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Caricature artist Paul Moyse talks about the secret behind captivating caricatures and his journey to becoming a successful artist.

Caricature
Mr. Beans

Paul Moyse, a successful artist who specializes in fine art caricatures, has an inimitable style to his art. Through his unmatched skill with his brush, he creates realistic caricatures that perfectly capture the spirit of the emotion.

Caricature
Daniel Craig

Paul always knew as a kid in the 1970’s that he would grow up to be a professional artist. It was only a matter of time for this dream to be realized, though the path wasn’t easy. In the 1980’s he became fascinated with the art of caricatures. He spent his teens emulating the caricature from the British show ‘Spitting Image’ and the cartoons of Kevin ‘KAL’ Kallaugher in the Economist.

Caricature
Einstein

But in his later years, Paul had to work several jobs to pay bills, all the while developing his skill on the side. In 2006 he finally got his break with his first magazine commission for Radio Times. And since then there has been no looking back.

Caricature
Group of Game of Thrones Sketches

His body of work includes commissions by Weekly Standard, live caricatures for Sir Paul McCartney, and paintings for several eminent private clients. A big highlight that catapulted his career forward was meeting Derren Brown, a renowned mentalist and illusionist, and painting him for the BP awards in 2012. Another memorable moment was getting a commission from Tim Jenison, the film producer, with Penn and Teller, the American magicians and entertainers.

Caricature
John Lydon

When asked, what is so captivating about caricatures, Paul said, “I think caricature taps into the part of the brain that recognizes features from memory, the part that allows us to separate one face from another in an instant, but it does so in an exaggerated way for humourous effect.”

Caricature
Neil Patrick

Paul believes observation and empathy are the most important tools required to capture the right expression. Being able to understand what is going on behind the eyes is essential to recreating it.

 

Given a choice, he prefers traditional mediums of painting over digital ones. This is because of the end result being a physical product; also the knowledge that it cannot be deleted or easily reproduced with the click of a button.

Caricature
Pope Francis

In retrospect, the journey to be an established artist wasn’t easy. For Paul, the hardest lesson was treating art as a serious profession. And the path of getting paid was filled with ups and downs. But through perseverance, stubbornness, and plenty of practice, success did come his way. Paul also attributes his success to luck, timing, and consistently ignoring the people who said it can’t be done.

Caricature
Tomhanks
Issue 44 - Creative Gaga

Published in Issue 44

Behind every successful studio, artist or designer there are stories of challenges, struggles and their unique solutions to these. With this issue, we interviewed many well-known names from the creative industry and found their different learnings and experiences behind making their own self as a brand. Though they all have a different take on this topic, still they all unanimously emphasise on focusing on their skills and quality delivery of the final outcome. So, if you are looking to establish yourself as a brand in the creative market or already in the process of it, this issue is a must read. Full of insights and inspirations from the best of the talents, this issue is waiting to reach your desks.

 

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They easily make us laugh, but caricature design is a tough form to master. Here, one has to feel the expression and manifest it through the use of colours and exaggerations. Keya Mahata dwells on these to bring characters to life. Below, she takes us through a demonstration for caricature design of Steven Tyler.

Caricature

Step 1 

At first, various high resolution reference images of the subject are selected which are then arranged on a layer in Photoshop. A jpeg file of the reference is created as well.

Caricature

Step 2 

This is followed by using a white page Photoshop as a canvas. Then, using a 19 pt brush, started drawing. While drawing a caricature, it’s important to retain the basic form and character of the Steven Tyler and simultaneously exaggerating what is necessary.

Caricature

Step 3 

This way, full drawing of the subject is completed. While doing so, focus on the expression and never deviate from it.

Caricature

Step 4 

The layer is then copied and coloured in. A de-saturated colour is used to make it soft.

Caricature

Step 5 

Once coloured in, the opacity of the brush is reduced and the colours are merged. The teeth are made yellow with some bits of grayish colour to resemble the real person.

Caricature

Step 6 

Once the facial colours are set, detailing of the face is carried out. This includes wrinkles of the eye to making his singing posture. One thing to take note of is the filling in of a darker shade in one side of the character’s face in order to give it 3D feel.

Caricature

Step 7 

In this step, some off white colour on nose, tongue and check is also used to give a highlight.

Caricature

Step 8 

Once, the colouring in of the face is completed, the body is started off with.

Caricature

Step 9 

For the body, once again a desaturated colour tone is used. It’s important to maintain wrinkles to maintain his aged body.

Caricature

Step 10 

Once the body is finished, the focus is on the hair. Gentle brushes are used to soften this area. Various shades of browns and blondes are used to define volume and depth.

Caricature

Step 11

Dark brown and shade of gray is used for the dark part of the hair.

Caricature

Step 12

This particular shade makes the hair appear soft and effortless.

Caricature

Step 13

After careful finish of the hair, additional detailing is carried out using a brush on shape dynamic mode. A brush on colour dodge mode is also used to add highlight.

Caricature

Step 14

Once hair is completed, a little bit of highlight is added on the whole figure.

Caricature

Step 15

After fully finishing hair and body, the background is coloured in with semi-violet. Some yellow is also added to establish lighting, giving the overall design a bright look. A large brush is used for this step.

Caricature

Step 16 

The lemon yellow colour is softened and then blended with the violet background.

Caricature

Step 17

A spotlight is then created using off white colour and a round brush.

Caricature

Step 18

Once the whole body, hair and background is finished, selected areas are infused with shadows using brushes on multiply mode.

Caricature

Step 19 

Finally, the caricature design is finished with the addition of slight brushing and leveling.

Product and Automobile Design

Published in Issue 27

This issue explores one of the widely discussed product design and automobile #design which is very close to our heart. We spoke to few leading names to find out the future of product design and understand the Indian designer sensibilities and practices. Everyone believe that it’s not just functionality but also the visual appeal of the product which plays a crucial in the success of a product. This issue is a bundle of inspirations and insights from the well know product and automobile designers. A must read which you will enjoy for sure.

 

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He observes, delves and emerges with his own version of reality. Caricaturist Shijo Varghese remains true to his subject while reflecting his observations. Concentrating on parts, he lets them come together to narrate the true character and spirit portrayed by unreal proportions. He explains how.

the Subject with Soulful Distortion
Messi. Personal work. About the football superstar
Danny-DeVito. Personal work. About the comedian-actor

A Caricature should Appeal to the Soul

When a caricature is taken up with a conscious mind, the result is impressive. However, when it is taken up with a desiring heart, the result is appealing. A true caricature charms not just the eye, but the soul.

 

A caricaturist must take to his drawing board as meditation, losing himself to the organic growth of the thought and lines. That’s when the subjects rise to become what he wants them to be while staying as close to the true character as possible.

the Subject with Soulful Distortion
Sreesanth. For Stumped!, a collection of 2011 world cup winning Indian team
Harbhajan Singh. Done for Stumped! a collection of 2011 world cup winning Indian team

Humans are a Sum Total of Parts

A caricaturist not just observes, but dissects. He studies not just the character of every person, but the characteristic features as well. The eyes, nose, lips or hair complements the happy, sad, positive or negative vibe that the subject exudes.

 

Generally, subjects have distinctive features that instantly catch the eye of an artist. In such cases, it becomes easy to exaggerate them and create the caricature. In other cases, the artist needs to dig deep into the subject and find out which feature or aspect to playing with. Distortion can go to any extent but the fact remains that it should not take away the person’s soul.

Shijo and Tintu. Personal work. Caricature of self and wife
Vrooom!. A collection of Formula One drivers’ caricatures

Style Grows Forever

A style that blossoms with time is an accomplishment. There is no greater joy than creating a new phenomenon every time the pencil gets to work. Creations that evolve naturally, liberally and timelessly are the ones that bridge the real world with the virtual.

 

However, the focus should be on getting the subject’s essence, whichever style you may choose. Strokes, textures, patterns and everything else follows. Spontaneity is a big tool that every caricaturist must employ. Ideas come in when you are not looking for it. Making that the trigger point often results in uninhibited, impartial creations.

Bernie Ecclestone. Personal work about personalities of F1 2011 in India
Yuvraj Singh. Done for Stumped!, a collection of 2011 world cup winning Indian team

Know it before Distorting it

For every caricaturist, it is very important to have a very good understanding of anatomy and proportions to do good work. We should know the basics before distorting or exaggerating. It is alright to look at subjects with an eye of humour. But ultimately, the job of a caricaturist is to express the characteristic essence of the subject.

Sachin Tendulkar. Done for Stumped!, a collection of 2011 world cup winning Indian team
Amitabh Bachchan. Personal work. A take on the icon

Humour with Care

There is a thin line that separates humour from sarcasm. Therefore it is important to honour the former while communicating the core message. Employing free-spirited strokes, ever new shading techniques and an understanding of the subject results in insightful humour and most importantly, being true to the character. Who said caricatures can only tickle the rib? It has all the power to take care of the mind too!

Roger Federer. Personal work. Interpretation of the tennis superstar
Steve Jobs. Personal work. Recreating the charm of the genius

There is a Ctrl Z for Everything

That’s one benefit of the digital technology. One doesn’t need to worry much about the final product. The ‘ctrl z’ solves everything for everyone. At the same time, it takes away the raw charm of working with pencils. The basic process of putting pencil to paper brings with it lots of ad venture, experiment and learning.

 

Pencils can be used in various ways as per the need. Strokes and shading style moulds itself as per y our thought. And there is a virtue in it. You’ll love every moment of creating, distorting and destructing. And this can never be delivered by any software.

Dwayne Bravo. Done for Howzaat, a collection of caricatures of members of the Chennai Super Kings team
Dhoni. Personal work. A take on the skipper

Never Give Up

Being able to draw is a gift from god. One should keep practising to improve one’s talent. Whatever time it takes, never stop or compromise with the quality. Make observation a habit and then a process. Most importantly, be your own critic. Remember, you loved it that’s why you are at it. And you can’t give up anything you love so easily!

Priyanka Chopra. Indian Actress
Sergio Pérez. Formula One Driver

Published in Issue 10

With this issue, we are exploring yet another discipline of design – Web and UI. With the changing times, Indian designers are increasingly opting for this new medium. But are we really prepared to take the global challenge? What’s missing and what do we strive on? We invited few leading practitioners of the industry to deliberate on this issue.

 

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A visual artist in the form of a cartoonist and animator, Manoj Sinha shares his process and details of his work one bit at a time, in order to achieve the right balance across aspects such as the tone of colours, the shades of lighting.

Depth in Details.

Manoj Sinha likes to play with simple elements in a rather detailed and no-nonsense way to create a portrait that is very much life-like if not larger than life. He starts out with the basics and rough works, turning basic aspects of the persona more and more real with each step as he progress towards the final outcome. The result is a sharp artwork with lively qualities.

Step 1

Started with a simple, rough sketch. Since this involved a pretty basic shading-like technique in order to give the portrait an outline and overall context. This is good enough to start with and build upon.

Step 2

This step involved applying the base colours on the face alongside some light shading. The rest of the elements i.e. the hair, the dress and the earrings were kept the same as in the rough sketch that was the starting point.

Step 3

Further details were added to the lips and teeth. The smile brings out the core of the personality’s expression and so it was highlighted.

Step 4

Just one ear of the subject has been made visible in the portrait and so it was important to provide it the right amount of attention. So, more detailing was done on the ear.

Step 5

Dark textures and sharp lines were added around the eyes to give the persona a practical look. Similarly, the eyeballs were also given details highlighting the reflection of light in the eyes.

Step 6

Shadow of the hair falling over the right eye was done. Which enhanced the lighting effect that was given to the image in the previous steps, thus bringing about an actual feel of the subject by making the portrait more realistic.

Step 7

Details were added to the earrings, hair and face in the form of greater definition, colour and texturing.

Step 8

The final details to hair and skin colour were then added with fine lines and rough stroke smoothing. Reached the final desired result, bringing out the real personality of the subject.

Published in Issue 41

Every year brings many opportunities and hopes along with celebrations. For this issue, we reached many visual artists and designers to know their expectations from the year 2018. This issue’s cover designer, Shreya Gulati is exceptionally impressed by the advancement of technology in design, especially how VR & AR has impacted new ways of creating. Whereas Seerow Unni, a digital artist sees the simple and minimal design is here to stay for long. So, whether you have many or none expectations for the year, this issue is a must-read. Go ahead and order your copy here or subscribe to not miss any future issues!

 

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Creating Illustrations on a real-life situation with a personal point of view can turn out as the most difficult learning for an artist. But illustrationist Uday Mohite has mastered this art over the years and now is on his finger-tips.

Illustrations
Ramdev baba proposing to legalise weed as it is natural healer
Illustrations
A portrait dedicated to his Uday's favourite actress, Deepika Padukone, on Women’s Day.
Illustrations
Ranveer Singh

As a kid, Uday was fascinated by the cartoons and caricatures published in books, newspapers and journals accompanying a story but was never really interested in reading the story. This worked as a motivation factor for him to work in a field where it was possible to develop and explain a story just through drawings and cartoons, without the use of any words and so he chose to specialize in the line of illustration.

Illustrations
Proposing the laddus of achhe din will help them secure votes to win the 2019 elections
Illustrations
Irfan khan. A water colour portrait dedicated to Irfan Khan on his birthday.
Illustrations
Gungi Gudiya to Goddess Durga. Indira Gandhi was a shy kid not wanting to talk, but when elected as Prime Minister, a huge crowd gathered to hear her.

As much as the cartoons and journals inspired him to become an illustrator in his childhood days, some world famous illustrationists and cartoonists have worked out as his motivational sources and have had an equal amount of influence on him while Uday still is developing and becoming better and better in his field.

Illustrations
A portrait dedicated to Nawazuddin Siddiqui on his birthday.
Illustrations
Rashtrapti is busy. One of Rahul Dacuna’s story is about how the president is busy, having the only work of inaugurating different functions!
Illustrations
Writer Rahul Dacuna’s story expressing the fact that he wasn’t invited to Virat and Anushka’s wedding inspite of him having a passport!

Self-Learning, a Trick!

Somethings aren’t taught in school but are self-learnt by following other peoples’ work. Following this methodology got him calls from various newspapers at an early stage in his career and also motivated him to start freelancing alongside.

Illustrations
Bahubali-2
Illustrations
This piece of art was in awe of the work of Anushka Shetty after seeing the trailer of Bahubali 2: The Conclusion.

Trying to understand how humor is defined in illustrations and how it can be developed to get it across to people in simple ways, Uday has always held his seniors from the field in high regard. Some of his inspirationists include Jack Davis, Pascal Campion, Mario de Miranda, Tom Richmond, Wally Wood and Paul Coker, who are all international fame illustrations. Also, cartoonists like David Low, Bal Thackeray and R.K Laxman, just to name a few, have really helped him learn the tricks of the art and master it.

Illustrations
Lobo lobo in the city. A character from writer Rahul Dacuna’s story who is always angry, doesn't like anything bad that happens and is against the system.
Illustrations
Arun Jaitley preparing for the 2019 elections and proposing that Union Budget 2018 will have achhe din
Illustrations
Bromance. While on his world tour, Prime minister Narendra Modi would greet the dignitaries with a hug.

The Twist!

When it comes to deciding upon the content of the illustration, Uday prefers to choose subjects based on real life. If his subject is an individual person or an actual situation that needs to be portrayed, he talks to the subject himself in order to understand the situation in depth. He gathers all the information including small details which he thinks is necessary to illustrate the subject close to perfection.

Illustrations
Balasaheb Thackeray’s Birthday. A hand done illustration dedicated to Balasaheb Thackeray.
Illustrations
Jassus Jagga and us. A scene from writer Rahul Dacuna’s story including Virat Kohli, Jassus jagaa, Ravi Shastri and Pahlaj Nihalani.
Illustrations
Lobo Lobo appeared at my doorstep this morning carrying eggs in a brown paper bag. "Thanks Thelonious, for this lovely gift of eggs on Easter."

Illustrations are something where the reader understands the situation from the viewpoint of the artist. And so it is important to aptly choose the theme and style for the illustration.

Illustrations
Today’s generation. Today girls take selfies in innumerable different and weird ways.
Illustrations
Alauddin Khilji

The theme and style for the illustration are developed based on the kind of message that is to be conveyed. With a special liking for caricaturing, Uday creates caricatures for a funny situation as caricatures have a tint of humor in them. He prefers to make funny situations stylish and colorful compared to giving a rough, black and white look to a criminal story.

Illustrations
No words. There are a lot of words in India which aren’t available in a dictionary!
Illustrations
Writer Rahul Dacuna received a call from Tipu Sultan, Gabbar Singh and Akbar asking him for an answer who are the people staying illegally on the land.

The Top Of The World!

For Uday, in order to remain in the market, he feels that knowing the works of people from the field is important. Not only knowing their work but also understanding their style of doing it helps an artist to learn. It is also necessary to know what is that the customers are looking for. Merging the market demands and the artists’ personal style together can help the artist remain afloat.

Illustrations
Dedicated to Mr. Atal Vajpayee on his birthday, an attempt to capture his andaaz of reading out poems.
Illustrations
Laali

Illustrator, Ernest Priego Martin, takes us through his approach behind making caricatures of various personalities. He speaks about the observation that goes into each of his works and the significance of watching carefully so as to achieve the best execution.

observation

According to you, what are the most important aspects of ensuring justice to represent the actual personalities of people through caricatures?

Ernest Martin: In the first place, the similarity is the most important. Without resemblance, there is no caricature. The thing that comes next is to not offend the person and still tell as much as possible about their personality. Keeping both these aspects in mind, it is rather important to maintain the apt balance that is desired in order to create an effective caricature.

How do you make sure you represent people in a way that viewers relate to the caricatures?

Ernest Martin: I seek that in a single glance the most singular characteristics of the person are known. Every character has his or her own unique traits that symbolise or signifies the person, whether they are the very physical features of the individual or characteristics in the conduct, temperament or personality. I also do that exercise when I look at the person and try to capture the first impression so as to work with it.

How do you decide on the proportion of features in different characters?

Ernest Martin: I do not really decide the proportion of features; as each person shows them through physical and psychological characteristics the proportions that I must emphasise upon in my work. It is something intuitive. It is just about amplifying or focusing on those particular aspects of the person that stands out and strengthen their persona i.e. features that describe their individuality and make them ‘who they are’.

What facets of people’s real-life personalities play a role in your depiction of them?

Ernest Martin: It depends on your assignment or your activity – if you are a politician, actor, musician, athlete, etc. That will influence the final result because it is not necessarily one aspect or the other in a person, but their entire self, which includes what they do, how they do it, their own unique style and expression in the course of the act and so on which defines them.

How have you grown and evolved your style, over the years?

Ernest Martin: There is no magic formula for growing and evolving one’s own style. It all comes down to the dedication, the number of working hours and the quality of effort that one puts into one’s craft, as is the case with just about anything that we choose to do and apply ourselves to. And, of course, learning to look and observe is vital as that is how we learn best.

What kind of changes would you like to see in your existing design trends related, in 2018?

Ernest Martin: I would like to work with other materials such as acrylic, and even merge them with digital – that would be interesting to see in terms of the various processes that could be applied and results that could be achieved. Though at the moment, I am comfortable with what I do and I see no need to change.

How do you think these changes will impact the process and perception of these designs?

Ernest Martin: I do not plan to change the way I draw by much, although that depends on the personal mood. The mood, context, requirement, application and such other aspects determine how a piece of work is executed and arrived at. Anyway, for now, I am rather satisfied with impressing the viewer in the same way as I did in 2017.

Published in Issue 41

Every year brings many opportunities and hopes along with celebrations. For this issue, we reached many visual artists and designers to know their expectations from the year 2018. This issue’s cover designer, Shreya Gulati is exceptionally impressed by the advancement of technology in design, especially how VR & AR has impacted new ways of creating. Honing and sharpening one’s skills is always a quest for every creative. So, whether you have many or none expectations for the year, this issue is a must-read.

 

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Painting characters as they are art. Discovering features that define the subject and exaggerating them is communication. Illustrator Uday Mohite explains how manipulating proportions helped him to create a caricature portrait of actor Naseeruddin Shah. 

Naseeruddin Shah
Naseeruddin Shah

Step 1.

Opened a light blue coloured A4 size document in Photoshop. Picked pressure brush size 9 or 13 and painted the canvas light blue to give it a gradient feel. This would help in sketching in the middle.

Naseeruddin Shah

Step 2.

Picked light grey on the colour pallet. Created a sketch of Naseeruddin Shah with the same brush. Kept about 30% details on the sketch. This would help in selecting the dark and light parts of the sketch.

Naseeruddin Shah

Step 3.

Gave the skin a basic tone. Mixed orange, yellow, brown and white to render a light tone. Followed by a dark tone by mixing brown and blue.

Naseeruddin Shah

Step 4.

Post the texture, worked on the details of the face.

“Mixed orange, yellow, brown and white to render a light tone. Followed by a dark tone by mixing brown and blue. Post the texture, worked on the details of the face”

Naseeruddin Shah

Step 5.

While detailing further kept a separate colour palette on the side. This would help in matching colours and guiding colour selections.

Naseeruddin Shah

Step 6.

Took note of skin texture and colour tone of hair from a reference image of Naseeruddin Shah, while working on the details. Chose ultramarine blue, greens, oranges, greys and cobalt blue as they would go with the texture on the face.

Naseeruddin Shah

Step 7.

Worked more on the details at the final stage. Painted the moustache, beard, skin texture and fold in tee. Picked brush number 31 and lightened the background to highlight the final caricature. The final caricature is done.

Published in Issue 14

We dedicated this issue to Digital Art where we explored the connection between our dreams and imagination and how the flexibility of technology can be used to document that. In his exclusive article, Android Jones explains the broader perspective of digital art. Featuring Ankur Singh Patar, Archan Nair, Harshvardhan Kadam and Aamina Shazi Arora, every article discusses how each of them has an individual way of working and yet they all look at life beyond the obvious to appreciate it’s beauty.

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