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Onassis Cultural Centre, a space that brings together people to express and discover diverse art and contemporary culture, needed a visual identity that translated the same. And Beetroot Design shows us how it’s done.

Visual Identity
Visual Identity
Visual Identity
Visual Identity
Visual Identity

Brief/ Challenge:

Onassis Cultural Centre, a platform for artists to come together to showcase and discover contemporary bold art, required an equally bold visual identity for the season 2017-18. This Athens based institution needed the identity to be open and relevant to everyone, thus reflecting the core idea behind OCC.

Visual Identity
Visual Identity
Visual Identity

Solution:

Beetroot Design Group, a multi-award winning, Thessaloniki based design firm, explored and created a visual identity for OCC, that is made for everyone, and yet so unique. Beetroot achieved thus by putting together all the typographies from the publications and events of the season, thus portraying them all under one visual identity. For this, the firm specially created software, Flow Type, which is now available for free. The software helped handle the high volume of typographies and played a key role in their manipulation, thus resulting in expressive free-flowing words.

The overall visual identity is an explosion of energy, colours, movement and boldness. Each piece of work is vastly different in its expression, but it is beautiful how they all come together to narrate a single story.


Client: Onassis Cultural Centre
Design Studio: Beetroot Design


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Designing by developing personalities is one of the best ways to create relatable, relevant and successful campaigns, and Saatchi & Saatchi Integrated Solutions shows us how with the Nobile’s ‘Hang Loose’ campaign for the wakeboards.

Brief / Challenge:

Nobile, a Polish manufacturer is worldwide critically acclaimed for its adventure sports products like skis, wakeboards, snowboards and kiteboards. In 2017, Nobile wanted to engage young wakeboarders with their products. For this, they needed a new upbeat and relatable campaign that would catch one’s attention.

Solution:

Saatchi & Saatchi created the ‘hang loose’ concept to encourage wakeboarders to look inwards and identify with their uniqueness. For this, the agency put together five distinct personalities as themes and created five wakeboard designs around them. Each of the personalities, and thus designs, are youthful, contemporary and fun.

 

‘Shaka’ captures the elements of our childhood imagination. ‘Brah’ talks of brotherhood and adventure. ‘Aloha’ encompasses spritely feminine characteristics. ‘Akaw’ illustrates the yearning for adventure and discovery. ‘Bee3’ displays the fierce need for freedom and individuality.

Credit:

Agency

Saatchi & Saatchi IS, Poland

Client

Nobile Sports, Poland

Creative Director

Michał Pawłowski

Design Director

Rafał Nagiecki

Art Directors

Anna Caban
Bartosz Morawski
Kamil Bugno
Rafał Nagiecki

Retouching

Aleksander Bieroński
Bartosz Morawski
Kamil Bugno

3D Artist

Bartosz Morawski

Senior Copywriter

Marta Frączek

Account Director

Jakub Krawczyk

Account Supervisor

Anna Borysewicz

CEO

Malgorzata Rosiak-Brawanska

Marketing and Communication Officer

Maciej Jaźwiecki

Brand Manager

Dominika Jagodzinska

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Why do we love illustrations so much? Is it because it gives us a different perspective? Or is it the yearning for something spectacular? Maybe it’s simply to make one stop and think. These 3D installations by Peter Tarka, is all this and more. Each installation in the series takes different principles of design and explores the possibilities. The tension between the various objects in each installation creates something wonderful.

 

Peter Tarka is an art director and illustrator based in London who has worked with several renowned agencies like Saatchi & Saatchi, and for eminent clients like Apple, Honda, etc.

 

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We all look for it. From a product to a person, quality is what stands out. It’s what is most desirable. “Design without quality is like mathematics without the number zero”, believes Creative Director, Avi Sehmi. And its importance multiplies when you’re starting up a design business. Here, he tells us how quality and other factors contribute to calculated growth of your business and you as a designer.

Reemerge - Digital Art Creativegaga
Shivinity - Digital Art Creativegaga

Achieve Quality And You Can Achieve Anything

For a design business, quality work always comes first and foremost followed by networking events and the word of mouth. To hook a new client, the best way to move forward is to sit with your team and whip together a solution based pitch deck, with a simple and consistent follow-up schedule. The rule is to not push too hard or you will push them off.

King Brach Kaiju - Digital Art Creativegaga
Spuddle - Digital Art Creativegaga

Practice Makes A Master

We’re born with talent within us and inspirations around us. These vary from designer to designer. One may wish to portray an abstract world and the other might want to tell a story through accentuated body language and a surreal setting. But the question is, ‘How do you do it?’.

 

Well, learning is a step by step journey. It’s a constant dance of finessing the basics’ the composition, the tone, the quality of light, the story etc. From Wacom & Adobe to Autodesk & Pixologic, digital design software and programs is where the magic lies. Master the magic, and there’s no stopping you.

 

And of course, it’s not just what’s within the measures of your screen but also the giant world around you. Travel. Experience various cultures. Discover different designs and art forms. Whether it’s African tribal art or the Bauhaus of Germany, notice the distinction, notice the similarities.

 

Remember, your mind makes connections that are unique to you and then you get to integrate that understanding and express that in a way that’s true to you. The process is nowhere near complete as it’s a lifelong mission to patiently work away at your craft.

Mechsplorer - Digital Art Creativegaga
Asia Borg - Digital Art Creativegaga

Every Creative Mind Needs To Be A Technology Mind As Well

The design is solution based and with modern day analytics and AB testing, there are ways to measure engagement and success rates. Keeping up to date with the trends in technology and working on the way you see the world around you is not an option, but absolutely necessary. Art is open to opinion and one will always feel that there are better, worse, stranger, even cooler artists out there. In that space its better to see how others are applying the principles and techniques and apply that understanding on improving the expression of your vision. Remember, it’s not a rat race but a lifelong process. Thinking otherwise will end up exhausting you too soon.

Trod - Digital Art Creativegaga
Puppetite - Digital Art Creativegaga

Never Forget To Work For Yourself Too

Over time, you will realize that it’s not all about you and your ideas but rather about facilitating the thinking of the team, making them work cohesively and passionately, to come to the best solution. That is actual growth. With such growth comes pressure and responsibility; not only to handle a team but to also manage a client. To stay in touch with creativity and innovation, always present an alternate route to the client if you believe it adds value to them. That’s another thing that often times, the client will stay bull headed in the pitch meeting. Some may appreciate the extra mile you walked, some may totally disregard the idea. Hence, it’s always beneficial to have an outlet, like digital painting or music. It keeps you sane and creatively active. That’s your space for unleashing ideas and experimenting.

Turtleopolis - Digital Art Creativegaga

Published in Issue 23

The issue explores a topic which is close to every designer, the Business of Design. We try to understand from the experienced ones that when is the right time to open own studio and what more you should get in your toolbox before taking the plunge! We had interactions with many talented studio founders like Rajesh Dahiya, Archan Nair, Ishan Khosla, Prasun Mazumdar and Anupam Tomer. Also featuring some of the best talents around the world such as Martin Grohs from Germany and Avi Sehmi from Canada, this issue not only provide answers to many questions but also initiate many new ones to explore further! We hope you will enjoy exploring the possibility of your studio with this issue.

 


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Don’t jump to the conclusions and enter into a world of assumptions, wait till The End, know the reality and live on peaceful terms for the time after completion of a project. Anuj Prasad from Desmania shares his insights about this phase, the last mile, as he calls it.

What is the Last Mile?

It’s often seen that designers and clients start getting flustered when the project is on the brink of completion. This is the last mile and the toughest to handle, because at this stage mind is in an anxious state to complete the project and get on with the next one.

 

Most designers feel the euphoria during creative phases and lose steam as the project moves into technical and execution mode.Perhaps, the last mile is the most important mile in any passage of activity that must come to a conclusive end. It is also the most frustrating mile as one is almost there but yet not.

It is the same feeling as your plane circling around before landing or your train parked at the outer locations as it crawls to the destination.

 

Such situations make the virtual time expand to disproportionate dimension, creating a good likelihood of losing cool. Flaring up at this point is so obvious, while the challenge is to let the positive energies flow steadily.

Tough to Handle? Not Really!

Patience and perseverance is the answer.

 

It is like making a painting with a hazy idea and then evolving it into something meaningful. Yet the final strokes make all the difference. Believe it or not, but a masterpiece is differentiated from an average piece of art based on the final strokes.

The same holds good in design, sustained energy to keep improving till the end of the project, penetrating down to tweak the final details, small little modifications and refinements make all the difference.

 

Being open to inputs from the stakeholders, while responding in judiciously is an art that each one of us needs to master consciously as our experience grows.

After-Effects of the Last Mile

The last mile has the power to break long-lasting relationships. Primarily because it creates the slip between ‘completion with contentment’ and ‘completion for the heck of it’.

 

A small advisory to the team to be prepared for this phase is a good beginning. Thereafter, project managers need to take on the mantle with a focussed aim to exceed the expectations of the client at the time of completion.

The intent should be to pair with the client and run the last mile as a true companion to touch the finishing line with aplomb and give a high five to each other!

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Critics, admirers and friends have in unison called his work controlled explosion of energy and movement. Tom J Manning believes this is true as it is his conscious effort to evoke positive and creative energy through his works. He presents an account of his design beliefs, thoughts and practices.

Evoking Positive and Creative Energy
Nike Wild

Personal Project

Mind Over Matter

Moving Images Are More Alive Than Static

I am fascinated by the flow of time, particularly the moments that may never be repeated. I also realise that nothing is ever truly still. With these themes in mind I make very quick strokes using special custom brushes. Smudging and fast scratchy pencil lines add to this effect. The theme of movement relates to the energy in my work. I always add simple lines to the outside of an image to make it ‘move’ even if it is portrayed as a static object.

Vinyl Cover

Evoking Positive and Creative Energy
Vinyl Cover

Repair Album

Contrast Adds Depth

I like to keep my images bright. That’s why I use vibrant colours, mainly orange. I find that I can isolate the brightness of the colours by using grayscale, which makes them stand out almost like highlights. I tend to work in darker colours first before layering brighter colours on top. I feel that this helps to create a more indepth kind of image.

Personal Project

INTERNAL CONFUSION.

Personal Project

Love and Pride

MUSE BOOK COVER.

Connect Comes From Positive Emotions

Most of my work is open to interpretation, especially the abstract work. When I do portraits I want the audience to understand who the person is and what they do and perhaps a glimpse into their personality. I also try to invoke happiness, content, hope, sadness and change within my images. My style always attempts to make good out of the bad, light out of the dark. Quick and vibrant strokes of colour represent that creative and positive energy.

Alberto De Tenis Illustrations

Alberto De Tenis Illustrations

Free To Pick, Think And Draw

In nature you can see so many things moving, so many colours and varieties. I pick them up in abundance and use them in my work. Like, the quick strokes in my paintings are inspired from Leafy Sea Dragons. Or, the orange comes from the colour of the Malay Lacewing Butterfly. More importantly, I find mixed media to be free and expressionistic which is perfect for my style and the themes I wish to communicate. It also allows me to keep my work traditional and raw. Often a single image could contain as many as 15 different media all mixed together with a digital finish.

Linkin Park, Musical Illustrations

Linkin Park, Musical Illustrations

Linkin Park, Musical Illustrations

Linkin Park, Musical Illustrations

Linkin Park, Musical Illustrations

Published in Issue 16

We always wish we had someone to show us the right way of doing things when we were starting our professional journey. And that’s why we have based this issue on graduates. The cover feature is an ensemble of advice from top names of the industry. We have also showcased few talented fresh graduates from across the country, keeping with the theme. You’ll find Tom J Manning and Pallavi Sen share their international exposure as well as insights behind their unique approach. Also featuring Shreya Shetty, a prominent concept artist, who shares the secret behind the believable characters she creates. She believes, with practice and patience, anyone can be a good artist.

 


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Showcasing new packaging design trends making their mark this fresh year. Check out all that’s new and all that’s found its way from the past into the present. There’s so much to discover!

Design, design everywhere! There is so much design in this world, today, considering the wide range of applications that it has. No doubt, it has become so much more relevant now than in the past. If you take a good look at it, you realise how design has changed across various mediums in time and taken new shape and perspective.

 

With that in mind, here we highlight some of the new trends that have found their way into the existing design scenario and those that have carried on through generations to come forth even in current times. Take a good look; you never know what it might strike!

01
Flat Design

Flat is in. Something that has been in vogue for a long time now, it continues to remain the ideal way of display, presentation and functionality as well. The classic flat can be seen in various shapes and patterns up to this day. Be it squares or rectangles, the flat is here to stay.

Brandiziac - Packaging
packaging design
startup

02
Minimal Design

Minimal is the new thing to do. Gone are the days of congested, over-informative and heavily loaded design with overwhelming patterns, colours and shapes. Instead, design has grown to become not only smart but so also ‘essential’. That just makes it easier to focus attention on what really matters, doesn’t it? Clear, simple minimal.

Packaging

Designed by
Łobzowska Studio and Marysia Markowska

Inspiring Packaging

03
The Colors

Bold Colors

“Colour, colour, which colour do you want?” Remember the game? Well, when it comes to current design, the answer is pretty clear and simple – Bold colours. They strike the eye well and stand out in a space filled with so many different shades without much effort. Bold is the new gold, indeed. It does the job and in a striking fashion, that’s hard to miss.

successful packaging
Packaging

Designed by Marco Serena

Packaging

Pastel Colors

Pastel colours are quite contrary to the widespread trend of bold tones and shades. That is one of the reasons they go so well with subtle messages that need to find their way through the clutter of loud designing. It is one way to be heard and seen without creating an unnecessary fuss in a space that is filled with noisy and flashy features.

Packaging

Designed by Creatsy Official

Packaging

Designed by ChocoToy cute


04
Bold Typography

Bold is big and bold is beautiful. It speaks loud and clear, without room for doubt, thus putting across the message in a way that leaves no scope for any kind of distortion or dilution. It has, for this very reason, become so much of a trend to find big and bold typo in bold shades and backgrounds. Look around, it’s everywhere.

packaging design
packaging design
Packaging
Bombay Brasserie - The Indian Culinary Expert

05
Patterns & Shapes

Geometric

Geometry is present in everything. Right from a needle to the very solar system, everything is geometric in nature – something worth considering when it comes to design too. After all, geometry is perfection and can never feel wrong if all is in sync. So also with the design elements, the right geometry never fails.

Packaging

Designed by oraviva! designers

Packaging

Designed by IWANT design

Custom Shapes and Elements

Made to fulfill the need of the hour based on the relevant context of communication, custom shapes and elements such as hand-drawn illustrations give an unmimicable touch to branding. They need not necessarily be symmetric or “perfect” in size and proportion but more a trademark style. What better than an un-mimicable touch, isn’t it!
Inspiring Packaging
Packaging

Designed by Lucas Wakamatsu

Vintage

The term “Vintage” speaks for itself and needs no real explanation. It is synonymous of a strong level of integrity and effect that has lasted the test of time without compromising on its originality. “Vintage” will never be old; it is here to stay for a long time to come if not forever.

Inspiring Packaging
Packaging

Designed by
Auge Design and Giovanni Stillittano

Packaging

Doodles/ Illustrative

Doodle-doodle on the wall, haven’t we all? Well, this is a trend that had lasted generations and seems to never get old—’cause doodles are always fun, spontaneous and hence unique, never exactly the same as another. That is why they’ve found their way well in the design culture too and are highly impactful especially with the youth.

Packaging

Designed by Backbone Branding

NH1 - Vada Pav

06
Unusual Materials & Shapes

The unusual never fails to be noticed and make an impression. So also it is when it comes to design – everything from weird shapes to all kinds of materials, the sky is the limit. With the kind of tools available today, it is not difficult to execute that which is not so common. No shape is odd and no material is wrong.

Packaging

Designed by Backbone Branding


07
Holographic Effects

The holographic effect used to be ‘the’ thing to do at one point in time due to its shiny, glittery nature. It is here to stay, though, as it finds it s way into the current design scene. The lure of the vintage never fails to shine even in new times. Holographs would catch our eye on any given day, including today apparently.

Packaging

Designed by Anagrama Studio


08
Gradients in Packaging

Now, here’s something new and definitely worthwhile. One shade just doesn’t seem enough sometimes, so there’s a whole range of it. Just a tone lighter or a shade darker can create and put together a whole series of gradient design. Isn’t that amazing, the entire rainbow is available to put on display!

Inspiring Packaging
Packaging

Designed by Marco Serena

Packaging

Designed by Backbone Branding