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Water will evaporate to become steam or freeze to become ice. Certain formulas and physical and chemical characteristics never change, even during the experiment of design. Change however is controlled by the elements in play, whether its colours and shapes or lines and patterns, the end-result is dependent on various external factors as well. A Brand, Strategy and Experience designer Sourajit Sengupta takes us through some of his design principles. Have you got your design goggles on?

Design
Branding for Travosh
Design
Packaging for Travosh
Design
UI for Travosh

Be the Solvent to Create a Solution.

Design is not just about creating an artwork. It’s a solution that varies from brand to brand and person to person. For a designer, it’s like dressing up according to a particular occasion. Is it going to be fun and funky or formal and sleek?

 

It’s not about what you feel like or what you want, but what the situation demands from you. The key is to understand the brand and dissolve yourself in it enough to be able to think from the clients perspective. Consider it like a science experiment, where the process and procedure must rigorously be followed in order to get the desired results.

Design
Sandoitchi Logo
Design
Sandoitchi Branding
Branding for Lokmat
Branding for Avendus

Don’t Force it.

Force might facilitate everything in the scientific world, but when it comes to design, forcing it has never worked. Firstly, one must be in the field for their love and passion for design and not because of external pressures. As long as you love what you do, the journey will appear effortless and smooth, making you a perfectionist sooner or later.

 

And that’s when it will translate in your work. Design has to be invisible and basic. It does not have to be forced. It’s not about simple colour palettes or minimalism, it’s about what is relative for that project. If it relates, it becomes memorable and recallable.

Branding for Empyrean School
Branding for Empyrean School
Forum Mall Book Design
Signage Design for Forum Mall

Give your Design Dreams Milestones.

Development is a series of chain reactions, where thinkers took what existed even beyond. For example, a light bulb couldn’t have been invented if electricity hadn’t been discovered. And the later wouldn’t have been so if a kite wasn’t flown. The concept is same for design. Start off every project with the caliber of making it a dream project.

 

Creating a difference in the design world is a huge consideration and can be best achieved by creating smaller milestones that may someday combine together to make a difference altogether. The key is to be open to all types of knowledge and methods. Put your hands on different styles and projects, especially the ones that are out of your comfort zone

Design
Space Design for Reliance HQ
Design
Space Design for Reliance HQ
Design
Space Design for Reliance HQ

Published in Issue 23

The issue explores a topic which is close to every designer, the Business of Design. We try to understand from the experienced ones that when is the right time to open own studio and what more you should get in your toolbox before taking the plunge! We had interactions with many talented studio founders like Rajesh Dahiya, Archan Nair, Ishan Khosla, Prasun Mazumdar and Anupam Tomer. Also featuring some of the best talents around the world such as Martin Grohs from Germany and Avi Sehmi from Canada along with Sourajit Sengupta from New Delhi. This issue not only provide answers to many questions but also initiate many new ones to explore further! We hope you will enjoy exploring the possibility of your studio with this issue.

 

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CEO and Founding Director of Lopez Design, Anthony Lopez, provides a good look into what employers look for while looking for the new generation of designers, creators, innovators.

How do you land up with a job, and more importantly, how do you find the right job? The two are distinctly different. The right job must ideally balance what you are capable of doing and your future ambitions. It all comes down to how you approach job-seeking.

Getting a job is an anxious business, let alone getting the right one. The first and foremost step is to do a self-strengths and capabilities analysis, giving yourself marks for both tangible skills and non-tangible abilities. Aside of looking at your skills, strengths and conceptual abilities, an interview panel will evaluate your portfolio based on how you showcase your work. Never try to mislead the interviewer. Title your entries, and present only your best, avoiding elementary work. Your portfolio should clearly demonstrate your strengths.

Based on your self-assessment and portfolio, start to evaluate the type of job you would be interested in, and which you’d be fit for. Start short-listing firms, and study them carefully. In the case of Graphic Design or Visual Communication, there are many types of firms you can join: advertising, design studios or corporates. Every one of these will open up different roles requiring different strengths.

Decide your path, based on what will be the right for both you and the firm. Start writing individual mails to each firm. The best way is to draft a master letter, which you can modify to suit your pitch to each firm.

Here are a few tips that summarise the key points to finding the right job:

1. Believe in yourself.

Be confident about who you are and what you are capable of.

 


2. Present who you are honest, and be yourself.

Show positivity, and ensure it is demonstrated in every attempt throughout the process.

 


3. Every firm has its own personality and character; See if there is a match, and write them individual emails.

It is not very different from locating your desired home and the right landlord! I often tell my future clients that we need to check each other out to see if we are the right match. This is a good step to maintain.

 


4. Your portfolio showcases not only your capabilities, but your personality

Craft it well, and ensure you clearly communicate exactly what it is you are showcasing.

 


5. Connect the project to your role, contribution and impact it had.

Most importantly, let your hiring panel know the context and the purpose.

 


6. Never try to fit into a job you are not made for.

It is best to be in a position of adding value and being an asset to your firm and team. Any false attempt will take you down the snake instead of up the ladder.

Looking for new design jobs? Try Jooble for creative jobs in India or abroad.

Published in Issue 38

This issue, we try to explore different views from many well-known studio owners and senior designers. While Anthony Lopez of Lopez Design shared tips on what a studio looks for in a designer, Mohar Ray from Codesign highlights the key aspects that play a significant role and make the difference in whether you are hired or not as a promising designer. Also, this issue has an insightful article on ‘Branding with reason and love’ from Itu Chaudhuri, founder ICD (Itu Chaudhuri Design) along with Siddhi Ranade, explaining his tools of story telling through his unique style of illustrations. This issue is a must read for a talented graduate to a branding expert. Order you copy and enjoy reading it!

 


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One of the most popular and commonly used typeface/ font ‘Helvetica’ has been redrawn by the designers at Monotype to suit the needs of a modern day contemporary artist, reader or writer.

Font Helvetica

Used by numerous students for their projects to be used by brands like Apple and Nestlé in their logo designs, Helvetica is one of the most widespread and universal typefaces utilized around the world, thanks to its simple and crisp design. Originally created by Max Miedinger and Edward Hoffman in 1957, this Swiss typeface has been used by countless brands and has managed to remain quite popular even today. To keep up with the modern standards of this decade, Monotype has reintroduced Helvetica as “Helvetica Now”, which is simpler, clearer and more sophisticated than its predecessors. “The design introduces a new chapter in the Helvetica story- expanding its look and utility while reinvigorating its heritage”, says Charles Nix, type director of Monotype.

Font Helvetica

Helvetica Now has been upgraded to provide more alternatives for graphic designers and creative professionals, like having size – specific drawings with size – specific spacing and a wide range of fonts and sizes to choose from. Completed over a span of 4 years, the designers have carefully redrawn all the existing characters and produced a new family of fonts: 48 fonts with 3 optical sizes to be precise; which include micro, text and display. Overcoming the limitations of the previous typeface’s spacing and legibility, the three new optical sizes have broadened the scope of Helvetica.

Font Helvetica

Helvetica Now Micro has alterations like a larger x-height with wider forms and open apertures making it highly comprehensible even at smaller sizes (4-7 points). On the other hand, Helvetica Now Display has been enhanced to be more eloquent when it comes to big and bold messages as it eliminates the need to make physical adjustments to the spacing. The size which is ideal for reading and information-rich domains, Helvetica Now Text has weights ranging from Thin to Black, alongside adequate spacing and kernel, which makes is pleasing to read.

Font Helvetica

Apart from these sizes, the designers have worked meticulously to also create brand new alternate glyphs in this advanced Helvetica family. A single story ‘a’ and a straight legged capital ‘R’ with their own alternates of each weight and optical style has also been included. The designers have gone all way to provide a wide range of alternates for different purposes and have also included a suite Helvetica arrows.

Font Helvetica

Monotype has successfully modified and redrawn 40,000 letters of the older version of Helvetica and produced a font that is more applicable in modern times and provides more scope for designers. Helvetica Now is now available for people and can found on Monotype’s cloud-based font discovery system ‘Mosaic’. It can be bought as single weights or the complete typeface families at different prices.

Font Helvetica
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Shaivalini Kumar

Always Start with a Sketch

Even though a lot of our work happens digitally, It’s important to establish a basic structure of what you wish to create! Physically sketching out the illustration is always a good practice.


Ideate

While ideating, create mood-boards, mind maps and write down everything that seems enticing. Narrow down on what you wish to create gradually and you’ll get your core idea.


Get Inspiration

Gathering inspiration is an important part of the process. Inspiration can also come from the smallest of things be it a conversation, a person, a place or a thought.


Build a Story

A trick can be used while illustrating characters is writing a short story around them, that entails details about the character’s personality traits. It makes the process of illustrating the character much more engaging.

Be Informed

Reading about areas outside of design is important for gathering content and making your illustration relatable to a larger number of people.


Experiment

Sometimes spontaneous decision to experiment with colours, textures, shapes and forms, can lead to unpredictable outcome, which can be interesting and unique.


Trial Runs

It’s okay to start from scratch, even multiple times. You may often end- up starting all over – but that contributes to making the final illustration much more refined and closer to what your core idea.

Render and Detail

Once you establish your base illustration, adding hints of details that are complementary to the forms will bring more life to what you have drawn.


Get Feedback

It’s always good to see what people feel about your creation and process, by getting feedback on your work you may be able to identify points that you might have missed out.


Practice

A lot! As you know, practice can make you perfect!

Published in Issue 30

We interviewed the branding experts, who are behind some of the very successful brands. Lopez Design, have shared the story behind the recently developed branding of ‘Bihar Museum‘ and also shared the basics of brand creation in the ‘Gyaan’ section. Young visual communication designer like Shaivalini Kumar shared her love for the letter design while experienced graphic designer Anup Shah dwelled upon his passion for calligraphy. In brief, this issue is packed with branding and typography design experts who can help you solve the mystery of the brand creation!

 


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Words can take your breath away, more so, when the words are written in mesmerizing hand drawn letters. Tobias Saul is a freelance designer based in Düsseldorf, Germany, and specializes in letter design. Here is an assortment of his work between 2017 and 2018. The range in style and depth of detail is absolutely mind boggling in this collection.

 

Tobias Saul gives a lot of thought to each of the lettering designs, where he plays with vintage ornamental elements to contemporary clean layouts, all the way exploring and creating delightful compositions.

 

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Onassis Cultural Centre, a space that brings together people to express and discover diverse art and contemporary culture, needed a visual identity that translated the same. And Beetroot Design shows us how it’s done.

Visual Identity
Visual Identity
Visual Identity
Visual Identity
Visual Identity

Brief/ Challenge:

Onassis Cultural Centre, a platform for artists to come together to showcase and discover contemporary bold art, required an equally bold visual identity for the season 2017-18. This Athens based institution needed the identity to be open and relevant to everyone, thus reflecting the core idea behind OCC.

Visual Identity
Visual Identity
Visual Identity

Solution:

Beetroot Design Group, a multi-award winning, Thessaloniki based design firm, explored and created a visual identity for OCC, that is made for everyone, and yet so unique. Beetroot achieved thus by putting together all the typographies from the publications and events of the season, thus portraying them all under one visual identity. For this, the firm specially created software, Flow Type, which is now available for free. The software helped handle the high volume of typographies and played a key role in their manipulation, thus resulting in expressive free-flowing words.

The overall visual identity is an explosion of energy, colours, movement and boldness. Each piece of work is vastly different in its expression, but it is beautiful how they all come together to narrate a single story.


Client: Onassis Cultural Centre
Design Studio: Beetroot Design


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Every year, the art of logo design evolves to meet the new needs of the business world — and the gap between old and new has never been bigger than in 2019. Logos that were once seen as modern and fresh now appear outdated and cliched, so designers are looking to the horizon to see which trends are up-and-coming for next year.

At 99designs, we’ve been analyzing the trajectory of logo design since we launched in 2008. Looking at the current state of design, we handpicked the eight logo design trends below based on our predictions for 2019. Some are advancements in past trends, while others are new stylistic choices that capture the public’s eye at this point in time. Take a look at how the trendsetters are already incorporating these techniques, and master them yourselves now while they’re still cutting edge.

1. Friendlier Abstract Geometry

Geometric designs like grids and big, blocky shapes strike a chord with people lately, perhaps because today’s tech makes the world seems more futuristic, or maybe a greater pull towards order and structure. Whatever the reason, logos with abstract geometric shapes are increasingly common, and in 2019, that movement is taking a sharp turn into new territory.

Logo - Polytrr logo]

Logo design by 99designs designer Ludibes

Logo - Hayespitality logo]

Logo design by 99designs designer CostinLogopus

The new geometric logos are taking a “friendlier” approach. Abstract geometry is inherently cold and imposing, sometimes even authoritarian. To compensate, designers are softening the visuals with techniques like vibrant colors (particularly gradients) and more inviting compositions. By combining “cold” shapes with “warm” colors and composition, logos can have the best of both worlds — a mathematical, futuristic look that doesn’t intimidate the viewer.

Logo - Wy’East Foundation logo]

Logo design by 99designs designer tgolub

Logo - Alo logo]

Logo design by 99designs designer bo_rad


2. Traditional Emblems

Not everyone is looking to the future for logo inspiration — many designers are looking to the past. Part vintage and part pedigree, the traditional emblems trend draws on centuries-old design tactics to make the logos of new brands seem old and established. For business-minded clients, this trend is a smart sales tactic: it suggests a brand’s authenticity to make them seem more trustworthy and popular, even if they just launched yesterday.

Logo - Copper & Cane logo]

Logo design by 99designs designer Sign²in

Logo - Rusty’s at Blue Logo]

Logo design by 99designs designer Jeegy™

The trend incorporates elements from medieval family crests and historic guild emblems, but designers can temper the degree of how “historic” it seems. If you’re hesitant to dive head-first into this style, you can give your modern logo a slight textured effect to add just a hair of that classic “authentic” feel.

Logo - Spruce logo]

Logo design by 99designs designer Agi Amri

Logo - Distillery 36 logo

Logo design by 99designs designer Project 4


3. Neo-minimalism

A few years ago, the digital space saw a widespread minimalist movement. Web designers especially took hold, not only because of the aesthetics but also because of the functional benefits. No matter whether you love or hate the style, you have to admit minimalism is more practical for the web: the simpler designs both load faster and look better on mobile screens.

Logo - Puracups logo]

Logo design by 99designs designer aarif ™

Logo - Devi Deli logo]

Logo design by 99designs designer sami222

The minimalist movement became so popular, the question for 2019 is how to make your minimalist logo stand out from other minimalist logos. Hence the rise of “neo-minimalism.” Essentially, it’s doubling-down on minimalism — using even less visuals, sometimes just lines or basic shapes combined in a memorable or thought-provoking way.

Logo - Skystone logo]

Logo design by 99designs designer Choni

Logo - Greentown logo]

Logo design by 99designs designer Agusbo


4. Contextual Logos (Responsive +)

Responsive logos have been growing in popularity for years now, but lately they’re being taken to the next level. Instead of simply adapting logos for different screen sizes and platforms, companies are creating logo variants better optimized for an array of different uses, both on and off line.

Logo - Vesper Hill logo]

Logo design by 99designs designer svart ink

Logo - Public Space logo]

Design via Sulliwan Studio

For starters, contextual logos include different versions to fit where they’re being displayed — a smaller logo for mobile screens or wearables, a colorless logo for fliers, a simplified logo that still looks good printed on clothing material, etc. But the trend nowadays is going even further, offering logo variations that cater to certain customer groups. This enables greater maneuverability for marketers, who can hand-tailor promotions using the logo that speaks to certain customer groups best.

Logo - Opera Ballet Theatre logo]

Design via Elena Kitayeva

Logo - Artist Brea Weinreb logo]

Logo design by 99designs designer goopanic


5. Intricate Detailing

One school of design is pushing back against the “smaller-and-simpler” mentality of contextual logos. A certain branch of designers is embracing the fine details, making logos even more intricate and complex than last year.

Logo - Honeybee Tribe logo]

Logo design by 99designs designer Maciev

How you utilize new details is up to you. Some designers incorporate line shading for a more hand-drawn look, others are simply adding in subtleties such as the feathers of a bird or individual strands of hair. This trend is not mutually exclusive either; for example, you can use it with traditional emblems (which were historically all hand-drawn), or with geometric shapes for elaborate patterned backgrounds.

Logo - Olivivo logo]

Logo design by 99designs designer olimpio

Just keep context in mind and save the details for spaces where they can be appreciated — an intricate logo won’t translate well on the small screen of an Apple Watch.

Logo - One Plaze logo]

Logo design by 99designs designer Jeegy™


6. Illusory Logos

On the heels of the geometric themes, people are also responding well to logos with optic illusions. The specifics are less important — logos could be blatant optical illusions, or could simply have small distortions to make them stand out. There’s a lot of room for interpretation with this trend, but as long as it pushes the boundaries and “looks cool,” it’ll suffice. Think of this trend as the 70s psychedelic style redone in the digital era.

Logo - Brickworks Australia logo]

Logo design by 99designs designer Milos Zdrale

Logo - Doppel logo]

Logo design by 99designs designer bo_rad

Logo - Tribe logo]

Logo design by 99designs designer ludibes

Logo - PS12 Logo]

Logo design by 99designs designer ultrastjarna


7. Integrating Negative Space

As a natural progression of recent years’ minimalist movement, designers have been incorporating negative space more and more. Lately, we’re seeing the emergence of actually using negative space to represent independent images within greater images.

Logo - Love at First Sight logo]

Logo design by 99designs designer cucuque design

Logo - Octopus logo]

Logo design by 99designs designer CostinLogopus

FedEx’s iconic “arrow” within the E and X was one of the original usages, but lately more brands are taking this idea and running with it. Aside from more stimulating visuals, this trend also benefits marketing — designers can use suggestive imagery (such as animal symbolism) and make monogram logos more visual by adding pictures within the letters. This trend is perfect for brands that want to add duality or extra depth to their identity.

Logo - Prinsta India logo]

Logo design by 99designs designer bo_rad


8. Overlapping Images

As we’ve seen with trends like illusions and geometric shapes, people are favoring more experimental visuals lately. In other words, logo designers must “think outside the box.”

Logo - Oak logo]

Logo design by 99designs designer bo_rad

One new visual trends that’s catching on lately is overlapping images. There’s not much to explain about the technique: you superimpose one element over another, sometimes to make a whole new shape in the shared area. You can be subtle about it like trendsetter PayPay, but more ambitious designers can build entire designs from the overlap to incorporate dual meanings just like with the negative space trend.

Logo - PopMint logo]

Logo design by 99designs designer Spoon Lancer

Most of the above trends are not mutually-exclusive — they can be combined to add new depths and dimensions individual trends couldn’t accomplish on their own. There’s ton of logo design inspiration headed your way in the upcoming year. The trick is figuring out which trends match your brand identity. Using illusory images might work well in attracting attention for niche or obscure markets, but they’d hold back more solemn brands by undermining their professionalism. Consider who you are as a brand before you decide which trends you will use to Create a Logo.