1

ad here

The Indian award tally has increased by one metal since past two Cannes Lions Festival Of Creativity, Dentsu Webchutney visibly playing a huge role in it.They are now India’s most successful digital agency with innumerable awards.

Dentsu Webchutney, the digital agency from the house of Dentsu Aegis Network has contributed in increasing India’s awards tally at the Cannes Lions 2021 with 7 metals and 20 shortlists consisting of 4 Silver Lions and 3 Bronze Lions.

Being the only Indian winner on Day 3, Dentsu won in the Entertainment category bagging a silver lion for ‘The World’s Most Reported Trailer’ for Trigger Happy Entertainment’s Thappad starring Taapsee Pannu in the engagement/distribution sub-category. In the trailer the actress is seen speaking directly to the audience, encouraging them to report the trailer. Within a few hours of the trailer’s release, it was taken down by YouTube, becoming the world’s first trailer to be removed from the platform and proving that if abuse is reported action will be taken.

Subsequently, Webchutney won three silver and two bronze lions for VICE Media’s ‘The 8-Bit Jurno’ an initiative they took to keep updating the Kashmiris with the world who were missing out on news due to the limited internet access for more than 4 months. Together with Webchutney, VICE curated youth-relevant news and sent them through SMS to thousands of Kashmiris during those hard times.

On Day 4 of the festival, Dentsu Webchutney bagged another bronze lion under the Creative eCommerce category for Swiggy Instamart’s campaign ‘The Better Half Recipes’, which displayed a distinct idea of ‘equality’. This ingenious cookbook spittled the recipe amongst partners to bring ‘equality into the kitchen’.

CURRENT ISSUE

 

Ad Here

Art is an expression of yourself, whether you work with a team or not, design is all about putting yourself out there. Thinking creatively, acting spontaneously and satisfying a wide spectrum is what Abhishek Sawant does and urges others to do. Here he talks on how to be part of a team while still maintaining own core self.

Design by Abhishek Sawant

Working in a team

Artists are best known for working alone; the brooding, silent type. However the same does not stand true for Abhishek Sawant who knows exactly how to be part of a group in order to deliver an innovative product. He believes that working individually allows the creative juices to flow, however working in an open board design environment promotes healthy competition, eventually leading to the evolution of design sensibility.

Design by Abhishek Sawant
An ironic advert of rejecting the best names in football business for creating the perfect fantasy!



Design by Abhishek Sawant
An ironic advert of rejecting the best names in football business for creating the perfect fantasy!

How can you make it?

Art is an expression of yourself; what you feel when you see a gorgeous sunset over the horizon or the inspiration from the world around us. Don’t lower your expectations or under-estimate your calibre, for nobody knows what goes on within the head of the designer; all they understand is what comes out on paper. What will make you click is subject to individuality and Abhishek finds his way when he travels or discovers a solution in scribbles on blank sheets of paper. He urges you to be yourself; as that is something nobody can take away from you.

Design by Abhishek Sawant
Dark humour used to depict the effect
of thick soup.

Design by Abhishek Sawant
Dark humour used to depict the effect
of thick soup.

Now, don’t lose yourself along the way

At one point in life everyone is faced with the doubt, ‘What can I follow in order to succeed?’ The answer is simple and it comes from within. There are no shortcuts to succeeding as an artist; all you have to do is be true to yourself and not bend before client briefs. Use them as a guideline but never lose yourself in the process. Detailed or minimalistic, enhanced human expressions or subtlety, monochromes or vivid hues; all of the basic design principles guide you and ultimately shape your work. Accolades will come and go; clients will do the same you have to live on with your brand identity so work on that first, others are sure to follow on.

The cool ones are invited to the Bombay Times after hour party.



Advert for the popular brand Airtel celebrating the friendship.

Make the group succeed

A team is as strong as the weakest link. While everyone is sure to put their best foot forward, the real challenge is to make everyone overcome the obstacles together and reach a point where the group and the client both are happy. Learning how to work with and for others can be what makes or breaks you, as individually brilliant artists also have to gel with others at some point in order to achieve their goals. Enthusiastic artists bursting with passion make confident partners who win Abbys.

Innovative Dietician Visiting Card

CURRENT ISSUE



 




ad here

Today, the world is experiencing one of the most trying periods in recent years where our physical and emotional endurance is being put to the test. The spread of COVID-19 has put millions of lives at stake. Locked down within our homes, we are looking at an unsteady present and a highly uncertain future.

Working from home has become the norm and we are spending hours inundated with every kind of information about the pandemic. Be it in the form of Whatsapp forwards, news articles or Instagram stories, the dissemination of information is at an all time high and we are at leisure to take it all in!

Amidst all the information coming my way, what seemed to pop out was that, even during a global crisis of this magnitude, there was a spurt of new ideas and innovation from every corner of the world. The observation got me searching for more examples of the different kinds of innovative technologies, unique designs and creative communication that was doing the rounds during this pandemic, and what emerged was fascinating.

One such product I came across was the ‘germ trap’ snood designed by Virustatic, a UK based biotechnology firm that apparently ‘deactivates’ viruses after filtering them onto its surface. Meant to cover your neck and approximately half of your face, the Virustatic Shield’s fabric is where the magic lies. It is said to imitate the surface structure of the human oesophagus, with a special coating that is believed to trap up to 96% of airborne viruses, thus enabling users to filter out harmful infections around them!

Another ingenious product, I found, was a hands-free door opener designed by Belgium-based company Materialise. To be attached to a door handle, this makes use of one’s arm or elbow to open doors thus reducing the risk of touching an otherwise potential ‘hot-spot’ for infections. What’s more, it is 3D printed, and Materialise has made the design downloadable for free from their website, making it extremely easy to use for individuals and organisations to print it as and when required.

During the course of this COVID-19 pandemic, the identification of those infected and their movement history has been of utmost importance. The Smart Helmet designed by China-based tech firm KC Wearable was something I found quite fascinating. This helmet is equipped to detect people with a fever up to five metres away, subsequently sounding an alarm to that effect! Featuring an infrared temperature detector, an augmented-reality visor, a camera that can read QR codes, plus wifi, Bluetooth and 5G enabled so as to beam data to the nearest hospital this product truly seems like a thing of the future.

A highly useful yet seemingly controversial innovation, to me, were a series of tracking apps developed by South Korean coders, one of which happens to be the Corona 100m. These applications build on the testing data collected by the government to alert users when they come within 100 metres of a location visited by an infected person. Such advanced tracking devices can definitely be crucial in curbing the incessant rise in the number of infected people. What needs to be considered, however, are the subsequent consequences when surveillance of this level is allowed and the boundaries of privacy become blurry. But I won’t delve into that for now. That is a subject for another blog!

In addition to these product and technology-based innovations, what I realised was that dissemination of important information in ways that are effective and memorable was the need of the hour. And I must say that I have come across some of the most creative instances in communication design during this COVID-19 period! From those that educate us about the crisis, inform us about crucial do’s and dont’s to the ones that turn this grim situation around, into something hilarious. For instance, when I saw this hand-washing tutorial by Iranian mime artist Danial Kheirikhah, where he can be seen furiously washing his hands to the tunes of classical music, it was just the thing I needed to see. Simple, funny and so effective!

Another widespread visual used to communicate the importance of social distancing has been that of burning matchsticks. When I first saw it, the impact was instant and the message was crystal clear. Adapted by various artists, animators and designers, it used such a strong visual metaphor that it became impossible to forget and extremely easy to understand. What’s more, it required no caption, no explanation thus crossing boundaries of language, cultures and education, to be understood by one and all.



I also had the chance to see some of the most creative campaigns from organisations across the world. At a time when business is slow, customers are wary, nobody is moving or buying or stepping out of their homes, advertising is playing a key role in helping brands stay relevant while being sensitive to present circumstances. Mercedes Benz talks about staying at home while Burger King’s quarantine whopper encourages customers to make their own burgers at home! It is amazing to see how these brands have turned around their product or service into a powerful message asking people to stay indoors and stay safe. All over the world, in every field, people are finding new ways to inform, engage and inspire millions.

However, what I realised is this. We aren’t witnessing this phenomenon for the first time.

History has shown us, that through the years, in the face of adversity, turmoil and tragic circumstances, creativity has never said die. Wars, socio-political unrests and economic crises have all invariably led to some of the most path-breaking ideas and innovations in the fields of product design, architecture, technology as well as communication. Take the iconic Charles and Ray Eames’ plywood splint for example. It became one of the most talked-about designs that emerged from the WW2. Not only that, but it has also further inspired many more designs in the years that followed, all based on the principle of problem-solving and ‘less is more’.

Years later, the Cold War also brought with it one of the most impactful visuals; the Fraternal Kiss by Russian artist Vrubel, that was actually based on a photograph but assumed a completely new meaning when it was painted on the eastern side of the Berlin Wall. The ‘I AM A MAN’ posters held by Memphis sanitation workers during the 1968 strike, was a simple design yet marked a significant moment in the American Civil Rights Movement and remained etched in the memory of the world. Closer to home, India’s own freedom struggle led to the propagation of khadi, spun using the charkha during the Swadeshi Movement by Mahatma Gandhi. Although it wasn’t unknown to the people, its creative juxtaposition against the backdrop of the British raj, made it a symbol of independence and of self-sufficiency and was adopted exponentially, throughout the country.

What I have noticed is that throughout history, difficult times have always led us to new beginnings. New materials are discovered, innovative products become a part of everyday life, art movements are initiated to do away with earlier styles, music evolves, architecture changes the way we see the world and technological advancements redefine the way we live. Every crisis brings with it a modification in circumstances and available resources. This further leads to a significant rise in new needs and unique problems. And with this, comes the drive to invent, to find a better way to deal with the circumstances at hand.

In the book, Wired to Create: Unravelling the Mysteries of the Creative Mind psychologist Marie Forgeard, (McLean Hospital/Harvard Medical School) explains, “Because adverse events force us to reexamine our beliefs and priorities, they can help us break out of habitual ways of thinking and thereby boost creativity. We’re forced to reconsider things we took for granted, and we’re forced to think about new things. Adverse events can be so powerful that they force us to think about questions we never would have thought of otherwise.” Adversity pushes us to find a way out and we turn to innovation and to design, which at its very core, is ultimately a problem-solving process. To mould what we have in the present, into an idea that has the power to change our future.

The article first published on GCD Studio

CURRENT ISSUE



 




ad here

As designers, ordinary events shouldn’t be ignored, for in them lie inspirations and insights that everyone saw but never noticed. How good you are with tuning your eyes to your mind is what counts, believes Karthik M. He makes some interesting points that translate into how to notice things so that people can take notice of your work.

Periods

First Coffee

Poster for Easy Cabs

Adoption

Vichar (thoughts)

Beauty Lies in The Eyes of the Observer

Any creative journey starts with observation; the ability to see beyond what is visible and read between the lines. Different designers will have different tones in which they try and communicate what they perceive, whether it’s through mockery, humour or abstract routes. What’s important is to find a unique connection inside what you observe and bring that to life in a personal way.

Road Ritual

Government Job

One will realise that over the course of time, doing justice to yourself will help bring recognition, as your designs make way into websites, blogs and so on. Create work that instigates discussion. And advertising is a good place to learn how to do that because it always keeps you curious and makes you dig for insights.

Life. An everyday situation, shown with a unique connotation; one that instigates the viewer to think beyond what they see.

Apocalypse. An everyday situation, shown with a unique connotation; one that instigates the viewer to think beyond what they see.



Grope Spot. An everyday situation, shown with a unique connotation; one that instigates the viewer to think beyond what they see.

As Every Sight has an Insight

Pretty much so. Inspirations are many and they are hiding everywhere. It could be in a fight you’ve had with your partner that might trigger a chain of thought or sometimes as simple as how your pet curls up and sleeps It’s funny how something so small are like blips on a radar screen and which actually have the potential to manifest into great ideas. The underlying element is of course to constantly look for inspirations to invent and create.

Connect. A series of illustrations exploring grey areas of life in black and white.

For Illustrators, Advertising is the Best School

There are probably millions of people out there who can draw, who can illustrate. They love to tell stories, share concepts via striking visual form. For them, and their audience, it’s something that never gets dull. And that’s why, advertising is the perfect launch pad for great talent. It not only allows you to do what you do best, but also teaches you other key traits that are vital for someone in a creative profession.

Cover for Helter Skelter Book

Editorial Design for Helter Skelter Book, Hands

Editorial Design for Helter Skelter Book, SpeakingTongues

Advertising, helps designers see a bigger picture; one beyond the edges of their canvas. It not only lets you make things but also teaches you how to present your idea to the world. It makes you a thinker, a creator, most importantly, it makes you a doer.

Sorry State

Silent Killer

Smirking Salary. Sometimes, words can be great visuals as well, demonstrates this tongue-in-cheek design.

Published in Issue 24

Illustration For Advertising Special! Gone are the days when Illustrations would take a back seat. Now, they are becoming more proactive and are evolving the way we communicate. This time, Creative Gaga focuses on how the advertising world is opening its doors to this exciting form of design. Featuring renowned Illustrators like Chris Beatrice, Nasheet Shadani, Vijay Kumar, Gabriel Mareno and much more, this issue promises to leave no page unturned!

 


Order Your Copy!

CURRENT ISSUE



 




Ad here

Gone are the days when Illustrators used to take the back seat in the advertising world. With things today, they’re emerging as the forerunners of some amazing and memorable communication that is being recognized. No doubt, clients, like OLX and Docomo, are exploring this valuable asset with Nithin Rao Kumblekar.

advertising
Namaste India Milk, Agency: ADK Fortune Communications Pvt. Ltd.

advertising
Urbanrise, Agency: One MG, Chennai

advertising
advertising

Contacting an illustrator for a TVC shoot might not be something we hear of everyday, but when OLX got in touch with Nithin Rao, it was a wise decision. The client wanted a campaign that would carry forward in print as well, and thus, saving time and cost, decided to get the shoot illustrated. Simple to look at, but the task was a challenging one for the artist. The OLX team had asked him to create every object separately in the layout so that they could pick each one later, according to their needs. Thus, the illustration required Nithin to create every object completely even if it was overlapped by the objects.

Wall graphic for Sulekha.com

Wall graphic for Sulekha.com



Wall graphic for Sulekha.com

advertising

When Docomo demanded an illustration route for its exciting print campaign ‘The bedtime stories’, Nithin knew it would be storytelling through single visuals. Without over complicating the visual, he worked carefully with shadow and light to establish humor and wit using relatable scenarios. To give the story a setting, subtle placement of props were used, like the placement of a kid’s drawing book, school bag and water bottle with a fish on it.

advertising
Client: Killer dryShampoo, Agency: Makani

advertising
Client: Killer dryShampoo, Agency: Makani

advertising
Client: Killer dryShampoo, Agency: Makani

advertising

Published in Issue 24

Gone are the days when Illustrations would take a back seat. Now, they are becoming more proactive and are evolving the way we communicate. This time, Creative Gaga focuses on how the advertising world is opening its doors to this exciting form of design. Featuring renowned Illustrators like Chris Beatrice, Nasheet Shadani, Vijay Kumar, Gabriel Mareno and much more, this issue promises to leave no page unturned!

 


Order Your Copy!

CURRENT ISSUE



 




Ad Here

Tapping into adversities our society faces on a day-to-day basis, Siju RS art directs a campaign that attempts to call out to the conscience of the onlooker and prompts for an action. The Winter Collection campaign draws public attention and interest to a raging issue.

Winter is the most difficult time for the underprivileged in India. And after the long and hot summers, the homeless and especially the children, are the most affected by the harsh weather conditions.

Winter collection
Newspaper - Winter Collection campaign for New Ark Mission of India by Ogilvy & Mather



Winter collection
Sack - Winter Collection campaign for New Ark Mission of India by Ogilvy & Mather

The campaign innovatively tackles this social issue. With street children posing as models and adorned in clothes made from discarded newspapers, sacking and cardboard, the campaign satires a fashion shoot. This juxtaposition succeeds in making people stand up and notice the plight of the less fortunate and donate clothes to help them. The sophisticated look and feel does not shout to sensationalize but creates enough room for curiosity and learning, while being packed with a punch. Thus, articulating what they call in advertising – success.

Winter collection
Cardboard - Winter Collection campaign for New Ark Mission of India by Ogilvy & Mather

Published in Issue 12

The first interactive issue of Creative Gaga with Augmented Reality features. This issue focuses on the transition of Advertising from real to virtual and blurring the boundaries of both at the same time. Also bundled with lots of interesting articles and interviews.

 


Order Your Copy!

CURRENT ISSUE



 




“The idea is getting lost.” “How about a bigger logo?” “I can’t shorten the headline.” These are the often repeated lines in an advertising agency. For an art director, the challenge is to meet all such expectations in a single design. Senior Creative Director Denzil Machado explains how keeping designs minimalist and simple can meet all of these to satisfy both creativity and the brand objective.

Advertising
Cat Paws. When the idea is the visual itself, nothing else is needed.

Advertising
Doggy Paws. Print and Poster Campaign for Sanitol Hand Sanitizers

Leave it to the Audience

Advertising is different from other design areas like graphic designing and illustration. That’s because it’s an integrated communication that involves a union of the idea, visual and words. The idea, no doubt, plays the most important role. And then the art form must compliment it, which is where the challenge lies. The best way is to let the audience decode an idea, helped by a design. That’s when an artwork is able to achieve the objective for the brand, the client and the agency.

Advertising
Bhole Bhandari

Advertising
Bulbul Pandey

Advertising
Komal Kanya

Make Your Visuals Talk

The objective is to do more with less. It’s a great challenge to try and solve a problem visually, without saying much. Especially when you have to say it all, integrating the product, idea, logo, copy, etc., all in one communication. Unlike a film which has the support of a narrative or dialogue, along with music and moving images, visual communication in advertising has to be made powerful on its own. Making intelligent use of colours, motifs and patterns help in doing so keeping it simple and minimalistic is the key. As a great mind once put it, “Simple is beautiful, but it is also most difficult to do something simple.” This is definitely tough, yet the most exciting part of the business.

Slipping Rooster

Slipping Pig

Slipping Goat

Protect the Child Inside You

Usually, during the initial phase of an advertising career, people prefer to be spontaneous. At that raw time, they are primarily driven by instinct. And they just use elements because ‘they felt like it.’ However, after one reaches a certain stage and the game is played on a bigger level, it’s important to get a lot more calculative. It becomes necessary to carefully think through ideas again and maybe once again. It becomes important to ask ‘why am I using this font and not that? Why this colour and texture?’ You need to justify and reason out with everything you use. But the source remains instinct. The trick is to keep the child in you alive.

Reebok Gear

Reebok Gear

Find out the “Aha” Moment

Well, there is no one way to go about design in advertising. Every brief, every page is something different. The variations in the nature of the ideas, clients, brands and target audience enable an art director to experiment with a myriad style of visual expressions. Ranging from traditional Indian to contemporary, the page is all yours. However, the objective is always the same – to make decoding the visual communication an interesting experience for the target audience. Right when your audience connects to your communication and exclaims “aha”, your design meets success.

Tarantula

Lizard. Print and Poster campaign for Hanes Tagless Innerwear

Stop Aping the West

It’s common to spot an art director flipping through the archive or referring to books like One Show, DnAD, etc, for that little push when one is stuck. No doubt, international advertising is inspiring and is doing rather well on the global level, but there is a lot of untapped potential in India, especially when it comes to design. Look locally. Look around. Extract from our incredibly rich and diverse art and culture. There are so many simple yet striking elements that can say so much on their own. There is a high possibility that designs, created using traditional inputs, might not even have crossed the mind of any artist sitting in an agency anywhere in the world. And that’s what makes it unique, utterly Indian.

Poster for India International Jewellery Show, IIJS

Poster for India International Jewellery Show, IIJS

Published in Issue 11

This issue also explored the Jewellery Design & Wedding Photography with some cool techniques to learn from experts in Gyaan section.

 


Order Your Copy!