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How artist/ illustrator Jasjyot Singh Hans tries to shift the public’s perception about beauty and fashion through his illustrations.

Illustrations by Jasjyot Singh Hans

CG. Could you please tell me about your educational qualifications?

Jasjyot. I studied Animation Film Design at the National Institute of Design in Ahmedabad and then did an MFA in Illustration Practice at Maryland Institute College of Art in Baltimore, Maryland.

CG. How and when did you come up with the idea of becoming an artist and fashion illustrator?

Jasjyot. I’ve been drawing ever since I was a kid, I can’t seem to recall a time I wasn’t. At the age of seven, I wanted to become a ‘3D Cartoon Animator’ even though I had little idea about what it actually entailed.

LOVER 2 LOVER

Everyone in my family humoured my interest in art, but my parents supported me through every step. They enrolled me in summer classes at the National Gallery of Modern Art, where I would roam in the exhibition halls for hours! It was there that I saw paintings of Amrita Sher-Gil and the minimal graphic work of Jamini Roy that remain my art-loves and influences even today. I was always interested in fashion and accessorising my characters (usually women), which adorned the back of all my notebooks. When my mum used to flip through them, she saw tonnes of illustrations of women in bikinis. She’d say, ‘wow they have amazing legs!’ At that time I knew I wanted to incorporate my interest in fashion into my work as an illustrator/ artist.

CG. Why did you choose to become an illustrator?

Jasjyot. After working on a small film project at NID, I realised that though I loved telling stories and animation, it probably wasn’t for me, especially in a full-time capacity. The idea of working on a variety of shorter projects involving different art styles, subjects and clients seemed invigorating to me and illustration felt like the right path.

CG. What does your daily routine look like?

Jasjyot. I wish my routine was more idealistic, sadly this will have to suffice. At the least, I hope it inspires people to do better! I sleep late, so I wake up late. I run to my Moka pot and pour myself some coffee before I can do/ recognise/ register anything. I usually take about an hour to calibrate and look through a list of continuing projects that I need to make progress on. I put on some music and make my way to the shower, think of what I want to eat for lunch, then watch a little something while I eat. Then I try to catch up on my emails and work for about 4 to 5 hours. After a short walk around the neighbourhood in the evening, I plan dinner and work a bit more depending on deadlines/ work schedule and work into the night. Some nights (read: most nights) are definitely spent binging TV series and snacking at odd hours.

Illustrations by Jasjyot Singh Hans
V R FAMILY. Tribute to queers in quarantine; supporting, listening and taking care of each other as well as their beloved breathing plant friends!

CG. What were the challenges you faced for reaching where you are today?

Jasjyot. I think anyone starting out in this industry face similar challenges: getting a foot in the door, managing work for finance vs passion, and most of all, getting to a place in your practice where both of them align as closely as they can. When I moved to the United States, it was pretty stressful to find work as a freelancer right after graduation. So in a way, I had to start from scratch, but in hindsight, I spent too long trying to create work that felt current. I got the best advice from the fantastic Marcos Chin to just create work around subjects that I like and the projects will follow.

Illustrations by Jasjyot Singh Hans
Stretching and dressing up at home

It sounds wild when bills need to be paid, but it worked out. I still struggle with getting work regularly, but that’s the life I chose as a freelance illustrator!

CG. What is the process or style that you follow to make an illustration?

Jasjyot. It’s pretty basic, read and re-read the brief, write down keywords of ideas that need to be conveyed and scribble out visual metaphors/ compositions that convey it successfully. The next step is to make a series of roughs, refine all areas that I find difficult in this stage, ink, colour, send! For my personal work, this process is a lot more easy and free, I usually think of a mood or a body posture or an article of clothing and centre everything around that.

Illustrations by Jasjyot Singh Hans
Stretch

CG. Who or what is your muse?

Jasjyot. The women I’ve known in my life are my muse. They represent everything I lack as a person and hence become my source of power through what I illustrate.

CG. What role have online platforms and social media played in your work?

Jasjyot. In the “simpler days”, I started putting work out on Blogspot and built a small community of people there. When Instagram blew up, I was consistent in putting my work out and that really helped my work get more attention and recognition. I was able to network with people in different places, which felt great. But over time, social media has kind of morphed into something a lot more insidious and we all walked right into its trap. People starting out in the industry measure success by people’s social media following and connect it to their self-worth which can be dangerous. So while I obviously still continue to put my work out pretty regularly, I feel less pressure putting in a certain kind of work or getting attention from a group of people.

NIGHTMARE XXVII

CG. While teaching in Baltimore are you able to fulfil your dreams?

Jasjyot. We’re constantly in the process of chasing the dangling (imaginary) carrot! I try to juggle a lot of different things like fashion, editorial, publishing, comics, zine-making, printmaking, gallery work and murals within my practice as an illustrator. I think teaching is just an extension of my practice.

Illustrations by Jasjyot Singh Hans
NIGHTMARE XIV

CG. What according to you is your best creation?

Jasjyot. I am too hard on myself to think anything is my best creation. It’s important to not be complacent!

CG. With the declining freedom of speech, freedom of sexuality and religious tolerance across the world, as an artist does it affect your work?

Jasjyot. I think it makes me go harder on things that I want to advocate for within and outside my illustrations, of course, that’s an idealistic answer. I understand people don’t always feel safe putting themselves out there in a capacity to attract bigoted views on their work and sometimes even putting their lives at risk. But this is the time for people to create more work around identities under threat and I do strive to put myself out there more honestly and Fearlessly.

NIGHTMARE XXIV

CG. Does the country you live in influence your work?

Jasjyot. I think one’s surroundings/ circumstance always finds a way into the work, whether it is a reaction that is a direct inspiration or escapist.

CG. Do your fashion clients request adjustments to the drawings to project what their ideal woman is like? If yes, do you make those changes or do you explain Yourself?

Jasjyot. It used to happen all the time, which was obviously frustrating. But of late, I think everyone that has reached out trusts that I understand their brand and will create something that best showcases their product.

CG. As an artist, how easy or difficult is it to channel your personal experience or emotions in your work?

Jasjyot. It is difficult, taxing and at times draining too, but I think that’s what makes the work more powerful, as it comes from a true place with the human connection.

CG. As an artist, how easy or difficult is it to channel your personal experience or emotions in your work?

Jasjyot. It is difficult, taxing and at times draining too, but I think that’s what makes the work more powerful, as it comes from a true place with the human connection.

CG. What is the motto behind starting the #BadaBehtarHai hashtag on Instagram?

Jasjyot. I started it just as a cheeky thing. Usually, the phrase is used in the context of masculinity and within it, Eg: the phallus. So I thought it would be cool to subvert from that and shift the conversation to a more inclusive, body-positive and femme space.

CG. Given your passion for fashion illustration, which collection were you recently drawn to and why?

Jasjyot. The Area SS2021 Couture collection was everything my senses (and the dated idea of couture) needed.

CG. Do you think the conversation around body image, sexuality and self-love are Progressing?

Jasjyot. Yes, they are, but bigger bodies aren’t nearly as normalised as they ought to be by now. In the past, characters with bigger bodies were one-dimensional and were used purely as comic relief. Even now, bigger characters are written into the media in a tokenistic way, never in a way that makes fatness seem like… just a thing. That’s probably why illustrations around these ideas from independent artists are important, and I’m happy to continue being part of this conversation.

CG. Most of your sketches are of women and you have very few sketches of men. Is there a particular reason?

Jasjyot. As gay boys, we often tend to bond with the experience of women around us because what is advertised as the male experience feels inadequate and toxic. This is why we are fascinated by women because they get to dress up in fantastical clothing and be unabashedly feminine: all things we wish we can someday do freely.

CG. What is one thing that you really look forward to doing someday in your career?

Jasjyot. Work on something big with Miuccia Prada.

CG. What are you working on next?

Jasjyot. I’m currently working on writing for my graphic memoir with Levine Querido, which has been quite exciting and challenging. I’m also working on some fun character illustrations for a wallpaper design which will be installed at the Taj St. James Court, London. I’m also teaching a senior class at Towson University in Baltimore.

Apart from that, I’m continuing my ongoing series: #ManSmutMonday and NIGHTMARE on social media, and planning on working on some t-shirt designs this year!

Issue 52 - Transforming Education

Published in Issue 52

The pandemic has brought many different challenges for everyone. But educating our young ones is among the top priority. The issue focused on how design education is still possible while most of us are locked in our homes. We also interacted with illustrators and photographers such as Jasjyot Singh Hans and Anirudh Agarwal, who seem to stand firm with their uniqueness in this time of chaos. Overall this issue serves food for thought with visually stunning creativity on a single platter.

 

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Creative Gaga - Issue 52

 

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If you’re talented, you will be noticed. The world is full of freelance opportunity these days, just that one must know which and when to take one. A successful designer is one that find his/her niche in the design world, believes young illustrator Ashish Subhash Boyne. Here, he tells us how showcasing everyday stories in a refreshing manner can open doors to a ‘not so every day’ life!

Freelance
Character Design
Freelance
AGHORA.
Freelance
AGHORA.

Find inspiration in everyday things that are omnipresent

People often pass by without taking notice of things that they encounter every single day. For executing story illustrations, these are the places you need to look. The skill is to give mundane life a refreshing and ‘never seen or heard before’ appeal. Like Surmai that showcases the story of a small boy who lives near fishing docks or 100 Kisses that shows how a cup of tea passes through so many people of different backgrounds. Just keep in mind, the purpose of the work is to be understood by everyday people. The execution needs to be simple. Don’t forget that fantasy is all around and finding a unique niche is the key to getting recognised.

Freelance
AGHORA.
Freelance
AGHORA.
Freelance
Character Design

Freelance
Character Design

Education prepares the talent within you

Most people are born with certain talents that define their future. Ask any designer to take a peek back into their childhood; they’d tell you they loved things like drawing, comics and imaginative forms. As you go grow up and finally get into school to do what you love doing, you start to understand yourself better. The vague question of ‘what do you want to do?’ starts to become clearer. Illustration art needs high observation of the subject matter that needs to be combined with your skill to visualise and express the idea in a simpler way. Studying design helps you do that. It also leaves you an initial portfolio that introduces you to the outside world.

Freelance
Illustration for BAJAJ ELECTRICAL'S "Magic of Light "
Freelance
Illustration for BAJAJ ELECTRICAL'S "Magic of Light "
Freelance
DEATH TO LIFE
Freelance
Tribe Spirit Hunter

The outside world is a self-learning experience

The transition from a student to a professional is a gradual process where change settles in with time and comes the wider understanding of client needs, concepts and ideas. Hard work, dedication and passion are the three key attributes that you need to bring to the class every day of your professional life.

Freelance
SURMAI.
Freelance
SURMAI.

Freelance
100 KISSES.
Freelance
100 KISSES.

A satisfied client is a gateway to the freelance career

When you’re just about to start off to try and make a mark for yourself in the big world of design, often most people wonder ‘How do I do this?”. It’s simple. Concentrate on things that come to you. Whether it’s your first assignment or project it’s important to make each and everything you do unique and fulfilling as per the client’s requirements. The rest is history.

Freelance
100 KISSES.
Freelance
FIXTRAL CAMPAIGN ILLUSTRATION

Published in Issue 22

Dedicated to the talented design graduates who are not just looking to work but seeking experience in order to realise the greater goal of life. The issue features various designers from India and abroad. Kevin Roodhorst from The Netherlands realised his goal so early in life that propelled him to start his career as a designer as young as 13. Ashish Subhash Boyne, a student of Sir JJ Institute of Applied Art realised his dream while studying when he started doing freelance projects, which allow him to express his free thoughts. To name a few talents we have Vivek Nag from Fine Arts from Rachna Sansad Mumbai, Simran Nanda from Pearl Academy New Delhi, Anisha Raj from MAEER MIT Institute of Design Pune, Giby Joseph from Animation and Art School Goa and much more. This issue gives a fresh perspective of talented graduates and their unique approach to design.

 

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Creative Gaga - Issue 52

 

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Roshan Gawand, a freelance illustrator and design owner at Gangsta Paradise Tattoo, from getting inspired from his daily Pinterest feed to moving his flashbacks to his canvas, shares his process of creating art and how he succeeded in this industry.

Collecting guava from guava garden

CG. Could you tell us about yourself, how you got into art and illustration, and your tattoo studio Gangsta Paradise?

Roshan. I am an Illustrator based in Navi Mumbai. I have done my Graduation Studies from L. S. Raheja School of Art as a commercial artist. I spent most of my childhood in a village and lived in an ordinary family. I feel the painting does not only colour on canvas, it is an expression of the artist. I keep expressing my thoughts through different artworks. I love to explore different colour schemes. As an artist, I never stop making myself better from all angles. My journey as a tattoo artist started during my college days. I used to earn money for myself by working as a freelance tattoo artist. This is how I earned my very first salary. Step by step I developed my skills and here I am today owning the Gangsta Paradise Tattoo and Art Studio located in Panvel.

Illustration by Roshan Gawand
Indian village girl and her Matka

CG. Could you describe your primary illustration style? Which mediums do you like to work with?

Roshan. I really like to work on Procreate. It gives me the ability to quickly bring my thoughts to life. I also like to create art with watercolours, it takes me back to where I started my art journey.

Illustration by Roshan Gawand
Partner, this artwork showcases the commitment and trust between a camel and his keeper.

CG. Some of your work depicts themes of nature and rural culture. What motivates you to illustrate village life?

Roshan. I was born and brought up in the village only. Even now I live like an hour away from my hometown, so I have a warm spot in my heart for my native place. That’s where all of my motivation
comes from.

Illustration by Roshan Gawand
Nothing is better than a cow grazing in a large open field.

CG. The series has a very unique use of colour – cooler colour temperature, vibrant, and abstract in some uses. Could you give us some insight into your approach?

Roshan. To me, colours are like a new way of living life, so I try to incorporate that happiness, joy and new way of life in my paintings. Human eyes are easily drawn to bright and vibrant colours, so I try that aspect in my artworks. People have started accepting these colour patterns nowadays.

Lotus, a Lotus flower, rooted in mud, surrounded by water and somehow finds a way to bloom

CG. Tell us about your process when creating illustrations. How do you approach concept development?

Roshan. Whenever I see something interesting, I always try to click a picture and keep it on my phone. Most of my inspirations come from the actual scenes and experiences around me. For some ideas, I try to search for some inspirations on Pinterest as well. It gives me the ability to play around with the ideas that I carry in my mind.

Illustration by Roshan Gawand
A girl who he saw everyday on his way to school, with two sheep in her hands.

CG. Where do you draw inspiration from when creating work with no source material?

Roshan. So whenever I do not have source material I do stick to my inner ideas and memories that I carry from time to native experiences. I start with a simple scribble over the blank page and then just continue drawing instinctively as my thought process allows me to move my hand.

Illustration by Roshan Gawand
Mirror - Life is like a mirror. Smile at it and it smiles back at you”

CG. How do you approach work for your tattoo studio? Do you create only custom work?

Roshan. I would say most of my tattoos are custom work as per the client’s requirements. And the rest of the tattoos are from references that my clients bring along with them.

The soul of India lives in its villages. Reminiscing old times, when farmers and their families spent time milking the cows, bonding with them

CG. What is your opinion about the appeal of tattoos in general?

Roshan. People are more drawn to tattoos nowadays. They like to get tattoos as a mark of special memories from their life. This COVID situation has impacted the footfalls in the studio but I am sure that once everything goes back to normal, more people will start coming to the tattoo studios.

CG. Are there any other areas where you would like to apply your creative skills?

Roshan. I am into wall arts, watercolour paintings and dot work tattoos and I have done a couple of wall painting projects.

Indian Summer Rituals. The lady sitting in this artwork is shown cutting chillies

CG. We’ve discovered a way to animate tattoos on people and a person wants you to tattoo them in your signature art style. What do you develop?

Roshan. I would really love to tattoo my signature style on a person. I can already think of many ways I can make it look like a masterpiece. Just tell me when and where!

Illustration by Roshan Gawand
Wheel of life, taking inspiration from childhood experiences, when an outlander would ask for a lift from native villager
Issue 52

Published in Issue 52

The pandemic has brought many different challenges for everyone. But educating our young ones is among the top priority. The issue focused on how design education is still possible while most of us are locked in our homes. We also interacted with illustrators and photographers such as Jasjyot Singh Hans and Anirudh Agarwal, who seem to stand firm with their uniqueness in this time of chaos. Overall this issue serves food for thought with visually stunning creativity on a single platter.

 

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CURRENT ISSUE
Creative Gaga - Issue 52

 

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We go through many interesting design projects each day and find them inspiring enough to be shared further. Projects which have the potential to inspire and spark multiple ideas. So, here are few selected one for this week’s illustration inspiration, enjoy!

A Dose of Illustration Inspiration #21
A Dose of Illustration Inspiration #21

Illustrations by Sudhin Subramanian

A Dose of Illustration Inspiration #21
A Dose of Illustration Inspiration #21
A Dose of Illustration Inspiration #21

Illustrations by Pracheta Banerjee

A Dose of Illustration Inspiration #21
A Dose of Illustration Inspiration #21

Illustrations by Anton Fedotov

A Dose of Illustration Inspiration #21

Illustrations by Dattaraj Kamat

A Dose of Illustration Inspiration #21
A Dose of Illustration Inspiration #21
A Dose of Illustration Inspiration #21

Illustrations by Dhwani Trivedi

A Dose of Illustration Inspiration #21
A Dose of Illustration Inspiration #21

Portraits by Julie Lafeuille

A Dose of Illustration Inspiration #21

Illustrations by Riffat Aga

Illustrations by Abigail Diaz

Illustrations by Tanmay Mandal

If you have any of your design or illustration project or someone else’s, which is equally inspiring for fellow creatives, then share it with us on contribute@creativegaga.com

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Creative Gaga - Issue 52

 

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Lovely Kukreja talks about his famous series of illustrations, the artist’s mindset and the state of art education.

For Delhi based artist Lovely Kukreja, the choice to become a full-time illustrator was a spontaneous decision. He moved away from his commerce studies to become a graphic designer, eventually specialising in digital art and illustration in 2005. Interestingly, he was not an avid reader of comics while growing up and favoured the available animated shows like Chip ‘n’ Dale, Talespin, and Duck Tales.

Digital Illustrator Lovely Kukreja

Currently, he leads the content department at Bobble AI, where he helps develop virtual avatars for stickers and gifs to enable a personalised experience for their users across messaging apps. A classic example of where modern technology meets traditional art forms.

Digital Illustrator Lovely Kukreja

Lovely is best known for his adorable illustrations of Indian mythological figures. The series depicts various gods and goddesses in a cute, child-like form combined with a soft yet vibrant colour palette. When creating pieces linked to heritage or religion, Lovely believes that the artist is responsible for balancing their personal style and the sanctity of the depiction itself, where cultural boundaries should be respected. His inclination towards children’s content and spirituality motivated him to create something that everyone, both young and old, could enjoy.

Digital Illustrator Lovely Kukreja

Having dabbled in children’s illustrations, medical illustrations, and UI design (to name a few), Lovely’s philosophy is that “evolution is the only key to survive and grow”. One of the major challenges during his career was “selling himself”, which he overcame by staying updated with the latest technology, constantly developing his skills, and making sure to market his development on social media and not simply posting to keep with the trends. Favouring freehand drawing for concept development, Lovely avoids references as much as possible and instead goes with his instincts for composition, character, emotions and colour to create an original piece. The aim for him is simple – try to be better than yesterday.

Digital Illustrator Lovely Kukreja

While he has a Bachelors in Multimedia and Animation, he thinks formal education institutions need to adapt to the shift from traditional to digital media and the high requirement for self-learning and self-representation. While he doesn’t abhor the foundational methods or art school study materials per se, he thinks there is room for improvement in how it is communicated.

Digital Illustrator Lovely Kukreja
Digital Illustrator Lovely Kukreja

15 years later, his advice for those entering the industry can be summed up in a word – temperance. According to Lovely, artists “should enjoy the freedom of expression, but not exploit it.”, doubling down on his stance on representation. He believes that one’s work has a longer shelf life when measured in its “impact and ripple effect” and not “likes and followers”.

He goes on to say that there is nothing wrong with an artist expecting proper monetary compensation for what they do, even though the impression is that creative professions are not sustainable. A lesson to which every digital artist and creative can relate.

Lovely makes it a point to follow the constraints of commercial work but takes the time to satiate his cravings to develop his personal projects and art pieces without any limitations. In his words, “I dedicate my day-time to work for food, and in the night I feed my soul.” In the future, he hopes to start his own production house where he can narrate unexplored stories.

Digital Illustrator Lovely Kukreja
Learn how Digital Illustrator Lovely Kukreja draws:

How to Illustrate ‘Goddess Durga’ with Basic Guidelines!

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Creative Gaga - Issue 52

 

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Portrait artist Mohan Sonawane shares his wisdom on the art of portraiture, revealing the secrets to capturing the essence of the individual.

Portraiture by Mohan Sonawane
A digital rendition of the Indian Bollywood actress Shraddha Kapoor

CG. Could you kindly recall your artist journey, the pleasures and pains of the path?

Mohan. I never imagined I would reach such heights in art as I have today. Art was my favourite subject as a child, and due to my family’s financial condition, I had to work part-time to purchase my art materials. As I progressed, my art teacher recommended ATD. During that program, I have suggested the JJ School of Art, where I pursued a program for Applied Arts. My time in Mumbai was testing and arduous; I was alone in the vast city and had to fend for myself. Apart from this, commuting took up most of my day, leaving very little time to study. Nevertheless, this period taught me several important life lessons that I cherish even today.

An illustration capturing the likeness of a Sadhu painted digitally

The most unforgettable moment, however, is the time I won a bronze medal during the final year of my under graduation. This path has been strenuous, and I have been rejected several times, but I wouldn’t have reached where I am today if I hadn’t faced those failures.

CG. What/who is your muse? What inspires you to take up the pen/pencil/stylus every day and sketch?

Mohan. Since I did not have strong financial support from my family, I had to work very hard to be self-sufficient. My desire to be independent is the fuel for my work.

Portraiture by Mohan Sonawane
An illustration capturing the likeness of an Old Man painted digitally

CG. Your work primarily consists of portraits. What inspired you to take up portrait painting?

Mohan. Artist Vasudev Kamat’s paintings inspired me to take up portraiture. I create all kinds of art, but portraiture has been my favourite ever since I was in JD Art painting.

Portraiture by Mohan Sonawane
A digital painting of Freida Pinto

CG. Could you kindly share the process behind your photo selection for your portraits? Are there any specific criteria that one must consider when selecting photographs for portrait painting?

Mohan. Photo selection is a critical aspect of portraiture. One must carefully hand-pick a photograph that has sufficient depth and ample lighting. The right picture can result in a vibrant portrait and shine a light on all of your hard work.

An illustration capturing the likeness of a Rajasthani old man painted digitally

CG. How do you design the background and assemble the colour palette for a piece? What are the critical aspects that one must look into while picking colours for a portrait?

Mohan. Background plays a vital role in a portrait because the right background can make your artwork stand out. The colour selection for the background depends majorly on the subject and their skin tone. I shift from light and dark colours depending on the mood and subject of the piece.

A digital rendition of the actor Aiden Shaw

CG. How do you determine the best angle and light for a portrait (assuming that there is no photograph to refer to), especially since all of us possess a “good” and “bad” side (in terms of photography angle)?

Mohan. Knowing your anatomy can save you here since an artist well versed in anatomy can create any pose with ease. Depth in the artwork can be brought about through shading. However, a reference photograph can help ease the process.

Portraiture by Mohan Sonawane
A digital rendition of the actor Rowan atkinson in his famous avatar as Mr.Bean

CG. Apart from realistic portraits, you have also mastered the art of caricatures. What are the similarities and differences in the artistic process for both? Does your process vary in terms of sketching and painting?

Mohan. Be it a realistic portrait or caricature, it is vital to know your anatomy. However, in lifelike portraits, we need to maintain the character, and in caricatures, we need to exaggerate the subject’s features. Therefore, we follow the rules of anatomy rather strictly for portraits. Otherwise, the painting and sketching process essentially remains the same.

CG. Your artworks have a significant variation in style and flair. How do you set a particular style for an artwork? Which is your most preferred style?

Mohan. I decide the style for an artwork based on the character and concept of the work. My go-to is the “one eye” style, which I have followed in several of my works.

CG. How do you choose the subjects of your painting? Could you elaborate on the portrait painting process? What are your preferred software and medium?

Mohan. Before beginning my painting process, I study the subject carefully and harvest ideas during the reference study phase. Quick gesture drawings provide a good understanding of the subject. Then, with the base secure, I proceed to draft the final sketch. Upon completing the final illustration, I work on the base colour for the skin tone and proceed to add darker shades and complete the work with finer details. The result is finalised only after the colour correction process, where I tweak the colours and check colour balance. As for my prefered software and medium, they are Adobe Photoshop and Watercolours, respectively.

CG. Who is your greatest inspiration and/or role model/mentor from the field of art?

Mohan. Artist Vasudeo Kamath is my role model, and his paintings are my source of inspiration. I have learnt a lot about portraiture by studying his works.

CG. Could you share a few words of wisdom with aspiring artists on the art of portrait painting?

Mohan. If you want to perfect the art of portraiture, then develop keen observation and sketch regularly. It is crucial to practice from live studies as much as possible.

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Creative Gaga - Issue 52

 

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Vijaya Laxmi exhibits the power that a woman possesses through her illustration series, ‘Devi’, ‘Shiva-Shakti’ and various other series, all are an exploration of her mythological concepts allowing viewers to see beyond the obvious.

Obsession with drawing and painting is Vijaya Laxmi’s genetic code. Pursuing art as a free-time hobby flowered into a passion of extremes where she could forgo sleep to complete canvasses and thus began her creative journey as a professional artist.

 

Also practicing clay modelling, she credits herself with a substantial part in promoting the concept of ‘Green Ganeshas’.

Shivgami

Themed Concepts of Modern Divine

Sensing and feeling divinity within her and outside of her, she has explored this divinity through her artwork in a modern and contemporary manner. Her work is mostly figurative created using oil and acrylics on canvas in subtle blues and greys, attempting to convey a story.

Saraswati

According to Vijayalaxmi, the female form has allure, grace and beauty emerging from the gentleness of form, the curves – be it the nose, the neck, the torso, the bosom, the waist; the softness of lines of fingers and toes convey a sense of movement. There is remarkable strength in what to the eye looks merely dainty.

Towards Peace

The Devi Series

To convey the message that each female has a different rupa, she has created a series, Devi, which is a reflection of her unhappiness where people see a woman as a goddess but not the other way round. Unlike calendar art, she has depicted the various Devi in a simple manner, without the much elaborate attributes of goddesses with heavy ornamentation.

Durga

She says that simplicity is itself the beauty of a message: ‘Here She is – now you draw your own meaning, interpret it, but here are my guidelines.’

 

Laxmi in her work is depicted as smiling – as everyone wishes to be blessed by her bounteous grace. Devi Kali’s face projects the anger or rage at injustice. Like Kali, Durga too has a more chiseled face, emphasising their strength, both destructive and creative.

Shivalankaar

The Shiv-Shakti

The Shiv-Shakti series is where she sees Shiv and Shakti as one – separate and together but spiritually one. It is a glorious representation of souls, their quest for merger and the attainment of the moment when they are immersed into each other.

 

Vijaya Laxmi sees Shiva not just in a male form but also as a female – the ardhanarishwar. He manifests himself in a complex dual form; the two forms merged in a manner where it is difficult to point where the male form ends and the female begins.

Shiva-Shakti

Shivangini

She has showcased the constant effort of Shakti to merge with Shiva in the He-She element through a series of paintings like Shakti seeking his attention; Shakti with the power of her will, she herself transforms into Shiva in the posture of meditation, but with her feminine physical attributes intact; Shakti trying to create a Shiva into whom she can merge.

Natsati

Traditional is Evergreen

For Vijaya Laxmi, the visual language on the canvas is the marriage of an idea, a thought, the medium and the expression using the mediums. Even an ordinary thing has to be beautified or the art is lesser for it.

Prayers

For her, digital art is flat and does not reflect the energy that the strokes of a brush provide, imparting life into a work of art. The computer screen’s size and the size of her canvases are of no comparison. Working on an actual canvas scale is a stupendous realisation that the good old brush can turn a trick or two which machines may not be able to.

Published in Issue 46

We all design for different audiences and always keep trying to figure out what they would need and how will they react to our designs? But, one audience who is the youngest of all and most difficult to predict is ‘Kids’. So, to get more clarity, we focused on animation design, an extensively used medium to influence these young ones. This issue is full of veterans advice and a lot of inspirations throughout for every creative soul. So, go ahead

 

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CURRENT ISSUE
Creative Gaga - Issue 52

 

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Arjun Parikh’s creative and artistic journey reflects in his detailed illustrations. Animal portraits and ‘art with deeper meaning’ is what his portfolio showcases!

Illustrations by Arjun Parikh
The Man Who Felt Too Much
Illustrations by Arjun Parikh
Unfold
Illustrations by Arjun Parikh
Labyrinth

Detailed, bold and narrative, is what Arjun Parikh’s art represents. A professional illustrator and graphic designer based in Los Angeles, his artistic roots go back to his childhood days when he would adorn his books with doodles and drawings! These experiences pushed him to follow his passion and pursue a degree in Graphic Design which was followed by a Master of Fine Arts degree in Illustrations.

Isolated
The Threat

While Arjun has a fondness for creating hand-drawn art, for the digital medium he prefers Adobe Photoshop and Illustrator. Beginning his design process with a solid brief putting all the key information in one place, he assigns specific words to his design and creates a bunch of thumbnail sketches. Converting these into compositional drawings, Arjun believes in keeping the client in the loop throughout the process to gather their perspective and inputs. Hoping to be an educator someday, Arjun is inspired by the works of Takehiro Nikai and Aaron Horkey amongst others.

Making Peace
Creative Gaga - Issue 51

Published in Issue 51

Business, studios, agencies, freelancer all have different perspectives to handle the pandemic and hurdle it brings. While some find pandemic an obstacle which will soon fade away and on the other hand, few saw opportunities in the same. Many creatives used the past few months to reflect on their styles and horn their art. Many utilized it for collaboration opportunities with national and international creatives. This issue is a must-read if you are looking for insights, inspirations and ways to bounce back in this unlocking phase.

 

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CURRENT ISSUE
Creative Gaga - Issue 52