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The animation industry in India has come a long way and has a long way to go. Renowned animation filmmaker, Suresh Eriyat, gives us the ground reality of the industry today, and where the future lies. In the process, he also teaches us a few things that make the animation world go round.

The Indian Animation Legend, E Suresh, has been a pioneer in storytelling and animation through films. He currently heads his animation studio Studio Eeksaurus. He was the first to launch clay animation commercials in India. A few feathers in his cap include creating Amaron battery advertisements, music video Bindu re Bindu, the Simpu series for Channel V, MTV Poga series, Johnny Bravo goes to Bollywood, Levis Slim vs. Slim, and so many more.

His short films, Fisherwoman and Tuk Tuk, and Tokri, both won National Film Award for Best Non-Feature Animation Film, apart from winning almost 60 national and International awards at various festivals with over 150 official selections globally.

CG. Where does animation stand today in India? Is there a gap in the understanding of what the animation industry encompasses?

Suresh. There are several gaps in the way animation is understood in India. Internationally ‘animation filmmaker’ and an ‘animator’ are similar. There the animator is synonymous to a filmmaker who uses animation to make his/her films bringing in a holistic process to the film making. In India that is not necessarily the case. Firstly, the animation is associated with cartoons in India. Beyond that, it is widely believed to simply be a technique. And this is used in the Indian animation industry mainly to provide a service, as a BPO format. Unfortunately here animation is seen as a skill set equivalent to learning software or a tool, and not as a conceptual ability of a person creating ideas to tell a story. It is not seen as the overall process.

Another misconception is that animation films don’t require direction/a director. These are all misnomers because it is not yet a popular medium here. The way it is taught or talked about by some of the academies in India, also adds to the confusion and misleading terms.

CG. What do you think it would take to change this perception in India?

Suresh. It would take more exposure to see these films, and gathering a better understanding of what animation is, for this change to occur. This will eventually lead to recognition for animation and its various forms. The evolution needs to happen where people become more aware of animation.

 

In the West, people have been with animation for many decades now, so they understand all that it encompasses. They understand that it is a tool to tell powerful stories. In India, the animation is still young. I am sure in another 10 years we will be where all these countries are in terms of understanding of the medium.

CG. When you are making your films, what sort of target audience are you looking at?

Suresh. I make both short films and advertising films. Both have different agendas. Advertisement films have a definite purpose, either to spread awareness about a brand or convey a message. In both cases, a behavioral change is desired. The brief and objective are very clear and the process involves a lot of research. We go by the design process where there is a defined problem, a defined target audience, and a very clear message to convey. The advertising films have a wider reach in that sense.

My short films, on the other hand, aren’t targeted to a market audience. Instead, they are targeted to a crowd who are artistically inclined and who appreciate the process. The films also target the festival audience, so that they see what India is capable of creating. It is important for Indians to not just be perceived as a service but also as great storytellers.

CG. Where does India stand on the global platform in the animation industry and film making?

Suresh. At the moment, we are not considered capable. Nobody thinks India will make good content. Right now, there are only a handful of companies that are known to create content in India. But the majority lot of animation professionals is complacent about creating something original. We need to tell more stories and make more films to be put on the map.

CG. In your work, how extensively do you use the design process?

Suresh. We often use the design process in the craft of film making. Through this process, we arrive at the most appropriate form and direction to convey the story in the best way possible. Different production houses are bracketed for making a certain type of content. It took us some time to establish ourselves without being labeled in that manner, and instead to be perceived as a design-driven production house.

We are known to work with any medium in order to make the idea stronger. I have directed and produced close to 500 films now, and I don’t consciously try to come up with a new medium, but somehow that has always happened. Each of my films has a unique look and feel to them. This is mainly the result of the design process that we use to strengthen the idea we want to convey.

CG. Creative professionals often begin to make the same kind of work, and then get stuck to that style. How did you escape that?

Suresh. While making films we first look at the story and then the form. We never begin by deciding the form. Many people tend to decide the form first thus stick to it. Sometimes clients go to them because they are known for a particular narrative style or a form that they specialize in.

Creating work with similar form is understandable because of our influences. We see things around us and try to include them in our work. But this is exactly why the design process is important. It diminishes the tendency of aping something or following a trend.

 

Our attempt has always been to push the form further than the predictable and strive to make it more cutting edge and niche.

CG. What makes a good story? What is good storytelling?

Suresh. No story is good or bad. It depends on how memorable a story is. And this depends on how engaging and captivating the audience is by it. And all this comes down to how the story is told. Majority stories have a similar pattern, the intro, the middle, the climax, the end, etc., but how you manage to tell the story in a captivating way is what counts. For example, the story of Ramayan and Mahabharat has essentially been the same. But the style of narration has changed with time. Every story can be told in many ways. Narrating it in a way relevant to the context is important.

CG. What is the importance of humour in storytelling?

Suresh. While narrating a story, the audience needs to feel good about it, and humour is a sure shot way to do that. It lightens up the mood and adds a twist to look at reality. Laughter is definitely a great ingredient.

CG. An example of great use of humour is the awareness campaign for Mumbai women that you had created. Can you tell us a little more about that, and how humour worked there?

Suresh. The Mumbai police claimed that in Mumbai, anywhere a woman is in distress, all she needs to do is call the hotline, and the police will reach her in within minutes. This was something they were proud of, but when I checked around, no one knew the number. So I decided to create a campaign to create awareness.

We did not want to go by the obvious approach of showing women morose or stressed ‘victims’, because that does not work at all. Through the communication we wanted women to feel empowered and get the courage to face the world. We wanted them to imagine the hotline was their weapon.

 

The beauty of this campaign is that the way it was executed, still makes it relevant. The form has a cartoon look, but artistic styling sets it apart.

CG. Many youngsters look forward to a career in animation. But Indian parents are very concerned about how lucrative this industry is. How would you respond to that?

Suresh. The animation is unlike mainstream fields like medicine, today in India. Instead, it leans towards art and culture, and these are essential elements of the fabric of society.

 

Another thing is, if you empower a student with animation, you are making him independent because animation films can be made single-handedly. It is like writing a novel. Just by investing time in it, sharpening your skills and exploring different mediums, a career can be made out of it.

If you are good at it, work will always come your way; because we are living in a time where the demand for entertainment is going to grow. Earlier the platforms were limited, but now there are so many non-linear avenues for accessing entertainment like Netflix and Prime. There is a lot of content that needs to be made available, because not it is turning into a library of content. In that sense, there will never be a dearth of work.

 

Apart from this, there are so many other emerging sectors connected with animation like the education sector, AR and VR experiential environments, simulations, etc. There is a tremendous scope and I don’t see parents regretting this in the future.

CG. Tell us why you see specialization as a danger today.

Suresh. Nowadays the younger generations are too focused on a specialization. It is necessary to know peripheral aspects that could influence art or the specific subject one is into. When you are thinking of a story or making a film it requires a certain sensibility towards what is going on politically, socially, and environmentally what is happening in the country and outside. Youngsters today find this irrelevant. They focus so much on their specialization that the ideas they give are no more holistic. When you are a specialist, the danger is not being aware of the bottom line issues.

There is always a contradiction between generalization and specialization. The organic path would be specialization after generalization. I am talking purely technically, but in life also, if you have a wider opinion on things, you have a much better view on a specific topic.

Issue 46

Published in Issue 46

This issue is focused on, how to design for kids, bundled with articles full of inspirations, advice and unique point-of-views from the veterans of the animation industry, illustrators, photographers, artists and many more. So, order your copy or subscribe, before print copies run out and enjoy reading this issue!

 

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The journey to a successful career in the animation can be thrilling and overwhelming. Renowned animation film maker, Vaibhav Kumaresh, tells us about the story behind his success and the establishment of Vaibhav Studios.

Lamput TV Series

Vaibhav Kumaresh has a unique unmatched style to his work. But Vaibhav traveled a long way before he met his success.

Animation
Lamput TV Series

Vaibhav completed his 10th grade, and then went on to pursue a 5-year graduation course in Fine Arts. In 1990 it was common to skip the 12th grade, and his parents were very supportive. Here he was introduced to drawing, sculpting, painting, printmaking, and photography; and specialised in Applied Arts. Later, Vaibhav joined NID where he explored and learned about the beautiful medium of animation.

Animation
Simpu for channel V

After NID, he joined Famous House of Animation in 1998. Animation legend, E. Suresh, was Vaibhav’s senior here and was assigned the task of setting up an animation studio at Famous. Together they produced several animation films. It was an exciting phase for Vaibhav.

In 2003 a lovely children’s film came Vaibhav’s way. He chose to take it, which meant he had to leave his job. Vaibhav confesses that it was the scariest yet happiest decision of his life. He joined forces with his wife, Suranjana, a product designer from NID, and Vaibhav Studios was formed. As projects kept flowing in, there was no looking back.

Animation
Nick Ident, Idli Song.

Vaibhav Studios broadly takes up two types of projects. First is commissioned work, primarily TV commercials where an advertising agency approaches them with a ready script. The Studio then interprets it in their own way, followed by direction and production. Second is when they build their own original IP and pitch those ideas and concepts to different clients. In the past 4 years, they have primarily worked on creating many original IP.

Animation
Buladi Horny Lovers

Vaibhav uses a variety of techniques and mediums to create films. He uses stop motion which is all physical materials – clay, wire, cloth, paper. For the traditional hand-drawn animation techniques, he uses paper, pencil, markers, erasers, correction pens, paints, and charcoal. Sometimes digital tools like Adobe Photoshop, Flash (now called Animate) to draw and animate are also used. For the digital 3D animation films Vaibhav uses Autodesk Maya and After Effects. At times his studio also shoots live action and mixes them with animated footage. Vaibhav believes the open source software, Blender, is soon emerging as an immensely powerful and artist-friendly tool for animation.

But Vaibhav adds that software is merely a tool. Using it does not guarantee one a good end product. The magic lies in the hands of the user of the tool.

Nick Ident. Mom And Brat.

Vaibhav recommends ‘Kampung Boy’ by Lat, as a great book with a beautifully illustrated story to read. He also recommends a few inspiring animation short film recommendations, namely, Madagascar – Carnet de Voyage by Bastien Dubois, Chick by Michal Socha, Father & Daughter by Michael Dudok de Wit

Issue 46

Published in Issue 46

This issue is focused on, how to design for kids, bundled with articles full of inspirations, advice and unique point-of-views from the veterans of the animation industry, illustrators, photographers, artists and many more. So, order your copy or subscribe, before print copies run out and enjoy reading this issue!

 

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Beard Design revamps a three decade existence by rebranding Value Research in a distinct design that is interactive by embodying the company’s persona in its office.

Rebranding
Logo
Rebranding
Logo Colour Options
Rebranding
Business Cards

Brief

A brand is made up of everything tangible and intangible to generate a wholesome experience. Its visual identity is an indispensable aspect to communicate the overall message, values and the promise to its consumer.

Rebranding
Book Design
Rebranding
Advertisement Design

Founded in 1990, Value Research is one of the most respected financial data and advisory firms in India. The company approached Beard Design studio to revamp its brand (rebranding) and create a visual asset library that could be applied to the company’s two main laterals: B2B business and Consumer business.

Rebranding
Rebranding

Challenge

Beard Design studio worked closely with Value Research for over six months to create an effective brand strategy and identity design that could be applied to all the collaterals of the company starting with their five-story office in New Delhi.

Rebranding
Space Design
Rebranding
Space Design

Instead of taking a conventional route of pasting graphics on the wall, the design implementation comprised of using mundane elements from the finance domain such as calculators, currency notes and ties as décor objects. Paying attention to every detail, the furniture, signage or space designed acts as an exhibit of the company’s identity.

Space Design

Solution

By creating various visual interests within the office that highlights the brand’s personality, the design successfully embodies the company’s values through its distinct narrative and style.

Some of the main features include: the Bailout Wall in the cafeteria which is a collage of real objects such as the typewriter, radio, shoes, etc. synonymous with its paint, the logo walls which stand out in the elevator bays comprising of the company’s iconic symbol ‘V’ displayed in a grid using different materials and finishes, and even furniture that subtly incorporates the brand’s identity. These elements as a whole make a compelling statement, constructing the essence of the brand piece-by-piece, thereby being the voice of the business to its consumers.


Client: Value Research
Agency: Beard Design
Solution/Expertise: Rebranding and Space Design

They were a fad back in the 70s. They are redefining jewellery design now. Beads are adding contemporary sensibilities to classical thoughts to create jewellery for the women of today. Jewellery designer Riddhika Jesrani tells us how beads play a major role in creating elegant and modern jewellery designs

Statement Orange Day Beaded Necklace

Beads Represent an Evolution.

Women are evolving. They are becoming bolder and are willing to try new things. Fashion-oriented jewellery is one of these. Working with beads makes necklaces look grand and glamorous. How light reflects off faceted beads and makes the wearer shine is inspiring. It’s the attraction towards contemporary designs and materials that women are choosing to wear around their neck rather than traditional pieces. However, it’s important to not make the change look so drastic. That’s why adding some semi-precious stones helps bridge that thinking and strike a balance between the modern and traditional. It’s how vintage stories can be told in a young, contemporary manner.

Jewellery Design
Big Bold Gold Beaded Necklace

Jewellery is an Experience.

While designing, one must think about the person wearing it. How do you want her to feel? Once you have the answer to that question, use material, form, texture, and colour to design that feeling in your jewellery. Each piece is a story that can only be expressed with these four key elements. For example, a faceted bead will add a different look in a necklace than a plain red round one. If you’re looking to make the design fun, then just add some felt beads. If you’re working on kids’ collection, keep the colours bright and the textures fun enough for the kids to enjoy.

Jewellery Design
Signature Beaded Happy Buddha Necklace

There is Symmetry in Chaos.

It’s important to first visualise the design, scribble it out if required. Next, think of a colour scheme. Once that’s in place, pick out beads of different shape and size and lay them out. Then start eliminating. In other words, de-clutter. And you’ll realize that in the end, all you’re left with is what you string together. Make sure you take into consideration the colour and size of beads in order to balance your design.

Jewellery Design
Signature Beaded Sunny Yellow Necklace
Signature Beaded Purple Burst Necklace

Jewellery Need not be Serious.

Put some fun in it. Create designs that remind the wearer that it’s not always about being perfect. It’s about enjoying the moment and being comfortable with the way things are. We all know how Indians take their jewellery so seriously. The idea is to get customers to buy a piece because it makes them smile and feel good every time they put it on.

Jewellery Design
Signature Beaded Statement Elephant Necklace
Signature Beaded Disco Necklace

Fashion is Freedom.

Following fashion trends is totally out of fashion. What’s in, is to believe in your own style and follow what makes you comfortable in your skin. It’s this freedom that a jewellery designer must pass on. Treat each piece as an incomplete sentence, with a belief that the story becomes complete only when it is worn. After all, it’s not just about what statement the jewellery piece makes, but also about how the wearer wants to make that statement.

Jewellery Design
Signature Beaded Icy Pearl Necklace
Signature Beaded Fiery Tortoise Necklace

Be Idea-Driven Rather Than Technique Driven.

Because, if the idea is in place you will figure out a way to make it. An idea or a colour scheme can be drawn from anything, anytime. It could be a rainbow you spot while traveling or the unique combination of colours in the food you’re having. Inspiration can ignite anytime and that’s why it’s important to keep your eyes peeled and ears perked up for anything exciting. Don’t worry if you don’t know the technique. It can be learned on the job. Just be original and believe in your creativity and creations.

Jewellery Design
Signature Beaded Pitch Black Necklace
Peacock Frenzy

Published in Issue 11

This issue also explored the Jewellery Design & Wedding Photography with some cool techniques to learn from experts in Gyaan section.

 

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We have seen a wave of change with many artists adopting iPad pro and vouching for the comfort and flexibility it provides. And, even in Lollypop, all the artists have been illustrating on Procreate and have been keeping their iPad pro closer; so we got on to understand what is it that they like so much about procreate and if they could share few insights of the features that might be of help.

We asked Preethika Asokan, Sr. Illustrator in-house to shed some light on Procreate. Here is what she had to say:

Why I love Procreate?

iPad Pro is my digital sketchbook and procreate is my favourite medium. As a professional Illustrator, I draw for a living, and I have no complaints at that. But at the end of the day, or on a day off, I am very tired and I get super lazy to sit in front of my computer again and draw for my personal projects. But ever since iPad pro and procreate came into my life, I can cozy up anywhere and draw more for myself. I can take the iPad to a park or a cafe, get some fresh air, Vitamin D and let the creativity flow. It’s like drawing with a pencil but with the digital advantages; the magic of undo, and myriads of colours and brushes to choose from, I am able to do wonders beyond imagination. P.S I still love my sketchbook and watercolors, they will be my forever travel buddies.

Features in Procreate 

The basic UI is easy to use if you are familiar with the other Illustration software like Adobe Illustrator or Adobe Photoshop. There are so many features and few amazing tutorials available online to learn it end to end. Now, I’ll just talk about some of my favourite features:

01 Drawing Guide

We have 2d, Perspective, Isometric, and symmetry. You can also change the grid size, customize your guidelines. Select drawing assists in the layers to paint strokes according to your guidelines. Now, making that fancy isometric illustration is super easy.

Procreate

02 Clipping Mask and Alpha Lock 

The clipping mask is a recent update from Procreate 4.2 that I absolutely love, this lets you clip multiple layers to the content of one layer, allowing non-destructive alterations.

 

The alpha lock is a transparency lock. If you turn them on in layers, any painting or other action you do on that layer will only affect the pixels that were already there.

03 Recolour

I use this feature way more than others because I am never satisfied with the colours I choose initially. I love to experiment with them. It’s under the adjustments, pick the colour you want to change in the particular layer, and experiment with your masterpiece. Adjust the flood option for desired results.

Procreate

04 Favourite Brush Set

You can easily import a custom made brushes to Procreate. But my most used brushes are procreate’s default brushes, they have some amazing range.

Procreate

05 QuickShape 

The ultimate update in 4.2 is about making shapes. I feel like my pain reached the creators and I feel so happy! With QuickShape you can create perfect shapes without lifting a finger. You draw a shape and hold, and QuickShape will create the exact shape you need, ta-da!

Procreate

06 Tips and Shortcuts 

Please check out the Procreate website, handbook and Instagram account for their tricks and tutorials. These are some basic shortcuts and gestures, that I wish I knew when I started using the application. Still, after a year of using the app, I keep figuring out new things that the app can do and feel stupid for not knowing it earlier.

07 Streamline for Brushes

If you want your line to be clean and smoother, increase the streamline percentage in the brush edits. This is an absolute delight to use if you want to do some precise hand lettering. Also with the stroke taper option under brushes, you can control the exact taper amount and shape.

Conclusion

I see that people often question whether to invest on Wacom Cintiq or iPad pro. Though I personally prefer iPad pro, I would say it depends on the work you do and specifications. Ipad pro and procreate is a great tool for all your personal Illustrations and to the extent your professional Illustrations also. I have used them for creating Illustrations for both Web and print and the results were pretty good.

 

But again, we have to remember Procreate is a raster software, so you don’t get the flexibility of resizing them quite often. The major problem I have faced with procreate is the artwork getting pixelated or blurred when resized. But they have recently updated an interpolation feature in transform, which helps out a bit with this issue. But needless to say that this is the best investment I had made recently. They may not replace Illustrator or Photoshop, but Procreate sure is one of my favourite software application.

 

Here are few of the illustrations done by me on Procreate:

Article by Preethika Asokan, Sr. Illustrator at Lollypop Design Studio

User experience is embracing a widespread implementation of trending technologies like voice user interface, smart home devices, and much more. The basics of designing these experiences might have remained unchanged, but the birth of these technologies have definitely brought changes in user behavioral patterns. Thus, it demands new user experiences and solutions.

2018 has been a year when UX has been at the inside stage. Despite the fact that this sign will proceed in 2019, there are sure-shot trends that are probably going to rule the scene. Along these lines, we have listed 3 most important UX design trends that are going to redefine this domain.

01
The Paradigm Shift from Flat to Material Design

The ‘Flat Design’ focuses mostly upon minimalism — open, clean, and crisp edges, usability, and the addition of bright colors with the help of 2D illustrations. When compared to flat design, ‘Material Design’ took birth in the year 2014 and since then the UX design has drifted more towards grid-based layouts, engaging responsive animations, light and shading features, 3D icons, and much more.

UX Design
Source: https://appinventiv.com/blog/flat-design-or-material-design-which-one-to-prefer

In the year 2019, it’s time to say goodbye to bland minimalism of flat design — it doesn’t work perfectly anymore. Embrace the increased liveliness, interactivity, and detailing that comes along with the material design – the need of the hour.


02
Voice-Command will Continue to Evolve

The revolution of voice-command technology has paved the way for various voice assistants like Siri, Alexa, Google Home, Echo, and much more. Its bombardment has caused ripples in the UX design industry, which will continue to be caused even in the year 2019. It is expected that this industry is going to be worth the US $21.5 billion by 2024.

UX Design
Source: www.marketsandmarkets.com/Market-Reports/speech-voice-recognition-market-202401714

In the year 2019, designers will have to invest their focus on coming up with the designs, focused on voice-command technology. Designs for multimodal interfaces — a perfect amalgamation of voice and visuals may also rule in the year 2019.


03
Content-Focused Experiences

No doubt in the fact that content is king, but remember, the design is the queen and together they can attract user base across any genre or segment. In today’s fast-paced, highly digitized society, the attention span of a human has dropped down to 8 seconds from 12 seconds.

Thus, the designer’s role has expanded from understanding a user’s customer journey to telling compelling stories around digital experience in a limited time span. And this trend will completely rule in the year 2019.

UX Design
Source: www.marketsandmarkets.com/Market-Reports/speech-voice-recognition-market-202401714

Design, in 2019, will be much more informed and will revolve around customer wants, user data, their preferences, and journeys. This will be the year of live videos and increased personalization.

UX Design and Success goes hand-in-hand

Whether it is 2018 or 2019, the basic rule of UX design is that it has to deliver a flawless digital experience on all devices and interfaces. Planning in light of user experience will keep on being a top priority in 2019 as we continue to deliver cutting edge and consistent products to customers through the UX industry.

Rocklets, a popular brand in the category of chocolate and confectionary in Argentina, wanted to give away headphones as a present with the purchase of Rocklets Easter Eggs. Morphine Motion Graphics created two fun and cool 3D illustrations for the packaging design of the giveaway.

 

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Packaging Design
Packaging Design
Packaging Design
Packaging Design
Packaging Design
Packaging Design

Here is an interesting portrait series created on the phone by Miten Lapsiya. This series is a collection of celebrity portraits like Amitabh Bachchan, Sachin Tendulkar, Barrack Obama, and more. Miten uses very realistic paint styles like watercolor for this series. Thus the portraits beautifully capture the essence of each personality.

 

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Celebrity Portraits
Celebrity Portraits
Celebrity Portraits
Celebrity Portraits
Celebrity Portraits
Celebrity Portraits

In an exclusive interview with Creative Gaga, storyboard artist Sachin Tiwari has given tips and shared his insights about creating a storyboard.

Storyboarding
Storyboarding

CG. What was your inspiration to choose the field of animation as your career?

Sachin. Growing up watching animated series like He-man, Barba-papa and many others. Seeing the characters perform various actions like talk, laugh move and dance always fascinated me. I wondered how it all works. Loving to draw, I would copy those characters in my sketchbook or even on any surface where I could draw, and eventually it took-up as a profession by undergoing a formal training from a reputed animation production house. This marked the start of my professional journey as an Animation artist.

Storyboarding
Storyboarding
Storyboarding

CG. What is a storyboard and what is it’s importance in a project? What are the different fields where story boards are essential?

Sachin. Storyboard is a shot by shot sequence of any written script represented visually using graphics or illustrations. It explains how the video will unfold shot by shot or look like on screen just like a comic book. It is very important for a video/visual-based project to have a proper storyboard of the script being produced.

Storyboarding
Storyboarding

In our everyday lives, sometime we have to draw a rough sketch to explain our point of view to make it easy to understand. Similarly storybord is like a road-map to visualise something which otherwise is not easily understood only through written words of the script.

Visuals make people understand the whole thing better. Thus, a storyboard undoubtedly plays a significant role in video production when a director needs to make the production staff understand his vision and show how exactly the product is going to be mapped out.

Storyboarding

These days many industries, apart from the animation sector, such as advertisement, live-action films, business explainers, television production etc., use storyboarding for their productions. The art of storyboarding is a powerful tool to help communicate ideas, and when used properly it helps to avoid common mistakes like a broken storyline, mis-matched dialogue and playback timing issues and keeps the whole team aware of what is to be done.

CG. As stories are integral part of storyboarding. But how critical are the characters of the story?

Sachin. Our sense of curiosity engages us to see what will happen next. Stories capture attention and we are hardwired to respond to that. An artist while drawing the storyboard, aims at creating visuals that convey the right message and the storyline and are relatable too, by the people. For this, a character is must to imbue the emotions. A story/plot is always designed or said to give a message, but without a character or protagonist, it is not possible to create any storyboard.

CG. What are the different kinds of projects that you take up and how do you decide upon the concept of creating a storyline for your projects?

Sachin. Majority of the projects I work on are story-driven cartoon film productions which are either episodic or full-length films. To start a project, one needs to understand about a few things like references, layout, framing, layering and lastly finishing. Although boarding is a team-based activity and anyone can contribute, but in today’s scenario storyboarding artists have to create and complete a storyboard, more or less, individually and have it approved by the directors.

CG. What are the different mediums that you use for creating story-boards?

Sachin. I personally don’t find myself dependent on any particular medium to create a storyboard. Choosing the medium should be result oriented, whether you use pencil paper, or any kind of computer-based software. In general, I use a paper and a pencil to create rough basic thumbnails. They’re pretty much scribbled for my reference. When satisfied with my scribbled drawings, I start creating them digitally with Adobe Flash. After translating the thumbnails into fine drawings, I then add the sound to set the storyline and timings for the final output.

CG. Time frames are an essential requirement for any creative project. How does time framing make a difference to the final outcome? And how do you balance?

Sachin. Yes, time frames are always there, and I try to adhere to them as much as possible but not at the cost of compromising the quality of work. I pass on the final work to the client only after being satisfied with the desired quality. I don’t prefer taking up projects with unrealistic time frames or where it is difficult to provide satisfactory results.

CG. What are the important factors to be kept in mind while storyboarding for a project?

Sachin. I work as a freelance boarding artist. Freelance means that you don’t always have work but the upside of working freelance is that no two projects are the same. There is ample variety and it is exciting to work on animation projects of different styles.

But still there are some important factors or a checklist, which remain same for every project and should be kept in mind, like:

 

+ Have I read the whole script?


+ Do I know the storyline?


+ How am I going to execute the scene?


+ Do I know the essence of the scene?


+ Do I have the proper material such as character sheets, prop sheets, backgrounds, audio etc.?


+ Do I have proper references?


+ Is my scene in-sync with the style of the animation required and flow of the episode?


+ Are characters matching with the layouts’ perspective?


+ Do I know where to minimize my efforts without affecting the quality?


+ Am I doing something to make the simple scenes better?


+ Am I planning according to the time deadline?

Issue 45

Published in Issue 45

When celebrations are all around for the new year, everyone is curious about what this new year will bring. So, the rounds of looking back to the past year and trying to predict the new one starts. We started the same exploration through this issue by reaching various experts for their take on the trends for their respective fields. So, go ahead.

 

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Advertising is one such arena where one can achieve as much as they’d like; provided, that they’ve got the skills, talent and of course the courage. Nasheet Shadani, believes it’s for every illustrator to make the most of this opportunity and create magical pieces that can manifest themselves as memorable communications.

Advertising
Poster for Vodafone India
Advertising
Poster for Vodafone India
Advertising
Poster for Vodafone India

If the Idea is the Soul of Any Work Then Illustration is the Body.

It is common belief that it’s tough for a fresh college graduate to walk in with a portfolio and land into advertising directly. Common notions are that one needs ‘contacts’ and ‘references’. That’s not true. A good portfolio is the key into this exciting world, provided that the work contains not only cool designs and illustrations, but strong and unique ideas behind them as well. Once you make your way in, the world is yours. And for an illustrator, it’s a very exciting place. There is a bit of illustration in everything you create, whether it’s a logo design, typography, calligraphy or even a photo shoot.

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Poster for Vodafone India
Advertising
Poster for Vodafone India
Advertising
Poster for Vodafone India
Advertising

Love Problems More Than Solutions.

Pablo Picasso once said, “God is really only another artist. He invented the giraffe, the elephant and the cat. He has no real style, He just goes on trying other things”. Once a new style is cracked, the job is done. Then it’s all about moving on to explore something new. It’s important to go for the best style that suits the brief rather than retro fitting what you are good at. It also depends on the brief, if the best solution is a minimal vector graphic then why waste energy and time in creating intricate miniature art?

Poster for Vodafone India
Poster for Vodafone India
Dancer Meets Potter, Dancer Meets Puppet. Surajkund Mela theme is used to invite people on behalf of Vodafone using vivid and vibrant illustrations.

Do the Doodle.

Whatever is the result, it all starts with a doodle. Never sit on the computer directly. It is always better to think, let your subconscious work on the problem then transfer your thoughts into paper and use that doodle as a building block. Remember that even though we’ve got incredible programs and software at our disposal, they can’t do the thinking; they cannot generate ideas. Surrounding yourself with interesting and creative things can help inspire. Whether it’s things you collect from your travels or simply dig deep into the rich Indian culture, design and artistic forms are all around us.

The Elves and the Shoemaker, Santa’s Gift and Wicked Harry.

What’s Stopping You?

Short deadlines, overnight work, client’s not so friendly feedback and budget issues are few things that, sometimes, stop us in doing great work. But it ultimately depends on the kind of brand you’re working with. There are clients like Vodafone who love illustrations and there are other clients who are more focused on photo shoots or stock images. Can you imagine Amul advertising without those funny illustrative ads? Once you figure out that illustration is the best answer to this brief then the real job starts to convince the client on the benefit of using illustration in that particular case. Illustration in advertising is very different from illustrations elsewhere. Here, every single line must serve a purpose and should add to that overall message.

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ORIYA, URDU, MALAYALAM. A campaign to promote the dying art of calligraphy.
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COUPLE. A print ad to show the ill effects of bad breath in a funny way.
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Illustration for Taxi Fabric

Published in Issue 24

Gone are the days when Illustrations would take a back seat. Now, they are becoming more proactive and are evolving the way we communicate. This time, Creative Gaga focuses on how the advertising world is opening its doors to this exciting form of design. Featuring renowned Illustrators like Chris Beatrice, Nasheet Shadani, Vijay Kumar, Gabriel Mareno and much more, this issue promises to leave no page unturned!

 

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