1

The Mahabharata has been told and depicted in various forms and formats. However, Freelance Illustrator and Concept Artist, Mukesh Singh, never felt satisfied and believed there was more to the story. In Graphic India’s project 18 Days, he illustrates the characters and their stories in a whole new light.

Jayadrath and Duryodhan

CG: Your artwork is a tribute to India’s rich mythology and culture. What gravitated you towards the subject of Mahabharata? As an illustrator, how do you relate to the story and the characters? How is it different from other projects that you’ve worked on?

MS: “Whatever is here is found elsewhere. But what is not here, is nowhere else”. This is the Mahabharata. It is the epic of epics, one that can be told again and again, generation after generation and still ring true. For all of their vain glorious powers, all the warriors, kings and queens are human, susceptible to the species’ frailties. Each character is a story in itself and the epic beautifully traces their lives from birth to eventual death. Read it with an expansive view of the affairs of men and Gods or choose your favourite character and walk with them as they make their way through life. Whoever you are, you will find something in the book to relate to and make of it what you will. At a personal level, compared to other projects, it was different in the sense that while I was already familiar with every major character it was also an opportunity to revisit them. But this time I was not part of the audience. I found myself set loose in a familiar world where I could not just wonder the what ifs, but also act upon my convictions.

The Mahabharata
Enter Man God
Mahabharata
Ravan

CG: Before you could manifest the story in your own style, how did you study the script and understand the storyline? Was it as simple as reading a book, or like a writer? Did you spend some time living in India and soaking in the environment?

MS: I was born in India and have stayed here my entire life. When it comes to Mahabharata, every Indian is familiar with it. I grew up, like most kids do, reading illustrated storybooks based on the epic as well following comic book version published by Amar Chitra Katha. Not just that, my father played a major role by narrating anecdotes from the scripture. This was then followed by television series, that gave 2D character form a 3D appeal. They had become real and have remained so ever since.

The Mahabharata
Markandeya Oracle Entrance
Mahabharata
Takshak

CG: You have given the Mahabharata a twist of your own. How do you describe your style? What was it that you experimented with and changed around? What remained the same?

MS: The modern audience has a keen and sophisticated understanding of the narrative design. They are beneficiaries of an accelerated volution of the storytelling process that started with the invention of the printing press and refined further with each succeeding generation of newer forms of communication mediums. Combine this with their familiarity with modern technology and it isn’t difficult to sell the idea of a hyper advanced civilization of a bygone era that could communicate across vast distances or wield destructive weapons embedded in something as small as an arrow head. I also trust their evolved sense of understanding to familiarize themselves quickly with an unfamiliar cast of characters.

Mahabharata
Krishna
Mahabharata
Radha Krishna

If we shift our gaze from the core USP of Mahabharata, which is of course its multi-layered characters, to its fascinating world of highly evolved technology, it isn’t difficult to envision its larger than life aura. While other interpretations of this timeless epic have done enormous justice to its characters, few, if any, have looked beyond them to its setting, its environment, its grandeur, its scale, its theatre stage where the lives of its players played themselves out. I had remained dissatisfied with earlier visual interpretations of the Mahabharata world. Armed with these inferences, I immersed myself with world building of 18 Days. Some images I had carried for a long time in my head, some suggested themselves based on Grant Morrison’s scripts, the writer of 18 Days. It also helped that I had spent a lot of time with its characters, through the works of others and my own interpretation of their psyche. In 18 Days the characters have remained the same, at least as I see them. Their outwards appearances though have changed. I wanted the audience of today to identify and accept not just the character’s inner selves but their outer ones too, which are external manifestations of their inner selves.

Arjun Invokes War godes

CG: If you look through India’s depiction of the Mahabharata, it appears more colourful and vibrant. Any specific reason why you chose to work with dark shades and hues? What is the overall feeling you wish to create through your designs? 

MS: Impending doom perhaps? For all of their boasts and chest thumping, the characters meet their maker in the end. Some believed that they will survive the war. So they go all out heroic, in their quest to leave their mark on what they know will be an immortal event, this 18-day war. At the end, it was a pyrrhic victory for the Pandavs. Arjun questions the war in the beginning and Yudhistir in the end. What has changed?

Bhem Beserk

CG: This one’s fairly straightforward; how you do manage to make violence look so beautiful? What features and characteristics do you need to balance with to make your artwork come across that way?

MS: Ah! I don’t know how to respond to that. Violence can never be beautiful. If it appears beautiful, it is only during its build-up phase, when primal anticipation overwhelms the senses. The aftermath is always ugly. A mundane analysis suggests few things. Maybe the ornate designs in the drawings coupled with composition choices give it that sense of beauty. It also helps that the art itself isn’t hyper realistic. The line art based style may also have something to do with the pleasing appearance of the images. Or perhaps it is because I knew the inevitable fate of each character. I gave them their moments of glory.

Andhaka -Pimple
Mahabharata
Bheem challenges

CG: No doubt people are smitten by India’s roots in history and culture. So after the Mahabharata, what’s next? In what other ways do you wish to explore Indian culture and mythology?

MS: As of now I am taking a break from stories based on Indian mythology and working on other things. But the intervening hiatus may be good. If I come back, I will hopefully have some new perspective. That is for the future though. We will cross the bridge when we come to it.

Mahabharata
Abhimanyu Slaughter

Published in Issue 28

This Illustration Special is best to know why and how illustration as a popular medium is taking the design world by storm! From evolution of illustrations to its place in the world today, renowned designers and illustrators like Abhishek Singh, Mukesh Singh, Archan Nair, Alicia Souza, Raj Khatri with some international talent such as Fil Dunsky from Russia, Iain Macarthur and Richard Field from UK, who live and breathe illustration, would be the right people to gain some insight from. With many more talents to explore with great insights and excellent techniques, again a fully packed issue is waiting to amaze you!

 

Order Your Copy!
CURRENT ISSUE
Creative Gaga - Issue 47

 

The brand name, list of ingredients and description as well. How do you fit all this into a limited space and still make it all look organised and appealing? Well, that’s why we have packaging designers. Akim Melnik, a Packaging Designer from Belarus believes it’s important to keep certain key things in mind to help fulfil the purpose. In a conversation with Creative Gaga, he tells us about his design dogma.

Packaging
NOORBEST HIBISCUS DRINKS
Packaging
NOORBEST HIBISCUS DRINKS

CG: Your designs are mostly focused on branding and packaging. What is your design philosophy that makes you as a brand, stand out?

Akin. To describe the philosophy in words is difficult. It’s like a dream that you’ve had, you remember it, but just cannot describe it. However, there are some things that are always important to be aware of when designing for a product or brand. First is to meet the expectations and preferences of the target audience. Secondly, ergonomics and making sure information on a pack is correctly presented is crucial too. And lastly, you cannot create without knowing what’s already out there. Hence, competent analysis and research of competitive product packaging is a necessary step. Remember, that a good design can sell a bad product, just like a bad design can worsen the selling a good product.

Packaging
Silver Probe Vodka Decor Design
Packaging
Silver Probe Vodka Decor Design

CG: You have designed across a range of products, providing packaging in a variety of shapes. How do put yourself in the brand’s shoes? How do you know a juice bottle should look like a juice bottle and not like an oil bottle?

Akin. Sometimes you have to comply with existing stereotypes, and sometimes deliberately go against them. Much depends on the marketing objectives of our client. The client, brand and brief determine where you must draw the line.

Tea Package Design
Tea Package Design
Helsy Granulated Coffee

CG: Packaging and logo design have to be practical because they serve a purpose that has to be truthful and genuine. How do you balance practicality with creativity?

Akin. The primary function of packaging design is to appeal emotionally. Practicality comes second. Any task can be perceived either as a routine or as an opportunity to show their creativity. Good packaging design is a harmony of creativity and practicality, all done in a contained manner.

Packaging
Indian Instant Coffee Package Design
Packaging
Indian Instant Coffee Package Design

CG: When you started as a design studio, what was the most difficult part? How did you overcome challenges to become so successful? How do you reach out to the world?

Akin. The most difficult part when you’re just beginning is the inexperience and lack of knowledge about principles and techniques of creating high-quality packaging. Like in any other part of life, all these difficulties are overcome by everyday work done with full dedication. Experience is the best teacher and this process of improvement is endless and amazing.

ABC Juices Package Design
Gotovim Vmeste Spices Package Design
ABC Berry Jam Design
Olivia Mix Sunflover And Olive Oil

Published in Issue 22

This issue is dedicated to the talented design graduates who are not just looking to work but seeking experience in order to realise the greater goal of life. The issue features various designers from India and abroad. Kevin Roodhorst from The Netherlands realised his goal so early in life that propelled him to start his career as a designer as young as 13. Ashish Subhash Boyne, a student of Sir JJ Institute of Applied Art realised his dream while studying when he started doing freelance projects, which allow him to express his free thoughts. To name a few talents we have Vivek Nag from Fine Arts from Rachna Sansad Mumbai, Simran Nanda from Pearl Academy New Delhi, Anisha Raj from MAEER MIT Institute of Design Pune, Giby Joseph from Animation and Art School Goa and many more. This issue gives a fresh perspective of talented graduates and their unique approach to design.

 

Order Your Copy!
CURRENT ISSUE
Creative Gaga - Issue 47

 

The human face communicates, even if it’s not talking. The eyes and expressions tell a story like pages of a book. Dominated by emotions and such human elements, Artist Alpa Mistry takes us through some of her depictions.

 

A face is a visual communicator, and thus Alpa’s designs are characterised by the use of facial elements. Because expressions can convey a thousand different stories, her designs use that aspect to portray various feelings and personalities. The use of vibrant colours helps mellow down negative connotations of the central element, bestowing a ‘ying-yang’ dynamism to the final outcome whenever acrylic meets the canvas. What starts as a random unconscious sketch is built upon spontaneously by addition of elements, and at the end you have an artwork that relates back to life.

 

Connect Here

 

Face
Glory
Face
Faces
Face
Answers
Face
Colors
Face
The Turban
Coming Together
Connections

For an artwork to be complete in an emotional and outstanding manner, characters and stories contribute as inevitable components. Danny Jose is a staunch follower of this theory, clearly evident in all his works.

Daaham, Malayali’s life
Naadodi, Malayali’s life

An engineer by profession but an artist and designer at heart, Danny has sketched for his entire life! The Internet and the online community of artists worked as a medium for him to polish his skills and gain confidence to step into the real world.

Characters-DannyJose-Feature-Creative-Gaga
Monkey Business

His journey began by illustrating medical procedures and scientific drawings for a journal. Alongside, he developed a taste for fine cinema only to realise that his illustrations had a major missing factor, stories. Once he incorporated these stories in his work, then came in his big break of being hired as a story-board artist.

Illustration for Dunzo.in
Characters-DannyJose-Feature-Creative-Gaga
Monkey Business

Constructing scenes and shots like in cinema and incorporating stories in them, Danny prefers to have characters in all his illustrations as they bring forth the emotional aspect of the scenario.

Illustrations for Sasken Technologies for their annual report

His personal projects serve as a platform for him to express his own design-style and storytelling. He very gracefully, transformed his explorations of shapes and poses into monkeys from different walks of life, defining his genre of art and style.

Illustration for Sasken Technologies for their annual report
Characters-DannyJose-Feature-Creative-Gaga
Monkey Business

With his clients reaching out to him for his way of art and story-telling, he uses this strength to his advantage to move forward. Believing in the core principles of mutual understanding, trust and respect in collaborative work, Danny is still on the hunt for his ‘A’ team to expand his work profile.

Characters-DannyJose-Work-Creative-Gaga
Monkey Business
Characters-DannyJose-Feature-Creative-Gaga
Monkey Business
Issue 44 - Creative Gaga

Published in Issue 44

Who doesn’t want to become famous, when everyone knows your name and especially for us designer, it is the basic dream every design student or young artist dream. But behind every successful studio, artist or designer there are stories of challenges, struggles and their unique solutions to these. With this issue, we interviewed many well-known names from the creative industry and found their different learnings and experiences behind making their own self as a brand. So, if you are looking to establish yourself as a brand in the creative market or already in the process of it, this issue is a must-read. Full of insights and inspirations from the best of the talents, this issue is waiting to reach your desks.

 

Order Your Copy!
CURRENT ISSUE
Creative Gaga - Issue 47

 

Mistakes are not really as evil as it sounds, on the contrary in most cases it helps you to evolve as a better person. We can learn a lot from our own mistakes. Also, for any artist, it can be a great exercise to revisit the old artwork just to see how much you have improved. To do the same, concept artist Shyam Deshpande re-illustrate his old illustration with new learnings. Here, he shares his process and all the learnings from his mistakes.

Mistakes
Mistakes

Step 1.

This is one of old work painted back in 2013 and I was pretty happy about it then, but after some time, it doesn’t look as great as I thought it initially. Actually, I feel the same for most of my artworks which I believe is a good thing in a way as it portrays your continuous evolvement as an artist.

Mistakes

Step 2.

Since I wasn’t too happy with this 3 years old artwork, I started working on it again. The basic idea was to show a fearless lady who’s a Mercenary goes with a ‘cute’ but fearless pet. So, in this revisiting exercise, I decided to design a tribal character, inspired from the Nigerian tribes reference which I found while looking for references for Hyena. I used few different elements from references with incorporate some of my own ideas.

Mistakes

Step 3.

After finalising on the characters and design elements I tried to work on the final lines. I believe, it’s good to fix most of the issues in the drawing stage.

Mistakes

Step 4.

Even if you add lots of details in the drawing and great rendering with a nice colour scheme in the first silhouette, it will still be a waste of time. As there will be no attitude in it, it will be boring and stiff. But on the other hand the second silhouette, clearly shows a particular attitude, the confidence in the stance comes due to the distance between the legs, the dynamic line of action which adds to the drama. So it’s always good to check the silhouette and correct it before going for the detailing.

Mistakes

Step 5.

Before adding colours, worked in grayscale as it’s very important to get the values and tones right. Skipping this may confuse you in hue & saturation and you may also miss the correct values. Also, it’s easier to paint once you have the values place in advance. You just need to add one more layer on top of the grayscale in colour blending mode and start painting.

Mistakes

Step 6.

The final Image after all the colours with raw brush feel as I wanted to highlight her raw nature & the aggressive attitude.

Published in Issue 35

The season of the festival has started and everyone is preparing to have a unique one this time with less cash and more fun. We interview many creatives who creates promotional or calendar design each year. As most of the thing around us had shifted to digital, even calendar design and the promotion has shifted. But Yorick Pintos, a strategic consultant at studio Kohl suggests that best option would be to a mix of both, the traditional and digital media. Digital Illustrator Nithin Rao Kumblekar also shared his love for the printed calendars and emphasis on the effectiveness of it. If you are interested in print design & want to understand the future of the same. So, go ahead and order your latest issue copy!

 

Order Your Copy!
CURRENT ISSUE
Creative Gaga - Issue 47

 

Last few years, India has seen a steady rise in design consulting needs from new mushrooming businesses, commonly referred as ‘Startups’. These are not necessarily the love child of newbies but also some industry veterans or serial entrepreneurs taking on new business challenges, who understands the importance of design. Here, Ashish Deshpande explains the pros & cons of designing for startups.

startup
ASAP. CIIE-IIM-A incubated Bangaluru startup that created this “on the go” snack, design helped strategise and communicate a differentiating visual story. Pic by Elephant

A motivating enterprise environment in India, propelled by several industry & government initiatives has helped create a breed of entrepreneurs high on enthusiasm, technology savvy and willing to take the risk on new product service formats. Design is playing a crucial role in their journey as well as successes and there is increasing acceptance to the use of design in building a resounding brand & quality of product or service application. Paperboat is great example of a recent startup success story where one can observe design playing a key role. However, working with startups has its own unique hiccups and thrills.

startup
Paperboat. A memory drinks based startup where design added emotive value to the brand, identity, language, pack form function. Pic by Elephant

• CHALLENGES with Startups

1. MULTI-ROLE INVOLVEMENT

Let’s face it! Startups are ultra lean. Aligning business & technology solutions to a consumer-focused approach needs to be done at multiple levels. Since most startups, unlike the well-established corporate world, cannot afford multiple experts & agencies, a designer is seen as a ‘fix all’ for several needs. Involvement of a designer or design firm goes beyond a specific design assignment. Designer ends up playing a strategic role, trying to balance business strategy with design, brand image, product, pack, quality, vendor development, applications and point of sale, with key design language & marketing messages.

2. DISTINCT SOLUTION

Most startups are either technology or business focused. Design is a weakness and so is the ability to profile and understand end consumer. Startups tend to get committed too early to a particular tech or proposition without ascertaining appropriateness, uniqueness and distinction of their offering. Despite a new idea, most times, the end offering is neither distinct enough, nor is perceived value appreciable. This grave omission places the fledging business at risk from the word go.

3. INCREMENTAL APPROACH

Paucity of key in-house expertise & resources, especially funds, forces design to be undertaken in an incremental manner, stretching across months at times. Design implementation also takes place at a slow pace so it is difficult to see the full picture or measure the impact of design. A healthcare start up, setting up new format of hospitals launched the service care product with just the new brand identity, However, the hospital experience that would resonate with the brand was placed on hold due to lack of funds. The result was apparent. Customers never experienced the distinction in the hospital value proposition and never understood as to why they should adopt this new hospital chain.

design
SynPhNe. Singapore based technology startup where design helped cutting edge tech become human through Industrial Design of Wearable stroke rehabilitation device focused on needs of patients. Pic by Elephant

• ADVANTAGES with Startups

1. CONTAGIOUS ENERGY

Startups are a happy lot. Usual work culture is hands-on and people come across eager to learn, share and help. It is great to work with synergies of such teams and be part of an exciting journey. The results reflect on the design output. Client meetings are less of drudgery, are participative and consequently more productive.

2. WILLING EXPLORERS

This is one place where Startups score. They are willing to play along as you explore, experiment & test. There is negligible blame game, no departmental silos or ‘mother of all’ presentation to the King of the corporate. Results are quick and decisions are usually part of a co-creative play. Funds are the only constraint but then frugal approach and ‘jugaad’ prototypes are more than welcome. This approach works wonders for the confidence of the design team.

3. CREATIVE SATISFACTION

Many startups are working in the healthcare, social impact, agri-tech and energy space. Just the sense of what your work will potentially achieve can layer the designer in you with goose bumps. Each startup is a new challenge, whether it is B2B or B2C, it gives a sense of new purpose and when design helps enable such opportunities, the result is very satisfying. Design as core to startups is understood by the fact that many new enterprises have designers as co founders. Designers in India will have to quickly adapt to this new scenario and draw out a process to work with the Startup eco system. This culture is here to stay.

startup
Plezmo. IOT based education platform that helps you learn program logic while you have smart fun. Pic by Plezmo
design
Plezmo. IOT based education platform that helps you learn program logic while kids have smart fun. Pic by Plezmo
client

Published in Issue 37

Recent demonisation and changing Taxes has pushed most of us in planning our finances more seriously. So to answer some of the basic questions for designers, freelancers and creative studios, we interviewed some of the creative legends to guide and share their wisdom. The issue includes interactions with Preeti Vyas from VGC on ‘How to pitch for clients or retain the existing one’ and Ashish Deshpande from Elephant on ‘Challenges of working with a startup’, along with some best freelancers like Archan Nair, Shreya Shetty and Paul Sandip, sharing their knowledge of working with various clients. Also, Sachin Puthran from Thatzit.com gave a 10-point no-nonsense guide for studios to handle their finances. A must read, if you are planning for the financial year ahead or worried about your handling your money matter, this issue can give you much-needed insight and guide you to a better financial health of your business or freelancing.

 

Order Your Copy!
CURRENT ISSUE
Creative Gaga - Issue 47

 

With the stakes of digital art soaring high in the market, have a look at some of the best Indian digital artists and get-going to be one!

Wanting to give life to your imagination? What are you waiting for! This is just the right time to start out and the right environment to be inspired from!

 

Be it replicating an image of a famous personality or creating other-worldly characters, anything and everything is possible with digital art using a simple pen-tab and digital software.

 

Follow these brilliant Indian Digital Artists and hop onto a journey of unplanned surprises and master-piece outcomes!

1. Aashit Singh

Aashit Singh is a Mumbai-based visionary artist specialising in creating visual representations of the intangible and other-worldly imagery. He feels that realism in psychedelic art is important to be able to relate to these psychedelic visions. Read the detailed article on Constructing Psychedelic Experience! featuring Aashit’s deep insights.

 


Digital Art

2. Ankur Patar

Ankur Patar, a national and international award winner, has had over 13 years of experience in the advertising industry. Accredited with being chosen as one of the best digital artists of India in 2012, he has brands like Adidas, Nike, Adobe and the likes associating him for years.

 

His recent collaboration with Adobe to recreate lost masterpieces got him into the limelight once again. He was one of the only 4 digital artists chosen from throughout the world to recreate paintings using only Adobe stock imagery.  Ankur also shared how does Digital Art help to exceed your imagination!

 


3. Archan Nair

A firm believer of creating what the heart says, Archan shifted from being a fashion major and an entrepreneur to a self-taught digital and visual artist and illustrator specialising in mixed media and digital art. He is now a Germany-based independent Indian Digital Artist with cultural roots from India. Archan calls this artwork as Psymbionic – a digital Illustration of human and the subtler elements of being human.

 



4. Jithin Roda

Jithin Roda is a freelance concept artist and illustrator based in Kerala. His passion for art got him specializing in a wide spectrum of the illustration world like pre-visualisation, concept designing, cover designing and illustrating for posters and topics in general.

 


5. Medha Srivastava

Attracted towards art depicting metaphors and thought-provoking subjects, Medha, previously a gaming artist has been fascinated by conceptualisation, ideation and realism. Concepts and character building have always aligned with the intent of her artwork.

 

Starting out with simple digital illustrations, she eventually moved on to the world of concept art. Social issues contribute to a major part of her inspirations. To be true to her style of art, which she defines as realistic with a tint of stylisation and conceptualisation, she picks up on things she sees in her vicinity like shapes, colours, patterns and textures for the visual representation of her digital masterpieces. She insists on thoughtfully mixing Realism with Conceptualisation.

 


6. Mukesh Singh

Mahabharata, the epic of epics, can be told and retold time and again, still feeling fresh and young to the receptor. Dissatisfied with the earlier visual representations of the Mahabharata, Mukesh Singh took on a journey to explore the characters of this epic through his own style of digital art and with the aim of wanting the audience of today to not just identify and accept the character’s inner selves but their outer ones too, which are external manifestations of their inner selves.

 


characters

7. Nikhil Shinde

Nikhil Shinde, an Indian digital illustrator feels that creating a character is similar to assembling the pieces of a puzzle together. He puts in his heart, mind and soul to create out-of-the-box characters and gives them a twist in a way which takes the audience by surprise!

 



advertising

8. Nithin Rao Kumblekar

Starting out in his career as an art director in an advertising agency in 2005 and having gained some experience in the field, Nithin decided to freelance as an illustrator from the year 2010, with a focus on commercial illustrations. Since then there has been no looking back and he has brands like IBM, Lenovo, Brittania, Idea cellular and alike as part of his clientele.

 

He has also collaborated with global advertising agencies like Saldo Disegni Italy, Kassett Norway, JWT Delhi and Bangalore, Leo Burnett Mumbai, Saatchi & Saatchi Bangalore, etc creating pieces of digital art to be used by them for their promotions and in other areas.

 


9. Pavan Rajurkar

Pavan Rajurkar, a young Mumbai-based freelance illustrator believes that traditional and digital art compliment and complete each other. In spite of being in the digital era, he feels that the mind is directly connected to the hand and a hand-drawn doodle is the strongest way to brainstorm, leading to an idea.

 

Pavan has worked for numerous reputed advertisement agencies and was also featured in Lürzer’s Archive’s 200 Best Illustrators worldwide in 2016.

 


Emotions

10. Pratima Unde

Accepting the challenge to create a unique beauty, Pratima Unde leaves no stone unturned to explore her subject of illustration. Specialising in expressing human emotions, she highlights these in her digital portraits through a particular technique called Giggling.

 

Focusing on subjects which are shy, she spends days with them sitting face to face, expressing the unexpressed, only to discover something new every day. This portrait is of a Joyous Rajasthani, as she likes to call it.

 


Versatile Designer

11. Rahul Arora

Rahul Arora is a Mumbai based freelance digital illustrator. Believing in the fact that versatility plays a massive role in the life of an artist, his spectrum of working typologies in the field of design is pretty wide, varying from illustrating for advertising to character designing, story-boarding, environment designing and comic books illustrations.

 

Keeping his clients in the centre of any project, Rahul feels that the designer is responsible for conveying the idea of the client through the creation of styles matching the needs of the clients; thus the style of the designer is a reflection of the clients’ sensibility and vision!

 



12. Raj Khatri

Raj Khatri is a Mumbai-based movie buff, visual designer and a digital artist who believes and lives by the fact that experimentation is the key to self-discovery. This thought has helped him create some brilliant movie posters and other artwork, only using the medium of digital art.

 

Having had more than a decade of an experience in various sectors of the field of design like websites, social media, flash animations, TV series, films and many more, he now heads the creative team at an entertainment design studio known as Marching Arts.

 


Indian thelas

13. Ranganath Krishnamani

Ranganathan Krishnamani is a free-thinker, an obsessive doodler and has a soft corner for architecture. An illustrator driven by passion, he feels that self-developed style is what contributes to the uniqueness of an artist.

 

With a keen eye for observation and a distinct point of view, Ranganathan captures and expresses the unique stories of simple everyday life through his own developed style of minute detailing in his digital illustrations.

 


14. Seerow Unni

Believing that the core idea of an artwork is to convey the message to its readers, Seerow Unni, a digital illustrator says that every artwork should be considered as a scene of a movie, as it helps in adding the missing elements, thus adding life and giving depth to the scene. Fun and witty humour are the key elements to grab peoples’ attention.

 

To be a part of the community, it is important to keep oneself updated with the latest trends and happenings of the digital design market. He feels that this year the trend is shifting to from complexity and elaborations to minimalism. He says the key is to enjoy the process and improvise at every level.

 


Characters Shreya Shetty

15. Shreya Shetty

Balancing fantasy and realism, Shreya Shetty creates characters dictating a sense of otherworldliness, yet being anatomically and functionally viable. Following certain thumb rules like relating the character to its environment and keeping the background subtle, she has mastered the art of creating original, believable fantasy characters on a digital screen.

 

She believes that the right expressions and poise can create a memorable moment that will stick with the audience even after the story is over.

 


16. Sri Priyatham

Earning his very first commission by turning his bedroom into a studio during his student days motivated and inspired Sri Priyatham to transform his love and passion for illustration into his profession. To have a free-flowing lifestyle and working on his own terms and conditions, he chose to work as a freelance illustrator creating digital art pieces.

 

The social platform of Facebook helped him communicate and promote his artwork and get commissioned. The reach of other social platforms like Instagram, Reddit and Imgur worked wonders for him to get in touch with a global clientele from the continents of America, Europe and Australia.

 



17. Sukanto Debnath

With an experience of living in changing surroundings and different cultures, Sukanto Debnath, a Hungary-based Indian digital artist explores human behaviour and body language through his extensively detailed yet sketchy illustrations.

 

He believes that travelling and exposure to various folk arts and cultures opens up an artist’s mind to think beyond the usual, thus resulting in mature design. The global artist has created this digital painting called ‘People in Groups’ where he expresses the facial features of Hungarian locals and their body language.

 


Illustrations

18. Uday Mohite

Uday Mohite is a digital-caricature specialist and paints characters believing them to be a piece of art! He does a deep research to understand the features that define and describe the subject of his digital illustration and then exaggerates certain components like colours or characteristic features to start a conversation with the viewer.

 


19. Vishnu

With an impeccable passion for drawing and sketching, Vishnu tries to achieve perfection in all of his artworks. With only an experience of a short span of 5 years in the world of art, he has mastered the skills and techniques of digital art in his own way, developing his own personal style.

 

To be the perfectionist he wishes to be, Vishnu puts his mind, body and soul into his work to achieve an intricate level of detailing, which is visible in all his sketches.

 


Vivek_Feature - Amitabh Bachchan

20. Vivek Mandrekar

Currently working as the chief creative designer for movie posters under the banner of Yash Raj Films, Vivek Mandrekar has come a long way from being just a self-taught artist to mastering the art of creating posters for the film industry.

 

Face expressions tell stories and Vivek has captured these different stories of many great legends of the Indian film industry through his digital paintings. One such famous artwork is that of the Bollywood star, Mr Amitabh Bachchan, created using Adobe Photoshop and Wacom pen-tablet.