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A carmaker that Renault bought from the Romanian government just over 20 years ago. Recently, car brands have been going for minor tweaks for their logos, Renault’s Dacia is going for a more radical revamp with its new logo, colour and vehicle designs.

Dacia Revamp its Logo!
Image Credit: Dacia

The new Dacia logo is entirely different from the previous logo, with sharp visuals and a more modern, geometric look that could almost convince us that it’s a higher-end brand.

Dacia has ditched the closing strokes on the ‘D’ and ‘A’ leaving minimal forms, which also mirror images, creating a simple, geometrical look with a mechanical feel. The accompanying emblem is derived from the logotype, bringing together the ‘D’ and ‘C’ to form a symmetrical link, which Renault says symbolises a cohesive bond. The earthy colour palette is built around khaki-green to elicit the brand’s closeness to nature.

Image Credit: Dacia

For the logo, Renault said last year that the goal was to change the brand’s visual language by tapping into its fundamental characteristics: robust, simple design and a willingness to focus on the essentials. The minimalist letters intend to communicate a pared-back and cunning character.

Image Credit: Dacia

Dacia’s revealed a new look for its cars, with sharper headlights and the new logo prominently placed on the grille as well as a change in the style of its photography and advertising. It’s also focusing on recycled materials with its Duster model featuring a recycled polypropylene material with a flecked finish that does not require painting.

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The rebrand comes out with some undeniably pleasing graphics and animations. Corel The brand behind apps like CorelDRAW and Corel Painter, Corel has undergone a comprehensive rebrand of the company and has changed its name, logo and entire visual identity.

The new name, Alludo, is going to take a while to get used to, but there’s no denying that it’s a more modern-sounding word than Corel. While the name of the parent company has changed, the products; Corel, MindManager, Parallels and WinZip would stay the same.

As for the visual identity, the logo was designed by DesignStudio, which describes the symbol as a “unique silhouette” that curves forward, off the beaten path, towards a boundless reality. The wordmark is tailored to match, with curving ink traps that echo the symbol.”

Alludo CEO Christa Quarles told Creative Bloq,”What you see really depends on where you are in the world. I see a half-dome in Yosemite, some people think it looks like the Sydney Opera House. Some people see a whale. Some see Baby Yoda’s Crib. What is beautiful about it is that it evokes emotion. Most of all, it represents forward progress.”

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Creatives are concerned for the future of the collaborative design platform, Figma.

Adobe, a renowned software giant behind Illustrator, Photoshop and Premiere Pro, is all set to buy Figma for a whopping $20 billion.

Figma has become a hugely popular online tool for user interface and user experience design -in fact, it currently tops the list of the best UI design tools. It’s praised for its streamlined form and collaborative tools while providing free student access has made it even more famous. On the other hand, Adobe has created some of the most fully featured industry-standard programs in the creative sector, however, its subscription-based pricing is a backdrop for many.

Credit: Figma

Although Adobe says it will keep Figma going rather than eliminate a rival to Adobe AD, Figma users are concerned for two main reasons i.e, price and bloat. Figma currently has a free starter plan and a professional plan that starts at $12 per month per editor – significantly less than an Adobe Creative Cloud single-app subscription. According to Figma there are “currently” no plans to change its pricing and access will remain free for those in education.

This partnership aims to accelerate growth and innovation, with Figma incorporating Adobe’s expertise in imaging, photography, illustration, video, 3D and font technology.

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Representing people is no small task, especially when each one is a complex amalgamation of peculiar moods, styles, experiences and so on. Sketch artist, Prakash Thombre, readily takes on the challenge of transmitting real life onto the canvas through his various sketches of everyday personalities.

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Observation is where it All Begins

Among the various subjects he sketches and draws, Prakash Thombre always finds Portraits to be most fascinating and interesting – mainly because he chooses his subjects from real life. Most of them, he captures on camera when travelling, later using them as references. He feels drawing Portraits helps to study people around us and connect with them – it’s like capturing their life narrative in lines and shades in the form of sketches. He has a keen interest in body language and face reading.

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While observing people in real life, he generally tries to find the story about the person. Carefully observing the costumes, facial features, gestures, posture, etc. tells him an interesting story, which he then tries to capture in sketches and drawings. Aspects or elements like these help display and represent the core personality or temperament of the subjects. When he is observing a subject, he studies the minute details about their costumes, poses, gestures, expressions, facial features and so on. If everything compliments each other, it becomes an interesting story to capture in lines as a sketch or drawing.

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The Style is Best when Synonymous with Spontaneity

Prakash is not very comfortable with following one style or technique, nor is he comfortable with the typical copybook fundamentals of rendering. He likes to be spontaneous with the tools and its application, and prefers the lines to be free-flowing and organic in nature – nothing rigid, nothing attempted. Further, with regard to the style of sketching and colouring, the nature of lighting and the likes depends on the time and place.

Usually, on location, he chooses to use the pencil, finding it to be the most efficient tool to play with the line pressure and tonal values. Sometimes, he also uses fountain pens, but with flex and fude nibs, as they provide fantastic dynamic lines, depending on the pen angles and pressure. The sketch artist finds water-colour to be the most dynamic medium since he feels It gives a lot of flexibility with the way one applies and uses it.

Using fundamental tools and techniques is the base of foolproof skills

If we take a good look at it, most of the designers today are inclined towards using smart devices to draw and sketch – like the iPad or Wacom Cintique – which Prakash feels cripple the true potential of the designer to draw with real tools. He rather opines that designers should use these tools but, at the same time, bring in and maintain the habit of drawing with hands and real tools, where they don’t have options like ‘Undo’ and the likes at their disposal. So, starting the design process with sketching using real tools will help explore and capture ideas quickly, and then explore further to refine it through Smart devices like the iPad or Wacom.

Published in Issue 41

Every year brings many opportunities and hopes along with celebrations. For this issue, we reached many visual artists and designers to know their expectations from the year 2018. This issue’s cover designer, Shreya Gulati is exceptionally impressed by the advancement of technology in design, especially how VR & AR has impacted new ways of creating.

 

Honing and sharpening one’s skills is always a quest for every creative. So, whether you have many or none expectations for the year, this issue is a must-read.

 

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Codesign shares their journey of creating the new brand identity for Licious that captures perfectly the sensorial emotion of “love of meat”. Have a behind the scenes look into how the heartier, meatier and more delicious identity of Licious transpired.

ClientLicious

Requirements Brand Identity Design

Brand Identity of Licious
Before (L) & After (R)

The Brief

Born out of the love for meat, Licious was founded in 2015. Licious emerged as India’s largest tech-driven, direct-to-consumer fresh meat and seafood brand by focusing on product quality, freshness, and innovation. In 2021, it became the first D2C brand in India to achieve unicorn status in India. With an expansion of the fresh meats category, the Licious brand needed to distinguish itself from other players with a strong voice, while also launching new offerings and formats to serve broader consumer needs.

Brand Identity of Licious
Colours
Brand Identity of Licious
Icons

Key Requirements

The brand identity must

  1. Capture an emotional mind space.
  2. Evoke the sensorial emotion of “love of meat”.
  3. Instil trust in freshness and quality.
  4. Unify core brand recall across the rapidly growing portfolio of products.
Brand Identity of Licious
Type
Brand Identity of Licious
Carry Bag

The Problem

With a rapidly expanding portfolio, it was critical for the Licious brand to distinguish itself from other players in the category by developing a distinct identity while also launching new offerings and formats to meet broader consumer needs. It was critical to unify core brand recall across new categories while also allowing for careful adaptation for different contexts.

Packaging Elements

The Strategy

Codesign’s partnership with Licious to refresh the brand identity was aimed at two key, interconnected objectives

Brand Identity of Licious
Badges

Capturing an emotional mind space for the brand

 

Make it Licious – Create authentic and ownable brand expressiveness that evokes the sensorial emotion of ‘love for meat’ while adhering to category codes of freshness and quality. The aim was to strengthen the brand’s connection to deliciousness and passion for food.

App Icon
Social Posts

Strengthen brand recall alongside brand growth


Always Licious –
Unify core brand recall across the rapidly growing portfolio, while allowing for thoughtful adaptation for different contexts (formats, content, packaging & more).

Packaging Elements
Apron & T-shirt

The Approach

The New Flavour of Licious

The brand’s inherent gastronomic passion is brought to life by the identity refresh, which is served with affable quirk. It’s heartier, meatier, and more flavorful, boosting brand ownership and recall. A warm and friendly family of brand assets lends a natural good-natured and fun-loving tonality to the brand. Carefully crafted cues instil trust in freshness and quality, which is critical for the category. Guidelines and usage principles enable consistently delightful implementation across diverse touchpoints—from online experiences to offline retail—to create a very Licious universe.

Plate Design

The Design

Licious is now heartier, meatier and more flavourful! The updated colour palette combines appetising, rich tones of red, grey, and warm white to create a unique combination. While the smile from the previous iteration remains, the wordmark has been redrawn to represent a delicious flow with meatier weight and warm, handcrafted details. The brand font complements other brand assets with its fullness and warmth, and goes well with the brand’s witty, light-hearted tone. The handcrafted juicy quirks of the wordmark also serve as inspiration for the distinct icon and illustration styling, which features thick-thin lines and spontaneous strokes in brand colours.

Brand Identity of Licious
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The Czech automobile manufacturer Škoda recently launched a new logo. The brand has described the change as its the biggest revamp in the last 30 years. The new logo embraces the trend of a clean and simplistic look

Škoda considered 165 proposals which got tested with feedback from several respondents from the Czech Republic, Germany, Italy, Norway, India and Israel.

Škoda has upgraded its colour palette by replacing the traditional green with two new shades: emerald and electric, which the brand says will look better on digital devices. According to the Head of Marketing, Petra Mackeová, “few brands have the colour green as ingrained in their DNA as Škoda. The new shades maintain the link with history but refresh the design and allude more strongly to electromobility.”

In addition, the brand has also attempted to resolve an issue; the inverted circumflex accent, or caron, over the S in the brand name, that it says was confusing global audiences. Škoda has incorporated it into the shape of the S itself, which for someone who is unfamiliar with the automobile manufacturer would not be hard to miss.

While looking at Škoda’s new logo, you might notice its resemblance to another renowned electric car manufacturer, Tesla. The look has a vaguely similar shape to the top of the A in the Tesla logo. Although it is a small detail and might go unnoticed, both the brands are in the same field and coincidentally even have the same number of letters in their respective names.

Skoda's New Sleeker Logo

The new logo will roll out across communications materials and won’t appear on cars until 2024.

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Jagadeesh Narayanan is an artist by passion on a quest to make art accessible to all. Art is the tranquility that he has always yearned for and wants to share with the world to make a difference.

Digital Oil Painting
Watercolour

Using art to make a difference in someone’s life, especially those going through trying times, Jagadeesh Narayanan’s philosophy is simple. Watercolour painter by passion and a digital artist by trade, he can find inspiration in the most mundane of things and truly turn them into works of art.

Digital Oil Painting

CG. Was there a pivotal moment when you decided to follow your path as an artist?

Jagadeesh. I was in sixth grade when I witnessed someone drawing for the first time. I wanted to watch him draw, but he wouldn’t let me near him, claiming that if I stood nearby, he wouldn’t be able to concentrate. I tried peering in through his window but was caught and forced to leave.

Watercolour

That’s when I decided to start drawing for myself and the pivotal moment when I knew I wanted to become an artist. I was constantly drawing, and then finally in 12th standard, I realised I didn’t want to waste any more time and study art professionally. A typical Indian household, my parents objected, but I was adamant and kept my dream alive despite being told that I can’t live my life by studying art, and 2 years later I did it.

Digital Oil Painting
Digital Oil Painting

CG. As a trained artist, could you talk about some specific techniques and insights you acquired through a formal education in art which contributed to the artist you are today.

Jagadeesh. I passed the Kerala Government Certificate Examination. Following that, I did not pursue a professional degree, but learned basic computer skills, Photoshop and other design software. I can quickly learn any software because, unlike most people, I did not learn the tools first and then design. As a result, I am capable of utilising any software in a variety of ways.

Digital Oil Painting
Digital Oil Painting

Because I could not afford to study professionally, I use my knowledge for the benefit of the common man. Everyone should be able to afford a digital painting, so that they can display good art in their homes. Meeting Milind Mullick Sir was a turning point for me. I was able to observe him at work, which was a huge source of inspiration for me, and I launched my YouTube channel as a result teaching everything about watercolour painting. I realised that many people were experiencing the same difficulties that I had when learning to paint. As I was mostly self-taught, I decided to share my knowledge and guide such aspirants.

Digital Oil Painting

CG. As a painter of landscapes and realistic portraits, you make use of vibrant colours in interesting ways to add a unique touch to your paintings, can you elaborate on that?

Jagadeesh. It is inspired by my mentor Milind Sir. I had been following him since I first began studying art, and his use of colour inspired me even after I met him. Also, who doesn’t enjoy bright colours?

Digital Oil Painting
Digital Oil Painting

CG. Do you have an essential philosophy that guides you in your creative expression?

Jagadeesh. My philosophy is to make art accessible to people from all walks of life. My work is inspired by the idea of making a difference in someone’s life through art, especially for those going through difficult times. Watercolour painting is both exhilarating and a passion for me. I paint watercolours primarily for the satisfaction and fulfilment of my mind. However, I believe that digital is easily accessible to people, and that it can be used to create oil paintings digitally.

Digital Oil Painting

“Everyone should be able to afford a digital painting for their homes and Jagadeesh Narayanan, a prolific artist is on a quest to make art accessible to all with his multi-disciplinary skills in painting.”

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CG. With a diploma in graphic design and experience in the fields of web and textile design, how do you bring the concepts of design into your art?

Jagadeesh. Designing has had a significant impact on my work. The use of album arrangement has greatly aided me when creating digital portraits. Because of my design skills, when I do a painting by hand, I can decide how to improve it, whether by using different colours, changing the brightness, or changing the composition. I can predict the outcome right away. I can plan a manual painting well using digital software because I first learned design.

Digital Oil Painting
Watercolour

CG. Is there a specific environment or material that’s integral to your work?

Jagadeesh. I am simple. I prefer plain air for watercolours and find subjects even in the mundane of things from my daily life. I’m not particular about the environment I work in as long as I can be inspired from nature and my surroundings. I want to create art that inspires others. For digital paintings, I’m confined to using a system and software, but my designs and artistic knowledge add that unique touch.

Watercolour

CG. What piece of your artwork would you like to be remembered for?

Jagadeesh. I prefer fantasy paintings but haven’t had the opportunity to fully explore them. My favourite is one that combines a peacock feather and a fish. I held an exhibition of such paintings titled “Roopantharam” which included some of my favourite fantasy creations. Such paintings take a lot of time and effort, with drawing, sketching, and planning over multiple iterations. Although I would like to be remembered for my work through such creations, the truth is that I do more watercolour landscape work.

Digital Oil Painting

CG. If you mentored younger artists who are beginning their art careers what single most important piece of advice would you offer?

Jagadeesh. I’ve noticed that everyone wants to start with a full-scale painting, but the foundation is drawing. Move on to painting only after you have mastered your drawing skills. Your drawing ability will be reflected in your painting. Second, even if you are a traditional artist, learn digital art as well. With new insights, we can bring about changes and improvements. We live in the digital age; the only way forward is to update ourselves. If you are interested in art, you should definitely acquire some digital skills as well.

Digital Oil Painting