1

ad here

Lovely Kukreja talks about his famous series of illustrations, the artist’s mindset and the state of art education.

For Delhi based artist Lovely Kukreja, the choice to become a full-time illustrator was a spontaneous decision. He moved away from his commerce studies to become a graphic designer, eventually specialising in digital art and illustration in 2005. Interestingly, he was not an avid reader of comics while growing up and favoured the available animated shows like Chip ‘n’ Dale, Talespin, and Duck Tales.

Digital Illustrator Lovely Kukreja

Currently, he leads the content department at Bobble AI, where he helps develop virtual avatars for stickers and gifs to enable a personalised experience for their users across messaging apps. A classic example of where modern technology meets traditional art forms.

Digital Illustrator Lovely Kukreja

Lovely is best known for his adorable illustrations of Indian mythological figures. The series depicts various gods and goddesses in a cute, child-like form combined with a soft yet vibrant colour palette. When creating pieces linked to heritage or religion, Lovely believes that the artist is responsible for balancing their personal style and the sanctity of the depiction itself, where cultural boundaries should be respected. His inclination towards children’s content and spirituality motivated him to create something that everyone, both young and old, could enjoy.

Digital Illustrator Lovely Kukreja

Having dabbled in children’s illustrations, medical illustrations, and UI design (to name a few), Lovely’s philosophy is that “evolution is the only key to survive and grow”. One of the major challenges during his career was “selling himself”, which he overcame by staying updated with the latest technology, constantly developing his skills, and making sure to market his development on social media and not simply posting to keep with the trends. Favouring freehand drawing for concept development, Lovely avoids references as much as possible and instead goes with his instincts for composition, character, emotions and colour to create an original piece. The aim for him is simple – try to be better than yesterday.

Digital Illustrator Lovely Kukreja

While he has a Bachelors in Multimedia and Animation, he thinks formal education institutions need to adapt to the shift from traditional to digital media and the high requirement for self-learning and self-representation. While he doesn’t abhor the foundational methods or art school study materials per se, he thinks there is room for improvement in how it is communicated.

Digital Illustrator Lovely Kukreja
Digital Illustrator Lovely Kukreja

15 years later, his advice for those entering the industry can be summed up in a word – temperance. According to Lovely, artists “should enjoy the freedom of expression, but not exploit it.”, doubling down on his stance on representation. He believes that one’s work has a longer shelf life when measured in its “impact and ripple effect” and not “likes and followers”.

He goes on to say that there is nothing wrong with an artist expecting proper monetary compensation for what they do, even though the impression is that creative professions are not sustainable. A lesson to which every digital artist and creative can relate.

Lovely makes it a point to follow the constraints of commercial work but takes the time to satiate his cravings to develop his personal projects and art pieces without any limitations. In his words, “I dedicate my day-time to work for food, and in the night I feed my soul.” In the future, he hopes to start his own production house where he can narrate unexplored stories.

Digital Illustrator Lovely Kukreja
Learn how Digital Illustrator Lovely Kukreja draws:

How to Illustrate ‘Goddess Durga’ with Basic Guidelines!

CURRENT ISSUE
Creative Gaga - Issue 52

 

ad here

When exploring a new space like NFT and cryptocurrency, Amrit Pal Singh highlights the importance of building a community and engaging with your audience to spark an interest that is sustainable in the long term.

By NFT artist

3D illustrator, art director, and Nutella enthusiast, Amrit Pal Singh is now a prominent Indian NFT artist whose art features prominent pop-culture and social figures from his “Toy Faces” series. Amrit leads “Mister Bumbles”, a design and publishing agency based in New Delhi that develops illustrations, animation pieces, games, mobile applications, and books. His clientele includes Google, Snapchat, and Netflix, among many other notable names over the last 10 years.

By NFT artist

Amrit made the switch to full-time 3D illustration in 2019, before which he was a product and brand designer for mobile apps and interactive experiences. Apart from commissioned projects, the aforementioned “Toy Faces” series is arguably one of his most ambitious and successful pieces of work.

 

It is a 3D library of over 2000 digital avatars in his signature childlike style that is a testament to diversity and representation. One can also request custom versions for themselves or their team.

The library has featured on Forbes, Wacom, Muzli, and Behance and was supported by the Adobe Fund for Design this year. Another notable series from his body of work is the “3D Rooms Project”, a personal project developed during quarantine that showcases isometric renditions of “iconic rooms” from popular movies and TV shows.

While he is a proponent of working solo due to the speed and flexibility he gains on projects, Amrit makes it a priority to engage with the design community. With the motivation to share what he has learned over his career, his blog “Lighthouse” is a collaboration with other designers to share design resources, trends and industry knowledge.

Including his experience with NFT.

For those not in the know (yes, all two of you), a non-fungible token (NFT) is a digital commodity (art, for example) that is unique and non-replaceable. Currently, the most popular crypto blockchain that supports NFT is Ethereum. The chain keeps a record of the transaction and the relevant information, giving it a “collector item” status.

 

At this stage, the experience is comparable to having the winning bid at an auction and proof of ownership. The caveat is that an NFT’s ownership parameters may include a limited number of versions should the seller wish to do so.

Another feature is that artists stand to gain a percentage every time the token is sold or changes hands. Before you make the case that procuring digital art is as easy as downloading an image, think about the gift shop at a famous museum like the Louvre. Owning the actual Mona Lisa versus buying a poster of the painting will naturally have different associated values, especially for resale.

Designers like Amrit view NFTs as another way to spread awareness and reach new customer bases for existing work. On selling Toy Faces through cryptocurrency, Amrit says, “Toy Faces started as a design asset, then I started doing custom Toy Faces to expand its reach. NFTs is the third step of its evolution, intersecting with art and collectables. I love how convenient it is to sell digital goods, and that is what attracted me to NFTs.”

 

He goes on the say that the space is very community-driven and that the media has covered the more sensational side of it, but it is the start of something new and revolutionary.

“Toy Faces started as a design asset; then, I started doing custom Toy Faces to expand its reach. NFTs are the third step of its evolution”

However, the relevant infrastructure in India has a long way to go relative to other countries. The constant misinformation and the lack of adoption by the Indian financial system have made enthusiasts take pause. However, Amrit is confident that, in time, cryptocurrency will be a widely accepted investment opportunity by both the government and the people.

His advice to others is simply “don’t rush”. He prioritises community engagement and building an audience before even considering to sell as this will inform how you even start. With the subjective variety, the key is to have a strong value system or storytelling skills to garner the favour of your work. “Quality and marketing go hand in hand”, and for all the other information you may need, the internet will provide.

Amrit specifies that “spamming people doesn’t work and is a bad long term strategy” and that real engagement comes with genuine interaction, asking for feedback, and sharing your insights or experience (no matter your skill level).

 

It would not hurt to consider making secondary or tertiary content around your primary skill or sharing thoughts you resonate with from others. Also, you would have garnered a knowledge base that you can tap into as an additional benefit.

 

Also, keep an eye on the trend but be true to your style.

Lay of the land

 

We will do a subsequent post on the emerging platforms in the NFT art world. If you’re itching to get exploring right away, here are some of the most popular NFT art marketplaces to get you going:

 

SuperRare — Highly-curated 1-of-1 edition NFTs. The “gold standard” in the current NFT space.

 

NiftyGateway — Fast-growing NFT market leading the pack in sales volume. Highly sought after daily NFT drops, with popular visual artists and now celebrities getting involved. One of the few NFT platforms that accept USD / credit card as payment.

 

Zora — Feed-style NFT platform in which the market of each piece is baked into the NFT itself and not run by the platform. Zora, therefore, doesn’t take a transaction fee on each sale like the other platforms. Creating NFTs is open for everyone. The Zora protocol is also open for anyone to build on.

 

Foundation — Beautifully designed and curated NFT marketplace with reserved bidding that, once met, unlocks 24-hour auctions. Creating NFTs is currently invite-only.

 

Rarible — The most open and permissionless NFT marketplace. Anyone can create an NFT right away without needing an invite, and a roadmap is in place to make the platform community-run.

 

Makersplace — An invite-only creator NFT platform that accepts both Ethereum and fiat currency. Recently partnered with Christie’s auction house to sell the first fully digital piece at Christie’s, by artist Beeple.

 

KnownOrigin — Quality NFT art platform with multiple weekly drops. Offers accepted in ETH.

To explore more of Amrit’s work, follow him on Instagram @amritpaldesign.

CURRENT ISSUE
Creative Gaga - Issue 52

 

Ad here

Women, the kind around us, represent two faces of existence. One, which is treated like a commodity, shackled in the age old misdoings of the tradition. And the other which is breaking all boundaries to follow the dreams of freedom. Digital artist Ankur Singh Patar chronicles this duality in his artwork and explains the process of creation.

Artwork

Step 01

Drew a row sketch to get an idea of how the artwork would be. Created rough lines to get a feel.

Step 02

Added a background colour to decide on the skin tone of the woman. This would act as a base colour for the whole illustration. Also added more details in the face with a soft brush, taking care of the highlights and shadows.

Artwork

Step 03

With the help of a pen tool, created the lines and gave them little bit of shadow. With the help of big soft round brush added some softness and some more highlights and shadows to give depth to the portrait.

Step 04

To add more details in the artwork, changed the shape of the lips slightly. Also added a texture to the whole portrait, giving it a rustic feel.

Artwork

Step 05

While on the go, decided to change the illustration for good. On the canvas made the woman portrait smaller so that some more area could be achieved around her to play with. Took the help of slightly harder round brush to made these swirl shapes around her face.

Artwork

Step 06

Added more details around the portrait with the help of thin soft round brush. It’s all about highlights and shadows which add the depth and drama.

Artwork

Step 07

On Adobe Illustrator created a few abstract 3D shapes. Imported the shapes to Photoshop and with the help of dodge and burn tools, added the highlights. Wanted to give it a glow effect which was achieved through dodge tool.

Artwork

Step 8

Used some stock imagery and some more abstract edgy elements. Adjusted the colours and saturation to mix it with the illustration. Also adjusted the light source by painting the areas of the dome to the ambience.

For a portrait, it’s all about highlights and shadows, which add the depth and drama to it.

Artwork

Step 9

Created some more element and placed on top left of the canvas to make the composition complete and add meaning to it. For the eyes, added two earthen lamps to make it look like a reflection of light and to add life to the illustration.

Artwork

Step 10

Keeping with the idea of festivals, added those flags. Used a pen tool to create a triangle, filled it with a colour, reshaped it with warp tool and used dodge and burn tool to add depth to them. More depth was needed to the gate. So with a hard round brush added that.

Step 11

Painted the bricks on the face with the help of med-soft brush.

Step 12

To achieve the concept of two faces in one, half of it was broken with top skin removed and bricks inside. The other one was outer part or the body which was beautiful and flawless but underneath was all broken. Painted ornamental elements to make it look royal. Also added more colour and contrast into the whole illustration. More elements, like the abstract sharp edgy depicting a heart and a gear and queen in chess were added.

Step 13

Added gears underneath the bricks layer which depicted that part of our society which consider women as mere objects. Made the gears in Illustrator and imported them to Photoshop. Using a brush highlighted the areas where light might be falling and then added shadows. More things were needed to make the message clear. One of them was freedom, depicted by open wings. So, added couple of wings and painted the areas to mix them with the surrounding environment.

Step 14

Lastly, added some contrast and some more texture. Texture always helps in giving your illustrations some depth. Added some more flags at the top to complete the illustration. Achieved the final artwork.

Published in Issue 17

We tried to capture the time of chaos and confusion we all are in. How it inspires and influences creative thoughts. Starting with the cover design by Ankur Singh Patar, who captures the duality in the way we treat women. Followed by a conversation with Italian illustrator Giulio Iurissevich who explores beauty behind this chaos. And many more inspirational articles to explore.

 

Order Your Copy!
CURRENT ISSUE
Creative Gaga - Issue 52

 

Gal Shir is an Israel based self-taught digital artist who creates digital illustrations on iPad Pro using Procreate App and Apple Pencil. He has been freelancing since the age of 16 and later worked with many creative studios/ startups including Promo.

 

He founded Color Hunt, which provides colour palettes with several combinations to make life easy for the creatives. He leads the design at Lemonade, along with consulting and helping entrepreneurs to establish design thinking. Gal has collaborated with brands like Apple, Adobe, LG, Procreate, Affinity, Dribbble, 9GAG, UNILAD, The Bright Side, and more.

 

Connect Here

 

ad here

Brice Chaplet aka Mr.Xerty from France shares his journey and insights as to what it takes to start out and establish oneself as a freelance digital artist and illustrator and create some surreal artwork.

Build Your Own Style to be a Successful Digital Artist!
Build Your Own Style to be a Successful Digital Artist!

CG. What according to you are the secrets to becoming a successful self-learning freelance digital artist?

Brice. No secret, it is all about ‘work, work, work!’ You have to practice yourself all the time and concentrate on what you do. In another way, you have to take some risks and explore new ways of creation. But you mainly have to build your own style day after day and stick to it!

CG. Where do you feel the digital artist is heading in 2018 as a profession?

Brice. It’s been 10 years since I’m doing this and, to be honest, I at times find it more difficult today than when I started to work and get new clients. We (illustrators, creatives) are probably a bit too many in the market and freelancers don’t get the recognition and exposure they deserve.

This may be because people believe that it’s easy to produce artworks since it’s computer-assisted. Also, I think digital related jobs are not so well-highlighted. 10 years ago, Graphic-designer or Illustrator was the thing to do to have a cool job (In my point of view, as a French digital-artist).

Build Your Own Style to be a Successful Digital Artist!
Build Your Own Style to be a Successful Digital Artist!

CG. What kind of a digital impact do you feel digital design and platforms will have on the next generation and its society?

Brice. We can already be said it’s everywhere around us and it will continue in this way. Youth are born with it and they will see this as a totally assimilated thing and continue to develop it more and more. But we have to keep in my mind that it is important to inject poetry and bring our souls and a bit of ourselves into the pieces we create, else it will lead us to a cold and boring world.

Build Your Own Style to be a Successful Digital Artist!

CG. What is the main idea behind your works and how do you conceptualise the composition?

Brice. It depends on the subject and the style I want to show. My style is very surrealistic and dreamy, with a worldwide cultural touch. I try to tell the story and illustrate my thoughts. I start writing some keywords on paper and a little story like “A little girl flying over flowers on a bird”.

Build Your Own Style to be a Successful Digital Artist!

Then I’ll draw a basic sketch, after which I’ll begin to work on the composition – first with Photoshop, using pictures I find on the stock website like Adobe-Stock or Deviant-Art or pictures I’ve already taken myself. It could also start from a cool picture (like a portrait) that inspires me and then I let my imagination flow – it’s more unconscious in this case and that’s how I can experiment with some new techniques.

CG. Also, what are the main software and tools you specifically use and for what purpose?

Brice. I use a Wacom pen tablet (to draw light and shadows for example) in Photoshop (since the 10th!), which is the main software I’m using to create my artworks. I also use a bit of Maxon Cinema 4D and Adobe Illustrator to create shapes and abstract elements and writings.

CG. How do you suggest other young designers can attain efficiency in their skills and ideas?

Brice. Be open; collaborate; read a lot of books and watch tutorials! Get feedback from friends and also from strangers who don’t know you personally and will be more honest in their critics! This is one way to grow as a person and even as a designer – it all then very naturally reflects and shows in your work.

CURRENT ISSUE
Creative Gaga - Issue 52

 

ad here

Art is all about materialising your expressions. Vishnu PR takes us through his tutorial of how he transforms the expressions in his mind or even the expressions visible in a piece of art into his style and statement by creating a digital portrait.

Creating from imagination and references is one thing, adding your personal touch to these references and imaginative thinking completely changes the structure of the artwork for the good, defining the artists’ style.

 

For the creation of a portrait, inspired from an oil painting, in his own style, Vishnu has represented his personal touch in various forms of detailing like managing the light, shadow and highlights and addition of textures in just the right amount.

 

Follow the step by step guidance to know the secrets of making a digital portrait look real and surprise yourself with your own creation.

Make a Digital Portrait

Step 1

Start by making an outline of the image that you want to create.

Make a Digital Portrait

Step 2

A suitable base colour needs to be added to the created outline. Base colour is an important factor to create a digital art or portrait.

Make a Digital Portrait

Step 3

The next step is to add different tones of colours in order to achieve the desired light and shadow effects. To give the skin a realistic look, use texture brushes to create a textured effect on the skin.

Make a Digital Portrait

Step 4

In your mind, divide the picture into multiple parts and start by detailing out one part of the picture at a time. This organisation helps in a clear analysation of what exactly needs to be done next and is a smooth way of developing the picture.

Make a Digital Portrait

Step 5

Then comes the time to adjust the levels of light, shade and highlights. This will take the picture art a step closer to the actual image.

Make a Digital Portrait

Step 6

The fixing of lights and shades is followed by the addition of textures. The more accurately the textures are added, the more detailed will the outcome be.

Make a Digital Portrait

Step 7

The textures add depth to the portrait. This is then followed by the detailing of the face and its parts like the eyes, nose, lips, etc.

Make a Digital Portrait

Step 8

Now focusing on the hair and detailing it out to perfection. But always keep in mind that doing the hair is time-consuming and requires a lot of concentration.

Make a Digital Portrait

Step 9

Finishing up the hair gets us very close to the finished portrait. Make sure that all different parts are detailed out in the proper manner and in the right amount of detail. As a mistake, as small as that of placing a strand of hair at the wrong place can disturb the portrait.

Make a Digital Portrait

Step 10

The final steps to finish up the portrait include last-minute touch-ups and detailing.
The amount of time put into creating a portrait is directly proportional to the outcome! This painting in particular was done by Vishnu in about 15 hours.

It is not easy for an artist to explain all the details and steps required through just a few words! Every step described above is needed to make it look the way it looks. Missing out on even one step can change the final result.

Published in Issue 43

With the changing weather comes the season of Interns, with fresh new energy everywhere and your talented creatives wanting to test their skills and knowledge in the real world of live creative briefs and super creative professional environment.
This issue is a must-read for internees and fresh talents. Go ahead and order your copy here or subscribe to not miss any future issues!

 

Order Your Copy!

CURRENT ISSUE
Creative Gaga - Issue 52

 

ad here

For an artwork to be complete in an emotional and outstanding manner, characters and stories contribute as inevitable components. Danny Jose is a staunch follower of this theory, clearly evident in all his works.

Character-Story-DannyJose
Character-Story-DannyJose
Character-Story-DannyJose
Character-Story-DannyJose
Illustrations for Canvs Club

An engineer by profession but an artist and designer at heart, Danny has sketched for his entire life! The Internet and the online community of artists worked as a medium for him to polish his skills and gain confidence to step into the real world.

Character-Story-DannyJose
Daaham, Malayali’s life
Character-Story-DannyJose
Naadodi, Malayali’s life

His journey began by illustrating medical procedures and scientific drawings for a journal. Alongside, he developed a taste for fine cinema only to realise that his illustrations had a major missing factor, stories. Once he incorporated these stories in his work, then came in his big break of being hired as a story-board artist.

Character-Story-DannyJose
Illustration for Dunzo.in
Character-Story-DannyJose
Monkey Business

Constructing scenes and shots like in cinema and incorporating stories in them, Danny prefers to have characters in all his illustrations as they bring forth the emotional aspect of the scenario.

Character-Story-DannyJose
Illustrations for Sasken Technologies for their annual report
Character-Story-DannyJose
Monkey Business

His personal projects serve as a platform for him to express his own design-style and storytelling. He very gracefully, transformed his explorations of shapes and poses into monkeys from different walks of life, defining his genre of art and style.

Illustration for Sasken Technologies for their annual report
Characters-DannyJose-Feature-Creative-Gaga
Monkey Business

With his clients reaching out to him for his way of art and story-telling, he uses this strength to his advantage to move forward. Believing in the core principles of mutual understanding, trust and respect in collaborative work, Danny is still on the hunt for his ‘A’ team to expand his work profile.

Characters-DannyJose-Work-Creative-Gaga
Monkey Business
Characters-DannyJose-Feature-Creative-Gaga
Monkey Business
Issue 44 - Creative Gaga

Published in Issue 44

Who doesn’t want to become famous, when everyone knows your name and especially for us designer, it is the basic dream every design student or young artist dream. But behind every successful studio, artist or designer there are stories of challenges, struggles and their unique solutions to these. With this issue, we interviewed many well-known names from the creative industry and found their different learnings and experiences behind making their own self as a brand. So, if you are looking to establish yourself as a brand in the creative market or already in the process of it, this issue is a must-read. Full of insights and inspirations from the best of the talents, this issue is waiting to reach your desks.

 

Order Your Copy!
CURRENT ISSUE
Creative Gaga - Issue 52

 

ad here

They easily make us laugh, but caricature design is a tough form to master. Here, one has to feel the expression and manifest it through the use of colours and exaggerations. Keya Mahata dwells on these to bring characters to life. Below, she takes us through a demonstration for caricature design of Steven Tyler.

Caricature

Step 1

At first, various high resolution reference images of the subject are selected which are then arranged on a layer in Photoshop. A jpeg file of the reference is created as well.

Caricature

Step 2

This is followed by using a white page Photoshop as a canvas. Then, using a 19 pt brush, started drawing. While drawing a caricature, it’s important to retain the basic form and character of the Steven Tyler and simultaneously exaggerating what is necessary.

Caricature

Step 3

This way, full drawing of the subject is completed. While doing so, focus on the expression and never deviate from it.

Caricature

Step 4

The layer is then copied and coloured in. A de-saturated colour is used to make it soft.

Caricature

Step 5

Once coloured in, the opacity of the brush is reduced and the colours are merged. The teeth are made yellow with some bits of grayish colour to resemble the real person.

Caricature

Step 6

Once the facial colours are set, detailing of the face is carried out. This includes wrinkles of the eye to making his singing posture. One thing to take note of is the filling in of a darker shade in one side of the character’s face in order to give it 3D feel.

Caricature

Step 7

In this step, some off white colour on nose, tongue and check is also used to give a highlight.

Caricature

Step 8

Once, the colouring in of the face is completed, the body is started off with.

Caricature

Step 9

For the body, once again a desaturated colour tone is used. It’s important to maintain wrinkles to maintain his aged body.

Caricature

Step 10

Once the body is finished, the focus is on the hair. Gentle brushes are used to soften this area. Various shades of browns and blondes are used to define volume and depth.

Step 11

Dark brown and shade of gray is used for the dark part of the hair.

Step 12

This particular shade makes the hair appear soft and effortless.

Step 13

After careful finish of the hair, additional detailing is carried out using a brush on shape dynamic mode. A brush on colour dodge mode is also used to add highlight.

Step 14

Once hair is completed, a little bit of highlight is added on the whole figure.

Step 15

After fully finishing hair and body, the background is coloured in with semi-violet. Some yellow is also added to establish lighting, giving the overall design a bright look. A large brush is used for this step.

Step 16

The lemon yellow colour is softened and then blended with the violet background.

Step 17

A spotlight is then created using off white colour and a round brush.

Caricature

Step 18

Once the whole body, hair and background is finished, selected areas are infused with shadows using brushes on multiply mode.

Caricature

Step 19

Finally, the caricature design is finished with the addition of slight brushing and leveling.

Product and Automobile Design

Published in Issue 27

This issue explores one of the widely discussed product design and automobile #design which is very close to our heart. We spoke to few leading names to find out the future of product design and understand the Indian designer sensibilities and practices. Everyone believe that it’s not just functionality but also the visual appeal of the product which plays a crucial in the success of a product. This issue is a bundle of inspirations and insights from the well know product and automobile designers. A must read which you will enjoy for sure.

 

Order Your Copy!
CURRENT ISSUE
Creative Gaga - Issue 52

 

ad here

Finding out what you are ‘born to do’, does not come easily for everyone. Archan Nair shares his story of finding his love for visual arts and how he established himself in this market.

Archan Nair
Numb
Altered Frequency

Only after a few years of starting his career in the fashion industry by joining his family’s apparel manufacturing company, Archan realised that he was not too fond of it. He then began experimenting with visual arts and in it he found a way to express himself, an escape to travel into a reality which was his own.

Archan
Tokara
Absorb
Archan
Way In

The beauty of art and creating something out of nothing took him by surprise, which got him exploring the subject deeper, leading him to the realisation that this is what he wanted to do all the time!

 

Archan quit his day job to start his journey as an independent artist and he definitely played his cards right! The decision of switching fields was worth the challenges that came in the way.

Outset
Myth
Freedom Jazz

Analog to Digital

Growing up from times when cable TV just started to dial-up Internet and the magical effect that the technology exhibited upon the use of tools on it, Archan was mesmerized to the extent that he drew inspiration for creativity using technology from his childhood seeings.

Unravelling
Archan Nair
Clarity

In Archan’s opinion, digital tools offer many more opportunities for creativity compared to traditional tools and uses a mix of 2D and 3D art to design the kind of artwork he is fond of. He feels that just the way how general art has diversified itself into the forms of traditional art, sculptures, installations, digital-art and mixed media, digital art will also expand much beyond its existing parameters.

Ambient
Archan
Spun

Taking on Challenges

Engaging with clients is challenging as it brings one out of their comfort zone, gets you digging deeper in to subject in order to align your work with the client’s demand and communicate in the best way possible. Dealing with clients, in other words, is a blessing in disguise.

Chime

According to Archan, obstacles are important and necessary, not just in the process but in day to day life, as they help in establishing relationships with ones’ work and aligning it to the energy outside.

Silent Letters
Archan
Taqueria

Obstacles are an integral part of any professional’s life, the most common being finding consistent flow of projects. Also, these obstacles refine a person and take him into a deeper space, helping him explore his own best.

Settle
Archan Nair
Flutter

Love What You Do

The intention of creating illustrations was only a medium to express his inner journey and showcase his love for creation. It was nowhere close to getting himself famous or enjoying popularity among global folks.

Archan Nair
Clarity

There aren’t any hard and fast rules laid down for marketing art and an artist. The process of creating an audience varies from person to person. All Archan believes is in that focus on creating and share what you create, the work will speak for itself and the rest will be taken care of.

Scopic
Ambient

Neither having the time or energy nor the strategy to brand himself, he follows his heart and does what he is best at, creating and is lucky enough to have everything fall in place for him. For Archan, this isn’t a race, it, in fact, is an open platform for people to bring out their expressions in their own unique style and serve as inspirations for others.

Dream in the Light

Craft-Focus

Advising the young and emerging artists, he suggests sticking to the basic things like creating, practicing, working hard, and not focusing on creating a brand. If that needs to happen it will happen on its own.

Crossing Beyond
Lune
Issue 44 - Creative Gaga

Published in Issue 44

Behind every successful studio, artist or designer there are stories of challenges, struggles and their unique solutions to these. With this issue, we interviewed many well-known names from the creative industry and found their different learnings and experiences behind making their own self as a brand. Though they all have a different take on this topic, still they all unanimously emphasise on focusing on their skills and quality delivery of the final outcome. So, if you are looking to establish yourself as a brand in the creative market or already in the process of it, this issue is a must read. Full of insights and inspirations from the best of the talents, this issue is waiting to reach your desks.

 

Order Your Copy!