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Usually, the idea of working on the creative front for a Government project is not welcomed by many studios. But Lopez Design has accepted the challenges that come along with these big scale projects and have been successful in carrying out the same.

Branding For National Impact

India a globe in itself with a population of almost 1.4 billion, it is important to create experiences that belong to us. Design is about people and the Government is the largest client in context to the impact it creates – it is an opportunity to design for millions. Taking on a Government project replaces the notion that design is for an elitist audience with the idea of design being for the masses.

A Rigorous Process

Government projects involve tedious processes – right from extensive documentation to verification of credentials and adherence to formal guidelines. Nevertheless, this struggle needs to be done to get recognition from the Government – that good design is important and can make a difference.

Design

Studio Lopez Designs’ first major project was identity and branding, communication collaterals, website design, social media and signage for Bihar Museum, with biggest challenges being dealing with the bureaucracy at the administrative level and getting payments and approvals sanctioned. Patience and persistence are the secrets to move forward in such kinds of projects.

Design

A Measured Gamble that Pays Off

A client picks Lopez Design recognising the potential and brand value. Equally, we take the initiative to bid for Government projects as the prospect of designing for a larger audience outweighs the tedium of administrative processes and other risks. Because of our rigorous and thorough design process, we usually get it right the first time, rarely facing opposition, in spite of going through the many levels of authority.

 

Under the umbrella of UNICEF, we were commissioned to do the branding of the Health and Wellness Centers of the Ayushman Bharat program.

Design

Indian Designers Can be Catalysts

We have garnered achievements largely by pushing boundaries and rising against the stereotypical application of design. Making the design, region and nation-specific and addressing the character, language and behaviour, imparting an authentic feel to the design.

Design

In Ayushman Bharat, the branding program was about painting the walls of 1.5 lakh local primary health care centres. Creating a national brand and yet a local brand was an achievement by which each HWC has its own unique character. By allowing people the creative power in execution, they became catalysts in the design process.

Simplicity and Creativity in Implementation

Sometimes following standard design practice and providing all specifications falls flat. In the Ayushman Bharat project, created a system with an element of creativity: a simple brand manual with 3 to 4 steps to bring a level of consistency and giving ownership to people at the ground level. This worked wonders and yielded beautiful results. People took responsibility and delivered within the time period. Leaving implementation to the people was a bold and necessary step, but was successful.

 

These projects outshine many corporate projects because of their scale and reach. It was a moment to take pride in our design process as it is making a difference to the nation.

Published in Issue 44

Behind every successful studio, artist or designer there are stories of challenges, struggles and their unique solutions to these. With this issue, we interviewed many well-known names from the creative industry and found their different learnings and experiences behind making their own self as a brand. Though they all have a different take on this topic, still they all unanimously emphasise on focusing on their skills and quality delivery of the final outcome. So, if you are looking to establish yourself as a brand in the creative market or already in the process of it, this issue is a must read. Full of insights and inspirations from the best of the talents, this issue is waiting to reach your desks. 

 

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Whether it’s a cultural transformation, differentiated customer experience, or tech-enabled innovation, every business needs to evolve with today’s rapidly changing world. Landor is helping its clients using the brand to transform their business for the new world challenges.

Client: Millennium IT

Services: Visual/Brand Identity

The Brief

The task was to determine how Millennium IT, a local information technology stalwart could create a new, differentiated frame of reference for itself? The brand MIT has a strong legacy of being a visionary player in the local market and it now sought to infuse new energy into the brand, striking a chord of relevance across stakeholder groups. The context was that technology disruptions, new market entrants, the emergence of new categories, are placing new demands on clients today to be nimble and deliver a seamless end-user experience. Business needs are ever-changing and clients require higher-order of flexibility from their IT partners.

The Solution

A new brand positioning was created for the brand that was all about harnessing the team’s passion for delivery and agility to bring a fresh perspective in its approach to not only addressing but exceeding its client expectations. This positioning was brought to life with a unique and distinctive visual identity system that drew inspiration word ‘millennium’ and created a dynamic identity that celebrated the brand’s future-forward, agile orientation towards its clients, always solving for what is vital for them.

Published in Issue 49

The Design in 2020! Each year starts with many predictions, anticipations and a lot of hope for bad things to go out and good things to come in our life. The year 2020 has already started with eventful initial months and may hold more surprises in coming times. To understand what’s coming from the design perspective, we featured some of the best design projects from last year. Also discussed a few broad questions like how minimalism will affect our designs or what all an illustrator to keep in mind to be successful and much more.

 

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Colours form an integral part of the world we live in. And more often than not, our feelings, emotions and even taste can be validated with colours! According to an article written by Charles Spence in BioMed Central 2015, five colour-taste studies were conducted and their results indicate some startling results.

For example, the colours black, purple and violet are widely associated with bitterness. White and blue is associated with the salty sea. Yellow and green represent a sour taste, because of its obvious recall to limes and lemons. Sweet is linked to pink or red.

Truth be told, colours can have a major influence on people’s purchase decisions. Most brands are associated with one or more colours; organizations have embraced the colour psychology as a major driver in their branding strategy. Why? Because people are drawn to certain colours for certain reasons and they carry associations with objects and tend to feel them.

Colour - Lollypop Design

As designers, we need to pay detailed attention to the colours we choose while designing a brand. Colour creates contrast, hierarchy, balance & rhythm. Choosing the right colour palette is important as it not only creates interest but also creates an emotional or subconscious connect with the people. Here are a few tips by Shrivathsan Raguraman, Sr. UI Designer of Lollypop Design, have a look.

Understanding Colours is Understanding Product

Colour - Lollypop Design

Research indicates that 85% of the decision made by individuals towards choosing a product was based on colours only. Colours carry an emotional value; each colour emotes different feelings and perception; these aren’t general emotions that are associated with it but the whole nature itself is built around it and perceived in a psychological aspect. For example:


Red – energy, power, and passion
Green – ambition, growth, freshness, and safety
Blue – tranquillity, confidence, and intelligence
Yellow – happiness, intellect, and energy
Black – power, elegance, and mystery
White – cleanliness, purity, and perfection

Questions and Considerations Before Choosing a Colour Palette

Before we get to explaining how to pick colours and go on to explaining the colour wheel, let’s be clear about a few fundamental questions that we should ask ourselves even before jumping on to the branding elements of the product. The questions would give you a sense of direction and make life simpler:

1) Are we designing for a brand new product or an established brand?

Brand New Product: Fresh branding might require you to understand the reasoning and the emotional connect of the brand. It will give you much-needed freedom to chose and play with your colours, unlike the defined products. We generally prefer to choose either monochromatic or complementary as they create more emotional value and a sense of purpose.

Defined product: One should understand the product and the guidelines it comes with. There might be many limitations or directions that we need to follow. So get acquainted with it. For example, Google or Microsoft has strict guidelines. In such cases, we suggest you choose the Analogous/ Triadic palette as they allow to stick to the prominent brand colour while allowing to play with the other colours from the wheel as an accent. It is like choosing a group of friendly neighbours to build a harmonious product.

2) Do we understand the product?

Colour - Lollypop Design

What is the intent of the product? What does it want to communicate? What problem does it want to solve? Who will use this product?  These questions will lead us to shortlist the primary and secondary colours of the product.

3) Do we understand the users well?

Colour - Lollypop Design

Who are the users we are targeting? What are there behavioural graphs? What their mental models like? How tech-savvy are they? What region do they belong to? What is their culture? Everything comes into play when you are deciding on the brand colours. Ask as many relevant questions as possible.

4) Are we accommodating the W3C principle?

Colour - Lollypop Design

Choosing a palette also involves accessibility as one of the major challenges for a product designer. As a designer, you must ensure that the product is accessible by all sets of colour vision deficiency personas. Adding to that, textual contrast check is really important which needs to be done before adding any coloured text over any background colour. This allows us in covering the CVD people by providing them with an accessible product.

How do we choose the colours?

Finally, let’s decode the different sets of colours and principles that will always make life easier as designers. Always look up to the nature of the product when it comes to choosing colours but before you go overboard looking for inspiration you have to understand the basics of the colour wheel. Follow Colour theory 101; there are many diverse ways of picking colour sets that work together. Try to pick the combination best suited for you ranging from those that are easy to use till difficult to use. We’ll explain this further below:

• Complementary – Easy To Use

As the name suggests, these colours are placed adjacent to each other in the colour wheel.  They complement each other perfectly. This colour scheme works best for brands that are trying to communicate reliability and a sense of balance. It’s like the colour blue says ‘you are beautiful’ to the colour orange, which complements its attributes, and vice versa.

RunAdam or Paytm Money are good examples of brands with complementary colours.

• Monochromatic – Easy To Use

These colours share the hues and tones of a base colour. When you use shades of the same colour, the ideal notion behind this is that it creates harmony and natural sync. Monochromatic colour sets are easy to remember since the user can associate these shades with one another and still can remember what brand or product it is.

Farmrise would be a great example of a monochromatic colour brand.

• Analogous – Exercise Caution

The word analogous means ‘comparable’. Under this, analogous colours refer to any set of colours on the colour wheel that are immediately adjacent, i.e, three colours left or right from the one of your choosing. As a set, these four colours will be considered as analogous colours. Analogous colours are preferred when there is a need to create a sense of harmony and contentment for brand design.

Paypal, Mastercard are good examples of brands with analogous colours.

• Triadic – You can try

This method is akin to choosing colours that are evenly spaced in an equilateral triangle. These colours are selected from the wheel in such a way that they provide high contrast and rich vibrancy in design. How do we do this? By picking colours, (to the left or right) that are equally spaced from one another on the colour wheel. For example, if you pick a specific colour on the wheel, you can go ahead and pick a colour that is three colours away on either side. These contrasting colours make for an effective, yet tough to create a palette.

Mozilla and  Burger King are good examples of the brands with triadic colours.

• Tetradic – Are you brave enough?

This is a four-colour structure evenly spaced on the colour wheel. This scheme is best suitable if you want to create an accent with colours, ie, you choose one dominant colour and three accents supporting it. This colour scheme is similar to triadic, which creates a vibrant and strong palette but is tough to handle.

Google & Microsoft is a good example of a Tetradic colour scheme.

Suggested Tools

Our suggestions towards tools that can be used to choose your palette:

 

Coolors.co – It’s super easy to use and it can show you multiple analogous variations of a single hue.

Adobe Color – Make your own colour palette from colour-wheel to hexcode and easily use it with most adobe apps & software.

Canva Colour wheel – It helps to generate your combinations and help build your palette.

Hope this helps you in building a beautiful palette for your product, Happy branding!

CURRENT ISSUE
Creative Gaga - Issue 49

 

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We go through many interesting design projects each day and find them inspiring enough to be shared further. Projects which have the potential to inspire and spark multiple ideas. So, here are few selected one for this week’s design inspiration, enjoy!

Sasken Annual report illustrations by Danny Jose

Packaging & Branding of Mochila by Swt & Co

Contours by Katt Phatt™

Kenjo Fonts by Anthony James

“A Nose For Fun” – Sticker Pack for Facebook by Chaaya Prabhat & Sandhya Prabhat

Packaging & Branding for GoodHair – Hair Care Range by Meroo Seth

Pleinair Illlustrations by Jithin Puthenpurakkal

Branding for Vortex events® by Mohamed Samir

Designit Rebrand Visuals by Shaivalini Kumar

 

If you have any of your design project or someone else’s, which is equaliy inspiring for fellow creatives, then share it with us on Contribute@CreativeGaga.com

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People don’t buy products or logos, they buy stories, they buy experiences. Believing this, NH1 Design, an integrated branding consultancy has always kept its focus on making a brand more loveable. Here are some of the recently created stories and experiences have been presented.

Stories

Client: MYSCAPE PROPERTIES PVT. LTD.

Services: Naming, Branding and Editorial Design

The Loft is one majestic building that towers over the vibrant financial district of Hyderabad. Designed to form an iconic residential high-rise in the heart of the city. The views and sunlight orientations are spectacular, no matter which side you’re on, or which apartment you book for that matter.

Stories

The Loft’s Jenga-like structure is also an ingenious architectural device that creates a multi-volume experience throughout. Shooting vertical fins and inner glass capsule elevators gives one a breath-taking view of the city, as one travels upward.

NH1 Design was commissioned to develop a brochure and identity that would enable prospective buyers to experience a taste of life in one of their luxurious residential projects.

The Logotype cleverly hints the unique stacking’ structure of the facade, by stacking L&O together.

Stories

The Brochure was designed to be perceived as a photo album, a visual representation of memories the future residents will live. The vertical orientation of the brochure also symbolises the high-rise structure of Myscape Loft.

Published in Issue 49

The Design in 2020! Each year starts with many predictions, anticipations and a lot of hope for bad things to go out and good things to come in our life. The year 2020 has already started with eventful initial months and may hold more surprises in coming times. To understand what’s coming from the design perspective, we featured some of the best design projects from last year. Also discussed a few broad questions like how minimalism will affect our designs or what all an illustrator to keep in mind to be successful and much more.

 

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Creative Gaga - Issue 49

 

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Rusbury is a great example of how to brand a sweet and savouries store in today’s contemporary times. Sukkrish AADDS, a Bangalore based creative agency founded by Shreesh Shankar, gives an interesting twist to the branding (visual identity).

Visual Identity

The Brief and Challenges

Rusbury is a sweets and savouries brand operating out of Bangalore. The brand needed a unique visual identity that would help it stand out from the clutter. The identity also needed to appeal to both, the existing customer and their target audience.

Visual Identity
Visual Identity

The Solution

When you think of a sweet and savouries store the image that comes to your mind is a traditional shop with all its aesthetics. Sukkrish AADDS decided to break away from convention to create a unique and contemporary identity for Rusbury.

Visual Identity

The bold yet simple logo and motif itself is a blend of western and Indian culture with the introduction of the Devanagari script. The colour palette is kept at a minimum with red, white and black. The majority usage is that of white and black, with the red colour judiciously added at places.

Visual Identity

The team makes great use of illustrations to create a feel and mood for the brand. The illustrations capture the very Indian vibrant and cheery vibe. Yet the balance of solid white and red keeps the overall branding contemporary and sophisticated.

Visual Identity
Visual Identity

The final visual identity is versatile allowing several possibilities and scope for play.

Published in Issue 48

A Freelancer’s Life in India! Every day, with a dream of ‘Being Your Boss,’ many creative professionals jump into the pool of freelancing. But many are not well prepared for the life of the freelancer, which brings many challenges along with benefits. So to explore further, we interviewed many freelance illustrators and designers to get answers to the question you should ask before taking the final call of becoming your boss! So, if you are planning to or have already become a freelancer then this issue is a must-read for you.

 

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NH1 Design takes us through its approach behind freshly branding a local Indian street food outlet while ensuring that it retains an identity credible of being authentic, fun, young and affordable.

Brief

The Ahmadabad market had been selling anything but authentic Vada Pav (typically, a local Mumbai delicacy); brands were serving it with cheese, Spinach, and cholle (a form of peas). The essential idea for Majja, a quick-service restaurant selling Indian street food as a branded and hygienic experience, was thus to reinforce the delicacy’s authenticity. Targeting the youth and office-goers, who prefer a quick snack at an affordable price, the challenge was to create a brand synonymous with authentic taste, fun, young and affordability.

NH1 - Vada Pav

The Concept

The word Majja (fun) is commonly used across India, especially in Gujarat. We created a fun verbal brand language that could be easily understood across different languages and cultures – a friendly tone of voice that completely aligned with the brand ethos.

The Solution

The visual story was inspired by the street life of Mumbai. The use of illustrated stories of people and the streets of Mumbai further emphasised the authenticity of the Vada Pav.

NH1 - Vada Pav
NH1 - Vada Pav
NH1 - Vada Pav
NH1 - Vada Pav
NH1 - Vada Pav
NH1 - Vada Pav
NH1 - Vada Pav
NH1 - Vada Pav
NH1 - Vada Pav
NH1 - Vada Pav
NH1 - Vada Pav
NH1 - Vada Pav
NH1 - Vada Pav

Together, the visual and verbal language established a consistent set of assets for the brand. Every touch-point was meticulously detailed. Applications included signage, environmental graphics, packaging, stationery, website, adverts, tent cards, floor graphics, social media posts, uniforms, food trucks, menu, danglers and others.

NH1 - Vada Pav
NH1 - Vada Pav
NH1-Vada Pav

Published in Issue 38

This issue, we try to explore different views from many well-known studio owners and senior designers. While Anthony Lopez of Lopez Design shared tips on what a studio looks for in a designer, Mohar Ray from Codesign highlights the key aspects that play a significant role and make the difference in whether you are hired or not as a promising designer. Also, this issue has an insightful article on ‘Branding with reason and love’ from Itu Chaudhuri, founder ICD (Itu Chaudhuri Design) along with Siddhi Ranade, explaining his tools of story telling through his unique style of illustrations. This issue is a must read for a talented graduate to a branding expert. Order you copy and enjoy reading it!

 

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Everything around us is the result of a design thought, conscious or unconscious. Diving deep into the story behind its creation inspires original creativity. Ruminates the young and promising illustration & design studio, LOCOPOPO, founded by Lokesh Karekar.

Illustration for Royal Stag Whisky packaging Design
Illustration for Royal Stag Whisky packaging Design
Illustration for Royal Stag Whisky packaging Design

We Live in a Designed World

There is design in every object or thing around us. From a bus ticket to apparels, from roads to an entire city, and every single thing around us is designed. Good or bad, it has been “designed” by somebody. The environment that we grow up in defines our choices of colours, patterns, purposes and forms. As consumers we prefer for a certain kind of design. And as creators, we subconsciously play the role of a designer, conceptualizing a product according to our choices. This is the most fascinating fact about the world around us.

Illustration for Taj Vivanta
Identity design for Myoho - a fashion apparel brand
Identity and label design for SIX FIELDS wheat beer

Creating is The Best Way to Get Inspired

Inspiration can come from anywhere. That’s the most heard statement in the life of a designer. What we do with it shape up our creativity. Travelling is just a beginning to imbibe ideas. Scribbling, doodling, clicking photographs, recording incidents is the next step. As creative minds, we need to keep dabbling with the triggers so as to come up with our own ideas. This is what keeps the mind of an artist fresh, original and prolific.

Identity design for Mango Pickle
Collateral design for Mango Pickle
Collateral design for Mango Pickle
Coaster design for Mango Pickle
Collateral design for Mango Pickle

Our Roots Define Our Identity

Our culture has a rich reservoir of forms and content. As designers we should search within and dig out references that are related to our roots. But the quest doesn’t stop there. Being part of the larger global family, our job is to merge our design sensibilities with the international one. Keeping the composition and colour preference modern and the choice of figures and patterns Indian, or vice versa, we are actually contributing our bit to make our own art socially appreciable. It’s time we simplify, modify, create shapes and motifs inspired from Indian traditional styles and implement them correctly with proper use of colours.

Brand illustration language created for festival mailers for Aditya Birla Capital
Brand illustration language created for festival mailers for Aditya Birla Capital
Brand illustration language created for festival mailers for Aditya Birla Capital

Illustration is an Illusion

And of course, a beautiful one. It’s wonderful to observe how it seamlessly integrates into the central thought of the project at hand. Ranging from minimal and form based work, where the whole charm is concentrated in one form to very detailed, sometimes bright and vibrant imagery, illustrations are carriers of ideas and have no existence of their own. Trying to define style through one’s illustration abilities is a wrong approach. Rather, one should focus on one’s communication abilities and explore the preferred design tools.

Illustration for Jack Daniels
Packaging Design for Jack Daniels
Play card Design for Jack Daniels
Play card Design for Jack Daniels

Every Medium has an Inherent Wit

As designers our job is to give a contextual twist and make the humour relevant to the design. There is fun around us. We don’t even have to search for it. If our process of getting inspired is right, it automatically transforms into our works. Be it illustration, collage, clay modeling or even product design, the medium inherits this wit and automatically gets translated through the specific language of the medium. The human figures in my work often follow a feeling of caricature as that is what I imbibe from the human faces around me.

How the stability of the Indian Rupee affects industries like infrastructure, automobile and banking. Created for Moneycontrol.com
How the stability of the Indian Rupee affects industries like infrastructure, automobile and banking. Created for Moneycontrol.com

Be Original

Look around and you’ll find your voice resonating in one of the elements of your root, your own culture. Get inspired from it, and embark on the journey of finding your own language.

Illustration created for LAKME - Absolute Salon advertising campaign
Lifestyle Illustration created for Lodha Bellissimo

Published in Issue 04

This is a Inspiration Special. The issue with the best insights from some of the top space designers and advertising tips from Happy Creatives with some exclusive mix of media experiments in type and digital art.

 

 

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CURRENT ISSUE
Creative Gaga - Issue 49

 

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Everyone notices a unique look and style. It’s the same for a logo or branding. “They are the face of a brand.” says Ketaki K, founder of Cub Design Studio. “And the industry is all about uniqueness, memorability and connect.” Here, she takes us through some simple remedies that can brighten your skills.

Branding for Simpli Eat
Branding for Simpli Eat
Branding for Rosy Bow Fashion

Change is the only Constant.

Every brand has diverse challenges and needs customised solutions. This means that the thought process has to be different for each brand. Designs have to be unique for each brand and are never repeated as they are a result of brainstorming, discussions and experimentation. However, what remains consistent with every project is a trendy fresh look for each design.

Branding for Krushnai
Branding for Krushnai
Branding for Glorious

How far you can imagine starts from how closely you observe.

A brand’s design is its identity. It’s very important that the design does justice to the brand- that’s exactly what its meant for! The briefing is most important, as getting a good understanding of the client’s requirements and the brand’s personality is key. As that is what will catapult your imagination when you get to work.

Packaging for K n U
Stationery design for K n U
Product Design
Branding & Packaging for LivRaw

Less Goes a Long Way.

A logo is the face of the brand. And in order for it to stand the test of time and become the brand itself, it needs to be simple and devoid of any complications. It must be easy to handle so that over time, it can be placed on any medium, from paper to billboard or from fabric to mugs. Consider the logo of Nike; a simple ‘tick mark’ that has worked so well for the brand.

Logo Design for Panditji - Veg Restaurant
Branding for Panditji - Veg Restaurant
Branding for Panditji - Veg Restaurant
Stationery for Panditji - Veg Restaurant

It’s all about what people remember.

The growth of a brand to a considerable extent depends on brand recall. Unique designs ensure people and consumers remember and recollect the brand and its design. Panditiji and Head Safe brandings are funky, playful and strongly distinctive. The client expects a ‘unique’ brand, the brand demands a ‘recall’ value and the target audience looks for a ‘connect’ while a designer needs to ensure all the above are met seamlessly. Nothing brings more joy than creating a lasting value.

Branding for Head Safe
Branding for Head Safe
Stationary for Bake Factory
Branding for Bake Factory

Design is everything.

Though branding can have different perspectives, any good branding should be simple and yet bring out the connect in an interesting manner. Understanding the product/service and then solving the problem is crucial. Always remember, design is a solution for a brand and not just a mere decorative thing. If you do this every day, you’ll never go wrong

Branding for Bake Factory
Packaging for Bake Factory
Logo Design for Vasundhara Jewellers

Published in Issue 21

Branding With Packaging! They say not to judge a book by its cover. But they also say that exceptions are always there. There’s no doubt, branding and packaging are the faces of any business and product. They decide the way people will receive the brand; whether they will accept it or reject it. To understand and gain more perspective on this much-unsolved mystery, we invited many branding and packaging experts who throw light on the topic.

 

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Creative Gaga - Issue 49

 

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It’s not just the design, the elements or the colours in an artwork that blow us away. It’s the concept; a force that resonates from the designer to the audience. Edmundo Moi-Thuk Shung, a graphic designer from The Netherlands, believes cracking a creative concept is the most important step in branding design. He speaks to us to throw more light on his approach.

Branding Design
What are u Doodling

CG: Branding and packaging is a very competitive sphere of design to be working in. What are the principles that dictate your designs?

Edmundo: There are three things that I constantly make sure I am aware of while designing – they have to be unique, meaningful and easy to understand.

Branding Design
Poppy Red Stickerpack

CG: Designs need to be creative and at the same time practical. How do your designs balance both the requirements? What are the challenges you face in day-to-day work? What do you enjoy the most about what you do?

Edmundo: Well, the most important part is to make sure the concept is clear and useful to others. This, for most of the time, also covers the creative part of the whole process. Concentrating on the job is the hardest part for me as I was diagnosed with Attention Deficit Disorder that hinders the thought and concentration process of the mind. I overcome this by doing exercises to clear my mind. You’ve got to figure out your own tricks to overcome whatever it is that distracts you from the job.

Branding Design
Poppy Red Stickerpack

I get the most enjoyment out of concept designing, like doodling in my moleskin and working them out digitally. It’s also refreshing to put your thoughts on paper and work these out.

DIY-HMZ. Some self-branding on various mediums and accessories can help gain exposure in the outside world
MOKKACCINO. These business cards in the shape of coffee cups that can be left behind on the train for travelers to pick up

CG: Branding requires a good understanding of the product/client. How do you then take it forward? Can you take us through your design process?

Edmundo: Once I’ve accepted the assignment, I make sure to gauge the client’s vision by asking them questions to rule out what they expect from me. From then on, I usually make a “plan of approach” that describes the needs, planning and requirements for the assignment. This helps put everything before me so that I can connect the dots through creative ideas and concepts. Afterwards I pitch my ideas to the clients and decide what direction I should take.

MIXWELL. A mix of street and graffiti art, this hiphop styled design uses audio and design supplies to infuse life into a concept
KOFI & AYU. A character getting ready to head a soccer ball, while Ayu the female character wants to check her camera lenses

CG: In your experience, how receptive are brands/clients and audiences to something new? Are people willing to take risks or do you feel they still prefer to play it safe?

Edmundo: The demand in today’s time is to create something that is ‘unusual yet affective’. I guess that means people are willing to take risks as long as the concepts are effective and don’t differ too much from already existing products.

Branding Design
SMOOTHIE POSTER. Designed for The Pepin Press Company the design uses relevant elements to bring together a concept
LOGOS. These logos designed for clients and the artist himself communicate and symbolise unique character for each

CG: You use the Indian symbol of a Yogi in your branding design for Mellow. Can you tell us more about the project and how you arrived at that idea? How do international elements feature in your designs? How do the local audience adapt to something foreign?

Edmundo: It all started with an old sketch of a Yogi which I stumbled upon while going through all of my drawings. The project was a mother’s day gift and I related the element to the fact that she does yoga. That’s when I came up with the idea to make something by myself using an old duffle bag and other stuff lying around my house and created several products out of it. Since Yoga originates from Ancient India, the logo was apt. The project was received well by people with different backgrounds perhaps because our world is getting more multi-cultural.

MELLOW. Symbolism in a logo makes it memorable as this yoga branding suggests
MELLOW. Symbolism in a logo makes it memorable as this yoga branding suggests

CG: Brandings can’t be static. How do you create designs that can be worked upon and taken forward as the brand evolves? How do you give it that flexibility?

Edmundo: I make sure the logo I design isn’t too complicated. Ofcourse a lot depends on the kind of brand and the brief, but I usually give it a visual reference for what the company stands for. It gives it the advantage to become memorable and the ability to evolve easily as the time passes on.

MELLOW BASIC YOGA POSTER. Displaying basic yoga poses, this design also translates onto a scroll that can be used as a handy guide for some yoga practice

Published in Issue 21

They say not to judge a book by its cover. But they also say that exceptions are always there. There’s no doubt, branding and packaging are the faces of any business and product. They decide the way people will receive the brand; whether they will accept it or reject it. To understand and gain more perspective on this much-unsolved mystery, we invited many branding and packaging experts who throw light on the topic.

 

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