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Mailchimp, a successful marketing company, announced a rebranding that stands out while staying true to the essence of the company.

Rebranding
Rebranding
Rebranding

Brief/ Challenge: 

The marketing company, Mailchimp has grown exponentially over the past 17 years of their existence. After all the success they wanted a complete rebranding that caught everyone’s attention and stayed true to their identity.

Rebranding
Rebranding
Rebranding
Rebranding

Solution: 

When young companies grow over years and succeed, they tend to go for a rebranding that reflects their new found maturity and expertise in the field. The general trend is to shed their old skin of unpolished branding, to embrace a more sophisticated, cutting edge appearance.

Rebranding
Rebranding
Rebranding

Collins, a New-York based strategy and design company, did the exact opposite with the rebranding for Mailchimp, and that’s what makes it interesting. Instead of reflecting the 17 years of success and experience the company has seen, the rebranding demonstrates a child-like personality, with rough and sketchy illustrations and a 1920’s typeface. Even Freddie, the logo-cum-mascot was slightly modified but retained. The overall feel of the branding is something of a kindergarten scrapbook, but in doing so the brand comes across as friendly. The rebranding dispels the unapproachable vibe that we generally see with technology companies. Only time can tell if this strategy will work. But it is definitely a bold and unique approach.

Rebranding
Rebranding
Rebranding

Client: Mailchimp
Design Studio: Collins
Solution/Expertise: Branding Strategy, Communication Design


The illustrator Ruchi Shah reflects on how illustration changes or retains form as it travels from one medium to another.

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Cover for the children’s book Grimms Fairy Tales.
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The making of the cover for the children’s book Grimms Fairy Tales.

While the Canvas becomes the message, Illustration becomes the medium

The job of a canvas is to effectively communicate the purpose of illustration. At the same time, illustration is a fitting medium that communicates the purpose of design. Together, they allow a designer to look at things from unlikely angles, allowing one to economise resources and break distinctions. This makes illustration a hybrid of different disciplines like art, craft, architecture and photography. Thus, narrating pictorial stories of the constantly evolving world.

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Front and back cover for the children’s book Grimms Fairy Tales.

Stories happen through Connections

Whether literal, physical or humorous, it is the connection that makes the style complement the idea. Space-agnostic illustrations are more skill-driven than conceptually steered. Thereby making the style of illustration following the idea. In such cases, the key is to know what can and what can’t be achieved through your form. The possibilities and limitations often declare the idea. Once you know your style well, it becomes easy to explore your idea further.

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The world through my window. Poster for an annual competition held by Association of Illustrators.

In the artwork, ‘The World through my Window’, the idea is a jumble of what has caught the illustrator’s fancy while travelling, expressed through a pop-art-ish route. The messy, clean and cozy windows that she observed kicked off the visual approach in her mind. The approach took inspiration from her cluttered workspace that is always scattered with curios, boxes, containers and papers. All these objects rearranged themselves to create the visual. With small niches and spaces it worked perfectly as big or small windows and buildings. The artwork is buzzing during the day, but actually comes alive at night. Being created with a mixture of coloured semi-transparent papers, it can be lit up during the night.

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The Rainmaker. Illustration for a children’s book.

The medium tells you what to do

An illustrator should let the form of illustration take shape according to what the medium allows it to do. This essentially means one needs to know the medium well. Does it bend? Does it fold? Where does it want to go? What does it refuse to do? The answers to these questions determine how one should go about the form, using the chosen medium. Keep exploring, make mistakes, characterise these errors and finally, build on some of them. The enhancement of the imperfections sometimes becomes the key to making a perfect visual.

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Purestone. Entrance graphics for a London based agency.

The brief was to design the entrance of ‘Purestone’ – a London-based digital marketing agency’s office. Part of a rebranding project, it was done in collaboration with Kyle Henderson. The 25ft x 10ft long space, had to be attention grabbing for potential clients, giving the office a strong identity. The style of both the designers on the project had a lot of detailed and bold line work, making it possible for occasional overlapping. Incorporating the window with a view of urban London that sat exactly in between the space, a visual was created that complemented style of both the illustrators on the project. As the space had a lot of geometrical niches and corners, a seamless graphic was preferred to run across it. The style nicely adjusted to the scale of the space and was received enthusiastically by the onlookers.

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The Rainmaker. Illustration for a children’s book.

Expertise is to know how to give context to everything

Of course, knowledge and skill remain irreplaceable. But expertise also comes with awareness that anything and everything can be used to express yourself. Either by essence or by form, if materials are captured and framed with singular or multiple contexts, brilliant results can be achieved. Turning snags into starting points for constructing the visual and keeping a balance between pausing and exaggeration define it. Unlearning trumps learning and knowledge of that facilitates expertise.

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The making of the Umbrella, the Rainmaker.

For the project, ‘The Rainmaker’, different skills were combined into one installation, where everything remained substituted. The fabric turned into rain, plastic pipes poured out paper puddles and real people became mere props. The idea was a transition between a sense of reality to conceptual and stylized depictions. The archetypal British summer was the inspiration behind creating the visual around rain, which the designer literally attempted to ‘make’. This was justified with a screen-printed fabric on which it was raining cats, dogs, fish, alligators etc., giant paper-cut ‘water’ and an intricately hand crafted umbrella, creating an image of the urban world above it, using mundane materials such as black strings and wires and things found in everyday life. This carefully arranged scene was a full-blown installation, letting people take the centre stage.

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The making of the Umbrella, the Rainmaker.

Sum up to your talent everyday, every moment

Learning and exploring are the two essential ways by which you can keep moving forward. Achieve that through travelling, developing new habits, observing anything and everything, miscellaneous conversations, following the trends in nature and the haphazardness of our responses to those trends. A culmination of all of these will be exemplified in your work.

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Umbrella for the Rainmaker Illustration.

Published in Issue 13

Coming from a country of stories and storytellers, Indian animation professionals are sitting on a gold reserve. Yet, we are miles behind the Western world. We spoke to few leading names to find out the reason and understand the Indian animator’s sensibilities and practices The house unanimously opined that we need to develop more original ideas and also create exclusive stories for animation, rather than going the other way round…

 

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Have you ever started doodling with nothing really on your mind? Just aimless strokes intersecting and your thoughts preoccupied elsewhere. Sometimes our best work comes from these mindless scribbles and we don’t even
realize it.

 

Victor Rigo, an illustrator based in Mykolaiv, Ukraine, created this lovely illustration series simply by using hard stones and putting pencil to paper and letting his mind wander. The result is this minimal illustration style, yet well-developed characters with expressive emotions and gestures.

 

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CURRENT ISSUE
Creative Gaga - Issue 44

 




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You can see so much more with one eye closed. Photographer Girish Jain believes art is present everywhere, and that one needs the right perception, an intention and of course a camera, to see it. Here, he tells us a few of his tricks that can get you clicking too.

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The Only Disability in Life is a Bad Attitude

Be the Fly on a Wall

As a street photographer, your first lesson is mastering the art of invisibility; wearing the invisibility cloak. Always try and find ways to keep your camera and yourself out of your subject’s sight while you photograph them. This is important because it helps you capture, raw and natural photographs without the person getting conscious of being watched. Photographers, who have mastered this ability, take the concept of candid photography to a completely different level.

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A Mysterious Misery
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A shot of people’s reflection in a puddle highlights how photographers like to see the same world differently.

Connect with the Subject

That’s the only way your photographs will stand a chance to connect with the viewers. A great connection is established when you wait for the right moment, when you are patient. That moment is so important because it will never come back in the way it was gifted to you. It’s the job of a good photographer to freeze that moment in time, by capturing it.

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An Approach to the Street as Canvas

See with your Mind

Learning to see is an essential characteristic of a photographer’s eye. Look around yourself. Observe the various elements in the scene. Discern the inherent details. View and review the scene. As you do so, you discover a lot of passive things, which never seemed to have caught your eye. Remember, composition is key. Think in terms of composition, lines, patterns, balance, and simplicity; they will lead the viewer’s eye into your photograph. Looking at things around you in this manner eventually leads you in discovering an interesting image from an ordinary scene.

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The meaning of street is the need for sharing life with others and the search for community
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Balancing elements to highlight the importance of image composition

Work the Shot

The perfect photograph could be a result of either great luck or great art. Professionals get the images they want by working the shot. It’s all about discovering the image. It’s all about composing and re-composing the shot by changing the angle of view, anticipating the moment, zooming in, maybe zooming out, subtracting some elements or even re-arranging them till you arrive at an image that satisfies the artist in you.

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A Warm Welcome

You are your Best Teacher

You can’t succeed by sitting on your desk, reading and researching about photography. You have to get outside to look, observe and experience the moments that you’ve been missing. And you’ve got to do it alone. Hold some private lessons with yourself. Photography requires a lot of concentration. And such focus can be attained when you practice the art by yourself, with no one but yourself to disturb you.

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A picture is complete even when the subject is not.
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Last but Not Least, Lose Yourself

The best things happen, when you give yourself up to the surroundings. Always remember there might be a limit as to what the eyes can see, but an artist’s vision is limitless.

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Published in Issue 19

A typography special, made up of not only Indian type designers or designers whose first love is type, but also few very talented international designers who open a totally new playground with sharing their insights and inspirations. This issue has exclusive interviews with Lucky Dubz Trifonas from Netherlands, Indian UI & type designer Sabareesh Ravi and Shiva Nallaperumal, who believes, type designers are the material providers to all the creative professionals. Also, includes a special making of Nirlep rebranding done by Elephant Design and an interaction with the ace product designer Aman Sadana.

 

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How do we involve a viewer into our art illustrations?

 

Ishan Trivedi, through his illustrative story of 3 live puppets, uses a surreal tone to captivate his viewers. The vibrant colours help make the characters and the environment pop. The soft textures and the blurred edges make it all seem so dreamy. The detail in the character emotions and layers too cannot be missed.

 

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CURRENT ISSUE
Creative Gaga - Issue 44

 




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Danny Jose, compiled some of his character illustrations to create a display of his work. The illustrations are amusing; with care taken to give each character its own idiosyncratic personality. The colour palette is wonderful and the noise added to the texture adds appeal to the overall look.

 

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CURRENT ISSUE
Creative Gaga - Issue 44

 




Having Fun with Character Design

Traveling is an important part of a designer’s life. It not only offers new experiences, but also opens the designer to fresh perspectives.

How do you know where to go, if you don’t know where you’ve come from?

 

Human beings have over 70,000 years of history on this planet. And to understand this history it is imperative to visit the various places that hold these ancient sites. But hold on a second, why should a designer care about history? Why invest time and energy in understanding it, when one could use their time scribbling down design ideas or working on their software skills? Shouldn’t we be working our way ahead, instead of dwelling in the past? What is the point of it?

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Oldest Human Drawing, Blombos Cave with ochre pencil on silcrete stone discovered in South Africa. Photography by Craig Foster

You can find the answer to that in the drawing tablet that you use to bring out your best ideas. This modern day sketching tool has become such an integral part of a designer’s digital life, that it’s not even given a second thought.

 

But the first appearance of a sketching tool was made 73,000 years back in South Africa, in the form of natural pigment crayons and the surface of a cave wall. From there we have evidence of the 40,000 year old cave paintings and hand stencils in the Spanish cave, El Castillo.

 

A couple more stops from there, and then we arrive at the tablet that has become an everyday essential in 2018 CE. So if you think about it, this very uber cool idea to make beautiful art with a tablet has its origin over 70,000 years back!

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40,000 years old El Castillo Cave Paintings in Spain
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Digital Drawing Tablet (2018) - Wacom Cintiq

In fact, everything around us today, toothbrushes, posters, cars, computers, houses – none of them have been created out of thin air. All these products have evolved with humans.

 

Contemporary art and culture may drastically vary from the past. But the design principles that these are based on, have stayed constant. This is because of the unchanged human behavior in all these years. The way people responded then to both visual and sensory experiences, is exactly the way we respond today. Hence, one will find principles of colour theory, patterns and textures, warmness and coolness, lightness and heaviness, compositions and proportions, perspectives and illusions, and so many more waiting to be discovered.

 

Visiting ancient human settlements is one of the best teachers as one witness’s exceptional examples of design.

Apart from the numerous lessons, traveling is terrific for inspiration as well. Creative ideas are not conceived in a void. They are the result of external triggers. The environment is filled with solutions, only if one observes. And places that are particularly dripping with ideas are ancient travel destinations.

 

Every ancient civilization in the world has been a pinnacle of art, culture, design and lifestyle, in its own unique way. Here we can find timeless solutions to design problems that we encounter even today. In that sense traveling is a great way to discover how the same problem was tackled in the past.

Travel

Traveling has a lot in store for the seasoned and established designer as well, as it also offers a very humbling experience. When you feel you are at the top of your game and the master of your designing domain – go travel. And watch your illusory bubble burst, and let yourself come crashing down to ground reality, as you realize that we aren’t the world’s first creators.

 

The quest for a better designed solution, that is visually soothing, and in line with the ‘user experience’, is a fairly old concept, probably as old as our cave men ancestors. Isn’t that the reason why we’ve come so far from then?

Today, we hear of thought leaders who want to disrupt and forge the path ahead. But for this, one must know the past to know where to lead the future. It is a great responsibility when one chooses to show the way. One needs to fully grasp the impact of their actions, which is only possible by understanding the past, learning about the origin of things. The origin of design.

 

And for all this wisdom, one can simply start by traveling the marvels of India. So, to get you going we’ve put together a few Indian historical beauties.

Location – Aurangabad district, Maharashtra

Period – 2nd century BCE to about 480 CE

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Travel
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Ajanta caves are ancient rock-cut Buddhist cave monuments. They constitute ancient monasteries and worship-halls depicting Buddhist traditions that are carved into tall walls of rock. They also depict detailed pictorial Buddhist tales.

 

Why you should visit this place – These caves are believed to be ‘the birth of Indian Art’. They are among the finest surviving examples, particularly expressive paintings that present emotion through gesture, pose and form.

 


2. Hampi

Location – Bellari district, Karnataka

Period – 14th Century AD

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Hampi refers to the group of monuments in Bellari district. Hampi was once the flourishing capital of the Hindu Vijaynagar Empire, and by the 15th century became the richest city in India. It is a sprawling grand site with over 1,600 surviving remains of the last great Hindu kingdom in South India. The site consists of forts, Riverside features, royal and sacred complexes, temples, shrines, pillared halls, mandapas, memorial structures, water structures and more. The elaborately decorated Virupaksha temple, adjoining the marketplace, is active even today, with countless pilgrims visiting the holy complex every year.

 

Why you should visit this place – The various remains demonstrate an evolved art style. Many elementary design principles like repetition, patterns, horizontality, etc., can be seen in practice.

 


Location – Lepakshi village, Anantapur District, Andhra Pradesh

Period – 16th Century AD

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Travel

Veerbhadra temple was built in Vijayanagara architecture style, the prevalent South Indian architecture style of the time. The carvings, painting and frescoes are intricate and depict stories from the Ramayana, Mahabharata and Purana. These pictorial representations are bursting with vibrant colours that have been well preserved.

 

Why you should visit this place – The temple has a fresco on the ceiling which is Asia’s largest and measures 23 x 13 feet. The pictorial art that adorns the walls, throw light on the period costumes and facial expression. The composition of the paintings brilliant and have a lot to teach.

 


Location – Konark, Puri district, Odisha

Period – 13th Century AD 

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Travel

The Konark Sun temple, as the name suggests is dedicated to the Hindu Sun God. The remains of the temple complex are in the form of a gigantic chariot with large wheels and a horse. The main idol of the Sun God was made to suspend in the air with the aid of the huge magnet at the peak and another fixed at the basement. This was before the temple was desecrated by Jahangir in the 17th Century. The Chariot shaped temple was built such that it creates the illusion of movement and dynamism, especially during dawn when it looks like the chariot is rising from the sea, carrying the Sun god.

 

Why you should visit this place – The temple is known for its elaborate iconography that is seen along the walls and the sides of the gigantic chariot. It is breathtaking at the break of dawn as it is aligned in an east-west direction; the light pours in on the huge chariot creating a dramatic effect.

 


Location – Chhatarpur, Madhya Pradesh

Period – 10th – 12th Century AD

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The Khajuraho Group of Monuments consists of Hindu, Buddhist and Jain temples. This reveals the acceptance of diverse religious views at the time in the region. These monuments were built in the Nagara style of North Indian architecture. The walls and sculptures are extensively intricate and decorative. This group of monuments is a fine example of Indian art and architecture.

 

Why you should visit this place – These temples are made out of sandstone without any mortar. The stones are held together with mortise and tenon joints, which then stay put on account of gravity. For this absolute precision is required.

 


Location – Bhopal, Madhya Pradesh

Period – 19th Century AD

Travel

Taj-ul-Masjid is India’s largest mosque. Its interior is spread over 4,300,000 sft, and can accommodate over 175,000 people. The construction was initiated under the reign of the Mughal emperor, Bahadur Shah Zafar. The mosque, with its pink façade, endless expanse, towering 18 feet high minarets, and the impressive main hallway, has a majestic appearance to it. The construction and interiors resemble typical Mughal style architecture, similar to the one seen in Jama Masjid in Delhi.

 

Why you should visit this place – The harmony and balance of the entire structure are impressive. The patterns of the fine screens are awe-inspiring.

 


Location – Sanchi town, Madhya Pradesh

Period – 3rd Century BC

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Sanchi Stupa is an ancient Buddhist complex that also has the famous great stupa. This mound-like structure is one of the oldest stone structures in India. It was initially commissioned by King Ashoka. The famous Ashoka pillar is seen here erected on the side of the main gateway.

 

Why you should visit this place – The Sanchi stupa is of great significance to India and Indian art and culture. The stone relief work on the stairways is unique.

 


Location – Pondicherry

Period – Established in 1673

Travel
Travel
Travel

Pondicherry, a union territory of India, was once upon a time colonized by the French East India Company. During the time of their control, the French brought a lot of their cultural influences into Pondicherry. Today, even after Pondicherry belongs to free India, some of these influences have remained, turning the region into a melting pot of south Indian and colonial French styles. This city is based on the French grid pattern where the streets are perpendicular. The town is distinctly divided into two parts, the French Quarter and the Indian Quarter. Most of the French section retains the French colonial architecture style, with yellow, white or earthy villas lining the streets. Apart from the architecture, the art too is very inspiring, as it depicts the colonial European school of thought.

 

Why you should visit this place – The city of Pondicherry demonstrates how a foreign style can seamlessly blend into an Indian setting, visually and experientially creating something inimitable and warm.

December 2018 is loaded with creative and entertaining workshops, events and exhibitions to give you a dose of inspiration and motivation to strengthen up the work spirit.  Read through to know about all these happenings in India and around the world.

With 2018 almost coming to an end, do you feel that you have missed out on opportunities of this year to engage in design, art, and other creative platforms?

 

Not to worry. There still is the last month left.

 

Read through this list of events happening in December and make the most of it!

December

1st – 3rd December
Udaipur, India

Kumbhalgarh Festival

With people exhibiting and curating business during the day transforming to a crowd tapping their feet to the rhythm of the beats by the night, the Kumbhalgarh Festival is where India’s finest artists and craftsmen put up their best work. Featuring Rajasthan’s folk performances along with an art camp, puppet show and some activities for the youth, it also promotes the heritage site, the Kumbhalgarh fort, the location of the festival.

 

Venue: Kumbhalgarh Fort, Udaipur

More Details

 


December

1st – 5th December 
Konark, Odisha

International Sand Art Festival, Odisha 2018

Organised by the Odisha tourism department, The International Sand Art Festival witnesses the best of the sand artists from across the globe. On display is the live creation of sand sculptures outdoing wooden, bronze and stone sculptures of the world. These sand exhibits can be seen at the Chandrabhaga beach, just a few kilometres from the town of Konark.

 

Venue: Chandrabhaga Beach, Konark, Odisha

More Details

 


December

1st – 9th December
North-East India

Photography Tour – North-East India and Hornbill Festival

This photography tour of North East India and Hornbill festival will allow you to immerse yourself in the cultural landscapes and interact with the indigenous people of small-towns and villages of Nagaland. A chance to visit the Kaziranga National park and navigating through the less-explored regions of India, this is the perfect opportunity for you to capture some unique frames and delightful sights of people and nature through your lens.

 

To Join Contact:  Arun/ Shreeram/ Sreedevi at 9880006460/ 9740083260/ 7022166822
Or Email at photography@darter.in

More Details

 


December

1st – 10th December 
Delhi, India

Delhi International Arts Festival 2018

Projecting India as a brand, the Delhi International Arts Festival attempts to draw the attention of the world to India’s soft power expressed through the arts. It promotes Delhi as a destination for international cultural tourism by incorporating national and international art forms varying from music, dance and theatre to literature, poetry and cuisines, thus providing a significant forum for cultural diplomacy.

 

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4th December 
Mumbai 

How to Paint Botanicals by the Ink Bucket

A nature lover and admirer? Want to draw leaves, flowers and everything else that you see in your garden? This is just the right workshop for you. Register yourself with The Ink Bucket to experience calmness and relax your mind by painting beautiful flowers, foliage and the artsy botanicals of mother nature in a simple manner and elevate your painting skills.

 

Venue: Café Arpan, Mumbai

More Details

 


6th – 7th December 
Mumbai

The Economic Times Emerging Media Summit 2018

With media breaking through the barriers of technology and consumers demanding interactive rather than informative communicative methods, The Economic Times has announced the launch edition of Emerging Media Summit, two days of a mega-confluence.

 

This is a platform which will bring together the universe of the media industry to discuss the underlying challenges, come up with technology-driven innovative solutions and eventually carve a roadmap for this emerging ecosystem.

 

Venue: Hotel Novotel, Mumbai

More Details

 


7th – 8th December
Mumbai

The Festival of Architecture & Interior Designing (FOAID)

Originated with the idea of celebrating the glory of Indian Architecture & Design, the Festival of Architecture and Interior Designing has lived up to its promise. A platform for creative minds to meet & discuss the new facets of the design fraternity, FOAID in its journey of design has embarked on to the 5th year, this time in an attempt to explore the theme, Time To Reimagine.

 

Venue: MMRDA, Ground BKC, Mumbai

More Details

 


December

7th – 9thDecember
Delhi

22nd – 23rd December
Mumbai

Comic Con India

Hosting the largest pop-culture conventions in India, Comic Con is back again this year hosting two exhibitions in December in Delhi and Mumbai. Not only does it provide a platform to expand and promote global popular culture, it also gives brands a chance to engage with passionate fans across the country. It is a chance for comic book fans to dress up as their favourite character and meet other comic characters.

 

Venue: NSIC Ground Okhla, Delhi

Venue: Bombay Exhibition Centre, Mumbai

More Details

 


8th December 
Mumbai 

Modern Calligraphy Workshop

If you like receiving a hand-written note on any occasion from your loved ones, why wouldn’t they? Ever thought about it?

 

Join this Modern Calligraphy Workshop to learn the basics of modern calligraphy, from ink flow and pen pressure to shapes and a modern set of alphabets. Just in a few hours, you will be able to develop your own style and soon will be sending love and warmth-filled hand-written cards to your near and dear ones.

 

Venue: Ministry of New, Fort, Mumbai (South)

More Details

 


December

9th – 19th December
Antarctica, South Pole

The White Continent – Antarctica Photography Tour

Situated at the South Pole, Antarctica is the coldest and whitest of all continents. Exposed to icy winds and surrounded by ice-bergs, it does have a brief window every year, during the Antarctic summer, where it becomes possible to travel to this wonderland and watch the nesting penguins. So, register for The White Continent – Antarctica Photography tour, travel on a small luxurious ship to experience the unique continent and photograph the wonders at the end of the world!

 

To Join Contact: Arun/ Shreeram at 9880006460/ 97400 83260
Or Email at photography@darter.in

More Details

 


12th December 2018 to 29th March 2019
Kochi

The Kochi-Muzhiris Biennale 2018

The largest of its kind in South Asia, the fourth edition of the Kochi-Muziris Biennale, an art exhibition and festival is scheduled to run from 12th December, 2018 until 29th March, 2019. It aims at introducing contemporary international visual art theory and practice to India and showcasing new Indian and international aesthetics and art experiences, in an attempt to initiate dialogue among artists, curators, and the public.

 

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INTERNATIONAL EVENTS

December

3rd – 8th December
Hong Kong

Business of Design Week (BODW)

A platform for business people to get creative and creatives to explore business opportunities, Business of Design Week (BODW) is Asia’s premier annual event on design, innovation and brands. Organised by Hong Kong Design Centre, BODW 2018 is based on the theme of “Think-Collaborate-Create”, teaming up with various economies to explore design and innovation across all creative forums.

 

Venue: Hong Kong Convention and Exhition Centre, Hong Kong

More Details

 


4th – 6th December
South Florida

International Contemporary Furniture Fair (ICFF)

An unparalleled opportunity to view a broad yet highly focused selection of the world’s finest, most innovative, and original avant-garde home and contract products under one roof, International Contemporary Furniture Fair (ICFF) is back for its third annual meet in South Florida from the 4th till 6th of December, in close proximity to the Art Basel and the Miami Design Week events . To know what’s the latest in the luxury interiors for South Florida, the Caribbean, and Latin American markets, this a must-visit exhibition.

 

Venue: Ft. Lauderdale Convention Center, South Florida

More Details

 


December

5th – 9th December
USA

Design Miami

Design Miami/ is the go-to place to get the best from the most influential collectors, gallerists, designers, curators and critics from around the world celebrating design culture and commerce. A visit to Design Miami/ will leave you in awe of museum-quality exhibitions of twentieth and twenty-first-century furniture, lighting and objets d’art. Strategically planned, it also allows you to visit the Art Basel in Miami.

 

Venue: Miami, USA

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December

8th – 16th December
Thailand

Chiang Mai Design Week

Presenting design innovations catering to the needs of modern living and functioning as aplatform of conversationbetween people and designers to share design knowledge, Chiang Mai Design Week brings together creators, entrepreneurs, young designers, local communities, tourists and anyone interested in design through multiple activities like exhibitions, installations, art and music, thus enriching the city’s creative atmosphere.

 

Venue: Chiang Mai, Thailand

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10th – 12th December
California

An Event Apart

An Event Apart, San Francisco is two days of sessions from 12 speakers with intense focus on digital design, UX, content, code, and more. Following the two-day conference comes a full day, A Day Apart, with a single speaker diving deeply into one important topic. Attend this conference, be influenced by industry leaders who are a constant source of inspiration and take back home some tips that definitely will help you grow professionally.

 

Venue: San Francisco, California

More Details

We’re all looking for something unreal, something that could hold our attention and give us something new. Locopopo DesignStudio, founded by Lokesh Karekar, helped create an illustrative series for GDPL design studio for Godrej Properties – Kolkata. The aim of the campaign was to focus on the greenscape the property had to offer, with the scope for multiple activities at different gardens. The beautiful colour combinations of blue-yellow, red-blue and more help grab the viewers’ attention. The illustrations are wonderfully layered into the backdrop and the foreground, giving the feeling of depth and never-ending gardens. The overflowing green from all ends certainly conjures an enticing visual.

 

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CURRENT ISSUE
Creative Gaga - Issue 44

 




Questioning… is integral to great creativity. It’s only when we brood, wonder and question a scenario, we can showcase a different perspective in a unique way. Illustrator, Ranganath Krishnamani, questioned the indigenous identity of the very Indian local culture. Through this he developed a series of illustrations, each depicting the lives of individuals who still hold on to the threads of culture and tradition, in this age of rapid globalization. Here we see the likes of our chaiwala, dhobiwala, darzi and more, people with professions that are ignored by most, and now hold on tight to the hem of our Indian urban fabric.

 

The art style is truly compelling. The illustrator has made excellent use of a complementary palette that includes brown and deep green. The style by itself has an earthy grounded feel to it. The detail helps make each character come alive, especially in the animation.

 

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Creative Gaga - Issue 44

 




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Chaiwala
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Hair Dresser
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Darzi (Tailor)
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Dhobiwala
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Flower Seller
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Beliefs
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