Curiosity enables us to question everything around us and lean into uncertainty with a positive approach. This self branding film by artist Eui Soo Lim showcases curiosity as an integral part of problem solving to find creative solutions.

Curiosity is the key to develop creative solutions. Albert Einstein once said, ‘I have no special talent. I am only passionately curious.’

Brief: The Source

‘Curiosity is the source of all my design process,’ explains artist Eui Soo Lim. As a self-branding film and a part of his graduate work at Visual Design & Art School, he designed ‘Curiosity’ to showcase the approach that is an integral part of problem-solving in a design for him.

 

Finding answers and the result of things that start with being curious are often unpredictable and are not confirmed. Although it could be frustrating, it is a valuable process that makes one approach problems from an unconfined, open mind to find the right solution.

Outcome: Beginning with unexpected results

And thus starts Curiosity Project. With a complex set-up representing various Q & A elements (Questions & Answers), the artist has further developed various attributes that showcase his approach – to repeatedly question, dig deep and persevere to find answers.

This design metaphorically gives us a glimpse of the artist’s mind by effectively portraying his approach to find solutions to problems by being curious.

As an alert pops up detecting a question, we see myriad of elements, of varied shapes and attributes gushing from a door. It is then that each of these elements passes various obstacles and tests, where many either disintegrate or fail in the search for answers.

 

However, slowly, an unexpected element finally finds its way to the question and turns out to be the solution.

Results:

Using Cinema 4D, After Effect and Premiere, the artist’s portrayal of his curious mind in ‘Curiocity’ to synthesise ideas and seek answers is effective.

Curiosity as a behaviour and emotion is attributed as the driving force behind human development. It is the building block to develop innovative and creative solutions.

Planning to venture into the world of motion graphics? Great, now as you take the plunge to explore it in the depth of the different areas of the graphics world, which will help you to stretch your imagination. But the more you explore the more you feel that it may require a lifetime to experiment and learn. So here we, listed out some the essential tools to start from.

When you start your journey of becoming a motion graphic designer you will encounter numerous programs. You not only need a great artistic eye as a motion designer but also need to master some of these tools. Though every tool has its own importance, when using these tools, please remember they only add value to your artistic wisdom.

Here Adaar has summed up the essential tools that may help you add value to your creativity.


1. Adobe Photoshop

A very useful and must know tool for any motion graphics designer when it comes to things like create textures, design boards, image manipulation etc. Expertise in Photoshop can help you create great designs elements for your motion graphic projects.


2. Adobe Illustrator

It’s a vector based software with an array of useful tools for motion graphics, which help you create great motion graphics design vector elements such as logos, shape objects, and vector background. Also, Illustrator files can very easily be imported into After Effects for animation, without losing quality.


3. Cinema 4D

One of the most popular 3D modelling, animation and motion graphic software which gives creative professionals the tools needed to create stunning 3D graphics. This will take your skill-set to the next level. All the tool in Cinema 4D helps you to enhance your 3D modelling, animation, and rendering. It is very flexible while integrating into After Effects.

There are other 3D programs like Maya or Max 3Ds, but when it comes to creating outstanding motion graphics Cinema 4D is the best. It allows you to render out higher-quality 3D visuals through its popular third-party render engines – Octane, Redshift, V-Ray, etc. To make a place for yourself in the motion graphics world, you have to be well-versed in Cinema 4D.


4. After Effects

Generally known as AE is an extension that helps carry motion graphics. After Effects is one of the most important tools one must learn while stepping into motion graphics world. It can provide you with high-quality customised visual effects and also help you to create & control great motion graphic works. Strong knowledge of AE will help you to make captivating visual effects for 2D and 3D animation, compositing, motion tracking, object removal, simulation effects, template creation and much more.

After Effects is flexible in integrating with 3D applications like 3D max Maya and Cinema 4D etc. Besides, there are so many built-in plug-ins and third-party plug-ins that let you play with interesting special effects.


5. Special Effects Tools

You can further raise the level of your motion graphics projects by applying many of the custom special effects tools like X-particle, Real Flow etc. for special effects like particles, water, smoke, fire and a whole lot more.


 

These tools will definitely help you add value to your creativity. And from here onwards ‘Just keep learning and keep growing!’

Each illustration or work of design is a new process and a new insight. From the wide variety of design work that Creative Gaga feature each year, at the end of the year we take a moment to acknowledge all of them by highlighting top 10 featured Illustrators of 2017. Here we go.

Featured Illustrator - Nithin Rao Kumblekar

1. Nithin Rao Kumblekar

Nithin Rao Kumblekar is not only an illustrator but also an Art Director and Concept Artist who has illustrated for and brands such as OLX, Century Ply, and the likes, apart from having worked on a vast range of projects. In this assignment, conceived and executed for AVP, a pet food company catering to the likes of household dogs and cats. He represents a direct connection between these adored domestic companions and their very beloved treats, thus portraying the animals directly interacting with AVP in a fun, colourful and real-like animated setting.

More Project Illustrations are here


Featured Illustrator - Mukesh Singh

2. Mukesh Singh

Khyber Nights is a life-like and realistic story of survival, love and loss. Based on the unruly frontier surrounding the Khyber Pass during the Soviet war with Afghanistan in the late 80’s. This cover art for the intense tale was created by Marvel artist, Mukesh Singh, in an effort to summarise a gripping narrative that is about sisterhood and brotherhood winning over the politics of war. Using a strong sense of lighting and character expressions, he does indeed capture the tale in the frame.

Mukesh’s more illustrations are here


happiness-Lavanya Naidu

3. Lavanya Naidu

A graduate of the National Institute of Design, Lavanya Naidu is an Animator and Illustrator. Her style of work is a representation and expression of focusing on producing work that is personally challenging and cherished, rather than just going about creating ‘what is required as per the brief’. She uses a very fun and lively colour scheme that is both vibrant and subtle, very much like the characters, environments, settings, and characters she chooses to portray.

Featured Article:

Induce Happiness with Your Work!


Create Your Style

4. Bhaskar Rac

Bhaskar Rac is a self-employed Concept and 3D artist. A graduate of Delhi College of Art (Applied Art), he works extensively in character development, 3D sculpting, and the likes. As someone who trusts in honing one’s own style, instead of trying to imitate fashionable cult or style, nurturing and developing refreshing ideas is his primary intention. Here, he simply starts off with initial sketches, further gathering all the related references, structuring, line drawings and then rendering. Likewise, he finds a balance between minimalism and amplification through colours, emotions, lines, contours and the likes in order to capture the main essence of the subject.


5. Anna Dittmann

Graduating from Savannah College of Art and Design in Georgia,  Anna Dittmann is a freelance digital illustrator who tries to evoke different emotions through her portraits. Here, using subtle facets with natural fundamentals, she manages to capture the emotions of the viewer, thus mainly tapping into and drawing their attention to it. Gaining insight and motivation from movement and raw shapes by blending nonfigurative conceptual and innate elements, she created this soothing piece through an amalgamation of fictional and realistic elements. Using pastels, watercolours, and oils here, she tries to capture an impulsiveness in the artwork.


Ancient Future

6. Omar Gilani

From Peshawar, Pakistan, Omar Gilani is a Double-Masters in Robotics from Washington DC and has an eye for discovering the modern in the ancient, something that is purely a matter of enhanced or evolved vision. And, so, his desire to renew the old and transform what is considered obsolete or irrelevant into the opposition stems from his work, ‘Desret Warrior Aunty’. He predominantly uses lighting to determine the initial composition of a piece. Importantly, dividing the canvas into simple black and white shapes to see if all the various aspects are harmonious helps him achieve the final piece which is full of colour and life-like vibrancy.


Siddhi Ranade - tale-telling

7. Siddhi Ranade

With a Commercial Arts from L. S. Raheja School of Arts, Mumbai, Siddhi Ranade trusts that geometry, colour and the subject are crucial features. As someone who feels that design needs to be time relevant in constantly modifying times, he pays attention to every tool that he uses in the making of his work. Over here, for example, geometry, pattern, and proportion in symmetry are not just advantageous but the very fundamentals. ‘Line’, for example, is the primary factor to achieve without any compromise. Colours finally add a mood to it in a more theatrical and impressive way that further dictates or overpowers the final piece.


8. Juan Casini

Juan Casini is a designer of multiple disciplines who experiments and works through various mediums. He trusts that ‘nature is art in its purest form’, and thus takes a lot of inspiration from it, thereby representing elements of nature through a lot of his designs. For example, over here, he tries to create a powerful and stimulating experience for the audience. In an effort to keep the level of expression rather intense, he goes on to add multiple layers of detail while experimenting with the colour palette. What that helps him achieve is that, no matter what the product is about, the eyes of the viewer can be positively held by the artwork.

Featured Article:

Living the Nomad life


9. Rohan Dahotre

Rohan Dahotre is an illustrator who feels strongly about nature and gains inspiration from the beauty of it. The core of his work lies in making the complexities of nature simple – for example, turning complex organic forms into simple shapes. Experimenting with pictures from the wild – mainly animals – and giving them a new visual representation and overall look, he tries to display the real beauty that resides within the amazing bounty of forest animals, all so that people learn to appreciate and better treat and respect them and their habitat.


Indian thelas

10. Ranganath Krishnamani

Ranganath Krishnamani is a designer specialising in Illustration, User Experience and Art Direction. This piece of artwork is a personal or self-initiated project through which he finds connection with his own origin in the south Indian city of Bangalore in Karnataka, India. Through the means of this series, he intends to portray some of the most interesting and intriguing selling-carts from across the Indian subcontinent. The basic idea stems from his nostalgic memories of him running out onto the street upon recognising the arrival of assorted carts and their bearings, something commonly found through most of India.

Passionate about sculpting human forms, Japanese artist, Nagato Iwasaki uses driftwood to create life-size human sculptures that are slightly creepy, yet beautiful.

Beauty of Human Sculptures

Imagine yourself in a horror movie, face-to-face with a zombie. Scary, isn’t it?

 

This nightmarish experience is probably what the humanoid sculptures by Nagato Iwasaki’s ‘Torso’ evoke at a glance.

Beauty of Human Sculptures
Beauty of Human Sculptures

However, slowly, a sense of mystery sets in as you begin to look at each of these sculptures, standing tall with a distinct personality. It is then, that you start observing the details and begin to see the beauty in these life-like human figures made completely out of driftwood.

Beauty of Human Sculptures
Beauty of Human Sculptures
Beauty of Human Sculptures

The warped wooden pieces are not bent, shaved or processed in any way. The talented artist uses wooden stakes to put the pieces together to create these stunning installations. Although faceless, these sculptures have indiscernible realism as individual pieces of wood, of varying shapes and sizes, fill the parts of the body naturally.

Beauty of Human Sculptures
Beauty of Human Sculptures

Every piece is built to stand on its own without support.

Placed in real-world environments, these sculptures appear to have a purpose of their own, silently still, yet being significant.

Beauty of Human Sculptures
Beauty of Human Sculptures
Beauty of Human Sculptures
Beauty of Human Sculptures

“Much like our own bodies will all one day rot away and return to the earth, so too will my pieces likely suffer a similar fate. Wood has that sort of "organic" appeal to it, and I believe that is why I was drawn to the concept of using driftwood to begin with,” explains Nagato Iwasaki.

Beauty of Human Sculptures
Beauty of Human Sculptures
Beauty of Human Sculptures
Beauty of Human Sculptures
Beauty of Human Sculptures

Rocket Science owned by Rajesh Thomas and Vidya Thomas takes us through the creative process involved in its diverse film-making, and introduces us to the changing trends and their impacts in today’s times.

CG. What determines the kind of projects you’ll take?

RS. We take up projects that carry a challenge or scope to come up with something new. It gets a bit boring to repeat stuff that we have already explored before.

CG. What is the most important thing you’ll try to achieve across the films you make?

RS. An unexpected visual or experience that hooks you to a film is what we try to achieve across the films we do. We try out various renditions of telling a story. We explore various techniques that can bring about a story in an all-new perspective. Be it live action, animation or mixed media, there is always a new way to use it – that is what takes the film to another level and makes it interesting to watch.

CG. For commercial animations, how do you meet or manifest the client’s expectations, or how do you instead convince them of what you’ve created?

RS. It’s got a little easier these days to convince the clients to take up a non-traditional route to achieve something unique as they are going through tough competition, and all of them want to stand out and look different in the crowd. We go about a very detailed treatment presentation that elaborates almost every aspect of the outcome so that the client is in a loop with the end results that may come with it. There are still some surprises in store for the client as stop-motion and mixed media cannot be elaborated to its exact outcome. However, it has mostly been pleasant surprises.

Film Creation - Rocket Science Labs
AJIO.COM Film

CG. How do you guys decide the direction of the film, in terms of colours, script, screenplay and other such fundamentals?

RS. We really work hard and put a lot of our energies in how to make the film stand out in the treatment stage. There is this gut feeling that lets us narrow down on the route we would like to take. Once we are happy with a certain route, we elaborate on the execution in detail. The route, in most cases, sets itself to the colour code and mood for the film. Almost nothing is left to chance, as far as pre-production is concerned. Though most of our works are experimental in nature, we go in for very detailed pre-production to anticipate all the challenges that may arise during the shoot and post, and try and solve it beforehand.

Film Creation - Rocket Science Labs
Taste INDIA on a plate” TVC for Kohinoor

CG. What kinds of results and processes feel most satisfying in the overall practice of creating an animation film?

RS. Every stage of animation is a really interesting process. We have the character in mind, which then slowly begins to take shape and come alive. Once everything is put together, and that idea in mind starts playing out in reality, it is a surreal experience.

CG. What are your views about the current animation scenario, and in which direction do you feel it is heading?

RS. We are still loaded with a chunk of overly emotional stories playing-out in safe live-action formats, but there is a change taking place, slowly but surely. Clients and agencies are on a lookout for directors and production houses that can take their story to the next level of execution. Animation and mix media alongside emerging technologies will play a huge role in the upcoming years.

CG. How important you see short-films has become for everyone in the times of Youtube and Facebook? And where do you see the trend taking us?

RS. The current trend on social media is completely content-driven. Though no one comments on the execution, but behind-the-scenes videos have as many, or sometimes more, views than the commercial itself. People want to know where the thought process began, and the technology used to make the film. This means that they are opening up to experimentations, and are enjoying films – that is radical in approach. It is an encouraging trend and great times for filmmakers.

Issue 40-Motion Graphics Special

Published in Issue 40

We all have favourite TV shows and we passionately discuss the stories and characters of it. But sometimes, we tend to ignore the channel and its branding. Now with many different channels to choose from, we are experiencing many new branding overhauls to grab the audience’s attention. In this issue, we focused on Motion Graphics design and people behind some awesome channel rebrandings.


If you are interested in moving design or animated content then this issue is a must-read for you!


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Matharoo Associates believe in clear emphasis on functionality, use of materials in their natural form and exercising restraint while designing a house or building. Their buildings are designed to unfold and reveal their secrets and meaning.

Matharoo Associates House
Curtain Door House with Wall of Light

1. The House With Balls

The 600 Sq-Yard weekend home for an aquarium owner comprises of four separate fish breeding tanks, an observatory which could double up as living space and a private sleeping area, all with provisions for biogas, rainwater collection for fishes and ETHE. On opening the house’s distinctive shutters, this linear space transforms completely into an infinite one, continuously mingling with and perpendicular to its original direction.

Matharoo Associates House
House with balls, Ahmedabad
Matharoo Associates House
House with balls, Ahmedabad

The house assumes a squat position and the curving wall to one side allows one to walk up the gentle slope on to the terrace running over the length of the house. Rainwater is harvested throughout the year to be used for the fish tanks and space made by this curving wall is used as a tank.

Matharoo Associates House
Prathama
Matharoo Associates House
Prathama

2. House with the Warped Court

The intention here was to use traditional design solutions, one of which is to center the spaces around a courtyard that provides a reclusive family area. The other was to use ‘Haveli’ inspired closed outer shell and hollow insides.

 

Irregular site lines act to generate a skewed wood form finished concrete box that encloses the house and provides a vision, climate, and noise buffer. These lines also help in making the best of the required margin space, engendering individuated clear and green spaces on all sides of the house enjoyed through the selective openings into these landscape gems.

Matharoo Associates House
Queen Mary’s High School

3. House with Wall of Light

The dwelling emulates the various facets of a diamond in several ways through the use of contrasting materials. The rough diamonds are represented by the concrete walls poured in stone casts and the polished ones are represented by the light emanating onyx wall.

Matharoo Associates House
Matharoo Associates Studio

One is opaque, the other transparent. One envelops the house and the other ties the house together. One absorbs, the other radiates. One is neutral, the other colourful. One is rough and the other is smooth.The core family and private areas are placed in a “black box” characterized by the use of Kadapa stone representing carbon, another avatar.

Matharoo Associates House
Patel Residence
Matharoo Associates House
House of Warped Court

One is opaque, the other transparent. One envelops the house and the other ties the house together. One absorbs, the other radiates. One is neutral, the other colourful. One is rough and the other is smooth.The core family and private areas are placed in a “black box” characterized by the use of Kadapa stone representing carbon, another avatar of the diamond. The base flooring is economical and common but robust kota stone as represents continuity and is set against the chic neutrality of travertine representing contemporary living.

Matharoo Associates House
India Pavilion

The three identical staircases are aligned to the three site angles converging near the entrance; one is placed on the floor, second on the wall and the third on the ceiling; signifying the illusionary world of diamonds.

Matharoo Associates House
Sand Stone and Water, house in Jodhpur

Published in Issue 01

With cover illustrations by Archan Nair, this issue brings inspiring Digital illustrations, Extreme Graffiti, expert’s insights on space design and many more!

 

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The changing times often call for channels to rediscover themselves and refresh their brand as a whole. Zee Cinema approached Dynamite Design to revamp its brand undergoing a total visual transformation at the commencement of a new era in cinema.

zee cinema rebranding
zee cinema rebranding

The Brief

With modernization, channels often strategize to rediscover and reposition themselves in the market through rebranding. A refreshed packaging involves renewing the logo to proposition a change that is synonymous with the content and the tagline adopted by the channel.

 

Zee Cinema, since its inception, has stood for three things: Movies, Masti and Magic. With the commencement of a new era in cinema, the brand decided to undergo a total visual transformation including a shift in brand focus – to dial up the Magic and Masti quotient in their brand promise. Thence the company approached Dynamite Design to re-assert their brand with a novel visual approach.

zee cinema rebranding
zee cinema rebranding

The Challenge

The major challenge here was to create a defining visual identity for Zee Cinema that was befitting with the brand’s overhauled roster of sister channels. As a movie channel, it was important to keep the visual identity true to the brand’s philosophy by encapsulating an idea true to the content delivered.

zee cinema rebranding

The Solution

Utilizing the concept of light and its movement to portray the channel as a portal, the design embodied the magic of light that leaks out of the film projector to create the charm of cinema in its logo. The rays of light designed in the logo emulate the shine and light leak of a film projector creating a sense of drama to visually connect the audience with the channel’s true identity. The same concept was taken forward for the channel idents with the alluring thaumatropes created through a series of stark visuals that conveyed masti and magic – the two core ingredients of Zee Cinema.

zee cinema rebranding
zee cinema rebranding

The Result

With the concept in place, the visual language was extended and interpreted throughout with a rich and vibrant colour palette for the on-air packaging in the studio environments. These designs seamlessly transcended for the off-branding as well.

zee cinema rebranding
zee cinema rebranding

True beauty is unaware. It’s raw and it’s free. It cannot explain itself, neither can be explained. It just exists. From this belief takes birth Eureka Alphonso’s project ‘Birds of Paradise’, a symbolic celebration of free-spiritedness, unworldliness and innocence of bird-humans.

Eureka Unaware Beauty
Timid Grace
Eureka Unaware Beauty
The White Queen
Eureka Unaware Beauty
Mohawk

Eureka’s characters are neither humans nor birds, but a species that is a mixture of the two. Each creature happens to have a face that reflects that part of us which is free, beautiful and unaware, all at the same time. Oblivious to their own beauty, protagonist’s expression is a glimpse of its personality, which in turn, is inspired by a bird. Like the Mohawk, inspired by a rooster, demonstrates the latter’s warrior-like qualities. The idea has been to capture the effortless beauty of the bird-creatures and contrast them with their innocently raw expressions. Because human beings are imprisoned in minds, birds are not.

Published in Issue 11

This issue also explored the Jewellery Design & Wedding Photography with some cool techniques to learn from experts in Gyaan section.

 

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Concept and 3D artist Bhaskar Rac, who’s been working extensively in character development, 3D sculpting and the likes, expresses how one can come up with and hone one’s own style, without needing to follow popular fads or trends.

Create Your Style
Turquoise
Create Your Style
The legend of Anarchy
Create Your Style
Untitled

Refreshing ideas is the intention.

The idea is the starting point; its nature, relevance, and quality come into play even before the stage of executing it through the medium. The intention is to bring freshness into the storytelling or characters.

 

To entertain people is quite a tricky task, and you have to have a fresh mindset to playfully bring something new to the table every time.

Create Your Style
Mandala
Create Your Style
The Maharaja
Create Your Style
The Gift

So, it’s always recommended to not just stick to any one style or idea for too long, as its magic starts to fade away after being over-repetitive.

 

The solution, thereby, is to not categorise oneself with a style or medium. When it comes to the major approach, it simply about has preliminary sketches from the brief, and collecting all the related references, structuring, line drawings and then rendering.

Create Your Style
One last bullet
Create Your Style
Create Your Style
Wicked Wazir

Striking the balance is of the essence.

Without expressions, figures are basically lifeless mannequins. So, it is always better to try and find a balance between simplicity and expressing with colours, feelings, emotions, lines, contours and the likes.

 

If everything is too saturated and complicated, the illustration starts to crumble. The old and prevalent idea is always to capture the main essence of the subject, and let loose off the other things in the background.

Create Your Style
Splinter Cell
Create Your Style
The Interrogation
Create Your Style
The Royal Guard

Colours, for instance, have their own importance in telling the difference between moods and temperature. At the same time, too many colours can be asking for too much attention, thus feeling overdone and confusing.

 

It doesn’t matter if one goes by the book, even when it comes to choosing colours if the process of drawing is dedicated to more attention and details. If the contrast or values are handled right, colours may not even be needed; it’s like expressing more with lesser words.

Create Your Style
Kolam
Create Your Style
Julius-Chopps

Do what matters.

The illusion of giving a good light takes the lion’s share in bringing the overall impact, whether it’s a simple line drawing or fully rendered artwork. Contrast and values are important to bring any photograph or illustration closer to its subject. If this fails, it’s hard to bring out what’s important against what’s in the background.

 

Depending on the composition, textures, surface material, shape or form of anything we are placing as a subject, there can’t be a simple preset to it. This has to have experimented at various levels.

Create Your Style
Kintsugi
Create Your Style
Crystals

There has to be a streamlined and thorough process to creating anything, else the result might be too chaotic in nature. The refreshing part of this industry, to succeed, no one has to copy others. Draw a lot; learn fundamentals; stay open to new techniques and technology, and keep experimenting.

Create Your Style
The Borrower
Create Your Style
The Rational Exorcist

Published in Issue 39

As the festivity is all around, every brand or business is trying to impress the Indian audience. But what really works for us Indians? What is an Indian design? And how we can make designs for India?

To understand it, we interviewed some Indian creatives who are successfully creating designs for the Indian audience. We support keeping ourselves connected with Indian cultures, languages, history, aspirations and more, will help find the Indian context in everything we create. This issue of Creative Gaga is a light read for someone looking for inspirations or insights on Indian design and how the Indian audience can be enticed. So go ahead and order your copy or subscribe if you want to keep receiving a regular dose of inspirations!

 

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Nature is blessed with a wonderful variety of things and one that captures the eyes of many are the animals. Created in various forms and having unique patterns, Richard Field, illustrates them in his own style using worldwide cultural influences. He elaborates on his nature inspired designs.

inspired
The Dark Owl.
inspired
The Travelling Turtle.

CG: What is the story behind what you do? How did you discover your talent and how did you work towards making it more than that? What were your inspirations? What were some challenges you had to overcome?

RF: Field-inspired, a play on the words ‘feel inspired’, is my name as an Illustrator. Having been inspired by so many things, it’s nice to do some inspiring of my own. My collection started when I was trying to make a bit of extra cash selling flash sheets to tattoo parlors around South London. Tattooists are always on the look out for new artwork to display in their shops. I used to work on black and white illustrations inspired by a variety of cultures around the world. My Native American, Mãori and folk art inspired illustrations caught the eye of a few people on Facebook and I decided to start adding colours and working on a new collection inspired by some of the nature’s most iconic animals.

inspired
The Bull.
inspired
The Stag Prince.

CG: Animals play a central role in your designs. Can you throw some more light as to why? How did you find inspiration in animals and their patterns?

RF: Isn’t wildlife the most wonderful thing we have on this planet? I’ve definitely chosen the best subject to illustrate. The shapes and patterns that it forms never cease to amaze me. It’s a great achievement to be able to put your own stamp on animals we see so often. I enjoy trying to add a bit of personality to them – the ‘Wise’ Lion or the ‘Truthful’ tiger. Nature is full of so much hidden beauty, the idea is to try to encourage people to take a closer look at the artwork and look beyond to read the halftones and patterns.

inspired
African Buffalo.
inspired
The Mountain Ram.

CG: Your designs have a striking contrast against black, creating an illuminated look and feel. How does that enhance the design?

RF: In my current collection, I work on black using a similar colour theme across all prints. By using strong, bold colours on black I hope to encourage the user to look closer at the detail. It’s not easy working on black, sometimes the colours can get a bit lost during the printing process – but I love the end result. Hopefully, people like how the artwork jumps off the canvas.

inspired
The African Elephant.
inspired
The Truthful Tiger.

Published in Issue 28

This Illustration Special is best to know why and how illustration as a popular medium is taking the design world by storm! From evolution of illustrations to its place in the world today, renowned designers and illustrators like Abhishek Singh, Mukesh Singh, Archan Nair, Alicia Souza, Raj Khatri with some international talent such as Fil Dunsky from Russia, Iain Macarthur and Richard Field from UK, who live and breathe illustration, would be the right people to gain some insight from. With many more talents to explore with great insights and excellent techniques, again a fully packed issue is waiting to amaze you!

 

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