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Dynamite Design shows us how they produce impactful TV branding in a time when digital entertainment production and consumption is at an all time high.

CG. What, according to you, are the most fundamental and essential aspects of  TV branding?

Dynamite: 3 things. Format, Genre and Audience. To smoothly navigate our layouts, it becomes essential to consider which format, either SD or HD, we are broadcasting in. Similarly, when dealing with a diverse set of genres such as movies, general entertainment, sports and so on, we take into account each genre’s uniquely different requirements. Finally, we make sure we understand who the audience is, based on demographics and tastes, as these further help us determine our approach to our design process.

CG. How is designing for the TV different from designing for other mediums?

Dynamite: We are out here creating new brands because someone, somewhere has identified a gap, and as a design house our mission is to occupy that space with as much responsibility in as beautiful and relevant a manner as possible. The design process is pretty much the same as when you design for any medium. The difference here is that the solution is not a static frame or a product, but a dynamic system that literally breathes life and character into the channel.

CG. What helps decide the tone of the visuals?

Dynamite: It is the audience, genre and format. When we design for an HD channel, we know we are dealing with a more evolved audience. Also, HD allows us to use a larger gamut of colours and gradients that the SD format can’t support. So, from imagery to typography, colours, gradients, and the palette, everything opens up completely when we are designing an HD channel.

CG. What is the main motive to achieve when creating TV branding, and how do you make sure it’s engaging?

Dynamite: The main motive is to present content in the best way possible. So, we keep in mind how the viewers’ eye needs to move and register information in a seamless and effortless manner. The biggest motive really is for the viewer to enjoy the experience, even during the breaks. So our job is really to create packaging that is sticky, and to keep the viewers engaged throughout their TV viewing hours.

CG. What is the overall approach and process you follow in your works for television?

Dynamite: We ask a lot of questions! This helps our clients articulate their ‘marketing’ brief in an informal and honest manner. Once we feel we’re on the same page, we take it back to the team for our brainstorm sessions. We are a pretty old school in our approach. In such a saturated market, any new player coming in has to have a unique proposition for the viewer. As a standard, content is always king.

If the broadcaster has to survive or be noticed; it is imperative that the carriage of that content/programming is well thought through. If it’s not presented interestingly enough, no one’s going to give it a chance. So, we really have to get a core understanding of the brand in place before we start our process.

For each of the Broadcast properties, it is identifying the core values that differentiate them in the mind of the consumer Branding then is simply a matter of creating communication that connects the broadcast brand instantly and intuitively to the targeted consumer.

CG. What is your advice to others practising?

Dynamite: Follow a clearly defined process. Be committed to what you have to offer. Don’t cut corners, as this is a profession that requires educating our clients about the value of branding. This is our constant struggle and quest. We have a talent pool of amazing designers in this country, yet, most of our clients prefer working abroad with international agencies. We need to be able to build trust, accountability and align as partners if we need to break that stereotype.

Issue 40-Motion Graphics Special

Published in Issue 40

We all have favourite TV shows and we passionately discuss the stories and characters of it. But sometimes, we tend to ignore the channel and its branding. Now with many different channels to choose from, we are experiencing many new branding overhauls to grab the audience’s attention. This issue features interviews with some of the well-known studios and teams of Motion Graphics from India and overseas, including FutureDeluxe Studio from London, Dynamite Design, Adaar and RocketScience Lab from India. It also includes digital artist, Renju MV, highlighting his exceptional control over the medium. If you are interested in moving design or animated content then this issue is a must-read for you!

 

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To meet the ever-changing demands of the Indian urban homes to be in-sync with the contemporary trends and lifestyles, Godrej is launching its new design brand Script outlined by Codesign.

The Challenge

The script is a new brand by Godrej & Boyce, offering contemporary furniture & decor accessories across mass-premium, urban markets in India.

 

Urban home living today throws up a new set of challenges via changing social behaviour, space availability, family structures, aspirations and global exposure to design and lifestyle. This necessitated a re-imagination of furniture—from lifestyles that adapt to established forms of furniture, to furniture that responds and adapts to activities & behaviour. Urban India as we know it, is changing—with people trying to find more meaning and relevance in everything they do, from food to fashion, work & mobility, it’s the time of new living.

The Script Project
The Script Project

The Solution

Contemporary India’s active pursuit of an openness to change formed the premise of design thinking for Script products & services. Codesign was commissioned in the early days of product development, to work in close collaboration with the internal project team, to identify & articulate the core brand idea and create a visual identity system through audios and visuals for the new brand.

The Script Project
The Script Project

Framing the Brand Narrative

‘Design for New Living’ is the soul of the Script brand, capturing the urban zeitgeist and acting as the north star for brand content—embedding a clear point-of-view within all communication.. ‘Design’ denotes the design-led approach of the brand, cueing both the purpose-built capability and higher aesthetic quotient and craftsmanship of the brand. ‘New Living’ denotes new practices or ways of living, that answer to challenges and aspirations of contemporary living.

The Script Project
The Script Project

Creating a Visual Vocabulary

The visual vocabulary for Script establishes an instantly recognizable and distinct aesthetic for the brand using fresh playful design elements in a cohesive and graphical play, evoking the core sense of newness & change.

 

The brand logo is a simple, sophisticated mark, that exudes warmth while standing out with its geometric construction. Derived from the logo, four Graphic Elements (the bar, bend, ring & half ring) open up a whole ecosystem of activity and play for the design language—cueing the smart agility & adaptability of the products.

The Script Project
The Script Project

The primary palette of Script, black & white provides a simple, yet bold canvas, to allow a variable colour play that is theme/product focussed and allows diverse storytelling about products and experience ecosystems.

 

Generously paced layouts and flexible grids allow for a simple but striking display of content. Photography guidelines set the framework for a distinct staging of product & settings that allow clear emphasis on functionality & form, and through consistency also build stronger brand recall.

Identity in Motion

On-screen, the visual vocabulary of the Script comes alive through audio-visual expressions with a characteristic motion—the Shift. Rhythmic & bold, the Shift moves with consistent pace and ease, to unveil new content and settings. The Shift moves on a simple grid across screens, allowing for greater consistency, while varying in orientation and scale.

The Script Project

The Logo signature uses only the characteristic Shift behaviour to decisively mark the beginning or end of branded content. While other elements in on-screen communication also use the Shift behaviour to move, its use in the logo signature reiterates brand presence through its starkness and simplicity.

The Script Project

The Graphic Elements inherit the Shift as the characteristic transition device and are designed for use both as single units and gridded patterns. A secondary expression of the Graphic Elements was designed to mark occasional communication, like a new season, range etc and uses 3-dimensional avatars of the elements with relevant surface treatments, suspended with gentle motion in space.

The Script Project

The Sound of New Living

The sonic identity of the brand celebrates the decisive motion of the Shift motion behaviour. Global, contemporary and agile—the master soundscape has multiple layers grounded in a base staccato string that complement the pace of motion. The instrumental character of the soundscape is balanced with an electronic undertone and harp-like sounds to infuse lightness and fluidity. The combination of diverse sounds within the composition evokes the diversity and adaptability of the brand products and appeals to a contemporary, global sensibility. The sound logo is a distilled essence of the soundscape and emphasises the bold pace of the logo signature animation as a stand-alone marker of a brand.

The Script Project
The Script Project

And The Result

Script marks the entry of the Godrej group into a new segment that is sharply differentiated from their established budget furniture brand Interio. It addresses emerging needs of contemporary lifestyle & home spaces and delivers solutions backed by Godrej’s intrinsic culture of design & manufacturing innovation. The freshness of the solution strategically enables a brand name as established as Godrej to reconnect with newer urban audiences and stand apart from its existing offering in the budget segment.

The Script Project

Client: Godrej & Boyce
Branding & Identity Design: Codesign
Moton & Sonic Design Partner: Addikt
Image Credits: All brand images & footage, courtesy Script.

The Script Project

Branding or Identity design for an established product or brand is a very tricky job with its merits and risks. In 2017 some of the well-known brands gone for a rebranding and came up with stunning outputs. Here, we acknowledge them with our list of top 09 branding design of 2017.

1. The ‘Spectranet’ Identity Design

The new revamped identity design of Spectranet by Ochre is bold with its unique typeface and successfully encompasses the vision of the company making it seamless and customer-centric.

identity design
Spectranet Old Logo
Spectranet Rebranding with Unique Typeface

2. Fanta

Designed by Studio Koto, the bold, vibrant and orangey global visual identity design of Fanta was initially re-imagined in paper-form, before putting it further to the digital process. This was done keeping in mind the fact that Fanta uses bespoke typeface created by hand, working across regular and extended weights, intending to be both natural and playful at the same time. The result, a young, trendy and expressive Fanta.

Fanta-Rebranding
Old-Logo
Fanta-Rebranding

3. SBI

Design Stack spells out the major and minor of rebranding State Bank of India from its conventional state to one more representative of current times and digital services.

SBI-Rebranding
Old-Logo
SBI-Rebranding

4. Mumbaiya Vada Pav

NH1 Design takes us through its approach behind freshly branding a local Indian street food outlet while ensuring that it retains an identity credible of being authentic, fun, young and affordable.

NH1 - Vada Pav
NH1 - Vada Pav

5. Bombay Brasserie

Design Stack owned byAnoop Patnaik and Priyanka Bhasin runs us through their approach, idea and process behind providing a concept-based branding solution to culinary experts, Bombay Brasserie.

Bombay Brasserie - The Indian Culinary Expert
Bombay Brasserie - The Indian Culinary Expert

6. Relaxo

The Relaxo rebranding exercise by Elephant Design focused on infusing a youthful and transformative spirit that felt important for the growth of internal and external stakeholders of the brand. The brand’s dynamism is now embodied in its forward-slanting ‘Blue Berry’ coloured letters, while a ‘Sunny Yellow’ coloured swoosh flows across it to signify a wave of transformation, optimism and positive growth.

Relaxo-Rebranding
Old-Logo
Relaxo-Rebranding

7. Yatra.com

Yatra.com which caters to travelling/traveller needs to be decided to improvise on it branding to be more fluid, vibrant, friendly and thus reliable for the young, more outgoing Indian traveller. Branding elements such as tonality, communication, look and feel were taken into consideration while shaping and improvising upon the new red logo to showcase the richness of “the Yatra experience” and its expansive depth of product portfolio. The typography, at the same time, was likewise made to be of a flowing nature, thus symbolising easy, hassle-free and smooth movement, trying to replicate a relaxed form of travelling.

Yatra-Rebranding
Old-Logo
Yatra-Rebranding

8. Wipro

The Wipro logo is a bold and dynamic signature that proudly headlines the vision pursued itself. Its styling captures the sense of fluidity, resourcefulness, optimism, and creativity with which it approaches everything. The simplicity and elegance of the mark signal a keen intellect; one that is completely in synch with the world around itself – vibrant, aware and forward-looking. Building on the universal form of the circle, the radiating rings of dots around ‘Wipro’ suggest the many connections the brand creates for its customers.

WIPRO-Rebranding
Old-Logo
Wipro-Rebranding

9. Zee Cinema

The changing times often call for channels to rediscover themselves and refresh their brand as a whole. Zee Cinema approached Dynamite Design to revamp its brand undergoing a total visual transformation at the commencement of a new era in cinema.

Design Stack owned by Anoop Patnaik and Priyanka Bhasin runs us through their approach, idea and process behind providing a concept-based branding solution to culinary experts, Bombay Brasserie.

Bombay Brasserie - The Indian Culinary Expert
Bombay Brasserie - The Indian Culinary Expert
Bombay Brasserie - The Indian Culinary Expert

Setting the Right Tone

Design Stack delivered a brand new visual concept infused with youth and energy for Bombay Brasserie, a restaurant that serves pan-Indian cuisine. While space is conceptually western, the food is distinctly pan-Indian, and the logo reflects the same. It initialises ‘Bombay Brasserie’, but with a twist, placing the Devanagri ‘Ba’ and its Roman counterpart side by side.

Bombay Brasserie - The Indian Culinary Expert
Bombay Brasserie - The Indian Culinary Expert
Bombay Brasserie - The Indian Culinary Expert

Creating a Connect

The personality of Bombay Brasserie is that of the intrepid traveller. The space graphics are thus multi-layered and diverse, taking you across India. Hints of geographical maps with coordinates trace the route from cuisine to cuisine. Regional recipes are personalised and rendered in water-colour, bringing them to life. The copy, in travelogue-style, celebrates each region’s culinary stereotypes, from the ‘Patiala Bar’ to the Red Hot Kerala Fish. The illustrations are a flavoured combination of ingredients, topography, and culture, while the typography is inspired by airport codes.

Bombay Brasserie - The Indian Culinary Expert
Bombay Brasserie - The Indian Culinary Expert
Bombay Brasserie - The Indian Culinary Expert

After all, it’s about the Representation

Every single piece of collateral, from what you see on the tables, to in-restaurant and promotional material, to takeaway packaging, extends the idea of travel and discovery of a confluence of culture and cuisine. That’s very much what the intention was, to create a designing initiative that was representative of the authentic diversity of the food.

Bombay Brasserie - The Indian Culinary Expert
Bombay Brasserie - The Indian Culinary Expert
Bombay Brasserie - The Indian Culinary Expert
Issue 39 - Indian Design Special

Published in Issue 39

As the festivity is all around, every brand or business is trying to impress the Indian audience. But what really works for us Indians? What is an Indian design? And how we can make designs for India? To understand it, we interviewed some Indian creatives who are successfully creating designs for the Indian audience. This issue of Creative Gaga is a light read for someone looking for inspirations or insights on Indian design and how the Indian audience can be enticed. So go ahead and order your copy or subscribe if you want to keep receiving a regular dose inspirations!

 

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Colours can paint a good picture or spoil it altogether, literally. Graphic Designer, Meroo Seth, speaks about and elaborates upon her approach towards finding the essential colour combination in sync with the remaining elements of her work.

Meroo Seth
Get Grubs Takeaway Bags.
Meroo Seth
Get Grubs Packaging Design.
Meroo Seth
Get Grubs Stationary design.

To connect is the calling.

Design plays a huge role in Meroo’s life; it’s a voice through which she finds expression. It not only makes her look at things differently but also manages to play with her opinions. Communicating complicated ideas simply; connecting with people, and making the world a beautiful place through appealing visuals is what spurs her. No doubt, she takes to an approach of fun, curiosity, happiness, and playfulness when working on her illustrations. She’s more than happy if her work can bring about a sense of delight in people, making them feel something good while solving problems as well.

Meroo Seth

Finding your own palette.

Colour sense comes with experience and the trial-and-error of playing with different sets of colours. She has seen her own colour palettes changing and evolving with time. Conversations with friends and strangers; meeting new people, and being open to new experiences are like finding a new colour palette, to Meroo. The process of building an unusual bridge between different observations and associations triggers insights and inspiration within her. According to her, emotion is the most important factor to consider while creating balanced colour palettes. That is why she avoids overusing a colour, while, many-a-times, the colour itself inspires her to create the design.

Meroo Seth
Making salad together.

Creating the balance.

Colour is a powerful and important communication tool and is tied to religious, cultural, political and social influences. So, it’s not enough for a designer to use a colour merely because one likes it.

Meroo Seth
Alphabet G Mug.
Meroo Seth
Alphabet M Mug.

Colours communicate various meaning; even all colours combinations signify differently, evoking varied emotions and feelings when paired with another colour. So, she believes it’s very important that elements in the composition balance weight. For example, the thickness of a form, colour, texture and the kind of forms should also have a consistent style they follow. Sometimes, the form cannot say it all; the use and amount of colours then play an even more important role in communicating the idea.

Meroo Seth
Cavaya Fine Dine Menu.
Meroo Seth
Cavaya Fine Dine stationary.

Harmonising elements.

Meroo firmly trusts that everything and everyone supports and relies on one another and that it applies in the case of colours too. Each colour change relies on what the rest of the colours and elements are. The shades and tones can be played amongst each other to provide an appealing look while balancing the elements of the composition.

Meroo Seth
Food posters.
Meroo Seth
Eating Together.

At times, she isolates a colour to give it focus, so as to create a totally unique impact. Likewise, she also plays with light and shade to create an interesting mood. While choosing a colour palette, she comes up with a few keywords the palette should reflect when creating a mood board for a particular subject – for example, ‘happy, fun and bold’. Now, that’s sure to spread some smiles.

Meroo Seth
Best Friends.
Meroo Seth
Coffee cups for The Hangout Café.

Published in Issue 35

The season of the festival has started and everyone is preparing to have a unique one this time with less cash and more fun. We interview many creatives who creates promotional or calendar design each year. As most of the thing around us had shifted to digital, even calendar design and the promotion has shifted. But Yorick Pintos, a strategic consultant at studio Kohl suggests that best option would be a mix of both. If you are interested in print design & want to understand the future of the same. So, go ahead and order your latest issue copy!

 

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Graphic designer, Itu Chaudhuri, lets out his experience and insight in the field of branding. He expresses what goes into creating effective brands, and the various aspects or elements that play a role in the process.

Branding
The Wild Stone Code Range.

CG. What is the relationship between the product and the branding? How does the former shape or inspire the latter?

IC. For some brands, the product’s properties are the heart of the brand. For example, we know Mercedes by their cars, which are a model of stability and Germanic engineered perfection; not by their advertising or showrooms or their F1 Cars (which they do very well). For those brands, branding needs to reflect what’s special about the product, but rarely reflects the product itself. The ‘what’s special’ part, in turn, depends on the category. For more functional products, it’s about a clear benefit from using it (e.g. relieving pain).

Branding
The Real Tea Range.

For less functional brands, the benefit may be more in the mind i.e. how it makes people feel, or its ‘values’ (what it encourages its customers to believe in). This is also true for brands, which we know by their advertising more than by the special qualities of the product (e.g. a mobile service like Vodafone or Airtel). But, rarely does the branding show the product itself. If the product is a packaged product that’s never unpacked (think deodorants, or insect repellents, or a fizzy drink), then the branding and the product are practically fused (even when large advertising budgets support the brands).

Branding
Branding
Branding
Eicher Live.

CG. According to you, How and to what extent, does branding impact an audience?

IC. Every customer knows that they are being manipulated. So, branding works best when it slips under the radar of the customers or escapes their ‘crap detector’. Yet, if the brand seems to admit this while managing to charm the customers, it works. The audience is then willingly helpless to resist. This means that the branding is, in some sense, invisible when it appears to belong or be inevitable as if there was no other way it could have appeared. This requires honesty on the owner’s part and linking the brand to what is true. Despite this, it’s carefully orchestrated. Simply appearing artless won’t do it. Done right, it can succeed in disarming the customer.

Branding
The Almirah.
Branding
The Almirah.

CG. What do you do to ensure that the brand character comes across fully in the final design?

IC. Personality is the key, and thus cannot be overlooked or sidelined at any stage. It’s a mental model of the brand that describes the brand’s character and attitude, more like a representative, and thus implies its appearance.

Brand applications for ‘Hired’.

CG. What do you feel should be proportion, or how much is the need for balance, between minimalism and complexities in a design?

IC. The point isn’t a balance: it’s more a purposeful imbalance. Different brands need different treatments, so that one may do best in a minimal style, and another with a busy, or even chaotic style. This is a necessary facet that one needs to recognise and remember throughout the process.

Branding
Annual Report Design for IDFC.
Branding
Branding
Branding
Branding
Branding

CG. What do you feel is an essential part of branding?

IC. Deep understanding of the client’s truth is fundamental and most essential, but making sure that it’s attractive to their customers is of value, at the same time. If you succeed on the first count and fail on the second, you touch no one. The other way around, and the attraction will be skin deep. It very clearly is a case of both or nothing.

Branding
Publication design for Breakthrough.

Published in Issue 38

This issue, we try to explore different views from many well-known studio owners and senior designers. While Anthony Lopez of Lopez Design shared tips on what a studio looks for in a designer, Mohar Ray from Codesign highlights the key aspects that play a significant role and make the difference in whether you are hired or not as a promising designer. Also, this issue has an insightful article on ‘Branding with reason and love’ from Itu Chaudhuri, founder ICD (Itu Chaudhuri Design) along with Siddhi Ranade, explaining his tools of story telling through his unique style of illustrations. This issue is a must read for a talented graduate to a branding expert. Order you copy and enjoy reading it!

 

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NH1 Design takes us through its approach behind freshly branding a local Indian street food outlet while ensuring that it retains an identity credible of being authentic, fun, young and affordable.

Brief

The Ahmadabad market had been selling anything but authentic Vada Pav (typically, a local Mumbai delicacy); brands were serving it with cheese, Spinach, and cholle (a form of peas). The essential idea for Majja, a quick-service restaurant selling Indian street food as a branded and hygienic experience, was thus to reinforce the delicacy’s authenticity. Targeting the youth and office-goers, who prefer a quick snack at an affordable price, the challenge was to create a brand synonymous with authentic taste, fun, young and affordability.

NH1 - Vada Pav

The Concept

The word Majja (fun) is commonly used across India, especially in Gujarat. We created a fun verbal brand language that could be easily understood across different languages and cultures – a friendly tone of voice that completely aligned with the brand ethos.

The Solution

The visual story was inspired by the street life of Mumbai. The use of illustrated stories of people and the streets of Mumbai further emphasised the authenticity of the Vada Pav.

NH1 - Vada Pav
NH1 - Vada Pav
NH1 - Vada Pav
NH1 - Vada Pav
NH1 - Vada Pav
NH1 - Vada Pav
NH1 - Vada Pav
NH1 - Vada Pav
NH1 - Vada Pav
NH1 - Vada Pav
NH1 - Vada Pav
NH1 - Vada Pav
NH1 - Vada Pav
NH1 - Vada Pav
NH1 - Vada Pav
NH1 - Vada Pav
NH1-Vada Pav

Together, the visual and verbal language established a consistent set of assets for the brand. Every touch-point was meticulously detailed. Applications included signage, environmental graphics, packaging, stationery, website, adverts, tent cards, floor graphics, social media posts, uniforms, food trucks, menu, danglers and others.

Published in Issue 38

This issue, we try to explore different views from many well-known studio owners and senior designers. While Anthony Lopez of Lopez Design shared tips on what a studio looks for in a designer, Mohar Ray from Codesign highlights the key aspects that play a significant role and make the difference in whether you are hired or not as a promising designer. Also, this issue has an insightful article on ‘Branding with reason and love’ from Itu Chaudhuri, founder ICD (Itu Chaudhuri Design) along with Siddhi Ranade, explaining his tools of story telling through his unique style of illustrations. This issue is a must read for a talented graduate to a branding expert. Order you copy and enjoy reading it!

 

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Packaging has gradually evolved from cardboard boxes or covers to keepsakes. As people realise the creative hard work behind beautiful packs, this hidden space is burgeoning to become a field full of innovation and potential. Isabela Rodrigues, a designer from Brazil, takes us inside the box with her out of the box philosophy.

packaging design
JJ ROYAL PITCH. A clean, clear and modern container design for Indonesia’s purest coffee grains reinforces the enriching experience.
packaging design
CG: Gone are the days where a label was slapped on a plain and ordinary packaging. Your packaging designs make the product look exciting and inviting. What do you try and achieve through your designs?

IR: The goal of packaging design is to turn projects into collectable and saleable items. These ideas translate everything we do and our way to achieve the final result. The objective is to prevent the user from throwing away the packaging and decorate his/ her house with it instead.

packaging design
KRÄFTIG. Packaging resembling real exquisite fruit shapes is employed to showcase this premium Brazilian juice brand. Can’t get more real than this.
packaging design
CG: What is it that excites you most about packaging design? What are the challenges that you face? Do you decide the fate of packaging design, or is someone else in control?

IR: The most exciting aspect of packaging is tactile designing and how it follows a simple function of conserving the product, selling it as well as enchanting the audience. The biggest challenges are the suppliers and the limitations to achieving the result we look for. Frequently, clients that are in product-testing phase need packaging on a small scale. In that case, one has to migrate to simpler solutions that are available in the label/bottle segment. In this way, working to conciliate innovative and beautiful designs within those limitations enhances a designer’s abilities and experience.

packaging design
packaging design
PETIT – NATURAL JUICE. These fun collectable juice packaging was developed especially for children using a tetra pack design in a sustainable manner that can be reused and recycled.
CG: Your designs are clean, minimal and follow a discipline, quite contrary to the Brazilian spirit which is known to be loud and colourful! How has Brazil influenced your designs?

IR: Brazil is renowned for its colours and aesthetics no doubt. However, the objective here is to try to be a studio with a personal and also a global aesthetic. The goal is to fit into each costumer’s reality and identity.

packaging design
JUICE MEDS. This natural fruit juice line that contains vital vitamins uses an interesting health based concept to break through traditional juice packaging designs.
packaging design
GOT MILK? Unique colour combinations are used to make milk a fashionable drink
CG: Packaging design is still an unexplored territory. According to you, what are some of the traits of good packaging? What do you do differently to make your designs stand out?

IR: There certainly is a long way yet to go before packaging design becomes a celebrated design field. There is so much more potential for innovation and creation in this field. A good package must conserve the product, have a structure, sell and enchant too. It’s vital to understand that one can’t do without the others; there’s no use in a beautiful but fragile package or even a rigid one that doesn’t show the concept of the product.

packaging design
LE CHAT. This packaging design for a French brewery showcases how designers can exercise complete freedom by breaking paradigms simply to delight the eyes
packaging design
NELEMAN. Minimalism with a touch of the classic vintage glass bottle makes for an ideal way to showcase chocolate milk for this Dutch company.
packaging design
TIÍLIN CACAO. The design exemplifies the essence of Colombian chocolate making by using traditional Cacao tree visuals to take the user through that very journey.
CG: And now something we’ve been dying to ask- why bottles?

IR: Why not bottles? Nowadays, many people are creating new products by quitting their conventional jobs, and the beverage industry is the one experiencing this the most. Alcoholic or not, this form of packaging is in constant demand.

packaging design
DELÍRIO TROPICAL. This branding and packaging design refreshes the identity of a popular local restaurant known for its natural anDd healthy appeal.
packaging design
FROO.IT. The design presents the fruit drink in a fun manner by using ludic and fashion illustrations to compose the branding and packaging.
packaging design
MANJOOR ESTAT E+NYFW. This fashionable and luxurious bottle design captures the essence of spiced beverages by Manjoor Estate in conjunction with New York Fashion Week.

Published in Issue 26

Packaging is the first vital step towards enchanting the audience. Who doesn’t like a cute box or a trendy bottle? With this issue, Creative Gaga lets the cat out of the box to reveal the world of packaging design. Featuring various local and international designers like Petar Pavlov from Macedonia and Brandziac from Russia, Elephant Design and Impprintz from Pune, the issue promises to be a keepsake for many.

 

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Uttam Hasabnis

The day we evolve from the life’s basic needs and moved to cave paintings, rituals and festivals, the colours have a special space in our life. Uttam Hasabnis, a creative consultant at Cub Design, believes that even right colours for a brand come from a deep understanding of the brand’s target audience and it can makeor break any brand.

The colour of your brand is not only an essential character of your brand’s story but also important in all forms of communications. Colour has the unique ability to make or break the success of a product. The right colour decision for your brand doesn’t cost you much. But the wrong colour can really impact the overall performance of your brand.

At Cub Design, we believe that the positive effects of colours on the consumer decision certainly can help enhance the brand image and due to the different meanings of colours in different cultures, we need to consider the attitudes and preferences of our target audience when choosing a correct colour for a brand. The best way is to do an in-depth research. It creates in us a feeling about colour. Observe, experiment and see how they make sense for you. We give all necessary freedom to our creative team to explore the brand and its environment physically to bring out the perfect colour that supports the brand positioning. And make sure the process must be based on:


Specifying the type of target audience.
Understanding the concepts of colour in the
targeted culture.
• Deciding on what emotion the consumers will experience.

And taking a critical look at which colours are being used
in the market.


 

Sometimes, choosing a colour that stands out can help. Once you’ve determined what it is that your audience is looking for, you can best decide on the colour to help them find it.

At times, rebranding is important to indicate that the brand is still modern and progressive. When freshening up logos and products you have to think about whether or not you want to retain some of the past, or scrap it entirely, ‘However, this isn’t always the best option’. Most brands want to hold on to the equity and goodwill of their image, by maintaining some of the colours. But yes, you can add a secondary colour to refresh the brand image.

When choosing a correct colour, you must think far beyond your personal opinions. Also, it should never be an exercise driven by the personal taste of the superiors involved. Properly chosen colours define your brand’s value, strengthen and support your brand positioning, enable awareness and customer recall, and distinguish your brand among its alternatives. Picking the right colour should never be underestimated.

Published in Issue 34

This is a rebranding special issue focused on finding the answers to some of the basic questions like what is the right time for re-branding? or what all needs changing and how exactly? We interviewed some of the best branding studios like Landor Mumbai, Elephant, VGC, Inchwork, and many more. If you are considering rebranding or want to learn more about the art of doing it then this issue is a must read. So, go ahead

 

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