017. The second is ‘Zero: An Indian Aliens Adventure’, which was a spin off from my earlier Indian Alien series of artworks. It throws light on India’s contributions to the world of science and invention. The third one is ‘Apes: An Indian Aliens Adventure’, a sequel to Zero.

Inspiration
Hutom. Bengali Literature. Based on the cult Bengali book ‘Hutom Pyachar Noksa’.

My fourth book is in production currently and will be out this year. In the coming 10 years I wish to write at least 10 more books. I have so much autobiographical and conceptual content, the challenge though is to put them on paper within limited time. I am also interested in web-comics. Hopefully sometime soon that takes off as well.

Inspiration
Relatives. Nature of blood relatives who bite back.

Published in Issue 48

A Freelancer’s Life in India! Every day, with a dream of ‘Being Your Boss,’ many creative professionals jump into the pool of freelancing. But many are not well prepared for the life of the freelancer, which brings many challenges along with benefits. So to explore further, we interviewed many freelance illustrators and designers to get answers to the question you should ask before taking the final call of becoming your boss! So, if you are planning to or have already become a freelancer then this issue is a must-read for you.

 

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To be a success story, one needs to dedicate and devote two hundred percent from your heart and of course, be blissful at heart. Alicia Souza is one such example to know about and be inspired from.

Alicia Souza

Sometimes, things don’t move as they are planned. Whatever has to happen, happens and there is definitely something good in it. So is the case with Alicia Souza.

The Inception

The reason she started illustrating as a freelancer was because she needed to pay rent. She feels like she didn’t intentionally get into the place that she is in today but rather fell into it with circumstances at hand and the choices she made. Alicia moved to India to illustrate and her style evolved into the style she uses primarily today. Setting up the online store came after massive demands started flowing in for it.

Launching her own studio, Aliciasouzastudio has been her biggest responsibility. Even after time constraints restricting her from visiting the studio often, she makes sure to communicate with her wonderful team working there through instant messages and collates information via spreadsheets. She also has a partner taking care of the studio.

Fate and Fortune

Alicia is one lucky person to have destiny on her side! She didn’t set out to establish her brand with competition in mind, she started it because there was a need and she wanted to fulfill that.

 

The basic idea of starting out, let her live without any competition pressure and keeps her grounded because she is true to her work and does not look in any other direction than her own path. She believed in herself and her work, and considered it as a case of ‘I’ll take this as far as it will go’ and it’s still going!

A liking for funny characters and a special love for drawing cartoons seems to have just seeped into her work. From drawing many different characters in the past, Alicia now prefers telling stories and incidents via the ones that imitate her life in a way. Whether that character be her husband or her cute little dog go, she converses with those characters in her own style

Promotional Planning

Alicia feels that it is important to market oneself and these days with the choices of avenues available for marketing, it sometimes becomes confusing to decide the one which would do maximum justice to the promotional work.

 

She chose the platforms of Facebook and Instagram to promote her work as she felt the most comfortable using them and she knew she was going to stick to them. Also, she tried some other ways of promoting her brand and they too proved to be successful for her like Amazon, Happy Wagon, a retail and online store founded by aliciasouzastudio as well. She also has an online store on Etsy.com under the name, ‘Alicia Souza UK’ which is handled by a team based in the UK.

Alicia does not have a success mantra, but she firmly believes in the concept of trial and error. She does not follow trends, instead does what makes her smile and hopes that it will get a smile on other faces as well!

 

From her experience, Alicia suggests not to over-think, to work hard, be humble and enjoy the process.

Issue 44 - Creative Gaga

Published in Issue 44

Behind every successful studio, artist or designer there are stories of challenges, struggles and their unique solutions to these. With this issue, we interviewed many well-known names from the creative industry and found their different learnings and experiences behind making their own self as a brand. Though they all have a different take on this topic, still they all unanimously emphasise on focusing on their skills and quality delivery of the final outcome. So, if you are looking to establish yourself as a brand in the creative market or already in the process of it, this issue is a must read. Full of insights and inspirations from the best of the talents, this issue is waiting to reach your desks.

 

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Palehorse, an illustrator from the US is highly influenced by Indian mythology and Gods, which is reflected in his art. From creating abstract manifestations of Ganesha to showcasing glimpses of Ramayana, his work has a cultural connection, with an alliance of traditional folklore.

Indian Mythology
Kali Maa. Devil’s Reign, Brooklyn, New York. A bold and classic adaptation of a Hindu deity with black light on metallic paper.
Indian Mythology
Ganesha. 'Aftershock Music Festival'. A vibrant and fierce Ganesha radiating immense power from his eyes is depicted on the event poster of a music festival

A digital illustrator and fine artist from Petersburg, USA, Palehorse, who is deeply connected to spirituality, it translates onto his work which comprises of screen-printed gig posters, skate decks, T-shirts and gallery artwork. Highly influenced by Southeast Asian and Latin cultures, the art he creates is also refined by his travels, Indian mythology and spiritual practices.

50th Anniversary Poster - Nat Geo
Indian Mythology
Inward-Looking Path. Majestic and nonchalant, Lord Shiva, rendered with shades of blue with visuals of Ganesha on a plain background

CG. Where are you from and what kind of work do you do?

Palehorse. I’m a professional illustrator and spiritual seeker with a studio in St. Petersburg, USA. After graduation, I began my career as a graphic artist and opened a collective studio space, with a tattoo artist. In addition to tattoo art, underground punk music, straight-edge hardcore and skateboarding also played a significant role in the style of work I connect with.

Indian Mythology
'Compassionate Protectors' 10-Skate Deck Totem

CG. Your work has abstract adaptations of Gods and deities. What is the story behind that?

Palehorse. In 2007, I embarked on a trip to Thailand, where I explored some magnificent temples and it was there that I received a visual introduction to Eastern spirituality and Ramayana through the ornately decorated murals and icons all over Bangkok. After these experiences, I decided to work with traditional design elements specific to Thailand, combined with Indian themes, Tibetan symbols and a touch of Balinese influence as a basis for my style.

SHINE Mural Festival Group. Ganesha, displayed in a combination of two colours stands out of the intense background and gives a feeling of magnificence.
Indian Mythology
A woman, who appears to be liberated and at ease, is surrounded by ferocious beings, and roses, was created in collaboration with artist 'Tes One'

CG. What fascinates you the most about Indian mythology?

Palehorse. A book called ‘The War of Art’ was my first introduction to the idea that artists are guided by ‘muses’. After that, I was drawn to Hindu deities as potential muses which I found thrilling as I could transform my illustrations into a spiritual offering to the deity. I learned that the Ramayana was the original epic quest and the effect that it has across cultures, is absolutely staggering and I resonate with Hanuman! From there, I ventured into the ‘Bhagavad Gita’ and every morning, I spend time with Yama, meditating on his teachings and ask Ganesha to clear the obstacles on my path.

Indian Mythology
Liberation through Realisation. A metallic gold poster that represents several interpretations of Hindu Gods and Goddesses
Inward-Looking Path. 'Represent'. The artwork depicts Lord Krishna who is tranquil and emits a feeling of command and vigour

Sadly in the Western culture, most of us have grown up never learning how to properly interpret mythology but I can now see the similarities of Christ to Buddha, or the perfect manifestation of Rama or Hanuman.

Indian Mythology
Collectionzz Rock for a Cause Poster Series. A silk screened poster created for charity support of 'The Living/Dying project'

CG. Tell us something about your favourite project and the project you are currently working on.

Palehorse. I really enjoy creating screen-printed gig posters as this is a wonderful opportunity to create personal artwork that has the potential to be appreciated by fans. When I incorporate my versions of Hindu deities into posters for bands like Foo Fighters, Queens of the Stone Age and Primus, I get to inject these powerful symbols into my own culture. I’m currently working on a piece for a sci-fi television series and also planning to incorporate more, large-scale public murals this year, so look out for some Hanuman and Rama walls coming soon!

Indian Mythology
Balance. Palehorse 'Represent'. Depicts a dynamic and aggressive personality of a goddess, with a blend of the shades of a handful colours
Indian Mythology
Premonition of the Striped Jaguar. Palehorse Solo exhibit 'Lucha'

CG. What is your design process like?

Palehorse. When I create a new piece, I’m excited to begin a deep relationship with the subject. All of the time I spend alone sketching and visualising, I do my best to get clear enough to tune into the spirit of it. Each element, word and aspect has an underlying meaning that is ripe for visual exploration. The artwork becomes a tool for me to talk about spiritual practice with people of all walks of life.

Indian Mythology

CG. Which software or techniques do you use to create your designs?

Palehorse. I create my digital illustrations using Photoshop CC, along with a 32 inch Wacom Cintiq Tablet. I’ve been printing on gold leatherette tapestries, layers of assembled wood panels and acrylic glass, LED light boxes and utilising laser etching on metallic substrates. Lately, I’ve been practicing with hand-drawn and painted calligraphy.

'Yama', the God of death, is illustrated with textures of browns and is surrounded by powerful symbols like 'OM' depicted in gold
EXPO LUCHA! Screen-Printed Event Poster

CG. What is your ultimate goal as an artist?

Palehorse. My goal is to support my family by creating artwork that is inspired and inspires others to explore their own truths and embark on their own unique adventures. I enjoy growing and sharing what I’m learning in real-time with my audience

Erawan. Foo Fighters / Live Nation. An adaptation of Ganesha with touches of minimal colours strikes a balance

Published in Issue 46

This issue is focused on, how to design for kids, bundled with articles full of inspirations, advice and unique point-of-views from the veterans of the animation industry, illustrators, photographers, artists and many more. So, order your copy or subscribe, before print copies run out and enjoy reading this issue!

 

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Freelance designer and minimalist illustrator Prathamesh Shedge talks about his urge to explore and how circumstance dictate his style.

Prathamesh has always been driven by the urge to explore. Discovering new methods and concepts, has always fascinated him. Thus, in this art series, he has experimented with a minimalist vector style, in contrast to the usual forced and enhanced detailing that is expected with the sports genre. He decided to approach the simplicity and flow of the sport, as opposed to its intensity.

 

With minimalist design, still flatness is the norm. Prathamesh however went for a route that is an amalgamation of multiple design styles, with a tin-tone colour palette. He also chose to not give the characters a specific skin tone, instead manipulating the colour palette to enhance and highlight the expressions.

 

In his design process, Prathamesh lets the circumstance dictate his style. He works in both traditional and digital mediums. But he prefers the traditional medium, simply because of how organic the process can be. Prathamesh first lays down his designs in sketch, before proceeding to convert them to digital to further enhance, a simple yet effective process.

 

One approach that Prathamesh sticks to, is not using the eraser too much, instead simply adapting and designing with the mistakes. He believes a mistake is merely a design anomaly that can become design idea

 

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Minimalist Illustrator Captures the Flow of Sport!
Minimalist Illustrator Captures the Flow of Sport!
Minimalist Illustrator Captures the Flow of Sport!
Minimalist Illustrator Captures the Flow of Sport!


Minimalist Illustrator Captures the Flow of Sport!
Minimalist Illustrator Captures the Flow of Sport!
Minimalist Illustrator Captures the Flow of Sport!
Minimalist Illustrator Captures the Flow of Sport!


Minimalist Illustrator Captures the Flow of Sport!
Minimalist Illustrator Captures the Flow of Sport!
Minimalist Illustrator Captures the Flow of Sport!

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Character designer, illustrator and storyboard artist, Ritaban Das, takes s through his own style of telling stories through illustrations in a single frame style of designing. He introduces his perspective that guides his ideas and also shares his process.

Single Frame
Mummy ka Scratcher
Single Frame
Team Dank. Personal work depicting a rather artistic team spirit.
Single Frame
Sketching with friends. Personal work showing aliens as company while sketching.
Single Frame
Kung Fu Singh
Single Frame
Together. Just a piece of commissioned work for my friend, depicting the funny side of companionship.

CG. What are the particular advantages and challenges of telling stories in a single frame?

Ritaban. Illustration or design is a visual communication medium. It is important to challenge yourself with a different perspective, scale and how your subjects interact with one another. When sketching, I produce numerous roughs or loose drawings which later make into more developed sketches. I then decide on a final composition. The most critical element is really an activity of the subject. The figure is usually doing something and caught before it happens or just after. The other elements are supporting artefacts. Whatever I draw, I think of it as a clue or a breadcrumb that helps understand the complete story and message. It’s up to the reader to put it all together and solve the riddle

Single Frame
Indian Warrior. For a monthly Facebook character design challenge. The topic was "Warrior".
Soccer Dad

Single Frame
Clown. Personal work, inspired by Eli Roth's film of same name.
Single Frame
Two Detectives cover artwork. For the unfinished graphic novel I was working upon with my brother.

CG. What are the essential designing tools and software you use for such an approach and how do you decide on what kind of a role they play in your work?

Ritaban. I usually make the design part in Photoshop, from scratch to end, and I work in Storyboard pro for storyboard. Tools can make your work easy or even open the avenues to do it faster, but it’s based on how good your design sense, storytelling abilities and drawings are. These are the most basic fundamentals to create anything.

Merry Christmas. Old commissioned work created during the Christmas season.
Two Detectives. A promotional poster for the unfinished graphic novel I was creating with my brother.

Komorebi Poster
Single Frame
YUWA. For Art Exhibition last year, collaborating with the NGO Yuwa that empowers young girls,.

CG. What aspects do you particularly give attention to in your work to ensure effective communication through your illustrations?

Ritaban. I start by trying to understand the character, his/her background, history as well as his/her place in the story. Research helps at this stage since it’s so important to understand the world you’re creating before jumping into it Next, I’ll do a series of drawings where I figure out the characters shapes and attitude; I try to just draw the first thing that comes to mind, knowing that I’ll be changing it later. All the while, I’m searching for a new or interesting take on the character. After I’ve done a few rough thumbnails, I decide on the one that has the most appealing silhouette, shape proportions and that best describes the character. I then start to flesh out the character and begin to add details, keeping in mind any specific traits described in the script or story.

Single Frame
A promotional fan poster for the most anticipated boxing match in the history between McGregor and Mayweather.
Heavy Dudes

Single Frame
Odd Socialites # 1. The first installment of a small comic strip project with my writer friend.
Single Frame
Red Necks. Personal work showing the not so friendly folk in town.

CG. How do you describe your process and goal of designing?

Ritaban. Being a Character Designer and Illustrator, most of my work is very much character driven, blended with humour and very graphical too. I always try to convey some sort of stories through each and every character or Illustration I make I like to play with various shapes and silhouettes and usually keep things simple. The character design process is, in a way, a combination of different things. I ask myself ‘Who am I drawing?’ What is his/her personality?’ I look at the work of influential artist sometimes to get some ideas or even start from a drawing I like and translate it into my style. Then, trying to forget those influences, I often start from scratch with a basic shape such as the face as it determines the rest of the character for me, then the body (this can be a circle, oval or even a pear shape – it all depends on the personality of the character I want to draw)

Single Frame
Battle of the Beasts. UFC 223 fan poster for the main fight between Ferguson and Khabib.
Single Frame
Inked! Personal work depicting a tattoo artist working his craft on the devil.
The Anarchist
Scary guy with skill
Issue-42-Cover

Published in Issue 42

Every designer wish to be independent and willing to jump into the word of freelance but most of them unaware of the fundamental challenges of the initial phase. So, we dedicated this issue to freelancers and interviewed some established and talented designers to dig deep for the expert advice. Kevin Roodhorst on the other hand, an experienced freelancer from Amsterdam, has recently shifted to be a full-timer with an Agency says “Freelancing is not all roses!” and shared the best way to survive as a freelancer! So, whether you are a freelancer or planning to be one, this issue is a must-read. Go ahead and order your copy here or subscribe to not miss any future issues!

 

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