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Bored of two dimensional design, Aman Khanna started exploring the third dimension of it by getting his hands dirty, literally! He got inspired by local Indian potters who breathe magic into a simple raw material like clay. Aman started molding sculptures and day to day knick knacks from clay.

Your Hands Dirty
Gray Water
Your Hands Dirty
Seek and How
Your Hands Dirty
Colour Me White
Your Hands Dirty
Pourer
Your Hands Dirty
Conscience of a Subconscious Mind
Your Hands Dirty
Shared Burden

What People Want

In India, the design is perceived in various ways; what works about Claymen is that it caters to a wide spectrum of users. Functional objects satisfy the practical shopper; dysfunctional art-oriented pieces attract the fanatics and the clay sculptures appeal to almost anyone who looks at them. Aman clearly understands the needs and more importantly the wants of the people thereby bringing to the table a fresh take on art.

Your Hands Dirty
Man and Woman v/s Society
Your Hands Dirty
The New Mountain
Your Hands Dirty
Mess is more - Bottle
Your Hands Dirty
Planter
Your Hands Dirty
Flask
Your Hands Dirty
Crow Bottle

A Shout Out to All

The theme of his project follows the daily routine of a common man; his ups and downs are captured beautifully in objects like lamps, cups and sculptures. The choice of colours and the fact that each piece is an outcome of love and painstaking labour is what sells across stores in Mumbai, Delhi, Bangaluru and soon in Melbourne

Your Hands Dirty
The Attachment
Your Hands Dirty
Balancing Vase
Your Hands Dirty
Scream
Your Hands Dirty
Lost In The Noise
Your Hands Dirty
Loud Mouth
Your Hands Dirty
Brain Drain

Exploring Forms Through Material.

Being inspired by local Indian potters, Aman tried his hand at clay sculptures; clay as a material is quite versatile and at the same time simple. Hence the exploration of design and expression of his thought process is quite clear. The idea behind using clay was because it is commonly used and worked with; making the theme of common men and his life more relatable.

Your Hands Dirty
Hyperventilating Vase
Your Hands Dirty
Release
Your Hands Dirty
The Balancing Act
Your Hands Dirty
Distressed Planter
Your Hands Dirty
Holler Kettle

Published in Issue 32

This issue has advice from many experts such as Ashwini Deshpande and Gopika Chowfla who gave the secrets of choosing the right intern for their well-known design teams. And on another hand, Rajaram Rajendran and Ranganath Krishnamani advise young designer to gain multiple skills and be the best at them.

 

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The force of nature is both powerful and beautiful at the same time. It shapes things and leaves behind its fingerprints, as if building on a work of art. Ceramic artist Kriti Chaudhary traces this artistry of time on a clay sculpture. She explains her insights and process.

Ceramic Art

Stroke of An Idea

Having spent a lot of time watching and observing a collection of rock-cut stones, which preserved the marks of nature and fossilised remains, the artist drew inspiration from the natural processes like erosion and changes through time and nature. The marks and traces left behind by these natural geological processes, a build up of sedimentary layers and patina over a passage of time gave way to a string of ideas. Fascinated by these varied forms left over the course of time, the objective became to evoke these ideas in the artwork.

Undertanding The Canvas

The area of interest lay in experimenting with the ceramic surface. Nature and the passage of time formed the core ideas. The surfaces, marks, textures, scratched, scraped or drawn by forces in nature tend to reveal hidden layers of narrative and offer a unique visual experience. At the same time, a personal story was instilled into the ceramic surfaces that reflect its creation and impart to it a sense of history.

On The Job

The work involved a deliberate non-use of glaze in an attempt to achieve a more natural look and retain the surface quality of clay. By making use of cracks and fissures, natural and organic materials were incorporated that left its fingerprint in the clay. These marks were then layered with metallic oxides to bring out the textural quality of the surfaces and suggest ideas of weathering and traces left behind as remains or fossils.

Alternative firing techniques like smoke pit firing and saggar firing were used in order to develop unique markings. The clay surface was subjected to various elements like heat, smoke, oxides and other combustible materials to develop marks and colour. Experiments with the markings of line and colour by wrapping the pots with salt soaked cloth, wire, organic material etc. were done. Also these surfaces with flashings of colour were an evidence of a literal passage of time during the smoke firing process, emphasising on the history of creation of each piece.

Published in Issue 13

Coming from a country of stories and storytellers, Indian animation professionals are sitting on a gold reserve. Yet, we are miles behind the Western world. We spoke to few leading names to find out the reason and understand the Indian animator’s sensibilities and practices The house unanimously opined that we need to develop more original ideas and also create exclusive stories for animation, rather than going the other way round…

 

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