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Jagadeesh Narayanan is an artist by passion on a quest to make art accessible to all. Art is the tranquility that he has always yearned for and wants to share with the world to make a difference.

Digital Oil Painting
Watercolour

Using art to make a difference in someone’s life, especially those going through trying times, Jagadeesh Narayanan’s philosophy is simple. Watercolour painter by passion and a digital artist by trade, he can find inspiration in the most mundane of things and truly turn them into works of art.

Digital Oil Painting

CG. Was there a pivotal moment when you decided to follow your path as an artist?

Jagadeesh. I was in sixth grade when I witnessed someone drawing for the first time. I wanted to watch him draw, but he wouldn’t let me near him, claiming that if I stood nearby, he wouldn’t be able to concentrate. I tried peering in through his window but was caught and forced to leave.

Watercolour

That’s when I decided to start drawing for myself and the pivotal moment when I knew I wanted to become an artist. I was constantly drawing, and then finally in 12th standard, I realised I didn’t want to waste any more time and study art professionally. A typical Indian household, my parents objected, but I was adamant and kept my dream alive despite being told that I can’t live my life by studying art, and 2 years later I did it.

Digital Oil Painting
Digital Oil Painting

CG. As a trained artist, could you talk about some specific techniques and insights you acquired through a formal education in art which contributed to the artist you are today.

Jagadeesh. I passed the Kerala Government Certificate Examination. Following that, I did not pursue a professional degree, but learned basic computer skills, Photoshop and other design software. I can quickly learn any software because, unlike most people, I did not learn the tools first and then design. As a result, I am capable of utilising any software in a variety of ways.

Digital Oil Painting
Digital Oil Painting

Because I could not afford to study professionally, I use my knowledge for the benefit of the common man. Everyone should be able to afford a digital painting, so that they can display good art in their homes. Meeting Milind Mullick Sir was a turning point for me. I was able to observe him at work, which was a huge source of inspiration for me, and I launched my YouTube channel as a result teaching everything about watercolour painting. I realised that many people were experiencing the same difficulties that I had when learning to paint. As I was mostly self-taught, I decided to share my knowledge and guide such aspirants.

Digital Oil Painting

CG. As a painter of landscapes and realistic portraits, you make use of vibrant colours in interesting ways to add a unique touch to your paintings, can you elaborate on that?

Jagadeesh. It is inspired by my mentor Milind Sir. I had been following him since I first began studying art, and his use of colour inspired me even after I met him. Also, who doesn’t enjoy bright colours?

Digital Oil Painting
Digital Oil Painting

CG. Do you have an essential philosophy that guides you in your creative expression?

Jagadeesh. My philosophy is to make art accessible to people from all walks of life. My work is inspired by the idea of making a difference in someone’s life through art, especially for those going through difficult times. Watercolour painting is both exhilarating and a passion for me. I paint watercolours primarily for the satisfaction and fulfilment of my mind. However, I believe that digital is easily accessible to people, and that it can be used to create oil paintings digitally.

Digital Oil Painting

“Everyone should be able to afford a digital painting for their homes and Jagadeesh Narayanan, a prolific artist is on a quest to make art accessible to all with his multi-disciplinary skills in painting.”

Watercolour

CG. With a diploma in graphic design and experience in the fields of web and textile design, how do you bring the concepts of design into your art?

Jagadeesh. Designing has had a significant impact on my work. The use of album arrangement has greatly aided me when creating digital portraits. Because of my design skills, when I do a painting by hand, I can decide how to improve it, whether by using different colours, changing the brightness, or changing the composition. I can predict the outcome right away. I can plan a manual painting well using digital software because I first learned design.

Digital Oil Painting
Watercolour

CG. Is there a specific environment or material that’s integral to your work?

Jagadeesh. I am simple. I prefer plain air for watercolours and find subjects even in the mundane of things from my daily life. I’m not particular about the environment I work in as long as I can be inspired from nature and my surroundings. I want to create art that inspires others. For digital paintings, I’m confined to using a system and software, but my designs and artistic knowledge add that unique touch.

Watercolour

CG. What piece of your artwork would you like to be remembered for?

Jagadeesh. I prefer fantasy paintings but haven’t had the opportunity to fully explore them. My favourite is one that combines a peacock feather and a fish. I held an exhibition of such paintings titled “Roopantharam” which included some of my favourite fantasy creations. Such paintings take a lot of time and effort, with drawing, sketching, and planning over multiple iterations. Although I would like to be remembered for my work through such creations, the truth is that I do more watercolour landscape work.

Digital Oil Painting

CG. If you mentored younger artists who are beginning their art careers what single most important piece of advice would you offer?

Jagadeesh. I’ve noticed that everyone wants to start with a full-scale painting, but the foundation is drawing. Move on to painting only after you have mastered your drawing skills. Your drawing ability will be reflected in your painting. Second, even if you are a traditional artist, learn digital art as well. With new insights, we can bring about changes and improvements. We live in the digital age; the only way forward is to update ourselves. If you are interested in art, you should definitely acquire some digital skills as well.

Digital Oil Painting
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Kerala-based illustrator, Ajith Ppaan, speaks elaborately on how one can develop one’s style to be versatile by consciously practicing it in one’s craft.

Ajith Ppaan
Display Punch

Ajith’s Journey in his own words.

I graduated in Fine Arts from the Raja Ravi Varma, college of Visual Arts, Alleppey, in 2016. After that, in 2017 I joined Reliance Education as a 2D tutor, which was a good time for me in terms of skill development. After a year, in 2018 I joined a creative agency called “Stick No Bills,“ a branding firm.

Man with Telephone created on Procreate
Ajith Ppaan

There, I did a number of projects related to kid’s clothing brands in particular. Two years later, I relocated to another branding start-up called “Pixpill” as Creative Director, where I worked on some interesting projects, mostly illustration-based. In 2022, however, I decided on trying out freelancing and now I’m a full-time freelance illustrator.

Ajith Ppaan
Spirit

Honing his approach consciously, Ajith has been practicing diversity in his subjects and the way he projects and portrays them, so as to build and bring about a strong sense of versatility in his very style itself.

The Monkey King

“Adapting and compositing will eventually create skill-sets which can be versatile in terms of style,” he says.

Ajith Ppaan
It seemed so perfect, but ended
Ajith Ppaan
Illustration for Paramaathma

Album and Magazine Art

Ajith considers himself fortunate to have worked with some of the most talented musicians on their album art. Elaborating on them, he points out:

CNR Mafia (UAE-based band):

The idea was to make an illustration with complexity and style which reflects the vibrancy of the band and its genre itself.

Illustration for CNR Mafia

Maarap-Matadoria (Kerala based band):

Here, the genre was so energetic and vibrant that I decided to create a motion through the illustration and its gradients. It eventually impressed the crew and we proceeded with the style.

Album Cover - Matadoria

In the Dark:

Vishnu Varma (an independent artist from Kerala) had an idea, the illustration topic was a man’s midnight dream projecting an emotional connection between him and an unknown girlfriend. I decided to show the singer’s portrait to represent the dreamer and compose the dream through multiple slices of his head, thereby depicting the pain in the lyrics.

Ajith Ppaan
Album Cover - In the Dark
Lines in Head

Ajith and 3D

Ask him about his 3D ventures and he says, “I’m a newcomer in the 3D style actually. I love to explore new and versatile media applications to develop my skills. I’m working on my 3D types on an application called, “Nomad Sculpt “ which is a small build software like Blender or Maya.”

Ajith Ppaan
A poison Picked
Ajith Ppaan
Antakshari poster Vol-2
Catching the Sunrise

Ajith’s Love for Portraits.

Ajith has been trying to create portraits with emotional reflections. By compositing elements from personal life, the whole work can convey the story, he feels. Elaborating on this, he says, “I have loved to draw portraits since my college time. I used to live-study people from college as a part of my studies. From there I’ve met and spent time with so many talented artists. I got to know more about the process of doing a portrait through immense observation. ‘Day-to-day practice and respectable time investment in research’ is Ajith’s mantra to success.

Ajith Ppaan
Portrait - Kohinoor
Portrait of Dev Patel

You can learn more about Ajith Ppaan and his works on Behance and follow him along on Instagram too.

Album Cover

For more exciting behind-the-scenes coverage of other artists & illustrators from around the world be sure to follow Creative Gaga on Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, Pinterest and LinkedIn.

CURRENT ISSUE
Creative Gaga - Issue 55

 

CURRENT ISSUE
Creative Gaga - Issue 55

 

Established illustrator Samji provides exciting insights regarding the eld of illustration, sharing his techniques, tips and tricks, while also opening up about the challenges and hurdles presented by this pandemic.

An elegance, in her pyjamas, moving through her backyard in a parallel world.
Freedom of expression.

Samji’s fondness for art was carefully nurtured since childhood. His first step into the realm of art was through the field of animation. “It was not a particularly successful stint. I began doing a few odd jobs to keep myself afloat. Following which, I took up BFA in Applied Art. But I had to drop out from that course in my third year, thus putting an end to my formal art education,” said Samji. After several years of exploration, he realised that his true love lies in the field of illustrations and thus began his career as a freelance illustrator.

A personal project titled Be Different

Brilliant, vivid colours, the gorgeous textures and zealous energy exuded by the artworks are key signatures of Samji’s illustrations. Through years of experimentation and exploration, Samji developed a distinct style, thus establishing himself as a talented illustrator in the industry.

A personal project titled Freedom of expression.
Package illustration done based on Ekpe masquerades culture
An illustration representing the research wing of Terra Money.

The bright, rich colours set Samji’s illustrations apart and give the pieces a burst of energy. “I used to work with a minimal set of colours. The hues you see in my work now are the ones I used to stay away from, simply because I was afraid of using them. I was not comfortable using highly saturated and vibrant colours. Then one day, I found the courage to get out of my comfort zone and experiment; and that made all the difference,” explained the artist.

Illustration by Samji
Mermay challenge
Illustration by Samji
Themed on Christmas

The richness and brilliance of the colours in an illustration are attained by adjusting and experimenting with the hues, saturation and brightness of a tone. “My process varies according to need. If the work is for a client, I follow the brand guidelines and other factors to set the colour palette. For personal projects, I start with random colours. I use complementary colours to differentiate between subject and background. After which, I keep experimenting till I hit the mark. In fact, HSB (Hues, Saturation and Brightness) is one of my favourite tools that I constantly use in my works,” shared Samji, illuminating the process behind his illustrations.

Illustration by Samji
Illustration by Samji
‘Me and Caverito’ based on my pet cat.

Lighting is another crucial factor in an illustration. “When it comes to lighting, I focus on highlights. I save it for the end because highlights are to an illustration what a soul is to a body; it provides life to the image,” commented the illustrator.

A podcast illustration themed on the power of music.

But the colours in our lives dulled at the wake of Coronavirus pandemic which shook this world. Our lives were drastically altered, and the pandemic affected various walks of life in various degrees. Hence, it is but natural to strive to understand the extent of its effect on the art industry in India. “The pandemic could have had monstrous effects on the art industry if not for the Internet and social platforms like Instagram. As with any change, adapting can take time, and it can affect your mental health. This is especially true for artists who are constantly seeking to get inspired, be it by taking a walk or talking to a person’s face to face. It is challenging for an artist to keep his creative juices flowing when his wings are cut,” commented Samji.

Illustration by Samji

A significant part of the art industry is freelancers. Providing critical insight into the lives of the freelancers, the illustrator observed, “As a freelancer, I’m used to working from home; hence I didn’t find much of a difference. The mass layoffs resulted in an increase in the number of freelancers which in turn led to more competition within the industry. The only way for us to keep up is by carving a niche and standing out in professional platforms, which is difficult to many, including me.

Illustration by Samji
Annoying Colleagues
Illustration by Samji
A digital artwork illustrated to be the cover art for a podcast.

It is quite a challenge to produce quality works and maintains your visibility in social media at the same time,” said Samji. And to cope with these sudden changes, artists devised various methods to stay active professionally. “I marked my presence in platforms where I could get potential work enquiries or opportunities. These included social media like Instagram, where we have to constantly stay engaged and be easily available,” explained the artist.

Illustration by Samji
This was inspired by a photograph that I had seen in Fubiz page.

But it was not all grey and dreary, the pandemic also resulted in positive changes and improvements. “The work inquiries, collaborations and potential clients increased during this pandemic for me. I am not sure of the exact reason – perhaps it is because of my improved effort at the online presence or the lack of full-time employees in firms and a higher rate of outsourcing to freelancers,” said Samji.

Illustration by Samji
One of the figure illustration done for a company based in U.K

With proper planning and smart management, it is indeed possible to cope with the hurdles of the pandemic. Offering invaluable strategies, the artist shares his suggestions, tips and tricks to fellow illustrators and freelancers. “We have proved that it is possible to work from home without any hassle. The next step is to maximise our visibility and availability across all platforms, especially if you are a freelancer. Another important step is to build a reliable community since we cannot downplay the extent of security that a well-built community can bring in a situation like this. So, I’d suggest that we all make an effort in bringing this community up. At the same time, please take care that you do not overwhelm yourself with the use of social media by comparing your work with someone else’s. Try to limit your use to get inspired or promote your work and not bring yourself down”.

Illustration by Samji
Fenix Getting ready for Halloween
UnibroW

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Encouraging us to make the best out the situation, Febin Raj cheers us to turn our obstacles into opportunities as the world fights this deadly pandemic.

Pandemic - Febin raj

Q.
What inspired you to take up art as your profession?

Febin. I loved drawing even as a child, and it has only grown stronger over the years. Hence, when it came to choosing a profession, there was no second choice. I consider myself blessed to be living my passion and making a career out of it.

Pandemic - Febin raj
Pandemic - Febin raj

Q.
Though your art journey began in watercolours, your current works are extensively digital. What is it about digital painting that draws you to it?

Febin. It is necessary to stay updated in this fast-paced world. Digital art provides us with a wide range of opportunities to challenge ourselves and explore new dimensions of art, while also making our work a lot easier compared to conventional methods. But nothing can replace the satisfaction of painting with watercolours on a piece of paper.

Pandemic - Febin raj

Q.
Your current digital artworks possess a specific style and geometric flair. Kindly share the artistic process with us.

Febin. My style has evolved over the years, and it is not done consciously or with any plan. I execute my ideas rather spontaneously and draw inspiration from what I see around me.

Q.
Your art pieces seem to possess a strict colour palette. How do you select the colour scheme for each piece?

Febin. My works are inspired by nature, and hence, the colours are a reflection of what we can observe around us. The colour palette goes in sync with the intricate hues of nature, and I try my best to do justice to this beautiful swirl of colours around us and keep my works natural.

Pandemic - Febin raj
Pandemic - Febin raj

Q.
Your artworks reflect your love for travel and nature. How did this pandemic challenge your creativity and artwork, especially since we were required to stay at home?

Febin. This pandemic did not challenge my creativity. I tried to see this as an opportunity to explore my limitations and push my boundaries. It is indeed true that we were all confined within the four walls, but our creativity and ideas were never confined. Even with these limited resources, I tried to bring out the best in me.

Q.
What are the effects of the pandemic on the art industry? Were there any unexpected hurdles?

Febin. The art industry, just as all the other industries, faced certain setbacks due to this pandemic, but it is slowly picking up the pace. If we convert every hurdle we face into an opportunity, I’m sure we’ll thrive. That is what I’m trying to do right now.


Q.
Freelancers are some of the most affected by this pandemic. What is the market like for freelancers now?

Febin. Just as in all the other professions, freelancers have faced some difficulties too. The market is not as commendable at this point in time, but the situation is undoubtedly improving. Personally, the pandemic has only brought new opportunities and fabulous projects for me.

Pandemic - Febin raj
Pandemic - Febin raj

Q.
How are the art agencies and studios coping with the pandemic? How are they supporting the freelancers through this crisis?

Febin. Art agencies and studios are indeed going through a difficult situation due to this crisis, but I believe that they are extending every possible support to freelancers. During the pandemic, I got the chance to collaborate with a few international studios.

Q.
When ‘Work From Home’ is the new norm, do you see any long-term changes in the way freelancers work?

Febin. The profession of freelancing, as we see it today, has evolved over the years. Any and every change is gradual. Hence, it is tough to predict how the concept of freelancing would be perceived in the future. But as of now, freelancing is linked to freedom and that would remain the same, regardless of any change.

Pandemic - Febin raj


Pandemic - Febin raj

Q.
Has the working style of art agencies and studios changed? Do you think this change will last post-pandemic?

Febin. The working style has definitely changed into a whole new dimension since the resources are limited. This pandemic proved to us that whatever the situation may be, there is always a way out. Perhaps some of the positive aspects of this new working style might stick with us post-pandemic.

Pandemic - Febin raj

Q.
Would you like to say a few words to your fellow artists and freelance who are fighting their way through this pandemic?

Febin. Make every obstacle your opportunity. Remember that these struggles, this crisis is not here to stay; this too shall pass. So, make the best out of the time you’ve been given, as creativity knows no bounds.

Pandemic - Febin raj

Published in Issue 51

Business, studios, agencies, freelancer all have different perspectives to handle the pandemic and hurdle it brings. While some find pandemic an obstacle which will soon fade away and on the other hand, few saw opportunities in the same. Many creatives used the past few months to reflect on their styles and horn their art. Many utilized it for collaboration opportunities with national and international creatives. This issue is a must-read if you are looking for insights, inspirations and ways to bounce back in this unlocking phase.

 


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Creative Gaga - Issue 55

 




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The real world is rich in experiences. But the one created by our imagination has greater possibilities. Inspired by the latter, Ishan Trivedi lets his brush loose when he goes on a fantasy drive to create captivating and surprising works.

At times, things that don’t exist inspire you the most.

Artists inspired by fantasy usually create a world of their own through their work. It is like the window to the soul and mind. If one wants to create realistic art then photography is the best manifestation of the real world. But beauty lies in showing people what they have never seen before, or rather something they have never even imagined.

Imagination
A pop-up book of adbenture of Hindu's blue God Krishna

Imagination
A pop-up book of adbenture of Hindu's blue God Krishna

It’s about crossing the horizons of imagination each time to discover something untouched and unseen. Artists are lucky today, in that, they don’t belong to the Renaissance, Realism, Romanticism or Classicism era. Now is the era of experimentation.

Ganesha and Mooshak



Ganesha and Mooshak

Imagination has no rules.

Ever wonder why most of us are amazed at a child’s imagination? That’s because it is unrestricted and free, because it follows no rules. In other words, it doesn’t go through a reality check. Same works for a true artist. Because imagination takes you where no one has gone before, it is a strong base that an artist can use to take his work beyond the ordinary.

Imagination
Imagination

Imagination has no rules.

Ever wonder why most of us are amazed at a child’s imagination? That’s because it is unrestricted and free, because it follows no rules. In other words, it doesn’t go through a reality check. Same works for a true artist. Because imagination takes you where no one has gone before, it is a strong base that an artist can use to take his work beyond the ordinary.

Imagination
Imagination


Imagination
Raja & Maharaja's Character Designs

Imagination is something very personal and one can’t design according to the point of view of the audience. Successful art works the other way around. The art must be such that it gives the audience a totally new perspective.

Illustration for a book about Krishna from Scholastic

Illustration for a book about Krishna from Scholastic

Illustration for a book about Krishna from Scholastic

Where there is a character, there is a story.

When you imagine a character, you imagine it in a particular setting and context. Knowing the concept is important as it brings out the right characterisation. How else will you know who is the villain or the hero? Hence, story and character are never mutually exclusive; they are both present to complete each other .

Nimboda (A Magical Tale of India) - A Picture Book

Imagination
Happy New Year 2020

Colours have a language of their own.

We may not realize it too often, but colours have been communicating with us for a long time. The ‘Tiranga’, for example, where each colour stands for something to make the flag meaningful. Colours have natural associations and psychological symbolism. The fact is that people feel comfortable when colours remind them of similar things. Like a shade of blue triggers associations with the sky and a psychological sense of calm and tranquility.

Illustration for 'The Enchanted Prince'



Illustration for 'The Enchanted Prince'

Owing to such importance that colours have for people, successful design requires an awareness of how and why colours communicate meanings. The point is, colours have acquired the ability to define any mood or contrast. Hence, a good sense of colour is important because it helps to define art physically in terms of shade, saturation, hue, tint etc. by giving it a deeper setting.

Illustration for 'The Enchanted Prince'

Light defines form and texture.

Otherwise, how do we know the difference between metal and glass? That’s why, lighting and shading is an important tool for artists to give definition to objects and bring the differences out. Sometimes, the colours of light and shade help create an illusion too. Such a treatment also gives an overall mystical appeal to the work, making it look dreamy and fantasy-like.

Illustration for 'The Enchanted Prince'

Beauty is the best experience for the senses.

No doubt, an idea is very important for making any painting, sculpture or illustration. However, aesthetics is also as important. Because it is the perfect kind of knowledge that senses can experience. It is what people first take notice of. In order to captivate the audience, an artist must beautifully present its final work. For that, an artist must ensure a lot many things. There must be a sense of balance, keeping in mind the proportions, colour combinations and arrangement of elements that give art its final aesthetic appeal.

Imagination

Published in Issue 05

With some of the best illustrators to political cartoonists, this issue covered independent Indian Design language.

 


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CURRENT ISSUE
Creative Gaga - Issue 55

 




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The enchanting portraits of Anna Dittmann evoke different emotions. It is a right blend of real emotions showcased in a dreamy, whimsical setting using delicate detailing with natural elements. Here, she gives us an insight into her creative process and discusses how one’s passion can be moulded to create striking designs.

Enchanting Natural Portraits
Oil

Enchanting Natural Portraits
Chalice

CG: Your illustrations are mystical portraits with delicate detailing which is heavily influenced by natural elements. What fascinates you to utilise these elements in your illustrations?

AD: I love the beauty and unpredictability of nature – it perfectly complements the human face. Most of my work consists of portraits because I enjoy depicting characters and emotions. I often draw inspiration from movement and organic shapes by fusing abstract natural elements. Environment evokes a sense of mystery which is very appealing. Therefore, I tend to create soft pieces with a combination of graphics and realistic elements.

Enchanting Natural Portraits
Spore

Enchanting Natural Portraits
Ink



CG: As a digital artist, what aspects of the tool attract you the most? Do you like to work in the traditional mediums as well?

AD: Digital art gives you the freedom to make as many studies/mistakes/finished pieces without wasting materials. When it comes to working with traditional mediums, I have recently enjoyed using pastels, watercolours, and oils for personal studies and I try to incorporate the textures of these to bring a spontaneous effect in my art created digitally too.

Enchanting Natural Portraits
Petal

Enchanting Natural Portraits
Camouflage

CG: What are the key points that you take into consideration when developing an idea into a design?

AD: With the portrait as the central aspect of my work, rendering and detailing facial features is the key. I love observing unique features and painting beauty that might not be traditional, but still striking. Through my art, I hope to inspire a sense of otherworldly beauty and mystery. The balance of a realistic figure within decorative surroundings is an aesthetic that I love and often try to apply to my work.

Enchanting Natural Portraits
Myriad

Enchanting Natural Portraits
Orb

CG: Your portraits illustrations are realistic and evoke emotions. How do you manage to do so? Are there any specific tools/ elements that you incorporate?

AD: Many of my portraits deal with liberation, release, and the search for a dream state. Perhaps because that’s what art is to me. Painting is therapeutic. I create my works digitally using Adobe Photoshop CS6 and my trusty Wacom Intuos 3 tablet. Mainly use a chalky brush throughout my process, as well as various watercolour textures that I’ve found and made for a traditional feel. Normally, I start with a vague concept in mind and sketch out my idea in black and white. After tweaking the composition, values, and being generally nitpicky, I start seeking out references and refining my sketch. Next, I start throwing in textures and add colour using layer modes. Toward the end, I detail the piece and call it a day.

Enchanting Natural Portraits
Dawn



Enchanting Natural Portraits
Bauhinia

CG: How has formal education in Art and Design helped your process or creations?

AD: I attended the Savannah College of Art and Design in Georgia and received my Illustration BFA in 2015. I loved being surrounded by creative people with a similar passion for art, who pushed, taught, and inspired me on a daily basis. I think the greatest benefit was learning more about the business side of illustration through my professors who had practical experience and making connections with other artists. However, I find that art school is really what you make of it and not entirely necessary for an artistic career (aside from those majors that require a degree). In the end, I feel that most growth occurs by the time and effort you’re willing to put in for improvement, as well as being driven by self-initiated projects.

Enchanting Natural Portraits
Tigress

Enchanting Natural Portraits
Duo

CG: How important is a colour palette in design?

AD: Over the years, my style has become more muted and monochromatic. I’m drawn to works that have colour restraints and which emphasises the atmosphere. Muted hues can often lead to greater balance and provide cohesion throughout a piece. There’s a delicate vintage quality that can result in limiting a colour palette. The colours I choose are inspired by flora, fauna (particularly insects), and other artworks. Even though I tend to start in black and white and prefer limited palettes, adding hue is my favourite step. After seeing an inspiring colour scheme, there’s nothing I want to do more than paint.

Enchanting Natural Portraits
The-Forgotten-Tale-of-Larsa

Enchanting Natural Portraits
Felis

CG: What aspect of illustrating excites you the most?

AD: I love everything about art and get very excited about every project I undertake. I love all the emotions that art evokes in me; it could be the rush when something is going well or the frustration of working for hours with no fruitful outcome. It is the thrill when I find beautiful artwork, the overwhelming feeling that turns my frustration into inspiration. I consider myself so lucky that people have given me opportunities to create art both personally and professionally.

Enchanting Natural Portraits
Flood

Enchanting Natural Portraits
Fragment



CG: What is your advice to budding artists?

AD: When you love what you do, the process involved and the experience, it will definitely show in your work! Be disciplined; draw every day even if it is just a little sketch. Introspect and understand the elements that attract you the most and what you personally enjoy creating. By doing so, your own voice will emerge. Look for possibilities and gain an online presence to showcase your work; never stop making lots of wonderful things (whatever that may mean to you).

Enchanting Natural Portraits
Soul Breather

Enchanting Natural Portraits