1

Ad here

Body form is a work of art in itself. Its design is like no other creation on Earth. Fascinated by this at a young age, Commercial Photographer Sanket Sanjay Khuntale decided to capture nude body forms depicting each zodiac sign in his final year photography project ‘Nudiacs’. He uses the concept of nudity that has been explored by painters and fashion designers since time immemorial, to capture it in a unique manner.

Art
Aries
Art
Cancer

Nude doesn’t have to mean Erotic

When working with nude subjects, it is very important to understand the purpose of the idea. Because the idea was to depict human nature through human body forms; the concept demanded nude body forms to be displayed elegantly rather than sexually. For those who understand fine art, they know it is primarily concerned with the aesthetic quality and creativity of the subject and where any erotic interest, although often present, is secondary in nude painting and photos.

Art
Virgo
Art
Libra

This distinguishes pornographic photography which has a primary purpose of sexually arousing the viewer and glamour photography which focuses the subject photographed in the most attractive way. In ‘Nudiacs’ it was always important to bear in mind that sexuality, although very subtle, was not dominant at any point.

Art
Scorpio
Art
Capricorn

The biggest challenge of Nude Photography is being comfortable with it

It’s tough to shed off all inhibitions, stand in front of a group of people and pose. In order to make the model comfortable with the job, the person behind the camera needs to be most comfortable. ‘Nudiacs’ being the first attempt at shooting nude, this clearly was a big challenge. Working up to the shoot was also challenging enough. For one day of shoot, it took up to three month to prepare, wherein Sanket pose in front of the mirror, experimenting with body forms and sketching down the shapes and contours of each zodiac sign that best represented it.

Art
Aquarius
Art
Pisces

Execution breathes life into an Idea

The style of lighting and overall look of the images was important to highlight and convey the concept. Of course, the shape, contours and postures were important, but figuring out how to emphasize those features was necessary as well. Lighting the subject from behind helped in highlighting the edges, that in turn made the frame look like a low key picture. Lighting makes all the difference when it comes to creating drama and intensity in the final outcome.

Art

Published in Issue 22

This issue is dedicated to the talented design graduates who are not just looking to work but seeking experience in order to realise the greater goal of life. The issue features various designers from India and abroad. Kevin Roodhorst from The Netherlands realised his goal so early in life that propelled him to start his career as a designer as young as 13. To name a few talents we have Vivek Nag from Fine Arts from Rachna Sansad Mumbai, Simran Nanda from Pearl Academy New Delhi, Anisha Raj from MAEER MIT Institute of Design Pune, Giby Joseph from Animation and Art School Goa and many more. This issue gives a fresh perspective of talented graduates and their unique approach to design.

Order Your Copy!
CURRENT ISSUE
Creative Gaga - Issue 48
Widget Image

 

Ad Here

Character designer, illustrator and storyboard artist, Ritaban Das, takes s through his own style of telling stories through illustrations in a single frame style of designing. He introduces his perspective that guides his ideas and also shares his process.

Single Frame
Mummy ka Scratcher
Single Frame
Team Dank. Personal work depicting a rather artistic team spirit.
Single Frame
Sketching with friends. Personal work showing aliens as company while sketching.
Single Frame
Kung Fu Singh
Single Frame
Together. Just a piece of commissioned work for my friend, depicting the funny side of companionship.

CG. What are the particular advantages and challenges of telling stories in a single frame?

Ritaban. Illustration or design is a visual communication medium. It is important to challenge yourself with a different perspective, scale and how your subjects interact with one another. When sketching, I produce numerous roughs or loose drawings which later make into more developed sketches. I then decide on a final composition. The most critical element is really an activity of the subject. The figure is usually doing something and caught before it happens or just after. The other elements are supporting artefacts. Whatever I draw, I think of it as a clue or a breadcrumb that helps understand the complete story and message. It’s up to the reader to put it all together and solve the riddle

Single Frame
Indian Warrior. For a monthly Facebook character design challenge. The topic was "Warrior".
Soccer Dad

Single Frame
Clown. Personal work, inspired by Eli Roth's film of same name.
Single Frame
Two Detectives cover artwork. For the unfinished graphic novel I was working upon with my brother.

CG. What are the essential designing tools and software you use for such an approach and how do you decide on what kind of a role they play in your work?

Ritaban. I usually make the design part in Photoshop, from scratch to end, and I work in Storyboard pro for storyboard. Tools can make your work easy or even open the avenues to do it faster, but it’s based on how good your design sense, storytelling abilities and drawings are. These are the most basic fundamentals to create anything.

Merry Christmas. Old commissioned work created during the Christmas season.
Two Detectives. A promotional poster for the unfinished graphic novel I was creating with my brother.

Komorebi Poster
Single Frame
YUWA. For Art Exhibition last year, collaborating with the NGO Yuwa that empowers young girls,.

CG. What aspects do you particularly give attention to in your work to ensure effective communication through your illustrations?

Ritaban. I start by trying to understand the character, his/her background, history as well as his/her place in the story. Research helps at this stage since it’s so important to understand the world you’re creating before jumping into it Next, I’ll do a series of drawings where I figure out the characters shapes and attitude; I try to just draw the first thing that comes to mind, knowing that I’ll be changing it later. All the while, I’m searching for a new or interesting take on the character. After I’ve done a few rough thumbnails, I decide on the one that has the most appealing silhouette, shape proportions and that best describes the character. I then start to flesh out the character and begin to add details, keeping in mind any specific traits described in the script or story.

Single Frame
A promotional fan poster for the most anticipated boxing match in the history between McGregor and Mayweather.
Heavy Dudes

Single Frame
Odd Socialites # 1. The first installment of a small comic strip project with my writer friend.
Single Frame
Red Necks. Personal work showing the not so friendly folk in town.

CG. How do you describe your process and goal of designing?

Ritaban. Being a Character Designer and Illustrator, most of my work is very much character driven, blended with humour and very graphical too. I always try to convey some sort of stories through each and every character or Illustration I make I like to play with various shapes and silhouettes and usually keep things simple. The character design process is, in a way, a combination of different things. I ask myself ‘Who am I drawing?’ What is his/her personality?’ I look at the work of influential artist sometimes to get some ideas or even start from a drawing I like and translate it into my style. Then, trying to forget those influences, I often start from scratch with a basic shape such as the face as it determines the rest of the character for me, then the body (this can be a circle, oval or even a pear shape – it all depends on the personality of the character I want to draw)

Single Frame
Battle of the Beasts. UFC 223 fan poster for the main fight between Ferguson and Khabib.
Single Frame
Inked! Personal work depicting a tattoo artist working his craft on the devil.
The Anarchist
Scary guy with skill
Issue-42-Cover

Published in Issue 42

Every designer wish to be independent and willing to jump into the word of freelance but most of them unaware of the fundamental challenges of the initial phase. So, we dedicated this issue to freelancers and interviewed some established and talented designers to dig deep for the expert advice. Kevin Roodhorst on the other hand, an experienced freelancer from Amsterdam, has recently shifted to be a full-timer with an Agency says “Freelancing is not all roses!” and shared the best way to survive as a freelancer! So, whether you are a freelancer or planning to be one, this issue is a must-read. Go ahead and order your copy here or subscribe to not miss any future issues!

 

Order Your Copy!
CURRENT ISSUE
Creative Gaga - Issue 48
Widget Image

 

Ad here

Gone are the days of drawing a portrait using pencils and brushes. Digital is the new canvas and Photoshop is the new tool. Digital Illustrator, Vivek Nag is fascinated by ‘Sadhus’ and here he takes us through the making of a portrait using Photoshop.

Portrait

Step 01

The first step is to make a rough patchy sketch of the character. It’s best to do this using a chalk brush or special Photoshop brushes which are meant to replicate a traditional look on the digital canvas. The lines mostly trace the shadows and/or contours of the face as seen in the image.

Portrait

Step 02

Taking the rough sketch as the base, the next step is to start making line art. This is made using the pressure sensitive round hard brush to create thin and to the point lines. Detailing is important in this step. Building upon the rough chalky sketch is beneficial. When satisfied, hide the sketch layer to proceed.

Portrait

Step 03

The next step is to start with the colours. Irrespective of the colours being used in the portrait, it’s best to dim down the background. This offers contrast and a better understanding of how bright the colours that are being used in the painting actually are. The next step is to make a palette of colours using the original image. Depending on the intricacy of colors in a photograph, it’s advisable to make a palette of 5 to 8 colors. In this case, a palette of six colours was used. It’s best to select colours in such a way that for any other shade or tint you require, one’s ability to create that using a combination of the set colours in the palette. As seen above, start filling the composition with patchwork. Using flats helps launch into the fray of the painting.

Portrait

Step 04

Taking the previous step forward, it’s now all about concentrating on detailing. Smaller brush strokes are employed as well as the colours being used are more varied. Notice how the freedoms of the strokes have become a little more restricted here. The line art acts as guiding points and this is the stage where it is put to most use.

Portrait

Step 05

Minute details start from here. The eyes are the most important part of a portrait. A lot can be conveyed from the eyes. For the most natural look, one needs to make the eyes detailed and relatable. The blending of the strokes also starts from this step. As is evident in the image, a certain level of ‘rawness’ is maintained with every stroke rather than applying a smooth blend. Keeping hints of patches provides a natural feel, especially on the skin. Also, one needs to keep the sheen of the eye in mind that is executed with a simple brush stroke, keeping minimal blending. The more striking the sheen, the better the eye tends to look.

Depending on the intricacy of colours in a photograph, it’s advisable to make a palette of 5 to 8 colours while performing a digital sketch.

Portrait

Step 06

The next step is replicating the previous steps with the lips and beard. Here, treat lips the same way skin near the eyes was treated. The beard however forms a rather tricky part of the portrait. The beard is mainly just brushed strokes with hardly any blending at all. The direction and the thickness of each stroke matters. For example, the brushes below the lip and at the origin of the beard are thick, whereas the strokes in the beard are rather fine.

Portrait

Step 07

The prior two steps are repeated on the remaining parts of face. The sides of the face are left undone because it will add on to the next steps. There are still many strokes on the face which are strongly patchy and look undone. However, this adds to the composition. The parts of any illustration with the most amount of detail and/or contrast attracts attention first; in this case, the eyes.

Portrait

Step 08

Once the face is done, this is where one needs to start working on the background. Against the already set dull gray background, start putting horizontal strokes with fine art brushes. The colours used are part of the portrait itself – reds, yellows and whites. This enables the background to compliment the main subject of the painting and establishes a flow to the composition. But also remember not to steal the focus from the subject by using colors that are too vibrant.

Portrait

Step 09

This step is called ‘The Haze’. This is where the focal points and edges are merged into the background. For example, the yellow ochre on the forehead is transformed into a form of smoke (haze) which drifts away from the head. This is still done using fine art brushes. Along with that, more horizontal strokes have been pulled around the beard and hair. These strokes are pulled in about 30% opacity and serve to blend the edges till the background looks like a part of the subject itself.

Portrait

Step 10

The last and final step is to add a layer mask. This is where curves are applied to the artwork. This is where contrast is also added to the painting. This helps the shades to pop out and there is a lot more depth than there was before.

Published in Issue 22

This issue is dedicated to the talented design graduates who are not just looking to work but seeking experience in order to realise the greater goal of life. The issue features various designers from India and abroad. Kevin Roodhorst from The Netherlands realised his goal so early in life that propelled him to start his career as a designer as young as 13. To name a few talents we have Vivek Nag from Fine Arts from Rachna Sansad Mumbai, Simran Nanda from Pearl Academy New Delhi, Anisha Raj from MAEER MIT Institute of Design Pune, Giby Joseph from Animation and Art School Goa and many more. This issue gives a fresh perspective of talented graduates and their unique approach to design.

Order Your Copy!
CURRENT ISSUE
Creative Gaga - Issue 48
Widget Image

 

Ad Here

Rohan Dahotre is an illustrator wanting to make a difference. One who feels deeply about nature and draws inspiration from the stunning bounty of life it nourishes, he aims to convey and express the magnificence of the natural world!

Furry Friend
Natural
Frog

Rohan had already made it a ‘habit’ to add detail to his depictions, by the time he’d started drawing out his favourite cartoon characters as a kid. He was always fond of textures and patterns, incorporating them in his artwork, which only grew to contain more design elements.

Tribal Queen
Natural
Crow

A keen observer who loves exploring the wilderness, he enjoys illustrating all things wild. For him, nature is full of inspirations, and is the ultimate form of creative expression – be it various life forms; textures in leaves; designs and colours in bugs and insects, or the elegance in tigers and other wild cats. Undoubtedly, it endows him with insight, as studying the intricacies in nature and understanding animal behaviour is what he likes most.

Mister Rhino

Natural

The crux lies in simplifying complex organic forms into simple shapes, even though adding patterns inside them gives them a new identity. Experimenting with animal photos and giving them a new look and feel, he yearns to demonstrate the true beauty within the amazing creatures, so that people may better respect them and their habitat.

Natural

Published in Issue 34

This is a rebranding special issue focused on finding the answers to some of the basic questions like what is the right time for re-branding? or what all needs changing and how exactly? We interviewed some of the best branding studios like Landor Mumbai, Elephant, VGC, Inchwork, and many more. If you are considering rebranding or want to learn more about the art of doing it then this issue is a must read. So, go ahead!

 

Order Your Copy!
CURRENT ISSUE
Creative Gaga - Issue 48
Widget Image

 

Ad Here

The everyday living need not necessarily be mundane, tedious or ‘routine’. When one’s very own personal dwelling is beyond the ordinary, life can definitely be more than cyclical and monotonous. Located in Danube, right in the heart of Budapest, Margeza is one such apartment that is full of life and brilliance, built by Belgian couple’s Margeza Design Studio that designs and builds ‘liveable’ spaces as a joyful, creative process.

Budapest - Margeza Design Studio
Budapest - Margeza Design Studio
Photo by Áron Erdőháti

Margeza Design Studio’s unique apartment SZABO ILONKA UTCA in Danube, Budapest, has the notorious capacity to pleasingly charm not just those who are living under its roof, but also the viewers admiring it from outside, as it employs the sheer power of its very charismatic nature, vibrancy and flamboyant character.

Budapest - Margeza Design Studio
Photo by Áron Erdőháti
Budapest - Margeza Design Studio
Photo by Áron Erdőháti
Budapest - Margeza Design Studio
Photo by Áron Erdőháti

The living space is more than just a fitting abode of interiors that is soothing to the eye and the mind, and so also does it serve as a deserving platform to some of the most extraordinary sights in the city—something that it harbours in abundance, amongst the rather vast bounty of treats that it has in store to generously offer its residents. As if that wasn’t enough, one also gets more than just a taste of the icing on the cake — a rather clear view of one of the most beautiful buildings, the architectural spectacle of the Parliament.

Budapest - Margeza Design Studio
Photo by Áron Erdőháti
Budapest - Margeza Design Studio
Photo by Áron Erdőháti
Budapest - Margeza Design Studio
Photo by Áron Erdőháti

Following a complete and thorough renovation, the place was made to be special with unique furniture and carpets that were designed specifically keeping the apartment in mind. The tiniest of aspects were acknowledged and paid attention to, leaving nothing behind while addressing each and every nook and corner, including the most minute of details. Testimony to this would prove to be the ‘living green wall’, a feature that is symbolic of the apartment’s liveliness and zest.

Budapest - Margeza Design Studio
Photo by Áron Erdőháti
Photo by Áron Erdőháti
Budapest - Margeza Design Studio
Photo by Áron Erdőháti
Budapest - Margeza Design Studio
Photo by Áron Erdőháti

Very naturally, the characteristics of Margeza can be found everywhere: joyful, energy-filled colours that provide or create an atmosphere of happiness. On the Budapest-shaped carpet, a small red dot shows the location of the apartment, while the giant window of the living room—like an open cinema—shows the ever-changing face of the city. Likewise, the entire apartment is flooded with light. Featuring a living room; two bedrooms and an additional study, the apartment is 110 sqm (1,184 sq ft) on two levels. Yet, if one yearns for or desires going into unbounded space, one can go on to the terrace and glance away at the boats serenely sailing on the Danube. From the limited to the unlimited, Margeza has it all.

Budapest - Margeza Design Studio
Photo by Áron Erdőháti
Budapest - Margeza Design Studio
Photo by Áron Erdőháti
Budapest - Margeza Design Studio
Photo by Áron Erdőháti
CURRENT ISSUE
Creative Gaga - Issue 48
Widget Image

 

Ad Here

Changing jobs and switching fields never let Zigor Samaniego’s love for art die. It instead inspired him and gave him the strength to follow his passion and go ahead with what he really wanted to pursue in his life.

Just be Inspired to Work and Happy at Heart

Being successful and achieving what he has today has not been an easy ride for Zigor Samaniego. Experienced much, from having tasted editing of videos in a post-production company and working in the stream of info architecture to designing websites and being employed by a video game company, Zigor was neither inspired to work nor was happy at heart.

Just be Inspired to Work and Happy at Heart

He then took to freelancing as an artist and an illustrator which got him illustrating for some of the highly reputed brands like American Express, Nestle, Wired and their likes.

Though some of these opportunities gave him the chance to explore the world of 3D design and drawing, he still wanted his artistic freedom to let his creative mind and thoughts pour out of his imaginative brain in the way he wanted them to.

Inspired

Transforming Imagination to Impressions!

Zigor has always had multiple crazy ideas occupying his mind and conveying the same to his viewers’ works as his biggest motivation and inspiration. For this, he found 3D as the best possible way to express his thoughts and to give life to his imagination.

Though he plots the drawing from his mind, his artwork, from scratch to finish, is entirely digital inspired. Gone are those days when he would use the traditional tools of pen, paper and ink to unleash his creativity.

Inspired

Follow Your Own Style!

Comfortable and confident about his own style of working, he accepts requests and designs characters only which have the possibility to be designed in his way. It is a moment of pride for him when clients, amazed by his portfolio, call to hire him for their work to be delivered in his style. His style is defined by the cute appearance of his characters, merged with a slight amount of humour and fun, aimed at bringing a smile to the viewer’s face. Sometimes not knowing what to draw works best for him as the ideas develop alongside his doodling.

Nature, a Trigger For Art!

He credits his inspiration, innovativeness and ingenuity partly to nature and partly to his crazy thoughts. A nature-lover and enthusiastic about outdoor activities, he is influenced by the things he sees around him and sometimes draws inspirations for his characters and art work while trekking up a mountain.

Tips From the Master!

Enlightening the young ones with certain tips and tricks, he emphasises on the fact that having ones’ own style is a very important thing. In addition to this, the quality of the portfolio plays a very crucial and significant role in a creative’s life.

It is essential that the artist should remain faithful to his tastes and be very careful with the toxic customers wanting to change their style.

Inspired

Published in Issue 43

With the changing weather comes the season of Interns, with fresh new energy everywhere and your talented creatives wanting to test their skills and knowledge in the real world of live creative briefs and super creative professional environment.
This issue is a must-read for internees and fresh talents. Go ahead and order your copy here or subscribe to not miss any future issues!

 

Order Your Copy!

CURRENT ISSUE
Creative Gaga - Issue 48
Widget Image

 

Consistency is imperative while creating a series. This can be achieved through the use of line style, tone, colour palette, a specific art form, etc. Here is an illustrations series created for The Lily News by Ana Duje, an Argentinean graphic designer and illustrator who currently works between Hong Kong and Barcelona. What makes this unique is the minimalistic art style, the starkness of the white lines and bright pop of colours against the pitch black background.

 

Connect Here

 

Illustrations
Illustrations
Illustrations
Illustrations
Illustrations
Illustrations
Illustrations
Illustrations

Ad Here

Mimicking nature is no small task, especially when it involves a moody and constantly swinging factor such as the weather. Yet, watercolour artist from Pondicherry, Nadeesh Prabou, attempts to bring to life nature’s aspects in the most realistic representations possible, through his watercolour paintings of different weather situations

weather
Rainy Day. A typical scenario of a small town going about on a rainy day, achieved by using the ‘Spreading’ method
Summer Street. Warm colours used to highlight the hot summer effect, in effort to portray a sunny day in a small town

Inspiration Shapes Gives Flow to One’s Work.

Inspiration is important, and being inspired is what gives direction to not only your chosen style of art but also the way you actually conceive it during execution; unfold it on the canvas, and finally manifest it as a whole.

 

Likewise, the weather has always inspired Nadees Prabou, ever since his childhood. He’s always admired the varying force and power of nature, and the impact it has on the surroundings, including the lives of beings (be it trees, animals or people) that are subject to it. An example of this being evident would be factors such as the strong force of the wind, and the dampness everywhere around, portrayed in his paintings that depict the monsoon time.