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Basic colours and shapes, when used in the right rhythm, can change our perspective about the things we see around us every day. Rahul Khobragade has taken this approach to depict the birds of nature, to showcase the beauty and elegance that we miss out on!

Capturing Elegance of Birds
Basic Shapes Colours 1- Creative Gaga

Singularly inspired by nature, Rahul Khobragade’s illustrations are a true extraction of it. The use of ideas, shapes, colours and styles are all deduced from nature.

 

With a desire to always present his viewers with fresh and vibrant work, he prefers to use gradient art and abstract vectors.

Basic Shapes Colours 4- Creative Gaga
Basic Shapes olours 8- Creative Gaga

A bird lover, Rahul created a series of illustrations on birds and their beauty, aiming to explore each bird’s unique and independent identity.

 

With an intention to portray the common birds that we see around us every day from a new perspective, he made an attempt to explore this particular series using basic shapes and overlapping multi-layer style.

Basic Shapes olours 6- Creative Gaga

To bring out the quirkiness and the dynamic traits of each bird, he used a style of simple gradients merged with low patches. The use of bright, dazzling happy colours, in addition to the mentioned techniques helped him define an over-all language for the bird series, yet giving every illustration a distinctive appearance and bringing out the beauty and charm of each these specific birds.

Basic Shapes Colours 5- Creative Gaga
The Intern Special! - Creative gaga

Published in Issue 43

With the changing weather comes the season of Interns, with fresh new energy everywhere and your talented creatives wanting to test their skills and knowledge in the real world of live creative briefs and super creative professional environment.
This issue is a must-read for internees and fresh talents. Go ahead and order your copy here or subscribe to not miss any future issues!

 

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Illustrator, Priyanka Karyekar, run us through the concept-based approach she takes to her work, and how that guides her process of designing her illustrations – right from observing to developing a strong concept, on until treatment and finally communicating effectively.

To all the Mothers out there who always eat at the end
Concept
Lucky Friend
Illustrated Mood
Concept
Weekend Swag

No Substitute For A Concept.

One must rather believe in having a strong concept. Treatment can be varied – for example, the colours that are used across artworks can very well be inspired by the subjects and personalities of the concepts. One might want to focus more on the big idea rather than the treatments and beautifying the elements. If you have a strong idea in your hand, you will eventually find a way to make it look good. The need is to be more simple yet effective. Likewise, quirkiness need not and may not always a part of the illustrations.

Concept
What I Ate For Dinner
Concept
Fri-yay
Concept
Black Chicken
Aam Life

There are certain subjects that may be serious, but you want to make it more fun to get the whole serious tone out – it entirely depends on what exactly you want to communicate. In the same way, do not really look to maintain symmetry and proportion in compositions, if that suits one’s temperament, style and approach. For example, in some of the illustrations, there is no symmetry that is trying to be achieved – it’s just the way of drawing;, not force-fitting any rules while one is drawing.

Concept
Work Life
Future Feminism

Concept
Happy 9 Years
Concept
Chai Therapy

Treatment Varies From Subject To Subject.

It can be very simple and minimalistic, or it can have those tiny details that add value to your subject. Adding minor details are actually the observations that you are trying to put into your design, which is also a great way to make your design truly relevant. People, their stories, and events happening around are what mostly inspire any form of artwork, directly or indirectly. All one has to do is observe; that’s all it takes – a keen sense of observation. The stories that you are trying to communicate through visuals, one must recognise, the need of strong colour systems as well – colours that decide the mood of the illustration.

Concept
Batatyachi Chal
Concept
Batatyachi Chal
Concept

To Truly Evolve Our Craft Is The Way Forward.

If artists and designers of all forms focus on the 3H’s (Head, Heart and Hands), their work will positively impact and take forward the process and future results of the field – that would be true evolution. The ‘Head’ stands for the ideation. The ‘Heart’ is for being empathetic towards the people you are working for. Then, lastly, all you need is skilful ‘Hands’ to execute that big idea that is visually appetising. That is the core of achieving what is desired. If these three things can be ensured in the years to come, then the creative communication can not only take a big step forward but can make a giant leap instead, especially with the kind of technology that is available to us today.

Welcome 2019
Concept
Me
Concept
Cute Monsters

Published in Issue 41

Every year brings many opportunities and hopes along with celebrations. For this issue, we reached many visual artists and designers to know their expectations from the year 2018. This issue’s cover designer, Shreya Gulati is exceptionally impressed by the advancement of technology in design, especially how VR & AR has impacted new ways of creating. Honing and sharpening one’s skills is always a quest for every creative. So, whether you have many or none expectations for the year, this issue is a must-read. Go ahead and order your copy here or subscribe to not miss any future issues!

 

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If it was only about needs, everyone would be sitting in similar chairs and drinking coffee and wine in the similar glasses. Desires are just as important. And to make these two meet, a product needs to be balanced, following a rational process. Product design studio, ‘Design Gandhi’, founded by Hardik Gandhi, lists down eight basic elements whose combination ensures people are wooed by its beauty and surprised by its functionality.

DOT Steel Wardrobe
VIBE Single Bed

1. Define, derive, delight

That’s the process a product designer should follow to arrive at richly thought out designs and products that are just as ingenious as resourceful. Once you have thought of the idea, the next thing is to figure out how to manifest it. That requires a good understanding of material properties and their behavior in various contexts. What you have in the end is a tangible token of what used to be only an idea, something that makes the user smile and feel special.

Product Design
D MUG. Inspired from how one holds the coffee mug naturally.
Float
Product Design
Knowledge Tree. Modified bookshelf that stores books in angles.

2. Keep it less to achieve more

In today’s cluttered and busy life, minimal designs can surely stand out. It’s important to understand that a product is a simple solution to an everyday problem. And minimal in no way means boring. In fact, minimal is something that one won’t ever get tired of seeing every day. In order to achieve that, you have to keep your designs colourful and dynamic, using appropriate materials and processes. That’s how products with an uncluttered and effortless appeal become hot favorites as they reflect clarity of thought and idea.

Product Design
Product Design
Zigzag Floor Covering. Multisegmented floor covering.

3. Observe, observe and only observe

Getting ideas is no big deal if you have your senses open. Inspirations can come from almost anything around you. From a roadside ‘jugaad’ furniture to a tree to a flower petal, India is a beautiful source of ideas. Sometimes really insignificant objects are the most inspiring. As a designer, the next job is to transform them into something beautiful, and there you have your design.

Product Design
Product Design
AER CLICK
Product Design
Home and Car Fragrances

4. Form and function go hand in hand

Marrying form and function might seem to be a tough part only if you consider them as two separates. The relationship between the two is not linear and one doesn’t come before the other. They come together in the form of an idea, when you are thinking of something new. Design is art with a purpose. Therefore, holistic thinking is the key to an innovative idea. Well, that’s also the difference between a designer and a decorator.

Product Design
Product Design
Product Design
Product Design
Jaipur pottery

5. A canvas means opportunities

Space is a very important aspect of product design and you must ensure the product demonstrates the best utilization of space. Space is your context and also the content. As designers we should realize how people love it when a design manages to do a lot in less space.

Product Design
Jaipur pottery
Product Design
Product Design
Xcent Multipurpose Stool

6. It can do this, this and this! 

Multiple usage of a product is a fancy bonus for the consumers. So think of ideas and designs that can be re-arranged to cater to multiple wants. After all, who wouldn’t be amazed at something that’s a bookshelf, a stool and a great looking storage space? Remember, people like to be unique and that’s why they buy things that are unique.

Product Design
Product Design
Product Design
Product Design
Aquarius

7. Show your funny side

Adding an element of humour in your designs helps create works that are more interactive, refreshing and young. Because you’re not giving your design just a utility, but also an experience. Incorporate an element of fun in your designs and consider them sold.

Product Design
ZigZag Modular Unit
Ease Chair

8. It’s common sense that’s not so common

Product design is no rocket science that involves design fundamentals or elaborate researches. At the end of the day, you are also a consumer and a human. And it’s common sense that helps generate newer ideas for spaces, thereby giving vent to intelligent creations.

Product Design
Kings Rolls
Product Design
King’s Rolls Environment Graphics

Published in Issue 12

The first interactive issue of Creative Gaga with Augmented Reality features. This issue focuses on the transition of Advertising from real to virtual and blurring the boundaries of both at the same time. Also bundled with lots of interesting articles and interviews.

 

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You can see so much more with one eye closed. Photographer Girish Jain believes art is present everywhere, and that one needs the right perception, an intention and of course a camera, to see it. Here, he tells us a few of his tricks that can get you clicking too.

Be the Fly on a Wall

As a street photographer, your first lesson is mastering the art of invisibility; wearing the invisibility cloak. Always try and find ways to keep your camera and yourself out of your subject’s sight while you photograph them. This is important because it helps you capture, raw and natural photographs without the person getting conscious of being watched. Photographers, who have mastered this ability, take the concept of candid photography to a completely different level.

Connect with the Subject

That’s the only way your photographs will stand a chance to connect with the viewers. A great connection is established when you wait for the right moment, when you are patient. That moment is so important because it will never come back in the way it was gifted to you. It’s the job of a good photographer to freeze that moment in time, by capturing it.

See with your Mind

Learning to see is an essential characteristic of a photographer’s eye. Look around yourself. Observe the various elements in the scene. Discern the inherent details. View and review the scene. As you do so, you discover a lot of passive things, which never seemed to have caught your eye. Remember, composition is key. Think in terms of composition, lines, patterns, balance, and simplicity; they will lead the viewer’s eye into your photograph. Looking at things around you in this manner eventually leads you in discovering an interesting image from an ordinary scene.

Work the Shot

The perfect photograph could be a result of either great luck or great art. Professionals get the images they want by working the shot. It’s all about discovering the image. It’s all about composing and re-composing the shot by changing the angle of view, anticipating the moment, zooming in, maybe zooming out, subtracting some elements or even re-arranging them till you arrive at an image that satisfies the artist in you.

You are your Best Teacher

You can’t succeed by sitting on your desk, reading and researching about photography. You have to get outside to look, observe and experience the moments that you’ve been missing. And you’ve got to do it alone. Hold some private lessons with yourself. Photography requires a lot of concentration. And such focus can be attained when you practice the art by yourself, with no one but yourself to disturb you.

Last but Not Least, Lose Yourself

The best things happen, when you give yourself up to the surroundings. Always remember there might be a limit as to what the eyes can see, but an artist’s vision is limitless.

Published in Issue 19

A typography special, made up of not only Indian type designers or designers whose first love is type, but also few very talented international designers who open a totally new playground with sharing their insights and inspirations. This issue has exclusive interviews with Lucky Dubz Trifonas from Netherlands, Indian UI & type designer Sabareesh Ravi and Shiva Nallaperumal, who believes, type designers are the material providers to all the creative professionals. Also, includes a special making of Nirlep rebranding done by Elephant Design and an interaction with the ace product designer Aman Sadana.

 

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The magic of Indian mythology and its epic tales takes people by awe and surprise all throughout the world. They are intrigued by it in a way which makes them believers and followers of the same.

Indian Mythology

Considering Indian mythology as an ontological cosmological model, Giampaolo feels that it describes human sense in a poetic manner expressible by art.

Kamala Subramaniam’s colourful version of the Mahabharata, explaining the tragic attempt of humanity to elevate themselves from lower individual consciousness to a universal spiritual liberated condition, inspired Giampaolo to create his illustrative versions of the Mahabharata.

Indian Mythology

Before illustrating characters, Giampaolo does an intense research and study about them. He combines the understandings of the characters and the scenes from the explanations of the Mahabharat, descriptions from Bhaktivedanta and Srimad Bhagavatam’s texts and also the interpretations of a sanyasi as some of the information is purely from oral traditions.

Indian Mythology

To have a better understanding of the Indian culture and mythology, he even visited India in 2011. He spent some time at the School of Drama, New Delhi where he had the opportunity to go through the texts about history of Indian costumes. He returned back to Italy with his mind impregnated with details from the past.

Indian Mythology

Hand-Art: An Exclusivity

The difference between hand-made art and digital art is extremely similar to meeting people in actuality and meeting people over social networking sites. The coming in of digital art has not washed away the other forms of art. In the past, there has been a wide variety of expressions using various techniques and these pieces of art have been more dominant than the present day art pieces, barring a few. The beauty of the hand-made art lies in the human touch it has, which is missing from the digital art. It is exclusive in the way that one can feel the surface and texture of the hand-made painting by touching it and also feel the gestures and the strokes used by the artist to create the master piece.

Indian Mythology
Indian Mythology

The Emotional Attachment With the Illustration

Choosing the scene to illustrate is an emotional process for Giampaolo. When reading the book, he reads it rationally while understanding the plot, the tales, the intricate relations and the feelings that the scene expresses. This helps him visualise the story in his mind simultaneously while reading. He illustrates the scene that moves him the most on an emotional front. For instance, the end of Bhishmadev Pitamah on the bed of arrows was something that Giampaolo did not wish to illustrate, but the emotional sentiment that the incident has, which explains the characteristic of a great warrior that Bhishma was, is what moved the artist and got him visualising this scene.

Indian Mythology

Art is Self-Rewarding

He is immensely submerged in a continuous cycle of art production to create works to be exhibited at the end of a cycle. At present, he is working around the idea of “order and chaos”, which starts from a chaotic distribution of colors, followed by carving figures of women, animals etc to re-establish the lost consciousness on known models to overcome the terror of the unknown. A big fan of Indian mythology, he is soon going to start illustrations on the epic story of Ramayana.

 

He believes that one always learns from their mistakes and that practice is the best teacher!

Indian Mythology
Indian Mythology
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Industrial designing makes public art accessible to the masses. These products are part of the physical as well as psychological space of everyday life. By giving these products a personality, design can turn them into expressions of a culture and human emotions. Product designer Satyendra Pakhalé talks about the perceptions and process of creating products that bear this human touch.

KUBU, wooden sculpted chaise
Kalpa. Ceramic vase and bowl in one design
Products with Human Touch
Kalpa. Ceramic vase and bowl in one design
Amisa. Mass manufactured interior accessory

An industrial design can develop an economy

A designed product stands as a testimony to the cultural ethos of society and mankind. A product arises out of the primal needs of human beings. Therefore, it has the opportunity to touch and affect a million lives. Using technology and creativity, these designs can contribute to an economy and rise above as cultural symbols. Hence, an industrial designer needs to come up with product designs that play a part in everyday life and improve living.

B.M. Kondane
Watch Me X, concept for health monitoring digital objects

“Taking life as the biggest teacher and researching your way throughout, one can draw ideas that can create a whole new culture”

Kayo, extensible table
Endless Alcantara, maxi-museum installation

Every product speaks a language

The moment a user comes in contact with a product, it ought to take him by surprise – a joyful one. Products, hence, can be expressions of the basic human needs. Such a sensorial language must be created through designs, which communicate emotions without compromising on the utilitarian needs. When these significant and crucial aspects are taken into consideration, the users embrace the products in a way that these gradually become a part of their culture.

Akasma. Revisiting the age-old typology of objects
Alaya. Ceramic baskets made of slip casting ceramics
Good Food. An age-old typology of a cooking utensil
Designer vs. Chanel No.5 Altar for Chanel No.5 bottle

Design, technology and material are intrinsic to each other

In industrial designing, technology can’t be separated from its design. Sometimes the design looks so simple and useful mainly because of its technology. The reason why, while designing a product one needs to mould the two aspects according to each other to have advancing results. Only then the product’s utility is proven. In the same way, a material cannot be separated from design. If not chosen appropriately, either of them can defile the completeness of the product. It’s for the designer to marry every aspect harmoniously.

Mini Flower Offering Chair
Fish Chair.

Fish Chair.
Assaya, centenary armchair for the connected world
Looking at Tod’s, Display design for New York store

Product designing is a state of mind

It takes a lot to create a product design. It’s better to avoid dwelling in nostalgia, regression or tradition. This results in a contemporary look and feels that can keep pace with current times and connect with the future. Taking life as the biggest teacher and researching your way throughout, one can draw ideas that can create a whole new culture. A product design needs to be human, articulate and symbolic. It should have the creativity that gives a message or tells a story. With this approach, one can achieve that iconic simplicity and sophistication.

Add-On Radiator. Can be integrated in an architectural setting just like a window or space divider
Add-On Radiator. Can be integrated in an architectural setting just like a window or space divider
Carving the Senses, Venice Architecture Biennale installation
Add-On Radiator. Can be integrated in an architectural setting just like a window or space divider

The seeker must find his way, on his own

Creativity is not a faucet that can be turned on whenever one needs. Also, it can’t be taught. Industrial designing has its own life story. On this great stage, a designer needs to find his role, cultivate his character and perform on his own. Only then one can change the world with one’s creativity.

Add-On Radiator. Can be integrated in an architectural setting just like a window or space divider
Add-On Radiator. Can be integrated in an architectural setting just like a window or space divider
NEKA®, non-electric kitchen appliances

Published in Issue 10

With this issue, we are exploring yet another discipline of design – Web and UI. With the changing times, Indian designers are increasingly opting for this new medium. But are we really prepared to take the global challenge? What’s missing and what do we strive on? We invited few leading practitioners of the industry to deliberate on this issue.

 

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Future London Academy collaborated with global artists and designers to ‘Design the Future’, speculate what it will be like in 100 years #future100years

The academy aimed to imagine designers and artists ‘the future’ where animals and plants have the ability to translate their feelings to a human, you can hug your Siri, cars can fly through the air and space travel is as easy as catching a taxi.

Over 13 countries from India to Australia, the Netherlands to China, Nigeria to Singapore creatives took the part in this collaboration. Scroll down to see artworks from the 17 artists…

Ibrahim writes: “In 100 years we would create super pills that would have the nano-est technology to figure out underlying medical conditions and cure by adapting to each medical case and providing additional details by QR codes, which would further be deconstructed to produce a diagnosis for every individual to keep records and for pills to behave in certain ways depending on past results.”

 

Ibrahim is an Art Director and Illustrator from Kerala, India. He started his career as a graphic designer and has been working in the advertising industry for the last four years. He is currently a Creative Associate with SPRNG Bangalore.

Giordano Poloni is an award-winning freelance illustrator based in Milan. He earned a cinema bachelor’s degree and in his past he has worked for advertising production companies as an editor and motion graphic designer. 

Chiara writes: “How will the interaction between humans and Ai look like in the future? These days, when social distancing is still the norm, I found myself thinking about the relationship we have with our technology and how it will evolve in the future to match the increased need for a more human-like interaction. What if you could hug your Siri? :)”

Chiara is an Italian illustrator working, biking and growing tulips in Amsterdam. Her work reflects both her Italian nature and her Dutch influences. Being inspired by Depero and Escher, she loves bright colours and clean, geometric shapes and is fascinated by scientists and inventors. 

Kezia writes: “In the next 100 years, I think the housing system will be more space-efficient and energy-conscious. Houses will be equipped with anti-gravity components that create more space for homeowners, solar panels installed on the exterior, energy-efficient windows and vertical farming facilities on the rooftop.”

 

Kezia is an art director and illustrator based in Singapore, with works that visualise the mundanities in life through bold colours, irregular character and exaggerated gestures. She currently is a full-time freelancer on top of running ANTINORMAL, an independent illustration lab and creative shop.

Joy Li writes: “ I have always been excited by humanity’s future in space, looking beyond ourselves and into the vast depths of our universe. My illustration imagines a future where women are at the forefront of space exploration, research, engineering and design in the 22nd century.”

 

Joy Li is a graphic designer based in Sydney. Her work examines the intersection where design meets gender, race and cultural studies. She ­­­often uses type and to express the things she feels but cannot explain.

Future London Academy - Design The Future

Juan ER is an illustrator based in Nanjing, China. His work encompasses fluorescent colours with a surreal interpretation of everyday life. 

Fernando writes “For the concept, I imagine 100 years from now, I see the perfect harmony between technology, nature and science, without any kind of aggression between them. The balance in the evolution of everyone will give us openings for new searches and knowledge.”

 

Fernando Molina is an Italian illustrator. art director and graphic designer based in São Paulo, Brazil. Her work tackles societal changes through whimsy, exaggerated compositions exploding with colour. 

Oksana writes “In the future animals and plants will have the ability to translate their feelings and thoughts to a human.”

 

Oksana Grivina is a Russian freelance illustrator based in Aveiro, Portugal. She creates joyful character-based work for print and digital mediums, including her own Shutterstock collections.

David writes “In the year 2120 we will have harnessed the power of gravity. Not all cars flying through the air will be newly designed vehicles. Just like there are vintage cars on the street today, people will add upgraded gravity control onto classic cars in the future enabling them to fly through the air.”

 

David is a freelance creative director and founder of studio Locked And Loading. He has worked with culturally-relevant brands such as Gucci and Vice. 

Future London Academy - Design The Future

John writes: “I saw Back To The Future 2 in 1989 and was so blown away by the iconic Hoverboard chase scene. I remember leaving the theatre completely inspired for the day I would be floating standing sideways on my own Hoverboard.  Here’s to hoping we will get there in the next 100 years!  “Hey McFly, you bojo! Those boards don’t work on water!”- Griff Tannon”

 

John Antoski draws inspiration from where he lives and works in Encinitas, California. Trained as a fine artist and designer, John’s work takes shape in a variety of forms and media. As co-founder of Wedge & Lever, his design sense for minimalism and attention to detail has lent itself to a variety of client work.

Niyi writes “My piece shows what a monument would look like in 100 years, ecology and water intact, promising a future where we haven’t destroyed the planet and at the same time advanced in technology. The monument features a monolith in the middle with a replica of a future planet being housed inside it with the help of future technology that serves as a magnet that holds the replica within the monolith.”

 

Niyi Okeowo is a multidisciplinary art director and photographer based in Lagos, Nigeria. His focus lies in art direction, branding, and photography, with over 8 years of experience, he has worked with numerous established brands and startups to create experiences, identities, and visuals. 

Ritika writes “The future surely has a lot in store for mankind. I feel that within the next century, man would not just be able to land on Mars but also start a civilisation on it. With already existing super-advanced technology, there is no doubt that in the coming decades, human beings will be successful to develop supreme technology that will enable human beings to live on Mars.”

 

Kolkata-based illustrator and creative storyteller Rikita Barua uses her graphic style to thoughtfully represent different communities across the globe. Not to mention her collaboration with Etsy to make people aware of India’s creative culture.

Future London Academy - Design The Future

Nayab writes: “I always see the future as full of new and innovative tech. Being said i believe in future law and enforcement will be replaced by AI- algorithms and robots. Plus i think in future hovering things will be a legit accessible tech for masses. Again since AI technology is getting advance everyday, i think smart robotic pets will be a thing ;)”

 

Based in Pakistan, Nayab’s friendly and thoughtful approach to her work spans across animation, illustration and UI design.

Prateek writes: “In the year 2120, space travel would probably be as easy as catching a taxi. Hop onto a local rocket-bus, from one of the interplanetary stations, and take a trip to one of the many fantastic destinations on the multiple planets in and outside our solar system!”

 

Prateek is a graphic artist and designer based out of Bangalore, India. His work, primarily using a blend of 3D and 2D media, brings together forms and content taken from his multiple interests in the fields of typography, architecture, interior design, and the occult. He enjoys working with vibrant and neon tones, to evoke different moods and hints of nostalgia.

Blup writes: “Our artwork is based around branded human microchips that are implanted in the body, which by this time, may well be a norm.  As you’ve most likely read, these chips could play a huge part in our daily lives, implanted as babies and uses as ID, trackers, currency, health checks, keys…Ours is a BLUP chip as we imagine they’ll be the designer option!” 

 

Since 2009, the London-based creative agency has made brands culturally relevant through design, strategy and motion. They’ve helped Nike, Adidas, BBC and many more clients get noticed, and talked about by their next generation of customers. 

A future full of rainbows and drones from Spanish illustrator, Yime. He goes further by displaying how our everyday lives could be harmonised by evolving our relationship with nature. 

 

Yime is based in Madrid, he explores society and human behaviour and illustrates what he finds meaningful, interesting or absurd. He loves daily routines and rituals and finds joy in being alone outside, watching people.

Baugasm/ Vasjen Katro

Vasjen writes: “In this image, I want to show that there is something holding all of us together. Is one main purpose for the future where the abstract bean star in the image represents the icon to unite us all.”


Vasjen Katro is a Visual Designer from Albania. Famous for his Baugasm work, Vasjen is multidisciplinary creative experimenting in graphic design, 3d, photography, cinematography and music.

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Shantiniketan, Hyderabad and now in Scotland, traveling and working in this diverse environment have given Sukanto Debnath a vision to cater to a range of clientele and dip his feet into a global palette of art and culture.

Traveling - Sukanto Debnath
Dogs and People
People in Groups
People Walking
People in Groups. Capturing Hungarian locals with elaborate facial features along with their unique body language.
Traveling - Sukanto Debnath
Illustration for Caravan Magazine India

Not Staying Put

The best part about working in a creative field is coming to something new every morning; Sukanto Debnath has been fortunate enough to have carved his niche in India and abroad for his style of work, designs and unique approach. Starting his career in animation right after his formal education ended to a point where he freelances from Scotland. This global artist has been influenced by his changing surroundings (traveling) and exposure to different cultures.

Jump
Jump
Little Landscapes
Little Landscapes

To-Do or Not To Do?

The eternal question of how much detailing is too much to get simplified through Sukanto’s thought process and his extensively detailed yet sketchy illustrations. With a deep thought behind every piece, clearly represent an experienced animator who is showcasing some lesser-explored human behaviour and body language.

Traveling - Sukanto Debnath
Folk Dancers
Traveling - Sukanto Debnath
Folk Dancers

Traveling - Sukanto Debnath
Folk dancers in red
Traveling - Sukanto Debnath
Folk Dancers

Signature Sukanto

Every artist has his own signature style, something that sets him apart. Sukanto has evidently achieved that through his illustrations and completely understands his zone. Although his work comes under a particular shadow, there isn’t a shred of repetition or dullness. Yes, the tones are muted and there are a lot of portraits but the sheer excellence in capturing the typical human essence is commendable.

Traveling - Sukanto Debnath
Assassin Nuns of Pistachio. Illustration for the book “Assassin Nuns of Pistachio”
Traveling - Sukanto Debnath
Assassin Nuns of Pistachio. Illustration created for a book by Manish Anand, published under Penguin Books
Traveling - Sukanto Debnath
Boys, Tattoos and Wheels. A poster tribute to the cool boys!

Diversity, a True Teacher

Getting a formal degree in art got Sukanto a job as an animator but how he has developed over the years is what elevates him from the regulars; he believes that diversity in the form of travels and exposure to various folk arts and cultures can open up an artist’s mind to think beyond the usual and result in mature design. This particular trait has made him produce very unique characters that are simple and not overly dramatic.

Traveling - Sukanto Debnath
Design Sketches for Veen Land
Traveling - Sukanto Debnath
Design Sketches for Veen Land
Fehervari. Study of a group of people on a winter morning showcasing the dissimilarities
Viz Dev for 3D animated short Ad

Viz Dev for 3D animated short Ad

Survive the Dreaded Block!

Running out of ideas or getting stuck while developing a particular theme is a common challenge that has bothered artists since the beginning of time. Sukanto tackles these by regular breaks and indulging in other forms of art such as movies, which clears his head. He then comes back to his board with a fresh mind and ready to pen down his creative awesomeness! He believes art should be fun, challenging and demanding but still fun.

Traveling - Sukanto Debnath
Couples and Cellphones
Traveling - Sukanto Debnath
Couples and Cellphones
Illustration for Mailfold Blog
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Creative Gaga - Issue 49

 

The art can not be described in a single frame as it has no genre, religion or language. It makes you feel the beauty of freedom. It is a free expression of the human mind, senses, ideas and feelings.

 

Bijay Biswaal is a self-taught artist, born at Pallahara in the Angul district of the Indian state of Odisha, and worked as a Chief Ticket Inspector at Indian Railways at Nagpur, India. He took the early retirement from his job to continue his passion for paintings. 

He uses the different types of mediums to express his feelings Watercolour, Oil Pastel, Acrylic, Pencil & Ball Pen sketches and Caricature. Most of his artworks are fascinated by the beauty of Indian culture, dance and mythological stories.

 

Observing the costumes, gestures, posture and scenes in everyday life tells him an interesting story which he then captures in his watercolour sketches and drawings. Bijay (artist) finds watercolour to be the most dynamic medium as it gives a lot of flexibility with the way one applies and uses it.

 

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Artist
Immersive Rhythm, Acrylic Painting
Artist
Vighneswara, Acrylic on Canvas
Acrylic painting
Artist
Wet platform MELATTUR , Kerala, Acrylic on canvas
Finding Nagpur on the Ghats of Varanasi, Acrylic on canvas
माँ लक्ष्मी Laxmi, ballpoint pen on paper
Artist
ऐरावत , The Majestic Elephant, Ballpoint Pen on Paper
Tribute to Telangana, Acrylic on Canvas
Watercolor
Artist
Wet Platform Bilaspur, acrylic on canvas
Artist
Bombay Village, Watercolor on arches
ODISSI..GOD’s own dance form, ball point pen on paper
Dance of Chilika, Ballpoint pen on paper
Artist
Selfie-expression, ballpen on paper
Odisha village, watercolour on paper
Artist