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Everyone notices a unique look and style. It’s the same for a logo or branding. “They are the face of a brand.” says Ketaki K, founder of Cub Design Studio. “And the industry is all about uniqueness, memorability and connect.” Here, she takes us through some simple remedies that can brighten your skills.

Branding for Simpli Eat
Branding for Simpli Eat
Branding for Rosy Bow Fashion

Change is the only Constant.

Every brand has diverse challenges and needs customised solutions. This means that the thought process has to be different for each brand. Designs have to be unique for each brand and are never repeated as they are a result of brainstorming, discussions and experimentation. However, what remains consistent with every project is a trendy fresh look for each design.

Branding for Krushnai
Branding for Krushnai
Branding for Glorious

How far you can imagine starts from how closely you observe.

A brand’s design is its identity. It’s very important that the design does justice to the brand- that’s exactly what its meant for! The briefing is most important, as getting a good understanding of the client’s requirements and the brand’s personality is key. As that is what will catapult your imagination when you get to work.

Packaging for K n U
Stationery design for K n U
Product Design
Branding & Packaging for LivRaw

Less Goes a Long Way.

A logo is the face of the brand. And in order for it to stand the test of time and become the brand itself, it needs to be simple and devoid of any complications. It must be easy to handle so that over time, it can be placed on any medium, from paper to billboard or from fabric to mugs. Consider the logo of Nike; a simple ‘tick mark’ that has worked so well for the brand.

Logo Design for Panditji - Veg Restaurant
Branding for Panditji - Veg Restaurant
Branding for Panditji - Veg Restaurant
Stationery for Panditji - Veg Restaurant

It’s all about what people remember.

The growth of a brand to a considerable extent depends on brand recall. Unique designs ensure people and consumers remember and recollect the brand and its design. Panditiji and Head Safe brandings are funky, playful and strongly distinctive. The client expects a ‘unique’ brand, the brand demands a ‘recall’ value and the target audience looks for a ‘connect’ while a designer needs to ensure all the above are met seamlessly. Nothing brings more joy than creating a lasting value.

Branding for Head Safe
Branding for Head Safe
Stationary for Bake Factory
Branding for Bake Factory

Design is everything.

Though branding can have different perspectives, any good branding should be simple and yet bring out the connect in an interesting manner. Understanding the product/service and then solving the problem is crucial. Always remember, design is a solution for a brand and not just a mere decorative thing. If you do this every day, you’ll never go wrong

Branding for Bake Factory
Packaging for Bake Factory
Logo Design for Vasundhara Jewellers

Published in Issue 21

Branding With Packaging! They say not to judge a book by its cover. But they also say that exceptions are always there. There’s no doubt, branding and packaging are the faces of any business and product. They decide the way people will receive the brand; whether they will accept it or reject it. To understand and gain more perspective on this much-unsolved mystery, we invited many branding and packaging experts who throw light on the topic.

 

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In such complicated times, it’s all about being simple. Simple is effective when it comes to design, believes Lundgren+Lindqvist, a Swedish design studio. It’s all about saying a lot more with a lot less. Engaging in a conversation, they tell us more on how they create effective and memorable design.

Design
Varvet - Visual Identity, Stationary and Sinages
Varvet - Visual Identity, Stationary and Sinages
Design
Varvet - Visual Identity, Stationary and Sinages

CG: Describe your journey as Lundgren+Lindqvist. What have been your accomplishments?

LL: When we started Lundgren+Lindqvist in 2007, our primary goal was to do what we love and stay afloat doing so. Now our ambition has grown along with our team, but we still want to do the best possible work. Over the years, we have had the opportunity to work with a great number of amazing clients, creating work that we can all be very proud of.



O/O-Brewing Baltic Porter-Packaging Design

CG: Your designs appear simple, effortless and smooth; however that is probably not the case behind the scenes. What all do you have to go through to arrive at the final design outcome?

LL: Simple is hard. Every project starts with a coconut. We use fine grain sandpaper to peel off layer by layer until we expose the core. That’s because we believe in honesty. Achieving that means removing the make-up to expose the bare, naked truth.

Design
Akademi valand photography next to the ocean exhibition catalogue covers

CG: What inspirations are included in your design? How does your background reflected in your designs?

LL: Like most in our line of business, we take an active interest in neighbouring creative fields; such as the arts and architecture. It is hard to judge as to what extent our Scandinavian background has influenced us. Of course, the legacy of great designers and thinkers such as Paul Kjaerholm, Olle Eksell and Alvar Aalto continue to inspire.

O/O - Brewing - Carismatico - Packaging and Visual Identity


O/O-Brewing Bangatan

CG: You work across various mediums. How working on paper differ from working for the digital space?

LL: Paper is definite, in that a printed piece is final. On the other hand, the digital space is an indefinite, organic medium. Both mediums offer unique possibilities. While conscious of this, we try to build each project around a concept and an idea rather than on the media of choice.

Maria Sole - Ferragamo, Visual identity and packaging
Design
Maria Sole - Ferragamo, Visual identity and packaging

CG: Designs have to look amazing and at the same time solve a problem and fulfil a greater purpose. How do you balance your and your client’s views?

LL: A good designer-client relationship is, like any relationship, based on trust. When there is a lack of trust from either side, the outcome will suffer.

Design
Critical Mass Studio Document Holder
Design
Critical Mass Studio Document Holder


Critical Mass Studio Pencils
Critical Mass Studio Poster
Critical Mass Studio The Totebags

CG: The world of design is constantly evolving. How do you keep up with the change?

LL: Although times are indeed changing, certain truths will remain. Our inherent curiosity and thirst for knowledge allows us to stay updated in a very natural, organic way. We visit exhibitions, read and travel a lot. Staying updated is nurturing our interests, which is the fuel we use for our daily (and sometimes nightly) design and development work.

A Sense of Place, Refugees welcome poster book
Design
Recto Verso Mirror


Design
Recto Verso Spread

CG: What other countries would you say are very prominent when it comes to design? What are your views on Indian design? Anything Indian that has caught your eye?

LL: In terms of graphic design, our neighbours Norway and Finland are definitely countries to watch out for as they are challenging those with a traditionally strong graphic design output such as Switzerland, England and the Netherlands. In terms of India, we are shamefully aware of the fact that we know very little about the country’s design scene. Perhaps Creative Gaga Magazine can put an end to our ignorance.

O/O - Brewing - Packaging and Visual Identity
O/O-Brewing-AW-2016-Packaging and Art Direction

Published in Issue 21

Branding With Packaging! They say not to judge a book by its cover. But they also say that exceptions are always there. There’s no doubt, branding and packaging are the faces of any business and product. They decide the way people will receive the brand; whether they will accept it or reject it. To understand and gain more perspective on this much-unsolved mystery, we invited many branding and packaging experts who throw light on the topic.

 

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Prasun Mazumdar - Brand
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Experience definitely counts. Prasun Mazumdar is here to share tips with the young, aspiring designers and to guide them in setting-up their own little studio and coverting it in a brand.

Prasun has a mixed take on the new-age designers of the current generation! Some would like to be independent designers and fit into the requirements as they come, some would want to use their remarkable skill to generate a style that is their very own and work as an independent design supplier, with social media helping them get the applause they want and also it would extend to real profits and then there are some who have long-term thinking and plans who wish to and will set up their own studios (brand).

Prasun is a supreme believer of the fact that everyone is different and has different life experiences. Hence the way of approaching a challenge and delivering it varies tremendously from person to person.



Having said this, he still feels that there are certain common aspects needed to be kept in mind to run an independent design studio.

01. Setting-up

The first challenge for setting up a studio is the space, as it has a major role to play in the initial years of a design studio. It considerably influences the evolution of thought process and allows designers to think with a free mind.

 

As for Prasun, personally, the new concepts of co-working space, is not a very ‘design studio’ thing as designers are a crazy breed, they need to talk but they also need to be in complete isolation at times.


02. The Driving Force

The urge and the push to work is the next most important thing. Post setting up the studio, the idea of just doing minimum work should not be the sole or pivotal idea. The project loads go up & down with market trends and requirements but to have the eagerness to do more is always good for a design studio as it keeps the spirit going.



03. Time Management

Managing time is quite a challenge during the days of establishment. Balancing between client and self-projects, allotting a good 20% to 30% of your total time to personal projects proves to be of great help.

04. Client Relationships

Building good and healthy relationship with your clients is always a plus as it helps in carrying the project further even after the defined work is finished. With the designer thinking in depth about the project and the client being ready to accept the suggestions, provided they are practical and propose a profitable angle to their business, it is a win-win situation for both parties, solely built on the established relationship between the two.



05. Eclectic Mix of Skills

For a stronger team and the studio’s organic growth, it is of much value to have a versatile group of designers, rather than having all good at one or similar skills.

Issue 44 - Creative Gaga

Published in Issue 44

Yourself as a Brand! Who doesn’t want to become famous, when everyone knows your name and especially for us designer, it is the basic dream every design student or young artist dream. But behind every successful studio, artist or designer there are stories of challenges, struggles and their unique solutions to these. With this issue, we interviewed many well-known names from the creative industry and found their different learnings and experiences behind making their own self as a brand. Though they all have a different take on this topic, still they all unanimously emphasise on focusing on their skills and quality delivery of the final outcome. So, if you are looking to establish yourself as a brand in the creative market or already in the process of it, this issue is a must-read.

 

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Design Stack
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Two NID designers, Priyanka and Anoop, came together in 2008 and started Design Stack. A Branding & Design agency, Design Stack is based out of Mumbai and services clients across the country. A highly specialised, 14-member team works on a wide variety of challenging projects.


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The Design in 2020! Each year starts with many predictions, anticipations and a lot of hope for bad things to go out and good things to come in our life. The year 2020 has already started with eventful initial months and may hold more surprises in coming times. To understand what’s coming from the design perspective, we featured some of the best design projects from last year. Also discussed a few broad questions like how minimalism will affect our designs or what all an illustrator to keep in mind to be successful and much more.
As the festivity is all around, every brand or business is trying to impress the Indian audience. But what really works for us Indians? What is an Indian design? And how we can make designs for India? To understand it, we interviewed some Indian creatives who are successfully creating designs for the Indian audience. This issue of Creative Gaga is a light read for someone looking for inspirations or insights on Indian design and how the Indian audience can be enticed. So go ahead and order your copy or subscribe if you want to keep receiving a regular dose inspirations!

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Designer Prasun Mazumdar didn’t only want to make his name, but wanted to make it into a brand. Here, he takes us back in time to tell us how he created his design studio pmd, right from scratch.

Brand

After working from a make-shift studio in his apartment for one year, in June, 2010, Prasun decided to expand. Without any second thoughts, he started evaluating his goal and visualising the work process involved. “You have to take the plunge.” he says, sitting on the other side of the table and thinking back.

One of the major decisions was to work out a logo and finalise a good name for the studio. The fact that his initials suffixed with ‘design’, made for an ambigram that was very exciting, it reaffirmed the decision about christening the studio as “pmd”.

Prasun Mazumdar studio

“Everyone starts from scratch. No one is born with knowledge.” says Prasun. When he joined NIFT back in 2004, he knew a challenging path lay ahead of him. The broad roads of Delhi and fashionable friends at NIFT made him accustomed to exploring and absorbing the unknown; a characteristic of a good designer.

Prasun Mazumdar studio

Once he was equipped with the foundation, he commenced a studio website and undertook small branding projects. “It’s even more difficult when you don’t have a portfolio, because the artworks you’ve got are those that were done while working for others.” reminisces Prasun.

Prasun Mazumdar studio

However, great things came gradually. Call it luck or destiny, Prasun was lucky to get a call from Rajesh Pratap Singh to design posters and artworks for his forthcoming rock collection. The fire was started, now all that needed was a constant supply of wood. Thus, an office space was set up. This was important because waking up and getting ready for work brought discipline, which is key to success.

The first brand identity system project and contract for PMD came from Stellar Children’s Museum, where Prasun designed their logo, print and space. “I reached office with new glass tumblers and juice packets. Looking back now, I guess the meeting was my first big success. They loved the half done office space and my work.” Prasun smiles and says.

Prasun Mazumdar studio

Published in Issue 23

The issue explores a topic which is close to every designer,  the Business of Design. We try to understand from the experienced ones that when is the right time to open own studio and what more you should get in your toolbox before taking the plunge! We had interactions with many talented studio founders like Rajesh Dahiya, Archan Nair, Ishan Khosla, Prasun Mazumdar and Anupam Tomer. Also featuring some of the best talents around the world such as Martin Grohs from Germany and Avi Sehmi from Canada along with Sourajit Sengupta from New Delhi. This issue not only provide answers to many questions but also initiate many new ones to explore further! We hope you will enjoy exploring the possibility of your studio with this issue. Happy reading!

 

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