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Tapping into a world that’s wonderfully chaotic, digital artist Satish Gangaiah integrates new-age technology with traditional art to bring out the central and common pursuit of his core project – people.

Wonderfully Chaotic
Light Me a Dream
Wonderfully Chaotic

For the series, Urban Contours, Satish steps into the shoes of the personalities, transforming each chosen subject to more approachable characters. Wonderfully Enigmatic people with endless emotions feature in every artwork.

Wonderfully Chaotic

Wonderfully Chaotic

All characters enjoy their own space, their own perspectives in this world. They all stand alone with their own different stories and perceptions.

Wonderfully Chaotic

The urban influenced illustration style paints interpretations of the world while the colours bring honesty to the frame. Gaining inspiration from various imbalanced, irregular environments, the protagonist is always put amidst the middle of this pandemonium.

Stranger

Journey

All characters are made to be expressions of their strong personalities, displaying what they believe in and what they are. With a look and feel that gives credit to the world around us, the common story running through every creation fluctuates between freedom and just being ourselves.

LSD Smile

Published in Issue 13

Coming from a country of stories and storytellers, Indian animation professionals are sitting on a gold reserve. Yet, we are miles behind the Western world. We spoke to few leading names to find out the reason and understand the Indian animator’s sensibilities and practices The house unanimously opined that we need to develop more original ideas and also create exclusive stories for animation, rather than going the other way round…

 

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Creative Gaga - Issue 48

 

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Finding the modern in the ancient is a matter of vision and desire, to renew the old in such a way that is thoroughly transformed in not only its form and look, but its very fibre and perception. That is what illustrator Omar Gilani prefers to do through his rather fascinating interpretations.

Ancient Future
Desert Warrior Aunty.
Ancient Future

CG. Your range of work bears contemporariness as a trend that seemingly defines or represents your style. What inspired this concept and what is your idea behind it?

OG. I wanted to show what I want to see (more like giving a perspective into one’s outlook, interpretations, and perceptions). Science fiction or fantasy typically falls into very western tropes, and the subcontinent is usually ignored in those regards. That was frustrating, for me – that no one was depicting how this region may look in the future, and so I decided to give it a shot in my spare time just for fun.

Ancient Future
Pindi Boyz.

CG. What impact or effect do you intend this ‘contemporary’ or ‘modern’ element to have upon your audience?

OG. I just wanted to show that it is possible to create such kind of visuals and interpretations through such representations of everyday objects, many-a-times easily taken for granted. If anyone can look at my work and feel motivated to do something outside the box for themselves, I’d consider that a huge win for myself.

Ancient Future
Sitaar Player.

CG. What inspires you as subjects for your depictions?

OG. Just everyday things I see around me inspires me as subjects, and I easily find them worthy enough to take shape as depictions. We have a pretty rich culture and ancient history, and to wonder, visualise, interpret and finally depict how that would evolve – or not – in the next hundred to two hundred years is a rather interesting and exciting task.

Ancient Future
The Bounty Hunter.

Ancient Future

CG. What role does lighting have in your illustrations, and how do you approach and apply it?

OG. Lighting has a rather significant role in any realistic illustration. I use lighting to determine the initial composition of a piece. Dividing the canvas into simple black and white shapes to see if all the various aspects are harmonious, helps me do that. The lighting in the shot helps guide at this step, and it does go on further to play a huge role throughout the development of the piece as a whole.

Ancient Future
Smog City.

CG. How do you conceptualise what you depict?

OG. I have a fair bit of back-story for the world I’m depicting, and so it is a matter of combining a certain scenario with that back-story. Artistic elements like colours and lighting play a role in conceptualising, composing and finally executing a shot to create the final image. I approach it as thinking I’m creating a screenshot from a movie.

Ancient Future
Inner City Tourists.

CG. What kind of improvisations or changes would you like to intend to bring about in your style?

OG. I’m learning to work with 3D these days, and it’s already hugely improving my flow of work. An essential change that I would like to make is to just get better at showing what’s in my head i.e. depict more clearly and precisely the image that is conceived in the mind, such that it is represented effectively on canvas. Although, it must be noted, that is a lifelong, constantly ongoing and evolving journey.

Ancient Future
Panorama1.
Ancient Future
Departure.

Published in Issue 38

With this issue, we try to explore different views from many well-known studio owners and senior designers. While Anthony Lopez of Lopez Design shared tips on what a studio looks for in a designer, Mohar Ray from Codesign highlights the key aspects that play a significant role and make the difference in whether you are hired or not as a promising designer. Also, this issue has an insightful article on ‘Branding with reason and love’ from Itu Chaudhuri, founder ICD (Itu Chaudhuri Design) along with Siddhi Ranade, explaining his tools of story telling through his unique style of illustrations. This issue is a must read for a talented graduate to a branding expert. Order you copy and enjoy reading it!

 

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Creative Gaga - Issue 48

 

Senior art director Vineesh Viswanath explains how music has always influenced him to create the illustrations.

For Vineesh, being in the creative field has been a childhood calling. He has always been obsessed with colours, shapes, lines, strokes and the method of using them together to create illustrations. The different facets of fine arts have fascinated him, and it made sense for him to embark on this journey.

Music plays a huge role in Vineesh’s life, and that is exactly what is depicted in this art series. It inspires him and keeps him going, and this art series is a small way of appreciation towards music. The thought behind this minimal style is to bring focus to the musician, the instrument, the musical language, and the many ways of expression.

In the world of music, it is just about the musician and the expressive vibrations created through the sound, while everything else fades away. Vineesh tries to reflect the same through the simplicity of the art style. The colour palette is carefully selected to tune out the noise, yet show the vibrant emotions that music evokes in us.

Illustrations

Vineesh believes the different softwares used are simply tools that aide in the creative output. For him the objective is to tell a story that touches a chord with the audience. After deciding his story, he tries to find the best way to depict it through various tools.

Illustrations

His career thus far has witnessed numerous changes in trends and styles. Art styles change, and in the process it changes mindsets, lives and emotions, through stories. He feels, lately experimentations have been welcomed in the creative field. If you put your heart into the work, it will always resonate with a certain audience.

The world is constantly evolving, believes Vineesh. He hopes in this age of experimentation artists explore ideas and designs that reflect their own vision, even if it finds a niche audience.

Illustrations
Creative Gaga - Issue 46 - Cover

Published in Issue 46

This issue is focused on, how to design for kids, bundled with articles full of inspirations, advice and unique point-of-views from the veterans of the animation industry, illustrators, photographers, artists and many more. So, order your copy or subscribe, before print copies run out and enjoy reading this issue!

 

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Creative Gaga - Issue 48

 

For an artwork to be complete in an emotional and outstanding manner, characters and stories contribute as inevitable components. Danny Jose is a staunch follower of this theory, clearly evident in all his works.

Daaham, Malayali’s life
Naadodi, Malayali’s life

An engineer by profession but an artist and designer at heart, Danny has sketched for his entire life! The Internet and the online community of artists worked as a medium for him to polish his skills and gain confidence to step into the real world.

Characters-DannyJose-Feature-Creative-Gaga
Monkey Business

His journey began by illustrating medical procedures and scientific drawings for a journal. Alongside, he developed a taste for fine cinema only to realise that his illustrations had a major missing factor, stories. Once he incorporated these stories in his work, then came in his big break of being hired as a story-board artist.

Illustration for Dunzo.in
Characters-DannyJose-Feature-Creative-Gaga
Monkey Business

Constructing scenes and shots like in cinema and incorporating stories in them, Danny prefers to have characters in all his illustrations as they bring forth the emotional aspect of the scenario.

Illustrations for Sasken Technologies for their annual report

His personal projects serve as a platform for him to express his own design-style and storytelling. He very gracefully, transformed his explorations of shapes and poses into monkeys from different walks of life, defining his genre of art and style.

Illustration for Sasken Technologies for their annual report
Characters-DannyJose-Feature-Creative-Gaga
Monkey Business

With his clients reaching out to him for his way of art and story-telling, he uses this strength to his advantage to move forward. Believing in the core principles of mutual understanding, trust and respect in collaborative work, Danny is still on the hunt for his ‘A’ team to expand his work profile.

Characters-DannyJose-Work-Creative-Gaga
Monkey Business
Characters-DannyJose-Feature-Creative-Gaga
Monkey Business
Issue 44 - Creative Gaga

Published in Issue 44

Who doesn’t want to become famous, when everyone knows your name and especially for us designer, it is the basic dream every design student or young artist dream. But behind every successful studio, artist or designer there are stories of challenges, struggles and their unique solutions to these. With this issue, we interviewed many well-known names from the creative industry and found their different learnings and experiences behind making their own self as a brand. So, if you are looking to establish yourself as a brand in the creative market or already in the process of it, this issue is a must-read. Full of insights and inspirations from the best of the talents, this issue is waiting to reach your desks.

 

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Creative Gaga - Issue 48

 

Juan Casini is a multidisciplinary designer juggling various mediums and keeping his passion alive by traveling and designing. He is a free spirit who loves to draw, travel and experience new things. Here, he talks about his journey and inspirations of becoming a designer.

The Snow Island.
SkyMath - Educational App
The Turtle Island.

CG: How did your tryst with design begin?

Juan: I started working as a 2D game artist for a video game company while I was in the early years of college. I learned a lot there and it was the perfect way to start exploring the video game industry and understand how such a complex product as a game is made. I found that I could really use my illustrations skills there so I focused entirely in the video game field and I worked in more than 50 game developments since then.

 

Today, design for mobile apps is my main area of expertise, collaborating in small-scale game development for indie studios to major developments and educational apps.

Hanuman.
Ishtar. A personal project to show how animals can be gods for many cultures, mythologies and religions across the world.

CG: Any role models who inspired you early in life?

Juan: My father used to draw with me when I was a child and I’ve always been supported to get involved in artistic studies. I am very lucky for the education I got at such an important time of formation of a person, as is the childhood. But the most important thing is that they always encouraged me to do what I love. So I can definitely say that my parents are my role models

Space Cantina Game

CG: What influences you for your artworks?

Juan: I really like Japanese anime and the way they handle expression and visual impact. I’ve watched a lot of series and movies, thus animation and Manga are a great influence for me. I also believe nature is art in its pure form, so I keep traveling and constantly learning by watching and living on this beautiful planet.

Travel
Mammoth in Istanbul. A personal project, done when Juan started the freelance journey
Anunnaki. A personal project to show how animals can be gods for many cultures, mythologies and religions across the world.
Cebolla in Tokyo. A collection of postcards of our nomad journey with Flor Bisagno.
Live Forever. Contribution to a t-shirt design contest for Backseries (Spain).

CG: What do you want to express through your artworks?

Juan: I always try to give the best of me in all the projects I get involved in, and that means not only putting your best energy on it but also try to create a powerful and stimulating experience for the user or audience. So I try to keep the level of expression very high, adding many details and playing a lot with the colour palette, so no matter what the product is about, the eyes of the viewer can be positively affected in a more subtle and deep visual experience.

The Thunder Island.
The Rain Island.

CG: How do you avoid creative burnout or what do you do incase you feel creatively exhausted?

Juan: Initially during the early days of my freelance career I found myself working for too many hours on too many projects at the same time. Eventually, I realised that organisation and discipline are essential but it’s also important to take days off, rest well, go out and explore nature to have refreshing and exciting experiences as much as possible. It’s imperative to find your own rhythm, but most important, finding what you love to do and stop seeing your job as an obligation. It takes time and a lot of energy to stay away from the comfort zone, but if you can accomplish that I promise that it can change your life completely. Nowadays, a creative burnout with this nomad journey is really rare, when you are constantly discovering new places and cultures! It is just the best for your mind and soul

Crypto Tower Game
Crypto Tower Game

Published in Issue 33

We all face it! But everyone has their own unique way to come out of it, in this issue we try to explore different ideas of handling the ‘Creative Burnout’. The most common of all was #travelling, through everyone do it in their own unique style. Like Luke Ritchie from South Africa finds the nature and mountains as the best source of inspiration while Sushant Ajnikar says riding his bike and meeting four-legged loyal friends, dogs, on the way is the best way to learn. So, pack your bags and don’t forget to subscribe your copy before you leave!

 

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Creative Gaga - Issue 48

 

The realisation of your idea doesn’t have to be technically correct, but it has to look authentic and believable. That’s how your stories find their way to the heart and mind of the audience. Gaming Studio Grafit Studio shares tricks that make learning this art easier.

Fantasy Stories
Warrior
Fantasy Stories
Official
Fantasy Stories
End of the Story
Fantasy Stories
Dancer
Fantasy Stories
Barrel Through

Almost all stories are alike.

That’s the hard truth, however creative you think you might be. Therefore, the challenge is to present them differently, make them special in some new way. One needs to strive to make made-up stories come to life, to make a beholder believe in whatever is happening on the screen. This trick is not the easiest thing in the world, but it’s worth learning. As soon as you have an idea of how the details work, it becomes easier to ride the whirlwind. Understanding the very core of the subject gives an ability to create believable lighting, surfaces, materials, etc.

Fantasy Stories
Snake Girl
Fantasy Stories
Field Marshall Duda Agitator
Fantasy Stories
Pathfinder
Fantasy Stories
Asian Varior
Fantasy Stories

The plot comes first.

No matter how great your character is, with the poor idea, it is a lost cause. Even super-tough attitude and superhero outfit won’t conceal the weakness of a raw plot and poorly written dialogues. A good plot’s purpose is to reveal something about the characters, confront them with thought-provoking choices, throw them in a situation where their personality gets exposed. The appearance, costume and other details follow this core theme established by the overall plot.

Fantasy Stories
Fantasy Stories
Satyr
Fantasy Stories
Sirens
Fantasy Stories
Fantasy Stories
Lamia

Good work is all about skill and sense.

With tools evolving, it’s becoming easier and faster to create art. But the availability of improving tools doesn’t cancel the importance of knowing what you’re doing. Without skill and sense, it’s impossible to create good, an eye-catching image with its depth and atmosphere, regardless of what tools you are using. The core idea always comes from inside. No matter which medium you are using, the basic sense of colour, anatomy, perspective and other skills are must-haves. It’s important to be mindful of technology and style while you create. Sometimes you can give your idea a boost with a proper combination of tools and skills, resulting in a better outcome.

Fantasy Stories
Fantasy Stories
Golem
Fantasy Stories
Champion of Impulse
Fantasy Stories
Gladiator

Published in Issue 15

In this issue, we invited leading Gaming professionals to share their inspirations along with their suggestions to improve the Gaming Art in India. Featuring some of the big names of Gaming Art like Vinay Vikram Singh, Sandeep Menon and Neeraj Menon along with Internationally renowned Russian studio, ‘Grafit Studio‘ and many more talented creatives. So, go ahead

 

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Creative Gaga - Issue 48

 

With the stakes of digital art soaring high in the market, have a look at some of the best Indian digital artists and get-going to be one!

Wanting to give life to your imagination? What are you waiting for! This is just the right time to start out and the right environment to be inspired from!

 

Be it replicating an image of a famous personality or creating other-worldly characters, anything and everything is possible with digital art using a simple pen-tab and digital software.

 

Follow these brilliant Indian Digital Artists and hop onto a journey of unplanned surprises and master-piece outcomes!

1. Aashit Singh

Aashit Singh is a Mumbai-based visionary artist specialising in creating visual representations of the intangible and other-worldly imagery. He feels that realism in psychedelic art is important to be able to relate to these psychedelic visions. Read the detailed article on Constructing Psychedelic Experience! featuring Aashit’s deep insights.

 


Digital Art

2. Ankur Patar

Ankur Patar, a national and international award winner, has had over 13 years of experience in the advertising industry. Accredited with being chosen as one of the best digital artists of India in 2012, he has brands like Adidas, Nike, Adobe and the likes associating him for years.

 

His recent collaboration with Adobe to recreate lost masterpieces got him into the limelight once again. He was one of the only 4 digital artists chosen from throughout the world to recreate paintings using only Adobe stock imagery.  Ankur also shared how does Digital Art help to exceed your imagination!

 


3. Archan Nair

A firm believer of creating what the heart says, Archan shifted from being a fashion major and an entrepreneur to a self-taught digital and visual artist and illustrator specialising in mixed media and digital art. He is now a Germany-based independent Indian Digital Artist with cultural roots from India. Archan calls this artwork as Psymbionic – a digital Illustration of human and the subtler elements of being human.

 



4. Jithin Roda

Jithin Roda is a freelance concept artist and illustrator based in Kerala. His passion for art got him specializing in a wide spectrum of the illustration world like pre-visualisation, concept designing, cover designing and illustrating for posters and topics in general.

 


5. Medha Srivastava

Attracted towards art depicting metaphors and thought-provoking subjects, Medha, previously a gaming artist has been fascinated by conceptualisation, ideation and realism. Concepts and character building have always aligned with the intent of her artwork.

 

Starting out with simple digital illustrations, she eventually moved on to the world of concept art. Social issues contribute to a major part of her inspirations. To be true to her style of art, which she defines as realistic with a tint of stylisation and conceptualisation, she picks up on things she sees in her vicinity like shapes, colours, patterns and textures for the visual representation of her digital masterpieces. She insists on thoughtfully mixing Realism with Conceptualisation.

 


6. Mukesh Singh

Mahabharata, the epic of epics, can be told and retold time and again, still feeling fresh and young to the receptor. Dissatisfied with the earlier visual representations of the Mahabharata, Mukesh Singh took on a journey to explore the characters of this epic through his own style of digital art and with the aim of wanting the audience of today to not just identify and accept the character’s inner selves but their outer ones too, which are external manifestations of their inner selves.

 


characters

7. Nikhil Shinde

Nikhil Shinde, an Indian digital illustrator feels that creating a character is similar to assembling the pieces of a puzzle together. He puts in his heart, mind and soul to create out-of-the-box characters and gives them a twist in a way which takes the audience by surprise!

 



advertising

8. Nithin Rao Kumblekar

Starting out in his career as an art director in an advertising agency in 2005 and having gained some experience in the field, Nithin decided to freelance as an illustrator from the year 2010, with a focus on commercial illustrations. Since then there has been no looking back and he has brands like IBM, Lenovo, Brittania, Idea cellular and alike as part of his clientele.

 

He has also collaborated with global advertising agencies like Saldo Disegni Italy, Kassett Norway, JWT Delhi and Bangalore, Leo Burnett Mumbai, Saatchi & Saatchi Bangalore, etc creating pieces of digital art to be used by them for their promotions and in other areas.

 


9. Pavan Rajurkar

Pavan Rajurkar, a young Mumbai-based freelance illustrator believes that traditional and digital art compliment and complete each other. In spite of being in the digital era, he feels that the mind is directly connected to the hand and a hand-drawn doodle is the strongest way to brainstorm, leading to an idea.

 

Pavan has worked for numerous reputed advertisement agencies and was also featured in Lürzer’s Archive’s 200 Best Illustrators worldwide in 2016.

 


Emotions

10. Pratima Unde

Accepting the challenge to create a unique beauty, Pratima Unde leaves no stone unturned to explore her subject of illustration. Specialising in expressing human emotions, she highlights these in her digital portraits through a particular technique called Giggling.

 

Focusing on subjects which are shy, she spends days with them sitting face to face, expressing the unexpressed, only to discover something new every day. This portrait is of a Joyous Rajasthani, as she likes to call it.

 


Versatile Designer

11. Rahul Arora

Rahul Arora is a Mumbai based freelance digital illustrator. Believing in the fact that versatility plays a massive role in the life of an artist, his spectrum of working typologies in the field of design is pretty wide, varying from illustrating for advertising to character designing, story-boarding, environment designing and comic books illustrations.

 

Keeping his clients in the centre of any project, Rahul feels that the designer is responsible for conveying the idea of the client through the creation of styles matching the needs of the clients; thus the style of the designer is a reflection of the clients’ sensibility and vision!

 



12. Raj Khatri

Raj Khatri is a Mumbai-based movie buff, visual designer and a digital artist who believes and lives by the fact that experimentation is the key to self-discovery. This thought has helped him create some brilliant movie posters and other artwork, only using the medium of digital art.

 

Having had more than a decade of an experience in various sectors of the field of design like websites, social media, flash animations, TV series, films and many more, he now heads the creative team at an entertainment design studio known as Marching Arts.

 


Indian thelas

13. Ranganath Krishnamani

Ranganathan Krishnamani is a free-thinker, an obsessive doodler and has a soft corner for architecture. An illustrator driven by passion, he feels that self-developed style is what contributes to the uniqueness of an artist.

 

With a keen eye for observation and a distinct point of view, Ranganathan captures and expresses the unique stories of simple everyday life through his own developed style of minute detailing in his digital illustrations.

 


14. Seerow Unni

Believing that the core idea of an artwork is to convey the message to its readers, Seerow Unni, a digital illustrator says that every artwork should be considered as a scene of a movie, as it helps in adding the missing elements, thus adding life and giving depth to the scene. Fun and witty humour are the key elements to grab peoples’ attention.

 

To be a part of the community, it is important to keep oneself updated with the latest trends and happenings of the digital design market. He feels that this year the trend is shifting to from complexity and elaborations to minimalism. He says the key is to enjoy the process and improvise at every level.

 


Characters Shreya Shetty

15. Shreya Shetty

Balancing fantasy and realism, Shreya Shetty creates characters dictating a sense of otherworldliness, yet being anatomically and functionally viable. Following certain thumb rules like relating the character to its environment and keeping the background subtle, she has mastered the art of creating original, believable fantasy characters on a digital screen.

 

She believes that the right expressions and poise can create a memorable moment that will stick with the audience even after the story is over.

 


16. Sri Priyatham

Earning his very first commission by turning his bedroom into a studio during his student days motivated and inspired Sri Priyatham to transform his love and passion for illustration into his profession. To have a free-flowing lifestyle and working on his own terms and conditions, he chose to work as a freelance illustrator creating digital art pieces.

 

The social platform of Facebook helped him communicate and promote his artwork and get commissioned. The reach of other social platforms like Instagram, Reddit and Imgur worked wonders for him to get in touch with a global clientele from the continents of America, Europe and Australia.

 



17. Sukanto Debnath

With an experience of living in changing surroundings and different cultures, Sukanto Debnath, a Hungary-based Indian digital artist explores human behaviour and body language through his extensively detailed yet sketchy illustrations.

 

He believes that travelling and exposure to various folk arts and cultures opens up an artist’s mind to think beyond the usual, thus resulting in mature design. The global artist has created this digital painting called ‘People in Groups’ where he expresses the facial features of Hungarian locals and their body language.

 


Illustrations

18. Uday Mohite

Uday Mohite is a digital-caricature specialist and paints characters believing them to be a piece of art! He does a deep research to understand the features that define and describe the subject of his digital illustration and then exaggerates certain components like colours or characteristic features to start a conversation with the viewer.

 


19. Vishnu

With an impeccable passion for drawing and sketching, Vishnu tries to achieve perfection in all of his artworks. With only an experience of a short span of 5 years in the world of art, he has mastered the skills and techniques of digital art in his own way, developing his own personal style.

 

To be the perfectionist he wishes to be, Vishnu puts his mind, body and soul into his work to achieve an intricate level of detailing, which is visible in all his sketches.

 


Vivek_Feature - Amitabh Bachchan

20. Vivek Mandrekar

Currently working as the chief creative designer for movie posters under the banner of Yash Raj Films, Vivek Mandrekar has come a long way from being just a self-taught artist to mastering the art of creating posters for the film industry.

 

Face expressions tell stories and Vivek has captured these different stories of many great legends of the Indian film industry through his digital paintings. One such famous artwork is that of the Bollywood star, Mr Amitabh Bachchan, created using Adobe Photoshop and Wacom pen-tablet.

CURRENT ISSUE
Creative Gaga - Issue 48

 

The challenge of capturing the energy and excitement when illustrating for sport is difficult to achieve. Shreedhar Sutar’s illustrations not only achieve it but also appeal broadly with an optimistic tone. He dwells on his techniques of maintaining that energy in each sport star while bringing character to life. He takes us through his processes.

Energy

Step 01

Draw on a paper sheet to get the hint about the main force and structure of the drawing. Later took the rough drawing to Photoshop and starts working on light source and shadow in outline with the help of Wacom tablet.

Energy

Step 02

With calligraphy brushes applied basic shade for a base colour. Here it’s better to know a grey scale in detail, as the skin style will be very important for the final output. Skin tone is prepared by overlapping of multiple layers, which makes skin look more realistic. Used the same process for the hairs & clothes too, using dark and middle tones with some highlight. For beard used stippling style to get the realistic feel using both mouse and pen tablet.

Energy

Step 03

The clothes are as important as skin to create that realistic look. Drapery and fold have been achieved by creating shade and highlight. For bright reflections kept the path open with white colour. To make the clothes more appealing also embedded logo and text on the T-shirt. Also kept a single light source to create the depth in illustration. Used the same process for other objects like a hockey stick, socks and shoes. To work further merged all layers into one.

Step 04

Used smudge tool at 60% opacity to create stokes which shows the force behind the action. Outlines may look a bit blur after using the smudge tool, so created a black outline around to maintain the sharpness. Additionally applied a motion blur effect to half of the image to achieve speed.

Step 05

To make the illustration more believable used the watercolour splatters, droplets, flow and strokes to portray the sweat, as it would be an important part of the illustration. Applied watercolour flows and white spatters to merge the background and the character. Then finally applied shadows to create the depth.

Step 06

The final illustration achieved.

Published in Issue 28

This Illustration Special is best to know why and how illustration as a popular medium is taking the design world by storm! From evolution of illustrations to its place in the world today, renowned designers and illustrators like Abhishek Singh, Mukesh Singh, Archan Nair, Alicia Souza, Raj Khatri with some international talent such as Fil Dunsky from Russia, Iain Macarthur and Richard Field from UK, who live and breathe illustration, would be the right people to gain some insight from. With many more talents to explore with great insights and excellent techniques, again a fully packed issue is waiting to amaze you!

 

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CURRENT ISSUE
Creative Gaga - Issue 48

 

Gal Shir is an Israel based self-taught digital artist who creates digital illustrations on iPad Pro using Procreate App and Apple Pencil. He has been freelancing since the age of 16 and later worked with many creative studios/ startups including Promo.

 

He founded Color Hunt, which provides colour palettes with several combinations to make life easy for the creatives. He leads the design at Lemonade, along with consulting and helping entrepreneurs to establish design thinking. Gal has collaborated with brands like Apple, Adobe, LG, Procreate, Affinity, Dribbble, 9GAG, UNILAD, The Bright Side, and more.

 

Connect Here

 

It’s not enough to create a character. What makes a difference is the way you portray it. Illustrator Neeraj Menon works on one of his creations to render it a disposition that presents it in a new light. He explains the process.

Render
Render

Step 01

Started out with a basic sketch. Used a fairly large canvas, usually A4 at 300 dpi, in case you would want to print it out later. It also gave enough room to zoom in and add detail.

Render
Render

Step 02

Rendered the basic details on the face. Modified the drawing on the left arm slightly. Used only grayscale on the majority of this painting. Realised this was the best way to ensure values and separations remained correct. Blocked in the shape of the goggles and added in the orange lenses. This would be one of the only actual colours used in the entire piece. Used a basic calligraphic brush for most of this painting.

Render

Step 03

Blocked out the basic shape of his flowing coat. This would help form his silhouette. Also blocked out basic folds and lines at this step. Cloth is usually tough to render and it helps a lot to have ready reference at hand. It’s best to shoot your own reference if possible.

Render

Step 04

Added in highlights and detail on his coat, such as bullet holes and tears/rips. Also, to help in the design of his armour, opened up alchemy, a free drawing software. Saved the design and imported into a Photoshop file. The free-flowing shapes in alchemy helped come up with a unique design which could be used as a base for the armour design.

Render
Render
Render

Step 05

Started fleshing out the armour here. Added shapes and light. Also, added some screws all over it. Used a simple custom brush. Also, at this stage, added a layer of flat purple in pin light mode to give the greys a bit of colour. It helped bring out a sterile sci-fi look.

Render

Step 06

Modified the armour further and added more light and shade.

Render

Step 07

Added a hexagonal pattern on the armour to suggest high tech. Used a brush for this to control the size of the pattern. Used the texture setting on the brush and paint it in.

Render

Step 07a

Added some fiery/glowing edges to the bullet holes on his jacket and small wisps of smoke from them.

Render
Render

Step 08

Added in bullet impacts on his armour. Added some stitching on his armor which was a simple modification to the calligraphic brush and added some decals overall on his armour.

Render

Step 09

Moved back to the face again. Finished rendering the hair and added some cuts/wounds on his face. Used custom brushes for some of these, which were mostly scanned splatter effects. Such brushes can also be downloaded online.

Render

Step 10

Added in details on the goggles. Used a pattern to suggest texture/material on the frame.

Render

Step 11

Rendered the right hand and then moved on to the gun. Looked for references that would help.

Render

Step 12

Added light shade on the gun and added some screws and glowing bits to suggest it came from the same family as the goggles and armour.

Render
Render

Step 13

Used some photo reference to get the swordhand right. Added some rim lighting around the edges and tightened up some details futher. Removed the shell casings from the gun. Added a pattern in the background and some sparks with a red gradient in the foreground for an added visual boost. Also added a noise filter in overlay mode on the image for added texture.

Render

Step 14

Arrived at the final image.

Published in Issue 15

In this issue, we invited leading Gaming professionals to share their inspirations along with their suggestions to improve the Gaming Art in India. Featuring some of the big names of Gaming Art like Vinay Vikram Singh, Sandeep Menon and Neeraj Menon along with Internationally renowned Russian studio, ‘Grafit Studio‘ and many more talented creatives. So, go ahead

 

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