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It’s interesting how all of us grow up with individual memories and experiences. It’s fascinating how transforming these memories to stories can create opportunities of telling unique tales that can emotionally connect to a universal audience. Animation filmmaker Balasubramanian explores his own memories and maps them to create engaging visuals and films.

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KING SAGE. Part of an unreleased project. As the ruler
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MYSTERIOUS SAGE. Part of an unreleased project. In his mystic world

Everybody is Somebody

All of us grow up in a certain environment, surrounded by visuals, which are unique in their own right. For an artist and storyteller, it’s imperative to go back to these memories to find figment of characters and stories. Everyone’s upbringing defines the visuals, mood, emotion, choice of colour, lighting etc. that one works with. One should be aware of it. After all, it’s always an emotional turmoil and an urge to communicate that makes one a creator. Be true to these feelings and you’ll end up creating engaging stories that will connect and speak to the audience.

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RELIGIOUS SAGE. Part of an unreleased project. Performing a tantric ritual

The Story is the Key

The process of narration can begin with a story, or a character, or justa few visuals. Any which way, it all boils down to one core story which is what you are working on. And this depends on a lot of factors. Who are you talking to? Which cultural mindset do they adhere to? What is the lifestyle and belief set they dwell in? And many more such questions that need to be answered before you take it forward. Next up, the story gives way to the elements of the craft – design, look-&-feel, camera angles, colours, lights etc. The key is to keep your story simple. If struck right, it will never fail to hit the audience and move them from within.

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Ideation for an Illustration
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WARRIOR SAGE. Part of an unreleased project. The fearless warrior

For Your Eyes Firstly

A film is primarily a visual medium. Therefore, it makes sense to pay extra attention to what you are sketching. The visuals should be appealing enough to keep the audience glued and be attentive to the narration. While the story dictates the visuals, it is usually the choice of colours that define the mood. And to top it, use a careful arrangement of lights to heighten the drama and movement of the frame.

THOUGHTFUL SAGE. Part of an unreleased project. Glimpse of his incredible brain

FIGHTING SAGE. Part of an unreleased project. The magnificent warrior

Normal is Boring

There is no fun in being normal. As filmmakers, our job is to blow up proportions of a character or a story that turns it into dramatic, engaging and moving. Exaggerating characters and elements is, therefore, one of the most prominent tools. Caricaturing is an age-old phenomenon. Therefore, the idea of exaggeration brings with it lots of challenges and opportunities at the same time.

POWERFUL SAGE. Part of an unreleased project. Displaying supernatural power
FURIOUS SAGE. Part of an unreleased project. The indestructible force

Hold on to Your Thought

There are umpteen visuals, sounds and incidents happening around you that hold seeds of stories. Keep your eyes, ears and mind open and grasp everything that you can. You never know what is going to strike you, when and where. And once you have got the thought, hold on to it. Spend time with that streak of an idea and develop it into something that becomes a part of yourself, in a true and honest manner. That’s how you become a storyteller that’s uniquely you. Hit upon an idea, form a story and then leave it to your instincts to do the rest.

RIDING SAGE. Part of an unreleased project. On an incredible journey

Published in Issue 13

Coming from a country of stories and storytellers, Indian animation professionals are sitting on a gold reserve. Yet, we are miles behind the Western world. We spoke to few leading names to find out the reason and understand the Indian animator’s sensibilities and practices The house unanimously opined that we need to develop more original ideas and also create exclusive stories for animation, rather than going the other way round…

 

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Chaitanya studied Character Animation at the online Animation school, AnimationMentor. He is an illustrator, animator and visual storyteller, who always enjoys bringing stories to life and evoking emotions through his illustration. While working at studios like Dreamworks Animation India, MPC Film and Prana he contributed on the VFX for ‘The Jungle Book’ and other Animated films and TV shows.

 

Times of India and Deccan Herald have published his illustration and he has also illustrated many book covers. He loves to illustrate in different styles, in a way that suits the material.

 

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A trend of glowing lines video animation is catching everyone’s attention these days. Specially on social media they are being liked and shared alot. So if you want to try your hands then here we have the collection of tutorials using Adobe After Effects.

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Blotter Media owned by Ofir Shoham creates the kind of glowing animation of dancers, celebrities and skaters which remind us of the 80s wave art. He has got the attention of over one million followers on Instagram with his style.

 

Shoham uses the ‘Adobe After Effects’ to apply the neon illustrations to the moving frames of dancers and celebrities. He changed the look and feel of the original video clips to make an eye-catching animations with the addition of light trails, neon limbs and props which doesn’t exist.

 

If you want to try the glowing lines animation effect to your videos, here are a few useful tutorials.

 

After Effects Tutorials: Create Glowing Lines Video Animation


Check out Ofir Shoham’s Profile

 

Vaibhav Kumaresh
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Vaibhav Kumareshexplains, how relying on your own unique inner voice and trusting your gut feeling could help you to create great stories or content for every audience.

Frankly, I have never given a very serious thought to who my audiences are, and what exactly they may want out of a film I’m making or a story I’m telling through my films. The only person I have taken very seriously is, myself. Over the years of making films, I have learned that I’m my first audience. If I am impressed with a thought or an idea, I will try my best to transfer that impression into my films as truthfully as I (along with our team) can. And I’ll hope that my audiences – be it young or old – will like that impression too.

Animation - Indian Content
Nick Ident, Idli Song.

But yes, there are many a times when I am required by my clients to create content specifically for a certain audience/ age group (indian content). At that point its easy to step back a bit, fall back on your past experience of that audience, reset your view point and then channelise your thoughts and stories through that ‘filter’. At times when our past experience is not sufficient, we do resort to research and homework to refresh ourselves. My prime intention would still be to extract from my head what I’d want to give them, and then work hard at realising that idea.

Indian Content
Return of the Jungle

Growing up in this country, interacting with the world around us, absorbing from it and making films all these years we tend to develop a basic gut feel about various audiences and of what we want to share with which age group. When I pitched an animated character called ‘Simpoo’ to Channel [V] in 1999 (indian content), all I knew was I had a damn funny character with a bunch of fun situations in my head. I only ensured that the fun translated unadulterated into every film we made.

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Simpoo for channel V

The Simpoo shorts successfully ran on TV for a decade and a half and continue to be an online hit with the young and old audiences even today. The more films you make, the more you get to test your gut feel!

Animation
Simpu for channel V

I believe the young audiences today – right from age 5 to 30! are exposed to a variety of content in different formats. Stories and experiences reach them through many of sources. As a storyteller/ content creator that’s trying to reach out to them, the best way is to tap your inner uniqueness and pour it out in your work. That’s the only strength you have. Show it off!

Lamput TV Series
Animation
Lamput TV Series

Published in Issue 46

This issue is focused on, how to design for kids, bundled with articles full of inspirations, advice and unique point-of-views from the veterans of the animation industry, illustrators, photographers, artists and many more. So, order your copy or subscribe, before print copies run out and enjoy reading this issue!

 

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Visual Design

Here Sonia Tiwari explains the importance of Visual Design in Children’s Education and how every successful learning tool has been created using strong visual design aesthetics.

“Let’s make learning fun for children!” has almost become a cliche for our generation of educators, children’s book authors, toy and game designers, children’s TV producers and anyone remotely related to children’s education. We cannot ignore the role of a strong visual design in creating any of the modern day learning tools, whether they are early learning apps like abcmouse.com, khanacademy.org/kids or educational toy robots like Cubetto, Dash & Dot, Botley or BeeBot.

From baby years, children are exposed to educational toys and games that heavily rely on cute characters, stimulating colours, patterns and textures for tactile learning. As children grow older, their learning expands to more mediums besides toys and into educational board games, puzzles, video games, television, online streaming services and many more. At school, they come across interactive learning games, or good old charts and posters on the walls of the classrooms.

They’re surrounded by beautifully illustrated educational children’s books at home and school. They belong to a generation where several startups and established companies are trying to design new and more effective educational products for children and several Learning Scientists are attempting to understand how learning occurs in different settings.

Guidelines for Visual Designers in the Children’s Education Space:

• Understand Curriculum and Context

Are your designs representing a topic in isolation or in a broader context of a curriculum? You might want to maintain a common design language for the entire curriculum around a topic, to support continuity/correlation visually.


• Understand Visual Memory

In an educational environment, Visual Memory consists of pictures, symbols, numbers, letters, and words. As designers, the more we rely on design elements that can be “memorable” for the target audience, the better it can support the subsequent educational content to be recalled later.

• Consider what counts as Developmentally Appropriate

The Age-range of the audience, their developmental milestones, complexity of visual information they can easily comprehend.


• Consider Situativity

Where will your educational designs be situated? What are the surrounding cultures, trends, locations, demographics etc. Are there certain design styles that may appeal to this audience?


• Consider the Gestalt Principles

Make sure the visuals are clear and denote the meanings you wish to communicate as an educator. Gestalt principles are a nice, quick way to review instructional art/educational illustrations for any “applied” meanings.

Creative Gaga - Issue 46 - Cover

Published in Issue 46

Designing for Kids! We all design for different audiences and always keep trying to figure out what they would need and how will they react to our designs? But, one audience who is the youngest of all and most difficult to predict is ‘Kids’. So, to get more clarity, we focused on animation design, an extensively used medium to influence these young ones. We interviewed and feature experts opinion from the industry leaders such as Suresh Eriyat, Dhimant Vyas and Vaibhav Kumaresh to ponder on the use of animation for early education. Our cover designer, Sonia Tiwari, an animator, and visual designer, shared her thoughts on ‘How to make learning fun again’. While Suresh Eriyat emphasises on using animation as an effective medium for education, on the other hand, Dhimant Vyas and Vaibhav gave advice on how to make content for the young ones. This issue is full of veterans advice and a lot of inspirations throughout for every creative soul.

 

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Suresh Eriyat - Animation in Education | Creative Gaga

The future of animation will be far beyond entertainment. Suresh Eriyat, the Indian animation legend, tells us how animation will change the education landscape for the better.

E very aspect of the world is transforming rapidly, right from art and culture to technology. Animation is slowly finding its way into different fields, and the aspect of education is no exception. This engaging medium has tremendous scope and possibilities in the learning environment. And in a world so high on technology, it makes sense to foresee future where the lines between education and animation are blurred.

01Animation as a Tool for Simplification

Animation will most definitely be an integral part of education in the future. One vital function is simplification of concepts. For example, in the field of medicine, animation helps make the learning more demonstrative.

 

Now with the possibilities of augmented reality and virtual reality, there are so many possibilities to look forward to. Even in schools animation serves as a tool to understand the primary STEM subjects with more clarity.


02Making Education Engaging and Fun

There is a need for the process of learning to occur in a more interesting manner. Children can get bored, especially with the rigid text book system followed now. It is important to adapt the education methods to suit children.

 

And animation is a great way to engage children and help them learn concepts better. It is better that a child internalises the concepts than mugging them up just to pass an examination and forget that forever afterwards.


03The Need for Constant Updating

Knowledge keeps getting updated and changing with new findings. Unfortunately with text books these updates reflect barely once in 10 years or 5 years at best. But interactive mediums and the information on the internet keeps updating constantly. In an age where things and facts are changing so quickly, it makes sense for animation and usage of graphics to come in as a useful explanatory tool.


04The Changing Learning Landscape

The world of education is evolving. Thus the methods and approaches will need to organically change as well. Today there are so many learning platforms like Khan’s academy and Byju’s, where animation and graphics are extensively used. It’s only a matter of time before animation becomes integral to education systems.


05 Invoicing

Be prompt about sending in your invoices as soon as the job is done. Most of the bigger companies have fixed billing cycles so if you are late and don’t send your invoices in by a certain time, it might take up to the next cycle to get paid.


06 Passive Income

It’s always great to supplement your commissions with passive income. This means that you can generate revenue with minimal effort, based on the work that you have already done. Examples of this would be Print on Demand (POD) services for prints, licensing; selling content like tutorial videos, brushes, and so on.06


07 Plan Downtime

Plan for the downtime and try to save up at least 3-6 months of your basic living expenses. When you start out keep your overheads low, embrace the frugality till you know you have saved up enough to not panic if the work dries up for a while.

Published in Issue 46

This issue is focused on, how to design for kids, bundled with articles full of inspirations, advice and unique point-of-views from the veterans of the animation industry, illustrators, photographers, artists and many more. So, order your copy or subscribe, before print copies run out and enjoy reading this issue!

 

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Juan Casini is a multidisciplinary designer juggling various mediums and keeping his passion alive by traveling and designing. He is a free spirit who loves to draw, travel and experience new things. Here, he talks about his journey and inspirations of becoming a designer.

The Snow Island.
SkyMath - Educational App
The Turtle Island.

CG: How did your tryst with design begin?

Juan: I started working as a 2D game artist for a video game company while I was in the early years of college. I learned a lot there and it was the perfect way to start exploring the video game industry and understand how such a complex product as a game is made. I found that I could really use my illustrations skills there so I focused entirely in the video game field and I worked in more than 50 game developments since then.

 

Today, design for mobile apps is my main area of expertise, collaborating in small-scale game development for indie studios to major developments and educational apps.

Hanuman.
Ishtar. A personal project to show how animals can be gods for many cultures, mythologies and religions across the world.

CG: Any role models who inspired you early in life?

Juan: My father used to draw with me when I was a child and I’ve always been supported to get involved in artistic studies. I am very lucky for the education I got at such an important time of formation of a person, as is the childhood. But the most important thing is that they always encouraged me to do what I love. So I can definitely say that my parents are my role models

Space Cantina Game

CG: What influences you for your artworks?

Juan:I really like Japanese anime and the way they handle expression and visual impact. I’ve watched a lot of series and movies, thus animation and Manga are a great influence for me. I also believe nature is art in its pure form, so I keep traveling and constantly learning by watching and living on this beautiful planet.

Travel
Mammoth in Istanbul. A personal project, done when Juan started the freelance journey
Anunnaki. A personal project to show how animals can be gods for many cultures, mythologies and religions across the world.
Cebolla in Tokyo. A collection of postcards of our nomad journey with Flor Bisagno.
Live Forever. Contribution to a t-shirt design contest for Backseries (Spain).

CG: What do you want to express through your artworks?

Juan:I always try to give the best of me in all the projects I get involved in, and that means not only putting your best energy on it but also try to create a powerful and stimulating experience for the user or audience. So I try to keep the level of expression very high, adding many details and playing a lot with the colour palette, so no matter what the product is about, the eyes of the viewer can be positively affected in a more subtle and deep visual experience.

The Thunder Island.
The Rain Island.

CG: How do you avoid creative burnout or what do you do incase you feel creatively exhausted?

Juan:Initially during the early days of my freelance career I found myself working for too many hours on too many projects at the same time. Eventually, I realised that organisation and discipline are essential but it’s also important to take days off, rest well, go out and explore nature to have refreshing and exciting experiences as much as possible. It’s imperative to find your own rhythm, but most important, finding what you love to do and stop seeing your job as an obligation. It takes time and a lot of energy to stay away from the comfort zone, but if you can accomplish that I promise that it can change your life completely. Nowadays, a creative burnout with this nomad journey is really rare, when you are constantly discovering new places and cultures! It is just the best for your mind and soul

Crypto Tower Game
Crypto Tower Game

Published in Issue 33

We all face it! But everyone has their own unique way to come out of it, in this issue we try to explore different ideas of handling the ‘Creative Burnout’. The most common of all was #travelling, through everyone do it in their own unique style. Like Luke Ritchie from South Africa finds the nature and mountains as the best source of inspiration while Sushant Ajnikar says riding his bike and meeting four-legged loyal friends, dogs, on the way is the best way to learn. So, pack your bags and don’t forget to subscribe your copy before you leave!

 

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Your childhood experiences, explorations and continued learning through life, greatly shapes the way we think and the career path we chart for ourselves. Veteran artist and animation film designer, Dhimant Vyas, is an example of this. He gives us a peek at his childhood and throws some light on the animation industry.

An alumnus of National Institute of Design (NID) and his previous work includes the title animation sequence for the highly acclaimed Hindi feature film ‘Taare Zameen Par‘, which was directed by Indian Film Industry superstar Aamir Khan.

 

During an earlier stint at Aardman Animation Ltd. Dhimant has worked as an animator on the Creature Comforts USA TV series. He has worked with brands like BBC, UNICEF, FCB ULKA, Zee TV, MTV, Cartoon Network and Nickelodeon, to name just a few. His work for Taare Zameen Par, Happy Planet, Cute Bunny, Y-snore, MTV promos and his photography has won him several national and international awards.

Animation -Dhimant Vyas

Q: Your work is often related to the flora and fauna. Can you tell us how your childhood inspired the theme of your various work?

Dhimant. I grew up in a small town called ‘Dhrangadhra’ near Kutch, Gujarat. I spent a lot of time amidst nature, as my town is surrounded by rivers, lakes and farms. Most of my childhood involved playing with animals, bird watching, gardening, swimming in the river, and playing with the fish.

 

I used to collect clay from the riverbed to make toys and pluck grass to create handicrafts. We had no televisions or mobiles then. Even the race to get better marks in exams did not exist for us as children; this leads to spending most of our time in the lap of nature. And all my observations of nature now reflect in my work in some way.

Q: Please throw some light on the different animation techniques. Which of these is your favourite, and why?

Dhimant. There are a wide variety of techniques like 2D classical animation, 3D Computer generated animation, Stop motion, Cut out, Pixilation, and so many more.

 

I have used almost all styles of animation, but the way clay animation has evolved somehow reflects in most of my projects. I don’t restrict myself to clay animation though. I especially love the 2D classical animation style.

The style and technique always depend on the requirement of the story. For Amir Khan’s ‘Taare Zameen Par’ I used clay animation. The animation needed to seem like handmade toys created by children. There is an organic feel to the medium which cannot be achieved through computer-generated animation. Clay is something everyone relates to as it connects us all to our childhood.

 

In film making, storytelling decides the technique. The story needs to be executed in a manner where the audience completely engages with the story, instead of focusing on the technicality of the film. The style should seamlessly integrate with the story.

Q: The audience connects very strongly with your work, especially because it’s got heart and warmth. How do you bring in that feeling and emotional connection to your work?

Dhimant. Hard to tell. Perhaps because I put in my heart into my work or my childhood observations of nature reflect in my work. When one enjoys their work, the audience picks up on that, and they enjoy it too. While working, I don’t focus on the final product, instead, I put all my energy in the process of creation and learning.

Shaun and Sheep - Animation -Dhimant Vyas

Q: What role do you think animation can play in education? And how important is it?

Dhimant. Animation can play a significant role in education. I have worked on creating educational content, and have seen the impact myself.

 

A picture is worth a thousand words; now imagine the impact of thousands of moving images in animation! It is a limitless medium. Anything can be created through animation and this is what makes it a powerful educational tool.

Q: Which one of your projects is especially dear to you, and why?

Dhimant. My favourite projects are Rag Malhar (Promo for Music Asia Channel), Creature Comfort of Aardman, title animation of Aamir Khan’s film ‘Taare Zameen Par’, Purple & Brown, and Shaun the Sheep created with multiple Oscar winner Aardman animation studio, U.K.

Q: What are your words of wisdom for a budding animator?

Dhimant. Enjoy the process of making films, as your passion shows in the end. It’s important to do quality work and strive to create the best because this will bring in the money later. Always be observant and ready to learn and explore and share your knowledge. With all this it is equally important to show integrity and honour your deadlines

Creative Gaga - Issue 46 - Cover

Published in Issue 46

We all design for different audiences and always keep trying to figure out what they would need and how will they react to our designs? But, one audience who is the youngest of all and most difficult to predict is ‘Kids’. So, to get more clarity, we focused on animation design, an extensively used medium to influence these young ones. We interviewed and feature experts opinion from the industry leaders such as Suresh Eriyat, Dhimant Vyas and Vaibhav Kumaresh to ponder on the use of animation for early education… So, go ahead

 

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Animated Explainer

The Internet is filled with free Animated Explainer Video Softwares that are easy to use. But you need the best for your brand! Which is why we’ve created a list of online tools to help you out.

The article was originally published on Studio Tale

It’s time to bid farewell to the written word. Brands all over the world have realized that consumers prefer video content over text. The industry is now reacting to this shift.

 

Today, the animated explainer video is dominating the marketing scene.

These video explainers are everywhere – Social Media, Product help pages, Landing pages of the brand’s website, you name it!

In this article, we’ve listed out the 10 best-animated explainer video software that will give you an edge over the competition.

 

Stop googling how to make an explainer video for free. These software are free and easy to use! And if you want to sign up for the full version of these products, we’ve added in the price range as well.

These explainer video software will help you create amazing explainer videos for your product or service and capture the attention of your viewers.

 

Ready? Let’s begin our countdown!

Rawshorts

Rawshorts is a brilliant online video animated explainer video maker for creating animations. It features a simple, user-friendly drag-and-drop interface, an amazing collection of explainer video templates, and a unique pricing structure.

 

Rawshorts is perfect if you want to convert slides into captivating animated videos. You can easily customize your video clips by adding audio, texts, and transitions.

 

However, keep in mind that this animated explainer video software needs a strong internet connection to work smoothly.

 

Full Version Pricing: $39 to $89 per month


Animaker

Create flashy and captivating explainer videos in minutes with this online explainer video maker.

 

Animaker brings together 3 different features in one place – Presentations, Graphic Design, and video editing.

 

Being a DIY platform, it is extremely user-friendly and features the largest set of free explainer video templates in this list – including an improved whiteboard animation software.

 

Want to use data and stats in your video? Animaker allows you to create beautiful visuals for your numbers. You also have a plethora of animated characters who you can drag and drop into your explainer video.

 

Not to mention it features resonating sound effects that will help you add life to your video – something other animated explainer video makers haven’t quite got on point yet.

 

Full Version Pricing: $12 to $99 per month.


Powtoon

Know how to use PowerPoint? That’s how easy it is to use Powtoon!

 

This animated explainer video software features a wide variety of free explainer video templates and animated characters that you can use in your product presentation.

 

There is also a constant design upgrade that meets their clients’ high expectations.

 

Full Version Pricing: $16 to $197 per month.


Wideo

Wideo is a great animated explainer video software for creating all kinds of video content.

 

Easy to learn and user-friendly, Wideo features a drag and drop interface and has a large number of professional, free explainer video templates to choose from.

 

Other features include YouTube sharing, the ability to upload images and audio, and an extensive library of over 1000 in-built images at your disposal.

 

Wideo is available on Windows, Linux, Mac and is also available as cloud-based software.

 

Full Version Pricing: $19 to $199 per month


Vyond

Formerly known as Goanimate, Vyond is a simple cloud-based video editing software.

 

Straightforward and intuitive, this animated explainer video software is simple for beginners to use and features beautiful in-built video templates.

 

Vyond features a simple drag and drop interface that allows you to create character-driven videos or compelling data visualizations.

 

It also has a large audio-visual library and is available on Android and iOS.

 

Full Version Pricing: $39 to $159 per month.


Viddyoze

Viddyoze is great if you need to create high-quality animated explainer videos in a short time-frame.

 

This cloud-based animated video software is really easy to use. It is the best explainer video maker for incorporating logos and text beautifully into your videos.

 

Viddyoze specializes in producing call to action videos and has over 700 templates to choose from.

 

And if you aren’t happy with the platform, there’s always a 100% money back guarantee!

 

Full Version Pricing: $77 or $97, one-time payment.


Biteable

Biteable has often been called “The World’s Simplest Video Maker”.

 

This explainer video maker’s tools are intuitive and easy to use. It has a great collection of pre-animated scenes to choose from. It also features a high-quality audio library and has a great colour editing capability.

 

The result? You can create high quality animated explainer videos in minutes.

 

Full Version Pricing: $20 to $99 per month


Renderforest

Renderforest is a simple cloud-based explainer video maker that lets you create great videos in minutes.

 

Equipped with a comprehensive catalogue of animated explainer video templates to choose from, you can use it’s drag and drop interface to get the style and tone you need. It also allows you to upload images and videos, and play with colours and text in your video.

 

However, Renderforest has a higher pricing range than the other contenders on this list.

 

Full Version Pricing: $59 to $299 per month


Animoto

This animated explainer video software allows you to easily create beautiful animated explainer videos that can incorporate video clips and images.

 

It provides you with a selection of explainer templates to choose from and even has an in-built library of music for you to use. Animoto has also partnered with Getty Images to create a collection of over 1 million stock photos and videos that you can insert in your explainer video.

 

However, keep in mind that you cannot edit individual clips in this explainer video maker. Any changes or edits made will translate to the whole video.

 

Full Version Pricing: $9 to $94 per month


Moovly

This drag and drop style animated explainer video maker features an extensive library of over a million usable objects – be it stock images, videos or sounds.

 

Moovly also has in-built templates that you can use to create the right explainer video for you.

 

However, there have been complaints that this explainer video maker takes time to render the final product.

 

Full Version Pricing: $49 per month


CreatorKit

CreatorKit as a solution to create Instagram stories, videos, and ads that convert and generate results. Creators are able to create social media content for their business or personal online presence without any design skills.

 

CreatorKit offers hundreds of templates proven to increase engagement rates and results. The animated text styles and motion graphics enables anyone to convert any static image into a highly engaging video.

And there you have it.

 

Those were our picks for the best-animated explainer video maker software on the internet today.

 

If you’re looking to create your own videos, these explainer video makers are going to give you some brilliant results!

The article was written by Koushik Marka and originally published on Studio Tale