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Imagination is the greatest form of flattery and for a designer; it doubles up as a way to pay homage to legends, icons and inspirations. Illustrator Shesh Kiran created the caricature portrait of flute maestro Pandit Hariprasad Chaurasia. He explains how.

Portrait
Portrait

Step 1

Started the rough sketching with new file of 300 dpi resolution. I used the tablet pen for this sketch with the various brush sizes from 25 to 30.

Step 2

Create a new layer below the sketch layers and filled it with black colour. Kept the fill opacity to 62% which makes the rough sketch partially visual.

Step 3

Added a new layer and started filling the flat skin colour in this layer. Also added another layer for colouring the clothes.

Step 4

Used new traditional texture brushes to detail the hair, eyes and skin tone. Airbrushes were used to bring shades and highlights of skin.

Portrait

Step 5

Further worked on the skin using ‘transform’ from the brush presets to lighten the skin and to create the softer tones using airbrush.

Portrait

Step 6

From the reference image collected the cloth colour palette to bring the real life feel. With the airbrush started detailing the clothes with the selected colour palette.

Portrait

Step 7

Gave a final touch to artwork using various opacity and ‘flow’ on hands, fluet and background as per the requirment to bring the depth and lighting. Hence arrive at the final portrait artwork.

Tools Used:

• Adobe Photoshop

• Wacom Bamboo tablet

• Airbrushes & round brushes for painting.

Published in Issue 21

Branding With Packaging Special! They say not to judge a book by its cover. But they also say that exceptions are always there. There’s no doubt, branding and packaging are the faces of any business and product. They decide the way people will receive the brand; whether they will accept it or reject it. To understand and gain more perspective on this much-unsolved mystery, we invited many branding and packaging experts who throw light on the topic.

 

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Creative Gaga - Issue 51

 

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Advertising is an interesting profession and those who work within it know of the everyday humps and bumps, the charm and harm that one has to deal with. As an Illustrator, when the brief is, as usual, a one liner and non-directional; in this case ‘create an illustration on advertising’, the job can be pretty tough. Many images and situations come to mind, and after you’ve decided which one you’d like (and the client would too), that’s when the real work begins. Illustrator, Nithin Rao Kumblekar, takes us through the key steps (illustration tutorial) to arrive at the cover illustration done for this issue’s cover.

Step 01

Always start the illustration with a rough scribble. This helps to get the idea on paper faster. While you do that, it’s advisable to check if it’s working in the layout or not. After that’s finalised, make a fine line drawing by putting all detailing in place. After that comes the lighting. Give a monochromatic tone on the entire sketch and decide the light source and the reflection. This gives a fair idea about the final look.

Step 02

Next, create different objects in separate layers. Once all the objects have been created, then give the basic shades in respective colours for each layer. This helps understand the colour tone for the illustration in the required light. Here, an 80-volt bulb effect is created in the shady bathroom. One thing that needs to be aware of is that the highlight cannot be pure white. The entire tone has to be yellowish.

Step 03

Now, select a soft brush to work in most of the places. Notice, a rough brush is also used in certain spaces that help colour filling to be faster.

Step 04

Once the direction of light is figured, we can move forward in details. Here, the tiles have been put in perspective after which the lights and reflections have followed. It is important to note that light plays tricks with different surfaces. Here, the bathroom tiles must reflect the light. If you are unable to judge the light, then it’s better to visit the actual site where you can see the reflection and tone in the required direction.

Step 05

The next stage is to get the expression right. Notice how the shadow formation on the expression of the character is what gives the entire look. Here, the reflection is monotonous. If this were an outdoor scene, the shadow light would have been in a bluish tone. However, that is not the case in this illustration. After getting the light, shadow and reflection right, the next step is to focus on further detailing. This includes creating facial hair. Notice how close the bulb is to the head and so a glare effect is created on top of objects below the light source. Hence, a yellowish tone is made to overlap the character.

Step 06

One can add as many elements to create detail in the picture. Here, crumpled pieces of paper are added to the story. Notice how the light direction changes on each paper. If you have trouble understanding light and shadow, then it’s always better to get a reference. Take pictures from a camera of the objects for reference.

Step 07

The final stage is the completion of the illustration. One very important thing to keep in mind is to always keep saving your Photoshop le multiple times. You never know when the le might get corrupted and you might end up banging your head on the monitor.

Published in Issue 24

Illustration For Advertising! Gone are the days when Illustrations would take a back seat. Now, they are becoming more proactive and are evolving the way we communicate. This time, Creative Gaga focuses on how the advertising world is opening its doors to this exciting form of design. Featuring renowned Illustrators like Chris Beatrice, Nasheet Shadani, Vijay Kumar, Gabriel Mareno and much more, this issue promises to leave no page unturned!

 

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Paintings don’t just have a layered concept but also layered design. What might appear as uni-surface and simple, actually goes through various complicated and calculated processes in the digital world today. Illustrator Rahul Sharma, uses his painting called ‘Last Fight’ to take us through its initial and final formation.

Step 01

After the brief has been absorbed into the mind and an initial thought or idea manifest itself, a small greyscale thumbnail is created, around 800×600 pixels in size. Once happy with the outcome, the next step is to increase the size and resolution to 300 dpi.

Step 02

A new layer is then created over the thumbnail after changing its opacity to 30%. The characters are then defined further, creating the line art.

Step 03

Another new layer is then created at the very top, and opacity of the rough sketch is turned to 30% and proper line art is carefully done by tracing out and fine tuning the picture. This stage is important as it becomes the base and guideline for the painting.

Step 04

The rough sketch layer at the bottom is turned off and the final art line becomes clearer.

Step 05

Following this, a new layer is created underneath the line art and named as ‘base colour layer’. The sketch is gradually coloured in. Because this happens underneath the line art layer, there is no risk of destroying the line art.

Step 06

Once the base colours are filled, notice that the mood of the painting begins to set in.

Step 07

Once satisfied with the outcome, a new layer is created, this time above the line art, and is filled in with necessary colours.

Step 08

While colouring the painting in, be aware of the light and shadows.

Step 09

And gradually, with patience, the painting starts to come more alive as colour creates tones of drama and action.

Step 10

The painting at this stage might appear finished, but not quite. It’s important to go in as deep as possible to make it real. The final stage involves creating the henna design on the woman’s leg. This is done on a single layer which is switched on in overlay mode, giving the henna a greenish hue.

Step 11

Once completely satisfied with the outcome, the layers are all merged. Thereafter, light and dark effects can be played with by visiting the adjustments tab.

Step 12

Once final adjustments are made, a new and final layer is created over the painting and filled with a light tone of bright orange. This is then changed to the overlay mode and the opacity is reduced to 20%. This is basically what renaissance masters use to do with their painting as the glaze unifies the painting’s colours.

Published in Issue 26

Packaging is the first vital step towards enchanting the audience. Who doesn’t like a cute box or a trendy bottle? With this issue, Creative Gaga lets the cat out of the box to reveal the world of packaging design. Featuring various local and international designers like Petar Pavlov from Macedonia and Brandziac from Russia, Elephant Design and Impprintz from Pune, the issue promises to be a keepsake for many.

 

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Creative Gaga - Issue 51