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Vijaya Laxmi exhibits the power that a woman possesses through her illustration series, ‘Devi’, ‘Shiva-Shakti’ and various other series, all are an exploration of her mythological concepts allowing viewers to see beyond the obvious.

Obsession with drawing and painting is Vijaya Laxmi’s genetic code. Pursuing art as a free-time hobby flowered into a passion of extremes where she could forgo sleep to complete canvasses and thus began her creative journey as a professional artist.

 

Also practicing clay modelling, she credits herself with a substantial part in promoting the concept of ‘Green Ganeshas’.

Vijaya Laxmi - Devata or Devi | Creative Gaga
Shivgami

Themed Concepts of the Modern Divine

Sensing and feeling divinity within her and outside of her, she has explored this divinity through her artwork in a modern and contemporary manner. Her work is mostly figurative created using oil and acrylics on canvas in subtle blues and greys, attempting to convey a story.

Vijaya Laxmi - Devata or Devi | Creative Gaga
Saraswati

According to Vijayalaxmi, the female form has allure, grace and beauty emerging from the gentleness of form, the curves – be it the nose, the neck, the torso, the bosom, the waist; the softness of lines of fingers and toes convey a sense of movement. There is remarkable strength in what to the eye looks merely dainty.

Vijaya Laxmi - Devata or Devi | Creative Gaga
Shivaay
Vijaya Laxmi - Devata or Devi | Creative Gaga
Towards Peace

The Devi Series

To convey the message that each female has a different rupa, she has created a series, Devi, which is a reflection of her unhappiness where people see a woman in goddess but not the other way round. Unlike calendar art, she has depicted the various Devi in a simple manner, without the much elaborate attributes of goddesses with heavy ornamentation.

Vijaya Laxmi - Devata or Devi | Creative Gaga
Kaali
Vijaya Laxmi - Devata or Devi | Creative Gaga
Durga

She says that simplicity is itself the beauty of a message: ‘Here She is – now you draw your own meaning, interpret it, but here are my guidelines.’

 

Laxmi in her work is depicted as smiling – as everyone wishes to be blessed by her bounteous grace. Devi Kali’s face projects the anger or rage at injustice. Like Kali, Durga too has a more chiseled face, emphasising their strength, both destructive and creative.

Vijaya Laxmi - Devata or Devi | Creative Gaga
Shivalankaar

The Shiv-Shakti

The Shiv-Shakti series is where she sees Shiv and Shakti as one – separate and together but spiritually one. It is a glorious representation of souls, their quest for merger and the attainment of the moment when they are immersed into each other.

 

Viajaya Laxmi sees Shiva not just in a male form but also a female – the ardhanarishwar. He manifests himself in a complex dual form; the two forms merged in a manner where it is difficult to point where the male form ends and the female begins.

Vijaya Laxmi - Devata or Devi | Creative Gaga
Shiva-Shakti
Vijaya Laxmi - Devata or Devi | Creative Gaga
Shivangini

She has showcased the constant effort of Shakti to merge with Shiva in the He-She element through a series of paintings like Shakti seeking his attention; Shakti with the power of her will, she herself transforms into Shiva in the posture of meditation, but with her feminine physical attributes intact; Shakti trying to create a Shiva into whom she can merge.

Vijaya Laxmi - Devata or Devi | Creative Gaga
Natsati

Traditional is Evergreen

For Vijaya Laxmi, the visual language on the canvas is the marriage of an idea, a thought, the medium and the expression using the mediums. Even an ordinary thing has to be beautified or the art is lesser for it.

Vijaya Laxmi - Devata or Devi | Creative Gaga
Prayers

For her, digital art is flat and does not reflect the energy that the strokes of a brush provide, imparting life into a work of art. The computer screen’s size and the size of her canvases are of no comparison. Working on an actual canvas scale is a stupendous realisation that the good old brush can turn a trick or two which machines may not be able to.

Published in Issue 46

We all design for different audiences and always keep trying to figure out what they would need and how will they react to our designs? But, one audience who is the youngest of all and most difficult to predict is ‘Kids’. So, to get more clarity, we focused on animation design, an extensively used medium to influence these young ones. This issue is full of veterans advice and a lot of inspirations throughout for every creative soul. So, go ahead

 

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The Euro-Vision project is a collaboration between 26 artists from all over Europe & the world to create their own interpretation and celebration of the renowned song competition, The Eurovision – Capitalising on this year’s Eurovision location, Israel, The Startup Nation.

The theme was:

Human & Machine

Some look forward to technology’s innumerable advantages while others fear the progression of artificial intelligence could lead to our downfall. Whatever the case, its rapid evolution is no secret – especially in the start-up nation of Israel, where Eurovision will be held this year.

 

The-Artery, a New York based creative agency invited many different artist to create a visual homage to the 2019 Eurovision competition. Ranging from 3D animation to stop-motion, the artists were invited to visualize what it means for humans and machines to operate as one. Is it peaceful? Violent? Organic? Or a mix of everything? Whatever it is, we know that music can always bring us together as one.
Illustrations from EuroVision | Creative Gaga
Liron Ashkenazi-Eldar | The-Artery
Illustrations from EuroVision | Creative Gaga
Andi Iacob | Romania
Illustrations from Euro-Vision | Creative Gaga
Caroline Kjellberg Juul Mortensen | Denmark
Illustrations from EuroVision | Creative Gaga
Mike Voropaev | Russia
Illustrations from Euro-Vision | Creative Gaga
Anastasia Kharchenko | Azerbaijan
Illustrations from Euro-Vision | Creative Gaga
Patrick Sluiter | The-Artery
Illustrations from Euro-Vision | Creative Gaga
Patrick Sluiter | The-Artery
Illustrations from Euro-Vision | Creative Gaga
Kristian Skogmo | Norway
Illustrations from Euro-Vision | Creative Gaga
Eduard Mykhailov | Ukraine
Illustrations from Euro-Vision | Creative Gaga
Yomagick | Malta
Illustrations from Euro-Vision | Creative Gaga
Grace Casas | The-Artery
Illustrations from Euro-Vision | Creative Gaga
Laura Sirvent | Spain
Illustrations from Euro-Vision | Creative Gaga
Daniel Nahum | Israel
Illustrations from Euro-Vision | Creative Gaga
Nadav Meidan | Israel
Illustrations from Euro-Vision | Creative Gaga
Machina Infinitum | Germany + Italy
Illustrations from Euro-Vision | Creative Gaga
Alex Sasha Djordjevic | Serbia
Illustrations from EuroVision | Creative Gaga
Ryan Morace | The-Artery
Illustrations from Euro-Vision | Creative Gaga
Kasper Pindsle | Norway
Illustrations from Euro-Vision | Creative Gaga
Mihran Stepanyan | Armenia
Illustrations from Euro-Vision | Creative Gaga
João Figueiras | Portugal
Illustrations from EuroVision | Creative Gaga
Andrea Philippon | Switzerland
Illustrations from Euro-Vision | Creative Gaga
Irene Feleo | Australia

Credits

Agency, Production, and Post
Collaborating Artists
Aleksandar Sasha Djordjevic
Anastasia Kharchenko
Andi Iacob
Caroline Kjellberg
Daniel Nahum
Eduard Mykhailov
João Figueiras
Grace Casas
Irene Feleo
Kasper Pindsle
Kristian Skogmo
Laura Sirvent
Liron Ashkenazi-Eldar
Machina Infinitum
Mihran Stepanyan
Mike Voropaev
Patrick Sluiter
Ryan Morace
Yomagick
Nadav Meiden
Andrea Philippon
Aline Sinquin
 
Executive Creative Director
Vico Sharabani

Creative Director
Liron Ashkenazi-Eldar
 
Music
The Soundery Sound Design
 
Sound Design
Patrick Henchman
 
Colour
Aline Sinquin
 
Executive Producer/Managing Director
Deborah Sullivan
 
Editor
Michael Elliot

Anil KS trusts his instinct, essentially, while designing. Observing elements in his environment, he cultivates his techniques to simplistically present depictions that effortlessly spread smiles on people’s faces and make the world a happier place through his illustrations.

Illustrations
Tea Master. A fun illustration for a magazine featuring Kerala Tea shops.

For Anil, the design is a natural way of life, such that a person’s design sense and character are innately connected. Mainly guided by his love for traditional art forms, Indian mythology, sculpting and mural art, he’s always trying to bring his own style into his work of illustration, design, animation and typography.

Illustrations
Double. Amusing characters designed for an animation project.

Choosing a colour palette is a major aspect of Anil’s work, helping his illustrations to stand out and make easily relatable. Largely influenced by the living ambience and visual art forms in his hometown, Kerala, sharp and contrasting colours always make their way into in his work.

Illustrations
Parrot Man. An evocative illustration from a series of miniatures done for society6.

Trying to keep it easily readable in a silhouette, he starts out by scribbling the simplest, basic shapes, adding extra bits only later. Understanding the story behind the character helps in deciding the nature of the character. Anil always tries putting his personal touch into his work, preferring whimsical illustrations with humorous concepts and cheerful colours that make both, viewers and him, happy. That sounds like a win-win.

Horse Man. A colourful, whimsical and funny character designed for a project in 2010.

Published in Issue 34

This is a rebranding special issue focused on finding the answers to some of the basic questions like what is the right time for re-branding? or what all needs changing and how exactly? We interviewed some of the best branding studios like Landor Mumbai, Elephant, VGC, Inchwork, and many more. If you are considering rebranding or want to learn more about the art of doing it then this issue is a must read. So, go ahead

 

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Characters – you’ll find them in comics, storybooks and fairytales as manifestations of imagination. Beyond that, elements like anatomy, expressions and plot are key in making a character appear realistic and relatable, believes character designer Aditya Chari. He explains the realistic principles one must incorporate while creating a character.

Kali. Illustration for a gaming concept. Depicts a negative character.
Tamohara. Displays how the character can narrate the story when placed in the right setting.

The Story Catalyses a Character

It’s important to know the story before giving shape to a character. After all, the purpose of every character is to tell a story. The story is built around their strengths and limitations. The props help them overcome their limitation and move the story forward. Next, figure out the role of the character in the story and layer your vision on top of it.

 

When you get content describing a character, you actually narrow down the choices and attain a more focused approach. This makes it easier to plan your character. However, when you work on your own conceptual art, there is no fixed direction. And you have to take the idea in your mind and put it down as a building block for the design. After that, let your intuition take over.

Character Design

It’s All in The Face

Facial expressions are most important when it comes to character designing. The eyes best convey the expressions, especially when in a close-up. The hands and the spine dictate the posture of the body, magnifying the emotion you try to convey through the facial expression. The expression is a window into the character’s mindset. Therefore, if you want people to relate and accept your characters, you need to design them to be expressive.

Character Design
Devi. The soft curves, posture and the facial expression keeps the feminine essence intact.
Character Design
Zoravar. The massive overgrown character has exaggeration that in no way disrupts the rules of anatomy.

Exaggerate What Anatomy Allows

When you are trying to draw from life or memory, your knowledge of anatomy is your main tool. You learn to look out for the landmarks on the body which help you put down your figure faster. Moreover, it helps you foreshorten the figure and also dress it up where the underlying body is not visible. Anatomy helps you understand mobility and the function of muscles. Muscles look different when they are relaxed and when they are contracted.

 

Exaggeration is just an adaptation of muscle and bone structure to the characteristics of the concept you wish to develop. This depends on what you expect the character to do when playing its role in the story. Characters like Popeye with huge forearms, Hulk with massive overgrown muscles or disfigured creatures from visual effects films, all fit into the same skeletal and musculature structure.

Character Design
Devi Comic. A very determined facial expression lends it the power that muscle lends to man.

Know the Difference Between Muscle and Mental Strength

While working with characters that are either male or female, it’s important to be aware of the differences between the two. Apart from the obvious physical differences, you need to bring forth the emotional difference too. Imagine combining the physical frailty of a woman with a very determined look when facing a larger than life scenario.

 

You have to make her look strong but at the same time maintain her feminine side. It’s about her mental strength. On the contrary, a male character would be more about robust physical posing and an exaggerated angry expression with throbbing veins and a muscular built. Even the design of clothing has a different approach for each type just as in real life.

Sea Creature. Irregular and bizarre. Follows the anatomy of sea life like the fins, the flippers and the claws.
Gorg. Complex, surreal and mechanical creature. Manages to get living feel because of its fierce facial expression.
Snake Woman. Body postures and facial expressions bring out the character’s personality.
Character Design
Character Sketch. Reveals many characters need props to help them overcome their limitation.

Published in Issue 14

We dedicated this issue to Digital Art where we explored the connection between our dreams and imagination and how the flexibility of technology can be used to document that. In his exclusive article, Android Jones explains the broader perspective of digital art. Featuring Ankur Singh Patar, Aditya Chari, Archan Nair Harshvardhan Kadam and Aamina Shazi Arora, every article discusses how each of them has an individual way of working and yet they all look at life beyond the obvious to appreciate it’s beauty.

 

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The challenge of capturing the energy and excitement when illustrating for sport is difficult to achieve. Shreedhar Sutar’s illustrations not only achieve it but also appeal broadly with an optimistic tone. He dwells on his techniques of maintaining that energy in each sport star while bringing character to life. He takes us through his processes.

Energy

Step 01

Draw on a paper sheet to get the hint about the main force and structure of the drawing. Later took the rough drawing to Photoshop and starts working on light source and shadow in outline with the help of Wacom tablet.

Energy

Step 02

With calligraphy brushes applied basic shade for a base colour. Here it’s better to know a grey scale in detail, as the skin style will be very important for the final output. Skin tone is prepared by overlapping of multiple layers, which makes skin look more realistic. Used the same process for the hairs & clothes too, using dark and middle tones with some highlight. For beard used stippling style to get the realistic feel using both mouse and pen tablet.

Energy

Step 03

The clothes are as important as skin to create that realistic look. Drapery and fold have been achieved by creating shade and highlight. For bright reflections kept the path open with white colour. To make the clothes more appealing also embedded logo and text on the T-shirt. Also kept a single light source to create the depth in illustration. Used the same process for other objects like a hockey stick, socks and shoes. To work further merged all layers into one.

Step 04

Used smudge tool at 60% opacity to create stokes which shows the force behind the action. Outlines may look a bit blur after using the smudge tool, so created a black outline around to maintain the sharpness. Additionally applied a motion blur effect to half of the image to achieve speed.

Step 05

To make the illustration more believable used the watercolour splatters, droplets, flow and strokes to portray the sweat, as it would be an important part of the illustration. Applied watercolour flows and white spatters to merge the background and the character. Then finally applied shadows to create the depth.

Step 06

The final illustration achieved.

Published in Issue 28

This Illustration Special is best to know why and how illustration as a popular medium is taking the design world by storm! From evolution of illustrations to its place in the world today, renowned designers and illustrators like Abhishek Singh, Mukesh Singh, Archan Nair, Alicia Souza, Raj Khatri with some international talent such as Fil Dunsky from Russia, Iain Macarthur and Richard Field from UK, who live and breathe illustration, would be the right people to gain some insight from. With many more talents to explore with great insights and excellent techniques, again a fully packed issue is waiting to amaze you!

 

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Maxim Shkret is a freelance digital artist with over 10 years of experience in various advertising agencies. His 3D Portraits are the brilliant confluence of realism and surrealism. In each of the work, the subjects are displayed with a high degree of detailing, yet the layered treatment of the form brings in the ethereal and surreal appearance to the work. The crispness and precision cannot be missed. The sharp edges and smooth textures add to the intense mood of each subject.

 

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3D Portraits
3D Portraits
3D Portraits
3D Portraits
3D Portraits
3D Portraits

Moritz Adam Schmitt, a German illustrator breaks through his creative block with a very fascinating approach. He closes his eyes and scribbles random lines. Then he looks for interesting shapes through the scribbles to weave a story. With Adobe Illustrator, he develops the sketch and finally adds texture and light with Adobe Photoshop. The result is a breathtaking composition of fantasy and drama. These compositions are a great inspiration to help think outside the box.

 

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Illustrations
Illustrations
Illustrations
Illustrations
Illustrations

Rocklets, a popular brand in the category of chocolate and confectionary in Argentina, wanted to give away headphones as a present with the purchase of Rocklets Easter Eggs. Morphine Motion Graphics created two fun and cool 3D illustrations for the packaging design of the giveaway.

 

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Packaging Design
Packaging Design
Packaging Design
Packaging Design
Packaging Design
Packaging Design

Here is an interesting portrait series created on the phone by Miten Lapsiya. This series is a collection of celebrity portraits like Amitabh Bachchan, Sachin Tendulkar, Barrack Obama, and more. Miten uses very realistic paint styles like watercolor for this series. Thus the portraits beautifully capture the essence of each personality.

 

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Celebrity Portraits
Celebrity Portraits
Celebrity Portraits
Celebrity Portraits
Celebrity Portraits
Celebrity Portraits

Shaivalini Kumar

Always Start with a Sketch

Even though a lot of our work happens digitally, It’s important to establish a basic structure of what you wish to create! Physically sketching out the illustration is always a good practice.


Ideate

While ideating, create mood-boards, mind maps and write down everything that seems enticing. Narrow down on what you wish to create gradually and you’ll get your core idea.


Get Inspiration

Gathering inspiration is an important part of the process. Inspiration can also come from the smallest of things be it a conversation, a person, a place or a thought.


Build a Story

A trick can be used while illustrating characters is writing a short story around them, that entails details about the character’s personality traits. It makes the process of illustrating the character much more engaging.

Be Informed

Reading about areas outside of design is important for gathering content and making your illustration relatable to a larger number of people.


Experiment

Sometimes spontaneous decision to experiment with colours, textures, shapes and forms, can lead to unpredictable outcome, which can be interesting and unique.


Trial Runs

It’s okay to start from scratch, even multiple times. You may often end- up starting all over – but that contributes to making the final illustration much more refined and closer to what your core idea.

Render and Detail

Once you establish your base illustration, adding hints of details that are complementary to the forms will bring more life to what you have drawn.


Get Feedback

It’s always good to see what people feel about your creation and process, by getting feedback on your work you may be able to identify points that you might have missed out.


Practice

A lot! As you know, practice can make you perfect!

Published in Issue 30

We interviewed the branding experts, who are behind some of the very successful brands. Lopez Design, have shared the story behind the recently developed branding of ‘Bihar Museum‘ and also shared the basics of brand creation in the ‘Gyaan’ section. Young visual communication designer like Shaivalini Kumar shared her love for the letter design while experienced graphic designer Anup Shah dwelled upon his passion for calligraphy. In brief, this issue is packed with branding and typography design experts who can help you solve the mystery of the brand creation!

 

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