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Creating a real-life or a reel-life characters is like putting various puzzle pieces together. It’s easy to see someone and say ‘I recognise that person’, but drawing from scratch is a different thing all together. Illustrator and digital artist, Nikhil Shinde, talks more about this less explored form of communication and how it can be made into a powerful tool.

Irfan Khan
Characters - Nikhil Shinde
Sadhu
Characters - Nikhil Shinde
Big Eyes
Characters - Nikhil Shinde
Characters - Nikhil Shinde
Characters - Nikhil Shinde

Surprise the Audience by Giving Them Something Unexpected

The idea of making different types of characters and models with suitable environments is always expected from a digital artist. So why not create them with a twist? Get random by stepping out of the box. Get unexpected by deviating from the initial plan. When the final outcome is not what you thought initially, you’re pretty much on the right track.

characters
THE KARNA

Sisters
Characters - Nikhil Shinde
characters
KAPIL SHARMA
characters
LATE NIGHT CHAT

The Real Deal comes with Unreal Characters

Believe it or not, it’s pretty easy to make a real character. It’s simply about making a replica of an existing person and all it is focusing on getting the right details in place. But fantasy or self-imagined characters demand a lot of time to think about their anatomy, pose, composition etc. Even though there is a stark difference in the creation of both real and non-real characters, what never changes is the approach in making them. As a designer, it’s vital to contribute your style and personality to it as well. This is what personalises the artwork and makes it ‘yours’.

characters
KRISHN
Characters - Nikhil Shinde
Characters - Nikhil Shinde
characters
SHAKTIMAN
Ganesha
Witch
characters
SADHU BABA

Every Work of Yours Must be Your Very Favourite

Even though some designs and projects get recognised over others that a designer has created, the bottom line is that they’re all of equal value. The designer puts the same amount of energy, thought and skill in each artwork. It’s important to not lose that focus. Because, if that balance is disrupted, it might make way for a shaky future.

characters
GRANNY AND MONEY
Characters - Nikhil Shinde
characters
THE WITCH

Characters - Nikhil Shinde
Radha

Digital Paintings are not Meant for Walls

In India, digital painting is yet to be accepted as a mode of communication. And from what it looks like, it’s still a while away. The only reason is that India lacks encouragement in this field as well as basic knowledge. Once we’re able to overcome this, it’s only then that digital paintings will make for a much more natural form of communication.

House wife making Chai (Tea)
Characters - Nikhil Shinde
characters
Dr. MANMOHAN SINGH
characters
DIABLO CHARACTER
characters
BLACK EYE

Published in Issue 24

Gone are the days when Illustrations would take a back seat. Now, they are becoming more proactive and are evolving the way we communicate. This time, Creative Gaga focuses on how the advertising world is opening its doors to this exciting form of design. Featuring renowned Illustrators like Chris Beatrice, Nasheet Shadani, Vijay Kumar, Gabriel Mareno and much more, this issue promises to leave no page unturned!

 

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CURRENT ISSUE
Creative Gaga - Issue 49

 

Aaron Pinto
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Aaron Pinto aka Kidsquidy, is a visual artist and also the drummer for the Deathgrind Band Gutslit. He has previously worked with MTV India as their senior designer. Aaron primarily works with the Indian subculture from designing album covers and band merchandise to art direction and creating music videos.


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We all started this year anticipating many things, but nobody thought of life coming to a complete halt. The Coronavirus pandemic has forced every human to re-evaluate their attitude towards nature and life. We also have been forced to lock down in our houses. Though we are no more in the lockdown, still many unfortunate ones continue to lose their lives and livelihoods. This isolation has given many of us the time we needed to finish our long pending tasks. Some have turned to art and craft for peace and solace. While most got relaxed and enjoyed their time with family, others used the focussed time to prepare themselves for the life post lockdown. On the other hand, creative freelancers found it helpful for them to focus and produce more as their work setup usually is within their homes. So, to understand how all the creatives have handled the lockdown, we reached many who have been creating and sharing inspirational artworks during this time. So order your copy if you are looking for inspirational COVID lockdown artworks and some advice on how to handle the current slowdown more creatively!

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CURRENT ISSUE
Creative Gaga - Issue 49

 

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We go through many interesting design projects each day and find them inspiring enough to be shared further. Projects which have the potential to inspire and spark multiple ideas. So, here are few selected one for this week’s illustration inspiration, enjoy!

Grower
Thiriyal
The Cave Shrine

Illustrations by Hazem Ameen

Mixc World Christmas Illustrations by Victo Ngai

Textile Pattern, Spring 2020 Сollection by Anastazi Li

Fantasy Light Illustrations by Ilya Shapko

Radha – Krishna TV series by Mukesh Singh

The Musical Kettle by Silvia Cancelmo

The Musical Kettle by Nana li

The Musical Kettle by Antonio Sánchez

ZACHARIE – GIANT BEAR by Olivier Bonhomme

Dwaraka, the sunken markets
Mercenary angels joe's bar interior

Illustrations by Subin Rajendran

Bad Geishas by Christophe Starace

BD Project by Stephanie LEON

Banana Hut
Midnight Gleam

Illustrations by Ayan Nag

If you have any of your illustration project or someone else’s, which is equally inspiring for fellow creatives, then share it with us on contribute@creativegaga.com

CURRENT ISSUE
Creative Gaga - Issue 49

 

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The transformation in the art styles from hand-made to computerised and digitalised versions is taking the world and people in its wave of craze! This fast-growing art style (digital art) has its own beauty and charm to capture the viewer, mesmerising him in its aura.

What is Digital Art?

In the era of rapid changes, new solutions and technologies evolving every minute, each higher than the previous, every field and profession is running the rats’ race to grab the new as soon as it can. One such interesting field is the line of art which has been digitalised and is called “Digital Art”.

 

Digital art is nothing but the traditional art form of hand-painting being modified into digital ways and styles of painting. It is an expression of ones’ thoughts, ideas and visions through an explicit medium of digital multi-media.

With a shift in the ticking of the clock from analogue to digital and the advent of computers in the 1990s, artist Sachin Puthran has seen it all, from hand-made tactile paintings and expressions being a physical manifestation of the artist’s vision to the digital paintings now meeting the ever-changing and quick demands of the clients!

Art From Pencil to Stylus

Indian traditional art has been practiced since time immemorial, accredited with famous art pieces. In the present day, with extremely talented artists pervading in every corner of our country, there are various representations of this traditional art in the form of digital art, defined by the individuals’ interpretation of the same.

Ranganath Krishnamani, took on to create a series dedicated to Thelas, the moving supermarket on Indian streets. Using his unique style of digital drawings, he expresses different kinds of thelas, from the ones selling chaat to ganne ka ras and barf ke gole, bringing out the smile and happiness on the readers face, similar to their reaction on seeing an actual thela!

Indian thelas

Inspired by the imbalanced and irregular environments, Satish Gangaiah expresses his interpretation of this traditional world by placing his protagonist in this pandemonium. He uses an urban-influenced illustration style in his digital art and the colours add a realistic touch to the frame.

Wonderfully Chaotic

Digital v/s Traditional Art

Switching over to digital art does not mean that the importance of traditional art forms of painting and sketching is lost or being forgotten. In fact, the truth is that the traditional technique of hand painting and sketching is what forms the base for digital artworks. A good command over hand drawings gives an artist the necessary push to explore the hidden treasures of digitalising their illustrations.

Pavan Rajurkar, a freelance Mumbai based illustrator has captured some of the very typical traditional scenes of the Indian culture like a fish market in his digital paintings, yet conveying the essence that a traditional painting would.

When it comes to the world of contemporary art exhibitions, hand-art has taken a back-seat paving way for the digital art, which has a magical effect on its viewers. It is growing tremendously, in terms of the message it wants to convey and also in terms of the size of the art, ranging from a small screen of a smartphone to being projected on huge walls in museums and art expos and also experiencing it through the medium of virtual reality.

 

With the growing awareness of people and the pace at which digital art is sprouting, clients definitely want the latest and original. Working for a wide range of clients demanding diverse typologies, Rahul Arora, a digital artist is a living proof that versatility can definitely up one’s game in the field.

Versatile Designer

Brands like OLX are definitely breaking the traditional stereotypical thought process and moving forward with time by hiring digital artists like Nithin Rao Kumblekar to do a campaign for their advertisements rather than doing an actual shoot!

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The advantage of being digitally artistic is that it opens a lot of doors to try out new things and create versatile outputs, visualise your imagination in different styles and modify all of this instantaneously with just a few clicks.

The Scope of Digital Art in India

The introduction of the pen tab has made life much easier for these artists as it gives the same feel of drawing on paper, but electronically!

 

The variety of styles explored in digital art is tremendous. The styles of digitalising vary from two-dimensional still-drawings on pen-tabs, graphic illustrations, photo-montaging paintings with images and creating image collages to graphics animations for multi-functional uses and are further extended to three-dimensional digital canvases using software like Corel-draw, Cinema-4d and possibilities of virtual reality.

Artist Medha Srivastava defines her style as realistic with a tint of stylization and conceptualization. She picks up on things she sees in her vicinity like shapes, colors, patterns and textures for the visual representation of her digital masterpieces.

An Indian-origin Germany-based illustrator Archan Nair’s digital artwork is influenced by the mysteries of our everyday existence and has also extended out to the realm of virtual reality.

The scope of digital at in India is not just limited to using digital tools to create paintings to be hung on walls, but is reaching out to the everyday life objects used at home. Illustrationists are being hired right at the start of a project to create customised digital designs in tandem with the overall scheme of a project.

For instance, Chumbak as a brand in collaboration with various artists has digitalised India’s environment through colourful and playful illustrations adaptable to various products ranging from home décor items like coasters, mugs, bags, cushion covers and laptop sleeves to personal products like t-shirts, accessories and even footwear! The digital art here gave it a scope to reach out to everyone through its online and offline medium.

Digital Art India

Digital art in India isn’t just a platform for the upcoming generation of artists to reach new horizons with their talent but also gives an opportunity to the tradition established artists to try out new things with the latest digital tools. In a way, it is a medium to revolutionalise the art industry of the country by representing the minds’ visions through a merger of the traditional techniques of art with the digital media.

 

With the digitalisation of everything in the future, this art form will surely go a long way in encouraging talents of all age-groups to expose their creativity. Social platforms like Behance, Instagram and Facebook are motivational and promotional sources for artists to publish their digital work, get noticed and step into the present day market of art and its likes.

 

Digital art today has captured the world in its long and stretched arms of beauty and creativity. The present level will definitely be escalated to newer heights in the future making each and every being its captive.

 

So strap your seat-belts and be ready for an enjoyable roller-coaster ride in this new realm of creations and explorations.

CURRENT ISSUE
Creative Gaga - Issue 49

 

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Art is an abstraction of the waking world, says Android Jones, the digital artist. As he explores his consciousness and finds visuals for his fantasies, he dwells between love and fear to create a body of work that is “One unending love story”. Excerpts from a conversation where he talks about his art, ideas and everything in between.

Android Jones - Consciousness
Union
Consciousness
Boom Shiva
DUB FX
Android Jones - Consciousness

CG: How do you perceive the relationship between art, artist and the world they are in?

Android. Human creativity is one of the most precious resources of our consciousness. As we look back at history, great art has always been the fulcrum point from where we measure the value of our humanity and the crucible of our evolution. Art helps us relate and reflect on the relationship between the invisible world of our consciousness and our dreams and makes it visible for the physical world. It acts as a bridge between the inner and outer realities that can share and evolve collectively.

Electric Love
Android Jones - Consciousness
Artumnal
Consciousness
Shambo
Consciousness
Tiger Shopify

CG: How much of this connection exists in your art? How has it evolved over the years?

Android. The creative process is an expression of my love of life and a service to my friends, family, and community. Fear of boredom or lost opportunities of using the gift of creativity keeps me active. This friction between love and fear always inspires my art. I am attracted to images that carry a spiritual or emotional significance to create a landscape that the viewer can form their own narrative around.

Consciousness
RAM
Consciousness
Shiva

Consciousness
Trancendia

CG: Where do these images come from? And how do you make them coexist in your artworks?

Android. Instincts guide the selection of images. I am naturally drawn to certain shapes, colours and patterns. It could be an arrangement of clouds, a unique tapestry on the wall, anything. Often, I look for the visual-fractal relationships between objects. For example, the spirals of the milky way or of a hurricane reflect the spiral seed pattern of a sunflower. I can look at the branches of a tree in wintertime and see the ventricles in the human heart. At the core of our neocortex is one of the most advanced shape and pattern recognition technologies. It’s the duty of an artist to take advantage of this gift of recognising the intrinsic relationship between all things. And art is an amazing medium through which one can express this concept.

Juna Akhara Naga
Android Jones - Consciousness
Dharma Dragon

CG: But do your viewers relate to the connection in the same way you do?

Android. My artworks are not the stuff of galleries or museums, but the interior of human imagination. The works I create are only crude snapshots of other realities, digital seeds that take root through the rich soil of the neocortex in order to inspire dreams, visions, ideas and emotional connections through the viewer. Art is really a visual crystallisation of consciousness. So, the more developed ideas you have, the clearer that idea comes out in the artwork.

Consciousness
Post Primal Scream
Android Jones - Consciousness
Sporeganesha
Consciousness
Pareidolia
Moksha Release

CG: Isn’t it also a mastery of technology that complements the idea?

Android. Human evolution is predicated on the advancement of our mastery of tools. All tools are first born in our imagination. They are essentially only a physical extension of our imagination. The advancement of our creative tools marks a furthering of our creative evolution. It gets really exciting when the tools we use expand our ability to imagine greater things and then give birth to further new techniques and new tools.

Magnus
Android Jones - Consciousness
Save One Planet Poster
Mellow LIB

CG: What role do technology and tools play in your art?

Android. I often dream in the current software that I am using. I don’t dream in brushes or paint anymore. My consciousness has completely embraced my technological counterparts. As we approach a technological singularity, digital hardware and software have the potential of advancing at a rate where it may be impossible for one mind to keep pace. This is going to open up new horizons of potential that no artist has ever anticipated.

Android Jones - Consciousness
Galactivangel
Android Jones - Consciousness
Picaflora
Light Field Rendering
Humming Dragon

CG: Where do you see digital or concept art moving?

Android. I believe that our thoughts and our dreams are electrochemical impulses. I see digital art moving into a space that will eventually bypass our meat fleshy extremities, Artists in the future will be able to ‘paint’ visual images, thoughts, dreams, and emotions directly into each other’s consciousness.

Android Jones - Consciousness
Android Jones - Consciousness
NIiza

Android Jones - Consciousness
Lightening in a Bottle
Android Jones - Consciousness
Deux Machina

CG: Does that imply live art experiences? How is it different from the traditional sit-and-draw ones?

Android. One of the significant differences is when making an image I am encoding my time and my life in a series of strokes and pixels. People ‘experience’ it but it’s a much more isolated series of moments. As an ‘experience designer’ you are not making paintings of people, instead you are making people your paintings. In a studio setting, you have total control over temperature, lighting, sound, silence, atmosphere etc. In live performances, I have to completely surrender control of all of these factors. My solitude is then replaced with thousands of other people. Human transformation is the final creation.

Emergensee
Android Jones - Consciousness
Consciousness
Tiger Durga

CG: With Digital art going through such a dynamic phase right now, what advice will you give to aspiring digital artists?

Android. It is important for all aspiring digital artists to recognize how profound the opportunities are in this moment of time. Never before have artists had access to such a plethora of information and tools. The future of art is not digital painting, but how we develop a creative relationship with the emerging tools around us. The boundaries are begging to crumble around us.

Android Jones - Consciousness
Unify
Android Jones - Consciousness
Fertility 2.0

Published in Issue 14

We dedicated this issue to Digital Art where we explored the connection between our dreams and imagination and how the flexibility of technology can be used to document that. In his exclusive article, Android Jones explains the broader perspective of digital art. Featuring Ankur Singh Patar, Archan Nair, Harshvardhan Kadam and Aamina Shazi Arora, every article discusses how each of them has an individual way of working and yet they all look at life beyond the obvious to appreciate it’s beauty.

 

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CURRENT ISSUE
Creative Gaga - Issue 49

 

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Imagination is the greatest form of flattery and for a designer; it doubles up as a way to pay homage to legends, icons and inspirations. Illustrator Shesh Kiran created the caricature portrait of flute maestro Pandit Hariprasad Chaurasia. He explains how.

Portrait
Portrait

Step 1

Started the rough sketching with new file of 300 dpi resolution. I used the tablet pen for this sketch with the various brush sizes from 25 to 30.

Step 2

Create a new layer below the sketch layers and filled it with black colour. Kept the fill opacity to 62% which makes the rough sketch partially visual.

Step 3

Added a new layer and started filling the flat skin colour in this layer. Also added another layer for colouring the clothes.

Step 4

Used new traditional texture brushes to detail the hair, eyes and skin tone. Airbrushes were used to bring shades and highlights of skin.

Portrait

Step 5

Further worked on the skin using ‘transform’ from the brush presets to lighten the skin and to create the softer tones using airbrush.

Portrait

Step 6

From the reference image collected the cloth colour palette to bring the real life feel. With the airbrush started detailing the clothes with the selected colour palette.

Portrait

Step 7

Gave a final touch to artwork using various opacity and ‘flow’ on hands, fluet and background as per the requirment to bring the depth and lighting. Hence arrive at the final portrait artwork.

Tools Used:

• Adobe Photoshop

• Wacom Bamboo tablet

• Airbrushes & round brushes for painting.

Published in Issue 21

Branding With Packaging Special! They say not to judge a book by its cover. But they also say that exceptions are always there. There’s no doubt, branding and packaging are the faces of any business and product. They decide the way people will receive the brand; whether they will accept it or reject it. To understand and gain more perspective on this much-unsolved mystery, we invited many branding and packaging experts who throw light on the topic.

 

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CURRENT ISSUE
Creative Gaga - Issue 49

 

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The real world is rich in experiences. But the one created by our imagination has greater possibilities. Inspired by the latter, Ishan Trivedi lets his brush loose when he goes on a fantasy drive to create captivating and surprising works.

Imagination
Happy New Year 2020
The Witch

At times, things that don’t exist inspire you the most.

Artists inspired by fantasy usually create a world of their own through their work. It is like the window to the soul and mind. If one wants to create realistic art then photography is the best manifestation of the real world. But beauty lies in showing people what they have never seen before, or rather something they have never even imagined.

Imagination
A pop-up book of adbenture of Hindu's blue God Krishna
Imagination
A pop-up book of adbenture of Hindu's blue God Krishna

It’s about crossing the horizons of imagination each time to discover something untouched and unseen. Artists are lucky today, in that, they don’t belong to the Renaissance, Realism, Romanticism or Classicism era. Now is the era of experimentation.

Ganesha and Mooshak
Ganesha and Mooshak
Ganesha and Mooshak

Imagination has no rules.

Ever wonder why most of us are amazed at a child’s imagination? That’s because it is unrestricted and free, because it follows no rules. In other words, it doesn’t go through a reality check. Same works for a true artist. Because imagination takes you where no one has gone before, it is a strong base that an artist can use to take his work beyond the ordinary.

Imagination
Imagination
Imagination

Imagination has no rules.

Ever wonder why most of us are amazed at a child’s imagination? That’s because it is unrestricted and free, because it follows no rules. In other words, it doesn’t go through a reality check. Same works for a true artist. Because imagination takes you where no one has gone before, it is a strong base that an artist can use to take his work beyond the ordinary.

Imagination
Imagination
Raja & Maharaja's Character Designs

Imagination is something very personal and one can’t design according to the point of view of the audience. Successful art works the other way around. The art must be such that it gives the audience a totally new perspective.

Illustration for a book about Krishna from Scholastic
Illustration for a book about Krishna from Scholastic
Illustration for a book about Krishna from Scholastic

Where there is a character, there is a story.

When you imagine a character, you imagine it in a particular setting and context. Knowing the concept is important as it brings out the right characterisation. How else will you know who is the villain or the hero? Hence, story and character are never mutually exclusive; they are both present to complete each other .

Nimboda (A Magical Tale of India) - A Picture Book
Nimboda (A Magical Tale of India) - A Picture Book
Nimboda (A Magical Tale of India) - A Picture Book

Colours have a language of their own.

We may not realize it too often, but colours have been communicating with us for a long time. The ‘Tiranga’, for example, where each colour stands for something to make the flag meaningful. Colours have natural associations and psychological symbolism. The fact is that people feel comfortable when colours remind them of similar things. Like a shade of blue triggers associations with the sky and a psychological sense of calm and tranquility.

Illustration for 'The Enchanted Prince'
Illustration for 'The Enchanted Prince'

Owing to such importance that colours have for people, successful design requires an awareness of how and why colours communicate meanings. The point is, colours have acquired the ability to define any mood or contrast. Hence, a good sense of colour is important because it helps to define art physically in terms of shade, saturation, hue, tint etc. by giving it a deeper setting.

Illustration for 'The Enchanted Prince'

Light defines form and texture.

Otherwise, how do we know the difference between metal and glass? That’s why, lighting and shading is an important tool for artists to give definition to objects and bring the differences out. Sometimes, the colours of light and shade help create an illusion too. Such a treatment also gives an overall mystical appeal to the work, making it look dreamy and fantasy-like.

Illustration for 'The Enchanted Prince'

Beauty is the best experience for the senses.

No doubt, an idea is very important for making any painting, sculpture or illustration. However, aesthetics is also as important. Because it is the perfect kind of knowledge that senses can experience. It is what people first take notice of. In order to captivate the audience, an artist must beautifully present its final work. For that, an artist must ensure a lot many things. There must be a sense of balance, keeping in mind the proportions, colour combinations and arrangement of elements that give art its final aesthetic appeal.

Imagination

Published in Issue 05

With some of the best illustrators to political cartoonists, this issue covered independent Indian Design language.

 

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CURRENT ISSUE
Creative Gaga - Issue 49

 

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Digital and Ball-point artist, Shital Verma, tells us about his process and idea behind creating portraits of renowned individuals from various fields and what exactly it takes to bring out what they symbolise or stand for as personalities. In other words, highlighting their unique stories which make them a recognizable face.

Stories
John Hurt
Wolverine
Amitabh Bachchan

CG. How do you conceptualise the use of lines and textures in your works and how do you execute them?

Shital. To begin with any drawing or artwork, I look at the character first and what kind of lines or textures justify the artwork; whether it’s a ballpoint pen drawing or digital drawing, and such other aspects. Lines and strokes, in particular, are my priority. All this helps me gain a clear picture of how I want to further proceed with the conceptualisation and execution.

Capturing the Stories Behind Every Face!
Clint Eastwood
Bob Marley
Shahrukh Khan

CG. What fascinates you most about the stories behind every face while creating portraits?

Shital. I choose some distinguished characters for portrait paintings, such as Salvador DALI, Zohra Sehgal, John Hurt, Ranbeer and many more. Their expressions with which they get naturally or symbolically associated with over a period of time are what tell their on-screen and real-life stories to the audience. I mostly try to represent and portray their charisma in my works, in the best possible way. In Virat Kohli’s portrait (on page 38), for example, I tried to bring out his toughness and determination through lines.

Haruki Murakami
Stories
Tiger Shroff
Ecstatic
Stories
Lata Mangeshkar

CG. Which software and tools do you mainly use and how do you apply them to achieve the desired effects?

Shital. I mostly use a digital pen tablet (Wacom Cintiq), as well as pencil and ballpoint pen, as my favourite tools. For digital artworks, in particular, I use Photoshop and Painter. Today, there are a great number and variety of tools with diverse functions that are easily accessible and available, so it all depends on what needs to be executed and in which manner.

Virat Kohli
Zohra Sehgal
Stories
Joaquin Phonix
Stories
Old Lady

CG. What is the main intention you wish to achieve through your work?

Shital. Being an artist, I mostly do it for my own satisfaction, while sometimes I get the opportunity to create something for the newspaper or for a friend request. Subjectivity is what essentially lies at the crux of any form of art, which is why there is no ‘right’ or standard answer to why we do it. The process itself is as gratifying as the result, if not more. So, in my case, the idea is to attain fulfilment within myself through my work.

Portrait of Ranveer Singh
Portrait for Rajnikanth
For Geet Chaturvedi's book

CG. What according to you are the most essential elements of creating portraits and how can one master them?

Shital. In my opinion, the eyes are the most essential part of the portrait and 70% to 80% of a portrait’s character comes out right when the eyes are drawn accurately. Yet, it does not mean that mastering the skill of drawing the eyes allows one to compromise on the other aspects as they too are equally important to add to and complete the character.

Deepika Padukone
Tom Alter

CG. What would you advice others young designers who practice a similar line of work?

Shital. My advice to young artists is to do more and more sketching and life study, structures, nature study apart from your digital work. Sketching is like ‘Riyaaz’ – the more you sketch, the finer the artist you become. The scope to create is wide open, much like the horizon; all one needs to do is stretch and deepen their vision, for the sky is the limit.

Birthday Gift
Jeff Bridges

Published in Issue 43

With the changing weather comes the season of Interns, with fresh new energy everywhere. With this comes dilemmas like where to intern and how to get selected in your favourite studio. So to bring little more clarity on current market trends of selecting the right interns, we interview some of the well-known studios to find their ‘Secret Process’ of selection.

 

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CURRENT ISSUE
Creative Gaga - Issue 49

 

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Gone are the days when Illustrators used to take the back seat in the advertising world. With things today, they’re emerging as the forerunners of some amazing and memorable communication that is being recognized. No doubt, clients, like OLX and Docomo, are exploring this valuable asset with Nithin Rao Kumblekar.

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Namaste India Milk, Agency: ADK Fortune Communications Pvt. Ltd.
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Urbanrise, Agency: One MG, Chennai
advertising
advertising

Contacting an illustrator for a TVC shoot might not be something we hear of everyday, but when OLX got in touch with Nithin Rao, it was a wise decision. The client wanted a campaign that would carry forward in print as well, and thus, saving time and cost, decided to get the shoot illustrated. Simple to look at, but the task was a challenging one for the artist. The OLX team had asked him to create every object separately in the layout so that they could pick each one later, according to their needs. Thus, the illustration required Nithin to create every object completely even if it was overlapped by the objects.

Wall graphic for Sulekha.com
Wall graphic for Sulekha.com

Wall graphic for Sulekha.com
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When Docomo demanded an illustration route for its exciting print campaign ‘The bedtime stories’, Nithin knew it would be storytelling through single visuals. Without over complicating the visual, he worked carefully with shadow and light to establish humor and wit using relatable scenarios. To give the story a setting, subtle placement of props were used, like the placement of a kid’s drawing book, school bag and water bottle with a fish on it.

advertising
Client: Killer dryShampoo, Agency: Makani
advertising
Client: Killer dryShampoo, Agency: Makani
advertising
Client: Killer dryShampoo, Agency: Makani
advertising

Published in Issue 24

Gone are the days when Illustrations would take a back seat. Now, they are becoming more proactive and are evolving the way we communicate. This time, Creative Gaga focuses on how the advertising world is opening its doors to this exciting form of design. Featuring renowned Illustrators like Chris Beatrice, Nasheet Shadani, Vijay Kumar, Gabriel Mareno and much more, this issue promises to leave no page unturned!

 

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