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For the majority of good design, less is, in fact, more. Rahul Bhogal and his team at Nothing Design Studio aim to declutter and simplify brand identities and strategies to make a memorable experience for their user bases.

Brand Identities by Rahul Bhogal
Making Waves Swim School, Facility Design
Brand Identities by Rahul Bhogal
Making Waves Swim School, Signages

Rahul Bhogal is a ‘meticulous maker of well-crafted brand identities’, and it definitely shows. He has clocked over ten years as a graphic designer and art director, specialising in brand identity and digital design. Rahul runs an independent design studio called ‘Nothing’, which at first glance, may seem an interesting title choice for a visual-heavy enterprise. Initially starting as a joke inspired by a Seinfeld episode (“The Pitch”), he found that the name resonated with his spiritual journey and desire to explore our world. As a bonus, he tells us it’s a great conversation starter at the very least.

Brand Identities by Rahul Bhogal
Spline Group
Brand Identities by Rahul Bhogal
Spline Group
Brand Identities by Rahul Bhogal
Spline Group, Outdoor signage

When asked about his design philosophy, Rahul quotes Sadhguru, “Forget philosophies, embrace reality.” He finds philosophies to be creatively crippling, closed off and restrictive, choosing instead to follow a practice to do what he loves while being passionately detached from the work he produces. Rahul expands the thought to keep curiosity alive and design for delight, empathy, coherence, and trust.

Brand Identities by Rahul Bhogal
Spline Group, Website
Brand Identities by Rahul Bhogal
Spline Group, Website.

Rahul’s experience in the industry has revealed that most brands struggle with establishing a solid connection with an audience due to being unclear about their user base. Catering to vague demographics and personas affects their ability to provide a memorable experience or produce creative methods of communication impacting their overall brand identity.

Canary Dental, Identity and signage.
Canary Dental, Identity and signage.

He tackles this by gaining clarity on the problem his clients are trying to solve and determining the metrics used to measure success. Working within these parameters allows him to reduce the solution (design or strategy) to its core for the most impact. Echoing Dieter Rams, Rahul believes that “simplicity is the key to excellence” and believes there is elegance and sophistication to the reductive design.

Art as Therapy, Brand Collateral
Art as Therapy, Brand Collateral

An excellent example of this mentality is the brand identity redesign for the Spline Group. Exploring the case study, you can see how Rahul directs the vision towards stripping away all the bells and whistles of the old identity, eventually leaving a customised wordmark and a striking colour palette that makes its presence felt. For a brand in the engineering space, this modern overhaul inspires a modern, professional, and dependable identity that cuts to the chase. The website design had an honourable mention on Awwwards, and AIGA featured the identity in its members’ gallery.

Brand Identities by Rahul Bhogal
Game6 Sports Academy, Identity, court design, and team jersey.

“I’m interested in creating work that is inspired by culture and community” – a trait that we see with his self-initiated creative projects inspired by Sikh culture. On the one hand, the work features a gorgeous painting of Guru Nanak in a meditative state and a playful “Sikher than your average” t-shirt design on the other.

Brand Identities by Rahul Bhogal
Source of Nature, Branding and packaging.

We asked Rahul about his experience navigating the pandemic and if he had any new insights about the future of the design market. He found it challenging due to a lack of human interaction and collaborative environments. Still, as the world is headed towards digital experiences, he has taken the opportunity to understand human behaviour and emotions within these constraints.

Bramptonist, Swag with messaging
Issue 52 - Transforming Education

Published in Issue 52

The pandemic has brought many different challenges for everyone. But educating our young ones is among the top priority. The issue focused on how design education is still possible while most of us are locked in our homes. We also interacted with illustrators and photographers such as Jasjyot Singh Hans and Anirudh Agarwal, who seem to stand firm with their uniqueness in this time of chaos. Overall this issue serves food for thought with visually stunning creativity on a single platter.

 

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CURRENT ISSUE
Creative Gaga - Issue 52

 

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The brand identity of ‘The Earth Collective‘ created by Manav Sachdev Design Studio (MSDS). The Earth Collective brings premium haircare range inspired by the goodness of nature. Believing in the process of finding beauty in everything around us, this brand has conducted extensive research and study to develop products with organic and natural ingredients, since it is their firm belief that hair care is an integral part of human existence.

Brand Identity of The Earth Collective

Brief

 

‘The Earth Collective’ required a visual identity that had to be designed from scratch. The visual identity of the brand includes brand logo, illustrations, packaging and website. The essence of the brand and their morals had to be brought out through fresh, unique and creative visuals which connected with the consumers instantly. The brand’s integration of nature and science must be showcased through its visual identity.

Brand Identity of The Earth Collective
Brand Identity of The Earth Collective

Challenges

The brand’s visual identity needs to stand apart from the others in the market, which is already cluttered with several similar products. The identity must also speak for brand and all that they stand for, which include the glorious union of nature and science. The rare and natural ingredients used in the product must be present in the brand’s visual identity. It is also crucial that the brand’s essence, which is nature coming together, must be represented strongly.

Solution

The brand strategy was focused on hair care inspired by nature. To signify this, the studio incorporated the five elements of nature in the logo, which resemble hair strands that make a solution for healthy hair. The logotype also signifies the earth’s hemisphere, which contains the rare and natural ingredients for the products. The team also represented the unique union of nature and science, which resulted in these products. Elements of the logo have been illustrated on the packaging. The brand’s identity has been kept elegantly minimal with a carefully handpicked pastel colour palette.

Creative Gaga - Issue 51

Published in Issue 51

Business, studios, agencies, freelancer all have different perspectives to handle the pandemic and hurdle it brings. While some find pandemic an obstacle which will soon fade away and on the other hand, few saw opportunities in the same. Many creatives used the past few months to reflect on their styles and horn their art. Many utilized it for collaboration opportunities with national and international creatives. This issue is a must-read if you are looking for insights, inspirations and ways to bounce back in this unlocking phase.

 

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Creative Gaga - Issue 52

 

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NH1 Design takes us through its approach behind freshly branding a local Indian street food outlet while ensuring that it retains an identity credible of being authentic, fun, young and affordable.

Brief

The Ahmadabad market had been selling anything but authentic Vada Pav (typically, a local Mumbai delicacy); brands were serving it with cheese, Spinach, and cholle (a form of peas). The essential idea for Majja, a quick-service restaurant selling Indian street food as a branded and hygienic experience, was thus to reinforce the delicacy’s authenticity. Targeting the youth and office-goers, who prefer a quick snack at an affordable price, the challenge was to create a brand synonymous with authentic taste, fun, young and affordability.

NH1 - Branding

The Concept

The word Majja (fun) is commonly used across India, especially in Gujarat. We created a fun verbal brand language that could be easily understood across different languages and cultures – a friendly tone of voice that completely aligned with the brand ethos.

The Solution

The visual story was inspired by the street life of Mumbai. The use of illustrated stories of people and the streets of Mumbai further emphasised the authenticity of the Vada Pav.

NH1 - Branding
NH1 - Branding
NH1 - Branding
NH1 - Vada Pav
NH1 - Branding
NH1 - Branding
NH1 - Branding
NH1 - Branding
NH1 - Vada Pav
NH1 - Vada Pav
NH1 - Vada Pav
NH1 - Vada Pav
NH1 - Vada Pav

Together, the visual and verbal language established a consistent set of assets for the brand. Every touch-point was meticulously detailed. Applications included signage, environmental graphics, packaging, stationery, website, adverts, tent cards, floor graphics, social media posts, uniforms, food trucks, menu, danglers and others.

NH1 - Vada Pav
NH1 - Vada Pav
NH1-Vada Pav

Published in Issue 38

This issue, we try to explore different views from many well-known studio owners and senior designers. While Anthony Lopez of Lopez Design shared tips on what a studio looks for in a designer, Mohar Ray from Codesign highlights the key aspects that play a significant role and make the difference in whether you are hired or not as a promising designer. Also, this issue has an insightful article on ‘Branding with reason and love’ from Itu Chaudhuri, founder ICD (Itu Chaudhuri Design) along with Siddhi Ranade, explaining his tools of story telling through his unique style of illustrations. This issue is a must read for a talented graduate to a branding expert. Order you copy and enjoy reading it!

 

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Creative Gaga - Issue 52

 

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The brand identity of the Afforestation project called Forestscaping created by Pratyush Gupta. Urban forestry is critical to the resilience of cities as they absorb carbon and pollution, aid flood resistance, and enhance human interaction with nature. Afforestt helps convert the tiniest of spaces into self-sustainable native forests which grow ten times faster, are 30 times denser and 100 times more biodiverse compared to conventional plantations. Starting from a mini forest in their backyard, they have grown over 130 forests across five countries around the globe.

Brand identity of Forestscaping. Forest

Brief from Forestscaping

 

Afforestt creates natural, wild and maintenance-free native forests. Forestscaping, a new offering by Afforestt, combines forests with art and architecture to transform barren properties into experiential spaces, where trees, animals and human beings can interact.

Brand identity of Forestscaping

Though a unique concept for India, Forestscaping needed to compete with multiple players in the landscape architecture industry, highlighting the advantage of growing forests instead of conventional gardens. It needed a brand identity that captured the strengths and essence of Forestscaping and exuded confidence and expertise.

Brand identity of Forestscaping. Forest

The Challenge

 

Forestscaping was targeted towards an affluent audience and required a positioning strategy that was distinct from Afforestt. The challenge was to cultivate a new personality for Forestscaping while holding Afforestt core values and beliefs.

It was challenging to capture the energy and joy of being one with the forest, at the same time, maintaining a level of sophistication and elegance to appeal to the audience.

Forestscaping just starting and didn’t have any photographs to showcase, hence we needed to create an identity which compensated for the lack of visuals and blend seamlessly with images once they were available.

Brand identity of Forestscaping. Forest

And the Solution

 

At the heart of the Forestscaping visual identity is a confident and elegant logotype. The G in the logotype has a leaf sprouting from its end, a subtle reference to forests and their beginning. The primary colours of the identity are green-representing forests, and gold – symbolising the wealth that forest create.

Brand identity of Forestscaping. Forest

A dynamic illustration language amalgamates forests, animals and people to create various forestscapes that bring to life diverse touchpoints. The illustration style has been inspired by Varli and Sohrai art forms, providing the visuals with an earthy aesthetic rooted in Indian culture.

“I see Pratyush work as an outcome of extreme creativity that produces some of the simplest yet brilliant art. His clear understanding of people perception makes him a business problem solver. He is a deep listener and can see the world through the eyes of his clients. Working with him created a synergy that improved our work and elevated our perception towards it”

 


Shubhendu Sharma
Founder and Director at Afforestt

Every year many exceptional design briefs are being answered with brilliant solutions by many talented designers. Some manage to reach the limelight through awards and other recognitions, but not all. And that is where the ‘DCS-01’ comes into the picture with detailed case studies highlighting the challenges, research, and the unique solutions to each obstacle faced in reaching these final design solutions. An inspiration and a collection of quality design projects created in India recently.

 

So, if you are creative freelancer, agency, studio, corporate or a design student, who needs inspiration and want to know the process of making great designs, then this is a must-have book for your collection. Order it today to reserve a copy of this limited stock book.

CURRENT ISSUE
Creative Gaga - Issue 52

 

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Colours form an integral part of the world we live in. And more often than not, our feelings, emotions and even taste can be validated with colours! According to an article written by Charles Spence in BioMed Central 2015, five colour-taste studies were conducted and their results indicate some startling results.

For example, the colours black, purple and violet are widely associated with bitterness. White and blue is associated with the salty sea. Yellow and green represent a sour taste, because of its obvious recall to limes and lemons. Sweet is linked to pink or red.

Truth be told, colours can have a major influence on people’s purchase decisions. Most brands are associated with one or more colours; organizations have embraced the colour psychology as a major driver in their branding strategy. Why? Because people are drawn to certain colours for certain reasons and they carry associations with objects and tend to feel them.

Colour - Lollypop Design

As designers, we need to pay detailed attention to the colours we choose while designing a brand. Colour creates contrast, hierarchy, balance & rhythm. Choosing the right colour palette is important as it not only creates interest but also creates an emotional or subconscious connect with the people. Here are a few tips by Shrivathsan Raguraman, Sr. UI Designer of Lollypop Design, have a look.

Understanding Colours is Understanding Product

Colour - Lollypop Design

Research indicates that 85% of the decision made by individuals towards choosing a product was based on colours only. Colours carry an emotional value; each colour emotes different feelings and perception; these aren’t general emotions that are associated with it but the whole nature itself is built around it and perceived in a psychological aspect. For example:


Red – energy, power, and passion
Green – ambition, growth, freshness, and safety
Blue – tranquillity, confidence, and intelligence
Yellow – happiness, intellect, and energy
Black – power, elegance, and mystery
White – cleanliness, purity, and perfection

Questions and Considerations Before Choosing a Colour Palette

Before we get to explaining how to pick colours and go on to explaining the colour wheel, let’s be clear about a few fundamental questions that we should ask ourselves even before jumping on to the branding elements of the product. The questions would give you a sense of direction and make life simpler:

1) Are we designing for a brand new product or an established brand?

Brand New Product: Fresh branding might require you to understand the reasoning and the emotional connect of the brand. It will give you much-needed freedom to chose and play with your colours, unlike the defined products. We generally prefer to choose either monochromatic or complementary as they create more emotional value and a sense of purpose.

Defined product: One should understand the product and the guidelines it comes with. There might be many limitations or directions that we need to follow. So get acquainted with it. For example, Google or Microsoft has strict guidelines. In such cases, we suggest you choose the Analogous/ Triadic palette as they allow to stick to the prominent brand colour while allowing to play with the other colours from the wheel as an accent. It is like choosing a group of friendly neighbours to build a harmonious product.

2) Do we understand the product?

Colour - Lollypop Design

What is the intent of the product? What does it want to communicate? What problem does it want to solve? Who will use this product? These questions will lead us to shortlist the primary and secondary colours of the product.

3) Do we understand the users well?

Colour - Lollypop Design

Who are the users we are targeting? What are there behavioural graphs? What their mental models like? How tech-savvy are they? What region do they belong to? What is their culture? Everything comes into play when you are deciding on the brand colours. Ask as many relevant questions as possible.

4) Are we accommodating the W3C principle?

Colour - Lollypop Design

Choosing a palette also involves accessibility as one of the major challenges for a product designer. As a designer, you must ensure that the product is accessible by all sets of colour vision deficiency personas. Adding to that, textual contrast check is really important which needs to be done before adding any coloured text over any background colour. This allows us in covering the CVD people by providing them with an accessible product.

How do we choose the colours?

Finally, let’s decode the different sets of colours and principles that will always make life easier as designers. Always look up to the nature of the product when it comes to choosing colours but before you go overboard looking for inspiration you have to understand the basics of the colour wheel. Follow Colour theory 101; there are many diverse ways of picking colour sets that work together. Try to pick the combination best suited for you ranging from those that are easy to use till difficult to use. We’ll explain this further below:

• Complementary – Easy To Use

As the name suggests, these colours are placed adjacent to each other in the colour wheel. They complement each other perfectly. This colour scheme works best for brands that are trying to communicate reliability and a sense of balance. It’s like the colour blue says ‘you are beautiful’ to the colour orange, which complements its attributes, and vice versa.

RunAdam or Paytm Money are good examples of brands with complementary colours.

• Monochromatic – Easy To Use

These colours share the hues and tones of a base colour. When you use shades of the same colour, the ideal notion behind this is that it creates harmony and natural sync. Monochromatic colour sets are easy to remember since the user can associate these shades with one another and still can remember what brand or product it is.

Farmrise would be a great example of a monochromatic colour brand.

• Analogous – Exercise Caution

The word analogous means ‘comparable’. Under this, analogous colours refer to any set of colours on the colour wheel that are immediately adjacent, i.e, three colours left or right from the one of your choosing. As a set, these four colours will be considered as analogous colours. Analogous colours are preferred when there is a need to create a sense of harmony and contentment for brand design.

Paypal, Mastercard are good examples of brands with analogous colours.

• Triadic – You can try

This method is akin to choosing colours that are evenly spaced in an equilateral triangle. These colours are selected from the wheel in such a way that they provide high contrast and rich vibrancy in design. How do we do this? By picking colours, (to the left or right) that are equally spaced from one another on the colour wheel. For example, if you pick a specific colour on the wheel, you can go ahead and pick a colour that is three colours away on either side. These contrasting colours make for an effective, yet tough to create a palette.

Mozilla and Burger King are good examples of the brands with triadic colours.

• Tetradic – Are you brave enough?

This is a four-colour structure evenly spaced on the colour wheel. This scheme is best suitable if you want to create an accent with colours, ie, you choose one dominant colour and three accents supporting it. This colour scheme is similar to triadic, which creates a vibrant and strong palette but is tough to handle.

Google & Microsoft is a good example of a Tetradic colour scheme.

Suggested Tools

Our suggestions towards tools that can be used to choose your palette:

 

Coolors.co – It’s super easy to use and it can show you multiple analogous variations of a single hue.

Adobe Color – Make your own colour palette from colour-wheel to hexcode and easily use it with most adobe apps & software.

Canva Colour wheel – It helps to generate your combinations and help build your palette.

Hope this helps you in building a beautiful palette for your product, Happy branding!

CURRENT ISSUE
Creative Gaga - Issue 52

 

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Packaging has gradually evolved from cardboard boxes or covers to keepsakes. As people realise the creative hard work behind beautiful packs, this hidden space is burgeoning to become a field full of innovation and potential. Isabela Rodrigues, a designer from Brazil, takes us inside the box with her out of the box philosophy.

packaging design by Swt.Co
Branding & Packaging for Sunset Gin
packaging design by Swt.Co
packaging design by Swt.Co
Branding & Packaging for Sunset Gin
Branding & Packaging for Sunset Gin

CG: Gone are the days where a label was slapped on plain and ordinary packaging. Your packaging designs make the product look exciting and inviting. What do you try and achieve through your designs?

Isabela. The goal of packaging design is to turn projects into collectable and saleable items. These ideas translate everything we do and our way to achieve the final result. The objective is to prevent the user from throwing away the packaging and decorate his/ her house with it instead.

packaging design
KRÄFTIG. Packaging resembling real exquisite fruit shapes is employed to showcase this premium Brazilian juice brand.
packaging design
packaging design
JJ ROYAL PITCH. A clean, clear and modern container design for Indonesia’s purest coffee grains reinforces the enriching experience
packaging design

CG: What is it that excites you most about packaging design? What are the challenges that you face? Do you decide the fate of packaging design, or is someone else in control?

Isabela. The most exciting aspect of packaging is tactile designing and how it follows a simple function of conserving the product, selling it as well as enchanting the audience. The biggest challenges are the suppliers and the limitations to achieving the result we look for. Frequently, clients that are in the product-testing phase need packaging on a small scale. In that case, one has to migrate to simpler solutions that are available in the label/bottle segment. In this way, working to conciliate innovative and beautiful designs within those limitations enhances a designer’s abilities and experience.

packaging design
packaging design
These fun collectable packaging was developed especially for children using a tetra pack design in a sustainable manner that can be reused & recycled

packaging design by Swt.Co
Packaging for Liz

CG: Your designs are clean, minimal and follow a discipline, quite contrary to the Brazilian spirit which is known to be loud and colourful! How has Brazil influenced your designs?

Isabela. Brazil is renowned for its colours and aesthetics no doubt. However, the objective here is to try to be a studio with a personal and also global aesthetic. The goal is to fit into each customer’s reality and identity.

packaging design
This natural fruit juice line that contains vital vitamins uses an interesting health based concept to break through traditional juice packaging designs
packaging design
GOT MILK? Unique colour combinations are used to make milk a fashionable drink
packaging design by Swt.Co
Branding for Marc Malou
packaging design by Swt.Co
Branding for Marc Malou

CG: Packaging design is still an unexplored territory. According to you, what are some of the traits of good packaging? What do you do differently to make your designs stand out?

Isabela. There certainly is a long way yet to go before packaging design becomes a celebrated design field. There is so much more potential for innovation and creation in this field. A good package must conserve the product, have a structure, sell and enchanting too. It’s vital to understand that one can’t do without the others; there’s no use in a beautiful but fragile package or even a rigid one that doesn’t show the concept of the product.

packaging design
This packaging design for a French brewery showcases how designers can exercise complete freedom by breaking paradigms simply to delight the eyes
packaging design
Minimalism with a touch of the classic vintage glass bottle makes for an ideal way to showcase chocolate milk
packaging design
The design exemplifies the essence of Colombian chocolate making by using traditional Cacao tree visuals to take user through that very journey

CG: And now something we’ve been dying to ask- why bottles?

Isabela. Why not bottles? Nowadays, many people are creating new products by quitting their conventional jobs, and the beverage industry is the one experiencing this the most. Alcoholic or not, this form of packaging is in constant demand.

packaging design
This branding and packaging design refreshes the identity of a popular local restaurant known for its natural and healthy appeal.
packaging design
FROO.IT. The design presents the fruit drink in a fun manner by using ludic and fashion illustrations
packaging design
This fashionable and luxurious bottle design captures the essence of spiced beverages by Manjoor Estate in conjunction with New York Fashion Week

Published in Issue 26

Packaging is the first vital step towards enchanting the audience. Who doesn’t like a cute box or a trendy bottle? With this issue, Creative Gaga lets the cat out of the box to reveal the world of packaging design. Featuring various local and international designers like Petar Pavlov from Macedonia and Brandziac from Russia, Elephant Design and Impprintz from Pune, the issue promises to be a keepsake for many.

 

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CURRENT ISSUE
Creative Gaga - Issue 52

 

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Starting from scratch isn’t that big a deal. Putting in your hundred percent, grabbing the right opportunities and administering patience go a long way in the evolutionary development of an idea. Gopika Chowfla shares her insight about the same.

After her graduation, choosing to work between 2 design studios and an ad agency to practice her learnings, Gopika joined the ad industry to do what she loved- illustration, logos, typography, poster making, packaging design and photography and was mentored by amazingly creative people at work like Frank Simoes and Mohammed Khan.

Gopika Chowfla Design
Brand Identity for Veeba

The Genesis

In 1996 when the market was changing, print media took a back seat and film was reigning supreme. Being driven by the desire to be innovative and creative, she was not inspired by what she was doing and wanted to get into the realm of design. This gave birth to Gopika Chowfla Design. Gopika Chowfla Design has evolved organically without much of a business plan or charting of a growth curve. The two driving forces for Gopika were enjoying the work she does and working with people who have the same motivation.

Gopika Chowfla Design
Gopika Chowfla Design
Logo and Packaging Design for Organica

The Work-Culture

A studio with the approach of making the clients’ job as owner and this has helped establish long-term relationships with clients. Believing in a work ethic that is cooperative and in creating an environment that enables people to work and create in an engaging and supportive way, Gopika has always treated the workspace as a place of learning design as well as life skills.

Gopika Chowfla Design
Gopika Chowfla Design
Brand Identity for Spicejet Airlines

Her workspace is her life with her own children growing up around here and her colleague’s kids as well. Here, personal issues become shared events and everyone is welcome to bring their lives into this work space. Gopika is proud of having created a space that has welcomed and nurtured as well as been enriched by some of the most talented and wonderful people. The result of this is evident in the output of the studio and the fact that people who have worked here never really leave.

Gopika Chowfla Design
Gopika Chowfla Design
Brand Identity for Spicejet Airlines

Growth and Expansion

Gopika Chowfla Design was started as a dominantly print design studio but soon branding was their core strength. Getting into the digital space became essential and started extending their design services to web interfaces, primarily as an integral part of developing the total brand architecture as they like to approach brand development in as holistic a manner that they can.

Gopika Chowfla Design
Gopika Chowfla Design
Brand graphics and complete retail experience for Oxford Bookstore and Cha bar

Finding something exciting that challenges creatively, works as a starting point and is then executed in a manner that is fresh, logically thought out and beautifully designed. When Gopika Chowfla Design was setup, clients typically engaged their advertising agencies for their brand and design-related jobs and these were done at very low fees by the agencies. So convincing a client to actually pay a proper fee to an independent design studio came with its own challenges. But soon enough a client recognized the value of engaging a designer for design specific projects as they got better, more specialized inputs. Seek clients who respect your work and give room to do what you do well.

Gopika Chowfla Design
Coaster design for Apsara

A Positive Outlook

Taking the challenges in a positive light as something new to tackle has never been a struggle to move forward. It rather is an enjoyable journey with plenty of interesting co-travellers and many important milestones. With a young and agile team, we try and keep pace with changes that happen around us and respond accordingly. With social media being such an important part of communication and marketing, are into that area too.

Gopika Chowfla Design
Anya Hotels branding and design

Hidden Treasures

Loving what we do and letting the designers at Gopika Chowfla Design take charge of the assignments they are working on is Gopika Chowfla Design’s secret to achieve everything that they wish for. Making tow of her designers as partners. Gopika wishes to transform it into a cooperative where everyone is an owner, contributes to the earnings and takes a share of the profits.

Brand Identity for Biotique

Clients respect your work only if you respect it yourself. Figure out what you want your brand to stand for, be true to it. Don’t chase the money, go after the ideas and do great work and the money chases you! Surround yourself with talent and feed off it, so that it keeps you going when you feel like you’re drying up. Enjoy yourself, there couldn’t be a more fun job in the world – than as a designer.

Issue 44 - Creative Gaga

Published in Issue 44

Behind every successful studio, artist or designer there are stories of challenges, struggles and their unique solutions to these. With this issue, we interviewed many well-known names from the creative industry and found their different learnings and experiences behind making their own self as a brand. Though they all have a different take on this topic, still they all unanimously emphasise on focusing on their skills and quality delivery of the final outcome. So, if you are looking to establish yourself as a brand in the creative market or already in the process of it, this issue is a must read. Full of insights and inspirations from the best of the talents, this issue is waiting to reach your desks.

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CURRENT ISSUE
Creative Gaga - Issue 52

 

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Everything around us is the result of a design thought, conscious or unconscious. Diving deep into the story behind its creation inspires original creativity. Ruminates the young and promising illustration & design studio, LOCOPOPO, founded by Lokesh Karekar.

Illustration for Royal Stag Whisky packaging Design
Illustration for Royal Stag Whisky packaging Design
Illustration for Royal Stag Whisky packaging Design

We Live in a Designed World

There is design in every object or thing around us. From a bus ticket to apparels, from roads to an entire city, and every single thing around us is designed. Good or bad, it has been “designed” by somebody. The environment that we grow up in defines our choices of colours, patterns, purposes and forms. As consumers we prefer for a certain kind of design. And as creators, we subconsciously play the role of a designer, conceptualizing a product according to our choices. This is the most fascinating fact about the world around us.

Illustration for Taj Vivanta
Identity design for Myoho - a fashion apparel brand
Identity and label design for SIX FIELDS wheat beer

Creating is the best way to get Inspired

Inspiration can come from anywhere. That’s the most heard statement in the life of a designer. What we do with it shape up our creativity. Travelling is just a beginning to imbibe ideas. Scribbling, doodling, clicking photographs, recording incidents is the next step. As creative minds, we need to keep dabbling with the triggers so as to come up with our own ideas. This is what keeps the mind of an artist fresh, original and prolific.

Identity design for Mango Pickle
Collateral design for Mango Pickle
Collateral design for Mango Pickle
Coaster design for Mango Pickle
Collateral design for Mango Pickle

Our Roots Define our Identity

Our culture has a rich reservoir of forms and content. As designers we should search within and dig out references that are related to our roots. But the quest doesn’t stop there. Being part of the larger global family, our job is to merge our design sensibilities with the international one. Keeping the composition and colour preference modern and the choice of figures and patterns Indian, or vice versa, we are actually contributing our bit to make our own art socially appreciable. It’s time we simplify, modify, create shapes and motifs inspired from Indian traditional styles and implement them correctly with proper use of colours.

Brand illustration language created for festival mailers for Aditya Birla Capital
Brand illustration language created for festival mailers for Aditya Birla Capital
Brand illustration language created for festival mailers for Aditya Birla Capital

Illustration is an Illusion

And of course, a beautiful one. It’s wonderful to observe how it seamlessly integrates into the central thought of the project at hand. Ranging from minimal and form based work, where the whole charm is concentrated in one form to very detailed, sometimes bright and vibrant imagery, illustrations are carriers of ideas and have no existence of their own. Trying to define style through one’s illustration abilities is a wrong approach. Rather, one should focus on one’s communication abilities and explore the preferred design tools.

Illustration for Jack Daniels
Packaging Design for Jack Daniels
Play card Design for Jack Daniels
Play card Design for Jack Daniels

Every Medium has an Inherent Wit

As designers our job is to give a contextual twist and make the humour relevant to the design. There is fun around us. We don’t even have to search for it. If our process of getting inspired is right, it automatically transforms into our works. Be it illustration, collage, clay modeling or even product design, the medium inherits this wit and automatically gets translated through the specific language of the medium. The human figures in my work often follow a feeling of caricature as that is what I imbibe from the human faces around me.

How the stability of the Indian Rupee affects industries like infrastructure, automobile and banking. Created for Moneycontrol.com
How the stability of the Indian Rupee affects industries like infrastructure, automobile and banking. Created for Moneycontrol.com

Be Original

Look around and you’ll find your voice resonating in one of the elements of your root, your own culture. Get inspired from it, and embark on the journey of finding your own language.

Illustration created for LAKME - Absolute Salon advertising campaign
Lifestyle Illustration created for Lodha Bellissimo

Published in Issue 04

This is a Inspiration Special. The issue with the best insights from some of the top space designers and advertising tips from Happy Creatives with some exclusive mix of media experiments in type and digital art.

 

 

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