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The Gurugram-based digital illustrator Lovely Kukreja shares his journey of being in multiple creative roles and how it all has shaped his process in this in-depth interview.

He has dabbled among creating children’s illustrations, rendering mobile comics and wallpapers and even created wire-frames and UI designs for the iPhone and iPad. His work is filled with subtle strokes exuding warmth and happiness.

Digital Illustrator Lovely Kukreja

Lovely’s work invokes devotion and playfulness – a rare combination. His animated illustrations of Hindu gods and goddesses blew up on the internet when he began posting them, says the visual development artist and Illustrator with over 15 years of experience in the wide spectrum of digital designs.

Digital Illustrator Lovely Kukreja

“My decision to become a designer was quite spontaneous since I was in school,” says Lovely, who now leads the Content Design Team at his firm, Bobble.

 

Since he began his career in 2005, Lovely has dabbled among the domains of publishing, advertising and medical illustrations. His turning point came at Thomson Digital while creating medical illustrations as he could be flexible and experiment with different styles to come up with creative illustrations while heading a team of illustrators at the medical department.

 

He also worked on children’s illustrations – where concepts of harmony and happy emotions were given top priority.

Digital Illustrator Lovely Kukreja

Lovely worked at three other design studios before he launched his own studio, White Mice Media in 2013. Having worked in graphic design, UI and AI design, designing for iPhone and iPad – he was quite familiar with the role of design in tech.

 

With several of these feathers in his cap, he launched Bobble AI Technologies – a medium through which users can communicate with each other in virtual conversational languages.

Digital Illustrator Lovely Kukreja
44 Best Indian Illustrator to Follow on Instagram!

Lovely says all of his work is a result of meditated thoughts and emotions. When asked to describe his design process, Lovely explains, “The first thing I do is to stop browsing on the internet if I want to ensure a particular piece is original. I then try recalling and extracting the original compositions, characters, emotions that inspired me to create the piece initially and try to replicate that on paper.

 

Once this is done, I add colours to support the whole experience and always try to be better than I was yesterday – which is most important.” Some of Kukreja’s favourite projects include Little Punch Inc. Pearson, Penguin, Chinmaya Mission UK, Phizzical Productions UK and Dorling Kindesley to name a few.

Digital Illustrator Lovely Kukreja
Digital Illustrator Lovely Kukreja

As someone who specialised in digital art throughout his journey, Lovely says he saw the decline of all print mediums coming a mile away, even when he first started out. “I saw it happening even before the decline of print media when illustrator started practising art on digital mediums over traditional ones even if they were working for print media. Artists are surely switching to digital platforms for all commercial uses.

 

I would strongly recommend designers to use these devices and software merely to ease their process and not become dependent on them with respect to tools and templates for illustrations,” he adds.

Lovely uses digital software to help him complete large scale projects and help with options and turnarounds but when he is brainstorming for a new idea that is very personal – the conventional pen to paper method works best.

As an illustrator, Lovely has had his fair share of challenges. “I think the biggest challenge of them all is for any creator to be able to sell their skills at the right time, right place and with the right approach. Everyone faces hurdles but evolution is the only way to grow. You should not rest simply because you are the king of a hill. Instead, hustle to become a warrior of a mountain. This approach will automatically help you get to the top.”

When asked about his future plans, Lovely says one of his goals is to own a production house that narrates untold stories with different approaches.

Digital Illustrator Lovely Kukreja
Learn how Digital Illustrator Lovely Kukreja draws:

How to Illustrate ‘Goddess Durga’ with Basic Guidelines!

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They easily make us laugh, but caricature design is a tough form to master. Here, one has to feel the expression and manifest it through the use of colours and exaggerations. Keya Mahata dwells on these to bring characters to life. Below, she takes us through a demonstration for caricature design of Steven Tyler.

Caricature

Step 1

At first, various high resolution reference images of the subject are selected which are then arranged on a layer in Photoshop. A jpeg file of the reference is created as well.

Caricature

Step 2

This is followed by using a white page Photoshop as a canvas. Then, using a 19 pt brush, started drawing. While drawing a caricature, it’s important to retain the basic form and character of the Steven Tyler and simultaneously exaggerating what is necessary.

Caricature

Step 3

This way, full drawing of the subject is completed. While doing so, focus on the expression and never deviate from it.

Caricature

Step 4

The layer is then copied and coloured in. A de-saturated colour is used to make it soft.

Caricature

Step 5

Once coloured in, the opacity of the brush is reduced and the colours are merged. The teeth are made yellow with some bits of grayish colour to resemble the real person.

Caricature

Step 6

Once the facial colours are set, detailing of the face is carried out. This includes wrinkles of the eye to making his singing posture. One thing to take note of is the filling in of a darker shade in one side of the character’s face in order to give it 3D feel.

Caricature

Step 7

In this step, some off white colour on nose, tongue and check is also used to give a highlight.

Caricature

Step 8

Once, the colouring in of the face is completed, the body is started off with.

Caricature

Step 9

For the body, once again a desaturated colour tone is used. It’s important to maintain wrinkles to maintain his aged body.

Caricature

Step 10

Once the body is finished, the focus is on the hair. Gentle brushes are used to soften this area. Various shades of browns and blondes are used to define volume and depth.

Step 11

Dark brown and shade of gray is used for the dark part of the hair.

Step 12

This particular shade makes the hair appear soft and effortless.

Step 13

After careful finish of the hair, additional detailing is carried out using a brush on shape dynamic mode. A brush on colour dodge mode is also used to add highlight.

Step 14

Once hair is completed, a little bit of highlight is added on the whole figure.

Step 15

After fully finishing hair and body, the background is coloured in with semi-violet. Some yellow is also added to establish lighting, giving the overall design a bright look. A large brush is used for this step.

Step 16

The lemon yellow colour is softened and then blended with the violet background.

Step 17

A spotlight is then created using off white colour and a round brush.

Caricature

Step 18

Once the whole body, hair and background is finished, selected areas are infused with shadows using brushes on multiply mode.

Caricature

Step 19

Finally, the caricature design is finished with the addition of slight brushing and leveling.

Product and Automobile Design

Published in Issue 27

This issue explores one of the widely discussed product design and automobile #design which is very close to our heart. We spoke to few leading names to find out the future of product design and understand the Indian designer sensibilities and practices. Everyone believe that it’s not just functionality but also the visual appeal of the product which plays a crucial in the success of a product. This issue is a bundle of inspirations and insights from the well know product and automobile designers. A must read which you will enjoy for sure.

 

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Finding out what you are ‘born to do’, does not come easily for everyone. Archan Nair shares his story of finding his love for visual arts and how he established himself in this market.

Archan Nair
Numb
Altered Frequency

Only after a few years of starting his career in the fashion industry by joining his family’s apparel manufacturing company, Archan realised that he was not too fond of it. He then began experimenting with visual arts and in it he found a way to express himself, an escape to travel into a reality which was his own.

Archan
Tokara
Absorb
Archan
Way In

The beauty of art and creating something out of nothing took him by surprise, which got him exploring the subject deeper, leading him to the realisation that this is what he wanted to do all the time!

 

Archan quit his day job to start his journey as an independent artist and he definitely played his cards right! The decision of switching fields was worth the challenges that came in the way.

Outset
Myth
Freedom Jazz

Analog to Digital

Growing up from times when cable TV just started to dial-up Internet and the magical effect that the technology exhibited upon the use of tools on it, Archan was mesmerized to the extent that he drew inspiration for creativity using technology from his childhood seeings.

Unravelling
Archan Nair
Clarity

In Archan’s opinion, digital tools offer many more opportunities for creativity compared to traditional tools and uses a mix of 2D and 3D art to design the kind of artwork he is fond of. He feels that just the way how general art has diversified itself into the forms of traditional art, sculptures, installations, digital-art and mixed media, digital art will also expand much beyond its existing parameters.

Ambient
Archan
Spun

Taking on Challenges

Engaging with clients is challenging as it brings one out of their comfort zone, gets you digging deeper in to subject in order to align your work with the client’s demand and communicate in the best way possible. Dealing with clients, in other words, is a blessing in disguise.

Chime

According to Archan, obstacles are important and necessary, not just in the process but in day to day life, as they help in establishing relationships with ones’ work and aligning it to the energy outside.

Silent Letters
Archan
Taqueria

Obstacles are an integral part of any professional’s life, the most common being finding consistent flow of projects. Also, these obstacles refine a person and take him into a deeper space, helping him explore his own best.

Settle
Archan Nair
Flutter

Love What You Do

The intention of creating illustrations was only a medium to express his inner journey and showcase his love for creation. It was nowhere close to getting himself famous or enjoying popularity among global folks.

Archan Nair
Clarity

There aren’t any hard and fast rules laid down for marketing art and an artist. The process of creating an audience varies from person to person. All Archan believes is in that focus on creating and share what you create, the work will speak for itself and the rest will be taken care of.

Scopic
Ambient

Neither having the time or energy nor the strategy to brand himself, he follows his heart and does what he is best at, creating and is lucky enough to have everything fall in place for him. For Archan, this isn’t a race, it, in fact, is an open platform for people to bring out their expressions in their own unique style and serve as inspirations for others.

Dream in the Light

Craft-Focus

Advising the young and emerging artists, he suggests sticking to the basic things like creating, practicing, working hard, and not focusing on creating a brand. If that needs to happen it will happen on its own.

Crossing Beyond
Lune
Issue 44 - Creative Gaga

Published in Issue 44

Behind every successful studio, artist or designer there are stories of challenges, struggles and their unique solutions to these. With this issue, we interviewed many well-known names from the creative industry and found their different learnings and experiences behind making their own self as a brand. Though they all have a different take on this topic, still they all unanimously emphasise on focusing on their skills and quality delivery of the final outcome. So, if you are looking to establish yourself as a brand in the creative market or already in the process of it, this issue is a must read. Full of insights and inspirations from the best of the talents, this issue is waiting to reach your desks.

 

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The world of design is huge and every client’s need is different. As a versatile designer working for a broad spectrum with regards to commercial requirements, Rahul Arora is able to push his boundaries, explore more styles and learn in the process.

Digital art by Rahul Arora
Digital art by Rahul Arora
Out of ideas

The ubiquity of the Internet and digital technology today has opened the door to the myriad of opportunities. As the online platforms are transparent and great to showcase one’s work while discovering the work of others worldwide.

Versatile Designer
Koi Fish
Digital art by Rahul Arora
Book illustration

Style of the Designer is a Reflection of the Client’s Sensibility and Vision

With diverse projects and context, each client has a different agenda and every script has its own requirements. Sometimes, the sensibilities of the clients vary too; some have a clear vision whilst some want to develop by working in tandem with the artist. Therefore, the foremost step is to discuss the script/ project with the art/creative directors to get an understanding of how they visualise the final product. Latching onto their concept, a versatile designer has to create styles portraying the same.

Versatile Designer
Castle on the rock
Versatile Designer
Sneeze

The Characterisation is Pivotal in a Narrative

The characterisation is a gradual process that first involves understanding a few pre-requisites before delving into its creation. As, context, appearance, ideology, and age are some of the factors that must be thought out prior to creation. So that, the exaggeration of these features amplifies the ‘key qualities’ which evoke interest. Relating the surrounding with desired detailing to enhance and portray the protagonist’s role conveys the storyline.

Versatile Designer
Minister of Universe
Versatile Designer
The butcher

Tackling Different Avenues

Working on comics is like making a movie where you can convey stories through illustrations and words by generating it frame by frame. Studying the human anatomy and expressions is a must for a compelling narrative. Creating arresting illustrations that appeal to the readers, is challenging and a test for artist’s imaginations.

Versatile Designer
Lazy Sunday Ride
Digital art by Rahul Arora
Book illustration

Storyboards are the pre-visualisation of a story/film/ad-film. Here much importance is given to the character placements and the angles rather than the colour schemes in the suggested visuals.

Digital art by Rahul Arora
Book illustration
Digital art by Rahul Arora

Advertising, on the other hand, is completely distinct. With tight deadlines, the challenge is to prioritise and achieve the required quality in the given time frame.

Versatile Designer
The imp

Versatile Designer
Lift

Colour Schemes and Mediums have their own Charm

They play a major role in bringing a story to life and convey the important aspects of the composition to set a mood of the narrative. Traditional mediums such as oils, poster colours, pastels, watercolours and pencil sketching often allow the designer to hone his skills and learn the intricacies.

Digital art by Rahul Arora
Digital art by Rahul Arora
Lady with the lamp

When working commercially, a digital medium is much easier and straight-forward to execute. As you can easily start with a quick thumbnail that gives a glimpse of the idea which then can be elaborated to form the layouts and finally, pencilling and colouring it in Photoshop can be done post the client’s approval.

Versatile Designer
The Passenger
Digital art by Rahul Arora
An evening at the terrace

Published in Issue 39

As the festivity is all around, every brand or business is trying to impress the Indian audience. But what really works for us Indians? What is an Indian design? And how we can make designs for India? To understand it, we interviewed some Indian creatives who are successfully creating designs for the Indian audience.

This issue of Creative Gaga is a light read for someone looking for inspirations or insights on Indian design and how the Indian audience can be enticed. So go ahead and order your copy or subscribe if you want to keep receiving a regular dose of inspirations!

 

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Finding the modern in the ancient is a matter of vision and desire, to renew the old in such a way that is thoroughly transformed in not only its form and look, but its very fibre and perception. That is what illustrator Omar Gilani prefers to do through his rather fascinating interpretations.

Ancient Future
Desert Warrior Aunty.
Ancient Future

CG. Your range of work bears contemporariness as a trend that seemingly defines or represents your style. What inspired this concept and what is your idea behind it?

Oman. I wanted to show what I want to see (more like giving a perspective into one’s outlook, interpretations, and perceptions). Science fiction or fantasy typically falls into very western tropes, and the subcontinent is usually ignored in those regards. That was frustrating, for me – that no one was depicting how this region may look in the future, and so I decided to give it a shot in my spare time just for fun.

Ancient Future
Pindi Boyz.

CG. What impact or effect do you intend this ‘contemporary’ or ‘modern’ element to have upon your audience?

Oman.I just wanted to show that it is possible to create such kind of visuals and interpretations through such representations of everyday objects, many-a-times easily taken for granted. If anyone can look at my work and feel motivated to do something outside the box for themselves, I’d consider that a huge win for myself.

Ancient Future
Sitaar Player.

CG. What inspires you as subjects for your depictions?

Oman. Just everyday things I see around me inspires me as subjects, and I easily find them worthy enough to take shape as depictions. We have a pretty rich culture and ancient history, and to wonder, visualise, interpret and finally depict how that would evolve – or not – in the next hundred to two hundred years is a rather interesting and exciting task.

Ancient Future
The Bounty Hunter.

Ancient Future

CG. What role does lighting have in your illustrations, and how do you approach and apply it?

Oman.Lighting has a rather significant role in any realistic illustration. I use lighting to determine the initial composition of a piece. Dividing the canvas into simple black and white shapes to see if all the various aspects are harmonious, helps me do that. The lighting in the shot helps guide at this step, and it does go on further to play a huge role throughout the development of the piece as a whole.

Ancient Future
Smog City.

CG. How do you conceptualise what you depict?

Oman.I have a fair bit of back-story for the world I’m depicting, and so it is a matter of combining a certain scenario with that back-story. Artistic elements like colours and lighting play a role in conceptualising, composing and finally executing a shot to create the final image. I approach it as thinking I’m creating a screenshot from a movie.

Ancient

Ancient Future
Inner City Tourists.

CG. What kind of improvisations or changes would you like to intend to bring about in your style?

Oman.I’m learning to work with 3D these days, and it’s already hugely improving my flow of work. An essential change that I would like to make is to just get better at showing what’s in my head i.e. depict more clearly and precisely the image that is conceived in the mind, such that it is represented effectively on canvas. Although it must be noted, that is a lifelong, constantly ongoing and evolving journey.

Ancient Future
Panorama1.
Ancient Future
Departure.

Published in Issue 38

With this issue, we try to explore different views from many well-known studio owners and senior designers. While Anthony Lopez of Lopez Design shared tips on what a studio looks for in a designer, Mohar Ray from Codesign highlights the key aspects that play a significant role and make the difference in whether you are hired or not as a promising designer. Also, this issue has an insightful article on ‘Branding with reason and love’ from Itu Chaudhuri, founder ICD (Itu Chaudhuri Design) along with Siddhi Ranade, explaining his tools of story telling through his unique style of illustrations. This issue is a must read for a talented graduate to a branding expert. Order you copy and enjoy reading it!

 

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Creative designer Muhammad Sajid discusses the roadmap to good illustrations, his love for Calicut and the nuances of being an illustrator.

“Art plays a huge part in my life. Art is my life and I live with art. It helps me speak to the world through my fingers and I feel it is a good medium to explain things we cannot literally talk about,” says artist Muhammad Sajid. The Bangalore-based artist, who has been creating digital art for about eight years now, took up art professionally after graduating from school. “I realised that I should learn more things that I am interested in. So I started focusing on designing and creating illustrations after my twelfth grade.”

Though he works as a creative designer in Bangalore, Sajid’s heart and home lie in Calicut, a village located in the state of Kerala. “My village is full of greenery, and the beauty of it inspire me. That is why I try to incorporate some of the plants and other elements into my work,” says Sajid, whose love for his hometown led to the creation of the series of his successful illustrations titled ‘Home’. “I moved to Bangalore in 2014 and after a while, I started missing my hometown. One day, I drew my home with some natural elements along with greenery from my memory. This led to the creation of ‘Home’, a project which featured different houses around the world and were illustrated in my style and colour. It received a good response from the audience and I loved creating it as well, so this led to the start of architectural illustrations.”

As the houses featured in Sajid’s illustrations are from all over the world, it is needless to say that they comprise a blend of classic and contemporary structures. When asked about whether he found either of the two challengings, he says, “The challenges came while illustrating classic houses because contemporary ones are more simplified and have geometric shapes such as squares and circles whereas classic houses are made of multiple layers and carved designs. I would say that classic houses are more difficult to draw than contemporary houses. Creating classic houses through digital art is a challenge.”

Sajid’s illustrations are filled with bold colours and vivid patterns. When asked about how he manages to balance out the colour composition, he says, “Striking the balance between different colours comes only with practice. When I start thinking of drawing, I initially think of the overall look and feel, so I try to capture that feeling I got from the scratch into the final product. Everything depends on the artists’ freedom, but if you share your work on social media, taking the audience’s perspective into consideration is important. I cannot simply add random colours to my illustrations, especially if I’m drawing a portrait or human figure as colours for such digital art must be chosen carefully.”

His portraits comprise striking facial details as well as convey the depth of the character. “I cannot simply add random colours to my illustrations, especially if I’m drawing a portrait or human figure as colours for such digital art must be chosen carefully. For me, drawing someone’s portrait is not a big challenge so I don’t follow the usual portrait style and try to create something interesting. This involves capturing the personality of the subject and their features into the portrait so the audience can relate to them and experience the same emotions while observing it.

Sajid has worked on a number of projects over the years, of which he recalls interesting ones for Adobe’s iPad release and Google Doodle. “For the Adobe release, the brief was to create something that was open and only bound by imagination; so I felt it had to have a good amount of fine detailing. It was a work that required a lot of patience with the composition and the process took quite some time. My takeaway from such a big project was realising that you should never stop dreaming big, no matter what.” As for the Google Doodle project, he adds, “The illustration was meant to be a tribute to the late actress Zohra Sehgal – so I had to watch a few of her movies to brush up memories of her and imbibe her grace into the illustrations. It was challenging to create a composition that was unique and yet had a nice way to stitch the typeface into it.”

While discussing the challenges an illustrator faces, he explains, “The downside to picking up projects is that sometimes it requires you to juggle work and it can take away that little bit of free time when you can just relax and observe things around you as this helps a lot with the creative process.”

When asked to give us an insight into his style, Sajid says, “I do not stick to any specific styles as I like to keep exploring different ones. My work has some natural elements, cultural inspirations, architectural touches and some surreal approaches and my favourite medium to work on is poster colour on paper but I mostly use digital art tools as it has everything. I also love watercolours, pastel and pencil.” About his process, he says, “The working process starts with scribbles and then I start sketching out my piece, after which I move into colouring. In most instances, I start painting directly without a brief in mind.” Few of Sajid’s trusty tools include Illustrator, Photoshop and Procreate.

Intrigued by his Behance bio – “The things I imagine in my head don’t exist or aren’t real, and so I’m compelled to create them the way that I see it,” On asking if he thinks artists should find inspiration from their thoughts instead of relying on external sources, he said, “I’m not quite sure, but it’s difficult to say because all the things you imagine will pop up in your brain through your inspiration, or your dream, isn’t it?” said Sajid, giving us some food for thought.

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They say imitation is the greatest form of flattery. For a designer, it doubles up as a way to pay homage to an icon and inspiration. Digital artist Pankaj Bhambri re-creates a portrait of the duo from a reference picture, adulation and following. He explains how.

Portrait

Step 01

Picked the reference image to start the portrait. Observed three things that would play an important role in the illustration – mid tone, highlights, and shadows.

Portrait

Step 02

Started with basic doodling. Worked in layers as that would help to separate elements in the composition and allow experimenting with lights.

Portrait

Step 03

Found a cardboard texture on the net. Used it as a base for the illustration which would act as a middle tone. Multiplied that layer after importing it into the composition.

Portrait
Portrait

Step 04

Refined the doodle a little more and then started with wet media brushes with the respective colour palettes. The first palette was for Lata Mangeshkar while the second one was for Asha Bhonsle.

Portrait

Step 05

Started with blocking shadows first with thick round brush of size 12 px.

Portrait

Step 06

Added black with round wet brush for more details in shadows. Downloaded ink splatter brushes from the net. Used them in different angles as highlights in the composition.

Portrait

Step 07

Used one of those brushes with scattering count 5. Refined till the desired effect was achieved. Used a round brush of 3 px for detailing with stylized black and white lines.

Portrait

Step 08

With the colour palette for Asha Bhonsle, started blocking shadows and then highlights. Lots of practice and observation of objects in different lightings helped in this job.

Step 09

Blocked with the colours in the palette choosing dark for shadows and light for highlights.

Step 10

For highlighting, used a wet round brush with white colour as a contour over it.

Step 11

Used splatter brushes for final detailings.

Step 12

Made a random flow of colour to differentiate the main object from the background. This made the composition balanced. Used writing brushes downloaded from the net on the splatter layer that separated the background.

Step 13

Added writing brushes on a new layer and filled the splatter layer with different brush sizes. Erased the edges to blend the writing with the splatter brushes.

Step 14

Used floral texture downloaded from the net to give some interesting background.

Final Portrait

Published in Issue 11

This issue also explored the Jewellery Design & Wedding Photography with some cool techniques to learn from experts in Gyaan section.

 

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The real world is rich in experiences. But the one created by our imagination has greater possibilities. Inspired by the latter, Ishan Trivedi lets his brush loose when he goes on a fantasy drive to create captivating and surprising works.

Imagination
Happy New Year 2020
The Witch

At times, things that don’t exist inspire you the most.

Artists inspired by fantasy usually create a world of their own through their work. It is like the window to the soul and mind. If one wants to create realistic art then photography is the best manifestation of the real world. But beauty lies in showing people what they have never seen before, or rather something they have never even imagined.

Imagination
A pop-up book of adbenture of Hindu's blue God Krishna
Imagination
A pop-up book of adbenture of Hindu's blue God Krishna

It’s about crossing the horizons of imagination each time to discover something untouched and unseen. Artists are lucky today, in that, they don’t belong to the Renaissance, Realism, Romanticism or Classicism era. Now is the era of experimentation.

Ganesha and Mooshak
Ganesha and Mooshak
Ganesha and Mooshak

Imagination has no rules.

Ever wonder why most of us are amazed at a child’s imagination? That’s because it is unrestricted and free, because it follows no rules. In other words, it doesn’t go through a reality check. Same works for a true artist. Because imagination takes you where no one has gone before, it is a strong base that an artist can use to take his work beyond the ordinary.

Imagination
Imagination

Imagination has no rules.

Ever wonder why most of us are amazed at a child’s imagination? That’s because it is unrestricted and free, because it follows no rules. In other words, it doesn’t go through a reality check. Same works for a true artist. Because imagination takes you where no one has gone before, it is a strong base that an artist can use to take his work beyond the ordinary.

Imagination
Imagination
Imagination
Raja & Maharaja's Character Designs

Imagination is something very personal and one can’t design according to the point of view of the audience. Successful art works the other way around. The art must be such that it gives the audience a totally new perspective.

Illustration for a book about Krishna from Scholastic
Illustration for a book about Krishna from Scholastic
Illustration for a book about Krishna from Scholastic

Where there is a character, there is a story.

When you imagine a character, you imagine it in a particular setting and context. Knowing the concept is important as it brings out the right characterisation. How else will you know who is the villain or the hero? Hence, story and character are never mutually exclusive; they are both present to complete each other .

Nimboda (A Magical Tale of India) - A Picture Book
Nimboda (A Magical Tale of India) - A Picture Book
Nimboda (A Magical Tale of India) - A Picture Book

Colours have a language of their own.

We may not realize it too often, but colours have been communicating with us for a long time. The ‘Tiranga’, for example, where each colour stands for something to make the flag meaningful. Colours have natural associations and psychological symbolism. The fact is that people feel comfortable when colours remind them of similar things. Like a shade of blue triggers associations with the sky and a psychological sense of calm and tranquility.

Illustration for 'The Enchanted Prince'
Illustration for 'The Enchanted Prince'

Owing to such importance that colours have for people, successful design requires an awareness of how and why colours communicate meanings. The point is, colours have acquired the ability to define any mood or contrast. Hence, a good sense of colour is important because it helps to define art physically in terms of shade, saturation, hue, tint etc. by giving it a deeper setting.

Illustration for 'The Enchanted Prince'

Light defines form and texture.

Otherwise, how do we know the difference between metal and glass? That’s why, lighting and shading is an important tool for artists to give definition to objects and bring the differences out. Sometimes, the colours of light and shade help create an illusion too. Such a treatment also gives an overall mystical appeal to the work, making it look dreamy and fantasy-like.

Illustration for 'The Enchanted Prince'

Beauty is the best experience for the senses.

No doubt, an idea is very important for making any painting, sculpture or illustration. However, aesthetics is also as important. Because it is the perfect kind of knowledge that senses can experience. It is what people first take notice of. In order to captivate the audience, an artist must beautifully present its final work. For that, an artist must ensure a lot many things. There must be a sense of balance, keeping in mind the proportions, colour combinations and arrangement of elements that give art its final aesthetic appeal.

Imagination

Published in Issue 05

With some of the best illustrators to political cartoonists, this issue covered independent Indian Design language.

 

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Encouraging us to make the best out the situation, Febin Raj cheers us to turn our obstacles into opportunities as the world ghts this deadly pandemic.

Pandemic - Febin raj

Q.
What inspired you to take up art as your profession?

Febin. I loved drawing even as a child, and it has only grown stronger over the years. Hence, when it came to choosing a profession, there was no second choice. I consider myself blessed to be living my passion and for making a career out of it.

Pandemic - Febin raj
Pandemic - Febin raj

Q.
Though your art journey began in watercolours, your current works are extensively digital. What is it about digital painting that draws you to it?

Febin. It is necessary to stay updated in this fast-paced world. Digital art provides us with a wide range of opportunities to challenge ourselves and to explore new dimensions of art, while also making our work a lot easier compared to conventional methods. But nothing can replace the satisfaction of painting with watercolours on a piece of paper.

Q.
Your current digital artworks possess a specific style and geometric flair. Kindly share the artistic process with us.

Febin. My style has evolved over the years, and it is not done consciously or with any plan. I execute my ideas rather spontaneously and draw inspiration from what I see around me.

Q.
Your art pieces seem to possess a strict colour palette. How do you select the colour scheme for each piece?

Febin. My works are inspired by nature, and hence, the colours are a reflection of what we can observe around us. The colour palette goes in sync with the intricate hues of nature, and I try my best to do justice to this beautiful swirl of colours around us and keep my works natural.