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Whether it’s a cultural transformation, differentiated customer experience, or tech-enabled innovation, every business needs to evolve with today’s rapidly changing world. Landor is helping its clients using the brand to transform their business for the new world challenges.

Client: Millennium IT

Services: Visual/Brand Identity

The Brief

The task was to determine how Millennium IT, a local information technology stalwart could create a new, differentiated frame of reference for itself? The brand MIT has a strong legacy of being a visionary player in the local market and it now sought to infuse new energy into the brand, striking a chord of relevance across stakeholder groups. The context was that technology disruptions, new market entrants, the emergence of new categories, are placing new demands on clients today to be nimble and deliver a seamless end-user experience. Business needs are ever-changing and clients require higher-order of flexibility from their IT partners.

The Solution

A new brand positioning was created for the brand that was all about harnessing the team’s passion for delivery and agility to bring a fresh perspective in its approach to not only addressing but exceeding its client expectations. This positioning was brought to life with a unique and distinctive visual identity system that drew inspiration word ‘millennium’ and created a dynamic identity that celebrated the brand’s future-forward, agile orientation towards its clients, always solving for what is vital for them.

Published in Issue 49

The Design in 2020! Each year starts with many predictions, anticipations and a lot of hope for bad things to go out and good things to come in our life. The year 2020 has already started with eventful initial months and may hold more surprises in coming times. To understand what’s coming from the design perspective, we featured some of the best design projects from last year. Also discussed a few broad questions like how minimalism will affect our designs or what all an illustrator to keep in mind to be successful and much more.

 

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We go through many interesting design projects each day and find them inspiring enough to be shared further. Projects which have the potential to inspire and spark multiple ideas. So, here are few selected one for this week’s design inspiration, enjoy!

Sasken Annual report illustrations by Danny Jose

Packaging & Branding of Mochila by Swt & Co

Contours by Katt Phatt™

Kenjo Fonts by Anthony James

“A Nose For Fun” – Sticker Pack for Facebook by Chaaya Prabhat & Sandhya Prabhat

Packaging & Branding for GoodHair – Hair Care Range by Meroo Seth



Pleinair Illlustrations by Jithin Puthenpurakkal

Branding for Vortex events® by Mohamed Samir

Designit Rebrand Visuals by Shaivalini Kumar

 

If you have any of your design project or someone else’s, which is equaliy inspiring for fellow creatives, then share it with us on Contribute@CreativeGaga.com

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People don’t buy products or logos, they buy stories, they buy experiences. Believing this, NH1 Design, an integrated branding consultancy has always kept its focus on making a brand more loveable. Here are some of the recently created stories and experiences have been presented.

Stories

Client: MYSCAPE PROPERTIES PVT. LTD.

Services: Naming, Branding and Editorial Design

The Loft is one majestic building that towers over the vibrant financial district of Hyderabad. Designed to form an iconic residential high-rise in the heart of the city. The views and sunlight orientations are spectacular, no matter which side you’re on, or which apartment you book for that matter.

Stories

The Loft’s Jenga-like structure is also an ingenious architectural device that creates a multi-volume experience throughout. Shooting vertical fins and inner glass capsule elevators gives one a breath-taking view of the city, as one travels upward.



NH1 Design was commissioned to develop a brochure and identity that would enable prospective buyers to experience a taste of life in one of their luxurious residential projects.

The Logotype cleverly hints the unique stacking’ structure of the facade, by stacking L&O together.

Stories

The Brochure was designed to be perceived as a photo album, a visual representation of memories the future residents will live. The vertical orientation of the brochure also symbolises the high-rise structure of Myscape Loft.

Published in Issue 49

The Design in 2020! Each year starts with many predictions, anticipations and a lot of hope for bad things to go out and good things to come in our life. The year 2020 has already started with eventful initial months and may hold more surprises in coming times. To understand what’s coming from the design perspective, we featured some of the best design projects from last year. Also discussed a few broad questions like how minimalism will affect our designs or what all an illustrator to keep in mind to be successful and much more.

 


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Rusbury is a great example of how to brand a sweet and savouries store in today’s contemporary times. Sukkrish AADDS, a Bangalore based creative agency founded by Shreesh Shankar, gives an interesting twist to the branding (visual identity).

Visual Identity

The Brief and Challenges

Rusbury is a sweets and savouries brand operating out of Bangalore. The brand needed a unique visual identity that would help it stand out from the clutter. The identity also needed to appeal to both, the existing customer and their target audience.

Visual Identity
Visual Identity

The Solution

When you think of a sweet and savouries store the image that comes to your mind is a traditional shop with all its aesthetics. Sukkrish AADDS decided to break away from convention to create a unique and contemporary identity for Rusbury.

Visual Identity

The bold yet simple logo and motif itself is a blend of western and Indian culture with the introduction of the Devanagari script. The colour palette is kept at a minimum with red, white and black. The majority usage is that of white and black, with the red colour judiciously added at places.

Visual Identity


The team makes great use of illustrations to create a feel and mood for the brand. The illustrations capture the very Indian vibrant and cheery vibe. Yet the balance of solid white and red keeps the overall branding contemporary and sophisticated.

Visual Identity
Visual Identity

The final visual identity is versatile allowing several possibilities and scope for play.

Published in Issue 48

A Freelancer’s Life in India! Every day, with a dream of ‘Being Your Boss,’ many creative professionals jump into the pool of freelancing. But many are not well prepared for the life of the freelancer, which brings many challenges along with benefits. So to explore further, we interviewed many freelance illustrators and designers to get answers to the question you should ask before taking the final call of becoming your boss! So, if you are planning to or have already become a freelancer then this issue is a must-read for you.

 


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Branding: Everyone notices a unique look and style. It’s the same for a logo or branding. “They are the face of a brand.” says Ketaki K, founder of Cub Design Studio. “And the industry is all about uniqueness, memorability and connect.” Here, she takes us through some simple remedies that can brighten your skills.

Branding for Simpli Eat

Branding for Simpli Eat

Branding for Rosy Bow Fashion

Change is the only Constant.

Every brand has diverse challenges and needs customised solutions. This means that the thought process has to be different for each brand. Designs have to be unique for each brand and are never repeated as they are a result of brainstorming, discussions and experimentation. However, what remains consistent with every project is a trendy fresh look for each design.

Branding for Krushnai

Branding for Krushnai

Branding for Glorious

How far you can imagine starts from how closely you observe.

A brand’s design is its identity. It’s very important that the design does justice to the brand- that’s exactly what its meant for! The briefing is most important, as getting a good understanding of the client’s requirements and the brand’s personality is key. As that is what will catapult your imagination when you get to work.

Packaging for K n U

Stationery design for K n U



Product Design

Branding & Packaging for LivRaw

Less Goes a Long Way.

A logo is the face of the brand. And in order for it to stand the test of time and become the brand itself, it needs to be simple and devoid of any complications. It must be easy to handle so that over time, it can be placed on any medium, from paper to billboard or from fabric to mugs. Consider the logo of Nike; a simple ‘tick mark’ that has worked so well for the brand.

Logo Design for Panditji - Veg Restaurant

Branding for Panditji - Veg Restaurant

Branding for Panditji - Veg Restaurant

Stationery for Panditji - Veg Restaurant

It’s all about what people remember.

The growth of a brand to a considerable extent depends on brand recall. Unique designs ensure people and consumers remember and recollect the brand and its design. Panditiji and Head Safe brandings are funky, playful and strongly distinctive. The client expects a ‘unique’ brand, the brand demands a ‘recall’ value and the target audience looks for a ‘connect’ while a designer needs to ensure all the above are met seamlessly. Nothing brings more joy than creating a lasting value.

Branding for Head Safe

Branding for Head Safe



Stationary for Bake Factory

Branding for Bake Factory

Design is everything.

Though branding can have different perspectives, any good branding should be simple and yet bring out the connect in an interesting manner. Understanding the product/service and then solving the problem is crucial. Always remember, design is a solution for a brand and not just a mere decorative thing. If you do this every day, you’ll never go wrong

Branding for Bake Factory

Packaging for Bake Factory

Logo Design for Vasundhara Jewellers

Published in Issue 21

Branding With Packaging! They say not to judge a book by its cover. But they also say that exceptions are always there. There’s no doubt, branding and packaging are the faces of any business and product. They decide the way people will receive the brand; whether they will accept it or reject it. To understand and gain more perspective on this much-unsolved mystery, we invited many branding and packaging experts who throw light on the topic.

 


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It’s not just the design, the elements or the colours in an artwork that blow us away. It’s the concept; a force that resonates from the designer to the audience. Edmundo Moi-Thuk Shung, a graphic designer from The Netherlands, believes cracking a creative concept is the most important step in branding design. He speaks to us to throw more light on his approach.

Branding Design
What are u Doodling

CG: Branding and packaging is a very competitive sphere of design to be working in. What are the principles that dictate your designs?

Edmundo: There are three things that I constantly make sure I am aware of while designing – they have to be unique, meaningful and easy to understand.

Branding Design
Poppy Red Stickerpack

CG: Designs need to be creative and at the same time practical. How do your designs balance both the requirements? What are the challenges you face in day-to-day work? What do you enjoy the most about what you do?

Edmundo: Well, the most important part is to make sure the concept is clear and useful to others. This, for most of the time, also covers the creative part of the whole process. Concentrating on the job is the hardest part for me as I was diagnosed with Attention Deficit Disorder that hinders the thought and concentration process of the mind. I overcome this by doing exercises to clear my mind. You’ve got to figure out your own tricks to overcome whatever it is that distracts you from the job.

Branding Design
Poppy Red Stickerpack

I get the most enjoyment out of concept designing, like doodling in my moleskin and working them out digitally. It’s also refreshing to put your thoughts on paper and work these out.

DIY-HMZ. Some self-branding on various mediums and accessories can help gain exposure in the outside world



MOKKACCINO. These business cards in the shape of coffee cups that can be left behind on the train for travelers to pick up

CG: Branding requires a good understanding of the product/client. How do you then take it forward? Can you take us through your design process?

Edmundo: Once I’ve accepted the assignment, I make sure to gauge the client’s vision by asking them questions to rule out what they expect from me. From then on, I usually make a “plan of approach” that describes the needs, planning and requirements for the assignment. This helps put everything before me so that I can connect the dots through creative ideas and concepts. Afterwards I pitch my ideas to the clients and decide what direction I should take.

MIXWELL. A mix of street and graffiti art, this hiphop styled design uses audio and design supplies to infuse life into a concept

KOFI & AYU. A character getting ready to head a soccer ball, while Ayu the female character wants to check her camera lenses

CG: In your experience, how receptive are brands/clients and audiences to something new? Are people willing to take risks or do you feel they still prefer to play it safe?

Edmundo: The demand in today’s time is to create something that is ‘unusual yet affective’. I guess that means people are willing to take risks as long as the concepts are effective and don’t differ too much from already existing products.

Branding Design
SMOOTHIE POSTER. Designed for The Pepin Press Company the design uses relevant elements to bring together a concept



LOGOS. These logos designed for clients and the artist himself communicate and
symbolise unique character for each

CG: You use the Indian symbol of a Yogi in your branding design for Mellow. Can you tell us more about the project and how you arrived at that idea? How do international elements feature in your designs? How do the local audience adapt to something foreign?

Edmundo: It all started with an old sketch of a Yogi which I stumbled upon while going through all of my drawings. The project was a mother’s day gift and I related the element to the fact that she does yoga. That’s when I came up with the idea to make something by myself using an old duffle bag and other stuff lying around my house and created several products out of it. Since Yoga originates from Ancient India, the logo was apt. The project was received well by people with different backgrounds perhaps because our world is getting more multi-cultural.

MELLOW. Symbolism in a logo makes it memorable as this yoga branding suggests

MELLOW. Symbolism in a logo makes it memorable as this yoga branding suggests

CG: Brandings can’t be static. How do you create designs that can be worked upon and taken forward as the brand evolves? How do you give it that flexibility?

Edmundo: I make sure the logo I design isn’t too complicated. Ofcourse a lot depends on the kind of brand and the brief, but I usually give it a visual reference for what the company stands for. It gives it the advantage to become memorable and the ability to evolve easily as the time passes on.

MELLOW BASIC YOGA POSTER. Displaying basic yoga poses, this design also translates onto a scroll that can be
used as a handy guide for some yoga practice

Published in Issue 21

They say not to judge a book by its cover. But they also say that exceptions are always there. There’s no doubt, branding and packaging are the faces of any business and product. They decide the way people will receive the brand; whether they will accept it or reject it. To understand and gain more perspective on this much-unsolved mystery, we invited many branding and packaging experts who throw light on the topic.

 


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CURRENT ISSUE

 




Prasun Mazumdar - Brand
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Experience definitely counts. Prasun Mazumdar is here to share tips with the young, aspiring designers and to guide them in setting-up their own little studio and coverting it in a brand.


P
rasun has a mixed take on the new-age designers of the current generation! Some would like to be independent designers and fit into the requirements as they come, some would want to use their remarkable skill to generate a style that is their very own and work as an independent design supplier, with social media helping them get the applause they want and also it would extend to real profits and then there are some who have long-term thinking and plans who wish to and will set up their own studios (brand).

Prasun is a supreme believer of the fact that everyone is different and has different life experiences. Hence the way of approaching a challenge and delivering it varies tremendously from person to person.





Having said this, he still feels that there are certain common aspects needed to be kept in mind to run an independent design studio.

01. Setting-up

The first challenge for setting up a studio is the space, as it has a major role to play in the initial years of a design studio. It considerably influences the evolution of thought process and allows designers to think with a free mind.

 

As for Prasun, personally, the new concepts of co-working space, is not a very ‘design studio’ thing as designers are a crazy breed, they need to talk but they also need to be in complete isolation at times.


02. The Driving Force

The urge and the push to work is the next most important thing. Post setting up the studio, the idea of just doing minimum work should not be the sole or pivotal idea. The project loads go up & down with market trends and requirements but to have the eagerness to do more is always good for a design studio as it keeps the spirit going.





03. Time Management

Managing time is quite a challenge during the days of establishment. Balancing between client and self-projects, allotting a good 20% to 30% of your total time to personal projects proves to be of great help.

04. Client Relationships

Building good and healthy relationship with your clients is always a plus as it helps in carrying the project further even after the defined work is finished. With the designer thinking in depth about the project and the client being ready to accept the suggestions, provided they are practical and propose a profitable angle to their business, it is a win-win situation for both parties, solely built on the established relationship between the two.





05. Eclectic Mix of Skills

For a stronger team and the studio’s organic growth, it is of much value to have a versatile group of designers, rather than having all good at one or similar skills.