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There are stories hidden in faces and bodies. Exaggeration brings them to the fore. A good caricaturist lives the subject and discovers the multiple facets that make the story. Caricature artist Manoj Sinha reflects while talking about his design process.

Manoj Sinha - Caricaturist
Donald Trump, courtesy Hindustan Times Group
Manoj Sinha - Caricaturist
PM Narendra Modi, courtesy Hindustan Times Group by Manoj Sinha
Manoj Sinha - Caricaturist
Captain Amarinder Singh, courtesy Hindustan Times Group by Manoj Sinha

To watch is to learn.

Keep your eyes wide open. Watch every character and everything about them. Absorb yourself into your characters and feel their presence around. Understand their behaviour, attitudes, experiences, and temperament. There is a story made by all these elements. Observe their actions, as they often determine the story. And then exaggerate all these through your strokes to re-tell the story.

Ajay Devgan, courtesy Hindustan Times Group by Manoj Sinha
Manoj Sinha - Caricaturist
Daroga ji, courtesy Hindustan Times Group by Manoj Sinha
Manoj Sinha - Caricaturist
Om Puri, courtesy Hindustan Times Group
caricaturist
Mr. Nitish Kumar, courtesy Hindustan Times Group by Manoj Sinha


Manoj Sinha - Caricaturist
Aamir Khan, courtesy Hindustan Times Group
Manoj Sinha - Caricaturist
Raj Babbar, courtesy Hindustan Times Group
caricaturist
Mr. Rahul Bajaj, courtesy Hindustan Times Group by Manoj Sinha

Mind precedes the pen.

Forget paper and pencil for some time. Take mental notes of their personality, work, and gestures, creating images in your mind, that’ll eventually come out in the form of caricatures. A caricaturist not just observes, but dissects. Study not just the character of every person, but the characteristic features as well. Generally, subjects have distinctive features that instantly catch the eye of an artist. In such cases, it becomes easy to exaggerate them and create the caricature. In other cases, the artist needs to dig deep into the subject and find out which feature or aspect to play with.

Manoj Sinha - Caricaturist
Virat Kohli, courtesy Hindustan Times Group
Manoj Sinha - Caricaturist
Harmanpreet Kaur, courtesy Hindustan Times Group
Manoj Sinha - Caricaturist
Kapil Dev, courtesy Hindustan Times Group

A caricaturist not just observes, but dissects. Study not just the character of every person, but the characteristic features as well. Dig deep into the subject to find out features to play with.


Manoj Sinha - Caricaturist
RONALDINHO, courtesy Hindustan Times Group
Manoj Sinha - Caricaturist
Danny Boyle, courtesy Hindustan Times Group
caricaturist
Naseerudin Shah, courtesy Hindustan Times Group by Manoj Sinha

Fun is inbuilt.

One needs to know the nuances of the subject to add to the appeal of the artwork. Read and analyse everything about your character. It will automatically develop a personal opinion about the person. As a caricature artist, the opinion is often laden with humour. Put the character in focus and the fun in the story will come out automatically. The more colourful a personality, the more fun you have doing the caricature.

Manoj Sinha - Caricaturist
A P J Abdul Kalam, courtesy Hindustan Times Group
Manoj Sinha - Caricaturist
Pranb Mukharjee, courtesy Hindustan Times Group


Manoj Sinha - Caricaturist
Jayalalithaa, courtesy Hindustan Times Group
Yashpal, courtesy Hindustan Times Group by Manoj Sinha

Caricature is not fiction.

Almost every time, a caricature is about a real personality and the story attached. It is the duty of a caricaturist to portray the true character of the subject chosen. Therefore it is important to understand the thin line that separates humour from sarcasm. The key lies in creating insightful humour and most importantly, being true to the character. That is why one needs to spot the “LOL” factor in everything around. You never know, what strikes off the next story.

Manoj Sinha - Caricaturist
George W. Bush, courtesy Hindustan Times Group
Manoj Sinha - Caricaturist
Bal Thakrey, courtesy Hindustan Times Group by Manoj Sinha
Ranveer Singh, courtesy Hindustan Times Group by Manoj Sinha


Manoj Sinha - Caricaturist
Dalai Lama, courtesy Hindustan Times Group
Manoj Sinha - Caricaturist
Barack Obama, courtesy Hindustan Times Group
Mr. Ratan Tata, courtesy Hindustan Times Group by Manoj Sinha

A story is timeless.

A good caricature starts a relationship, between the story and the viewer. Media, today, is moving at an astonishing rate. Therefore it is important to choose topics that are not going to be forgotten at the next ‘Breaking News’ segment. The importance of a story lies in the fact that it brings education along with fun. This way, the news may become redundant but the awareness of the change that the news brings to the daily lives of the people, lingers on

Manoj Sinha - Caricaturist
Steve jobs, courtesy Hindustan Times Group
Manoj Sinha - Caricaturist
Mark Zuckerberg, courtesy Hindustan Times Group
Manoj Sinha - Caricaturist
Sunder Pichai, courtesy Hindustan Times Group

Published in Issue 12

first interactive issue of Creative Gaga with Augmented Reality features. This issue focuses on the transition of Advertising from real to virtual and blurring the boundaries of both at the same time. Also bundled with lots of interesting articles and interviews.

 

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When we look at great art we are amazed by its perfection. But what is carefully hidden from us is the toiling and hard work that goes behind the perfect piece of art. Chetan Patil unravels his thought behind the expressive caricature and his art in this insightful piece.

The Perfect Caricature
Hawaldar by Chetan Patil
The Perfect Caricature
HAMAL

Very few find their calling at a young age. The professional illustrator, Chetan Patil, is one such individual. Chetan has been enthusiastic about art since a childhood, and a further push by his school teacher, sent him rolling in the direction of the world of art. He went on to take professional training in the commercial field of art, and there was no looking back.

The Perfect Caricature
Kasai
The Perfect Caricature
Kamwali by Chetan Patil


Human Shapes Patterns

Chetan makes great use of expressions in his work. He believes attaching emotions to an idea makes it far more impactful and believable. In most of his illustrations and his caricature art he tries to create a connection by expressing his own emotions in the idea through appropriate visuals.

Human Shapes Patterns
Monday Love

Expressions, emotions and experiences are aspects that Chetan takes very seriously while creating his art. He pays a lot of attention to detail in his work and tries to make it as expressive as possible. Chetan believes that the quality of art and amount of work put into a project makes it a treat for the viewers.

Human Shapes Patterns
The Perfect Caricature
Chef by Chetan Patil


An underlying element in most of Chetan’s work is the exaggeration. For Chetan exaggeration takes art to the next level and gives it a larger than life feel. It intensifies the expressions of the subject and is great opportunity to demonstrate an entirely different perspective. A great story or a certain character can be represented only through exaggeration, believes Chetan.

The Perfect Caricature
COOLI by Chetan Patil
The Perfect Caricature
Garegewala

The Caricature Illustration Campaign

Chetan has created a spectrum of amazing work, but his caricature illustration campaign project is his favourite, which he did in college. The series illustrated common people from different walks of life, and he completed this series of 17 caricatures within a 10 day deadline. This particular project is special because it involved observations of different people – their daily life, habits, behaviours and professions.

The Perfect Caricature
Camera Boy

Chetan sees art and design emerging in India. Digital art is gaining traction and is rapidly developing. But still there is a long way to go before people truly understand the creative field, feels Chetan. There are plenty of opportunities to explore the creative industry in India, however, the focus should be design education awareness. The design field is constantly changing and evolving. Amazing art collaborations, conferences, creative events and discussions will certainly push the boundaries of the design world.



Pandit Shivkumar Sharma
Gulzar

In terms of technique and medium, Chetan loves both the traditional hand drawn and the digital one to create illustrations. Hand drawn techniques provide a wide canvas to explore. However, for professional speed and quality, Chetan prefers the digital medium.

Fauja Singh
Amitabh Bachchan

Inspiration is the backbone of creative work. Chetan draws his inspiration from nature, people, cultures, and every day events. He also takes inspirations from all that is related to the living and non-living. Some of the master artists that have been an influence on Chetan’s work are Steve Simpsons, Pascal, Jason Sellar and many others.

Malika Sarabhai
Drunk Man

Finally, the advice that Chetan would like to give the budding artists is that art is a never ending learning process. Whether it is college, a job, a freelance project; at every stage learning occurs. Hard work and being abreast with new techniques and technology is part and parcel of the creative journey. It’s also important to have a social media presence for your work. Looking at the bigger picture, taking risks and embracing setbacks will only build you as a professional.



Absolute Vodka

Published in Issue 48

A Freelancer’s Life in India! Every day, with a dream of ‘Being Your Boss,’ many creative professionals jump into the pool of freelancing. But many are not well prepared for the life of the freelancer, which brings many challenges along with benefits. So to explore further, we interviewed many freelance illustrators and designers to get answers to the question you should ask before taking the final call of becoming your boss! So, if you are planning to or have already become a freelancer then this issue is a must-read for you.

 

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