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Illustrator Nipen Bhuyan expresses his love for cute illustrations. He takes us through his personal journey as an artist and the approach he chooses along the way.

Illustrations by Nipen Bhuyan
Illustrations by Nipen Bhuyan

“I just liked drawing things around me,” says Nipen Bhuyan, leading to how his tryst with cute illustrations began. Professionally, he started illustrating only while interning with a creative studio. In doing so, he began to like what he was doing. Interactions and feedback from clients, along with inputs from colleagues, ultimately led to his growth.

Illustrations by Nipen Bhuyan
Illustrations by Nipen Bhuyan

Belonging to Arunachal Pradesh, Nipen has always been surrounded by natural scenic beauty. Constantly observing his surroundings has majorly influenced his art and sensibility. “I try to depict everything in the simplest way possible,” the illustrator points out.

NipenBhuyan-away-from-the-city
NipenBhuyan-arey-dada

Working mainly on Photoshop, Nipen is equally comfortable working on Illustrator and has an affinity for depicting cute illustrations through emotions, whether it’s happiness or sadness.

NipenBhuyan-aur-batao
Illustrations by Nipen Bhuyan

Meanwhile, there have been quite a few interesting projects to his name – recently, for a book on the holocaust. The subject was grim and he had to do some research on it, too, but the client found the outcome satisfactory.

NipenBhuyan-childhood
Illustrations by Nipen Bhuyan

On the contrary, the brief for the sticker project for Hike was very simple. Being given the creative freedom to work, as also relevant feedback, was an encouraging sign. “The inputs from the creative team at Hike always helped improve the final outcome,” he asserts.

NipenBhuyan-cocodile_baseball
Illustrations by Nipen Bhuyan

Speaking about maintaining a balance between his own personal cute illustrations apart from commissioned work, Nipen says, “I constantly strive to improve my personal work. Between all the commissioned work, I do take out time to sketch and create something that inspires me. I don’t make any specific effort to commercialise them. If, however, someone likes a particular artwork, I quote an amount.

NipenBhuyan-coffee
Illustrations by Nipen Bhuyan

Coming to his pick of clients, the artist reveals, “There are no best qualities. Some of the clients are always positive and happy with whatever you do and that is, of course, a very pleasant experience.

NipenBhuyan-world-yoga-day
Illustrations by Nipen Bhuyan

Some who are slightly critical or like giving their inputs are also fine. I do like to let them know if I disagree with an edit and, more often than not, they go along with my advice.”

NipenBhuyan-friends
Illustrations by Nipen Bhuyan

Finally, his two cents for new illustrators out there? “You have to be open to criticism or feedback. There is always room for improvement, so be flexible. If your work is good, good projects follow.”

NipenBhuyan-getting-Late
Illustrations by Nipen Bhuyan
Illustrations by Nipen Bhuyan

Published in Issue 53

With pandemic, varients, and lockdowns, the year 2021 has not been kind to most of us, especially those who have lost more than just freedom. Despite all the challenges, adapting to new ways of learning and working, honing many new skills, this year’s design graduates are having uniques issues. This issue focuses on 2021 design graduates to help them shine in some spotlight, whose talent you can surely see through their portfolios.

 

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Vibhav Singh is a Bangalore-based artist and illustrator who has a penchant for storytelling. After gaining popularity in the indie music scene for innovative album arts and event posters now he is keen to take his creative venture, Studio Sideline, forward.

Illustration and Storytelling by Vibhav Singh

After working with Achint Thakkar, he collaborated with Anuv on two more artworks, plus he also recently worked with Tejas for his new album “Outlast”, creating four pieces in total. Now, he is keen to take his creative venture, Studio Sideline, forward.

Illustration and Storytelling by Vibhav Singh

It all started with the love of reading. When he was growing up, his favourite books were sci-fi and fantasy stories, and he always loved the cover illustrations that came with them. He became increasingly fascinated by the storytelling by these images over the years, and it soon turned into a full-fledged career path.

Illustration and Storytelling by Vibhav Singh


He also found music extremely compelling, and in college, he began to make artworks inspired by music. These caught the eye of some people in the indie arts community, and it eventually led him to make posters for Sofar Sounds.

Illustration and Storytelling by Vibhav Singh

There has been no looking back ever since. He has been working on a lot of projects with Converse, Kulture Shop, and Netflix—just to name a few. He has even designed cover artworks for some of Audible’s original stories. His collaboration with Converse as part of their Peace campaign, where he was one of the 9 artists selected from around the world.

Illustration and Storytelling by Vibhav Singh

As he continued to achieve his artistic dreams, Studio Sideline was born. Four storytellers combine their creativity and skills to bring the kind of stories they always wanted to tell but never had the manpower to pull off. ‘Our vision is to tell stories that have heart, and to execute them at the highest quality,’ says Vibhav.

Illustration and Storytelling by Vibhav Singh

What inspired the illustrators to start this company was the large number of people who are returning to illustration as a means of self-expression and storytelling. A range of exciting possibilities has been added to illustration by the digital medium, constantly blurring of lines between illustration, animation, fine art, installation art etc. In fact, movie posters, album covers, and books have been using more illustrated art. 2D animated films are popular once again, as they represent an appreciation for hand-drawn artwork.

Illustration and Storytelling by Vibhav Singh

The secret recipe beyond all this is establishing a successful client-designer relationship. Vibhav’s solution — contracts. Having an idea of the kind of work you do and the way you do it helps to set boundaries for your clients so that everyone knows what to expect.



Setting terms, boundaries, and commercials, preferably in the form of a contract, he recommends that goes a long way.

VibhavSingh-9

Vibhav is still building up his portfolio with unique explorations of storytelling. When asked about what he wants to work on next, he answered, ‘I would love to work on anything that’s narrative-based, primarily book cover illustrations and zines.’

You can uncover the artistic vision of Vibhav Singh creations on his website and follow him along on his visual art pieces on Instagram.

 

And for more exciting behind-the-scenes coverage of other artists & illustrators from around the world be sure to follow Creative Gaga on Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, Pinterest, and LinkedIn.

Kannan Chithralaya
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Kannan Chithralaya is a renowned artist based in Thrissur, Kerala. His keen interest in fine arts has resulted in his wide range of skills across varied mediums including but not limited to watercolours, oil painting, charcoal, acrylic and soft pastels to name a few. Kannan’s experience in abstract and realism paintings have garnered him several national and international accolades.


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Art has a unique way of forging our lives. It has the ability to transform the ordinary into something special. Every artist holds a unique relationship with art. Some use art as a form of expression whereas others use it as a means of escape. Regardless, every artist would attest to the fact that making art is the closest they have come to making magic.

by artist Kannan Chithralaya
Soft Pastel

by artist Kannan Chithralaya
Soft Pastel

For Kannan Chithralaya, art is something that has been with him as far back as he can remember. “I started drawing back when I was a child. I used every second of my day to draw and paint, even during class hours in school.

by artist Kannan Chithralaya
Soft Pastel

My teachers were kind and supportive for the most part, of course, occasional chiding is to be expected. As I began participating in competitions and winning them, I realized that I wished to become a full time artist,” said Kannan, recalling the beginning of his artistic career.

by artist Kannan Chithralaya
Soft Pastel

“Despite being unable to join art school, I opted painting as my career. I initially began working as a part time publicity artist; this is where I learned how to hold the brush and mix colours. My journey as an artist started there and it was soon my only means of bread and butter.”

by artist Kannan Chithralaya
Watercolour

But even as Kannan’s artistic abilities grew tremendously, the commercial artscene in the country took a turn for the worse. “I began receiving several opportunities but then the commercial art scene underwent a drastic change. Many companies began moving towards print media, especially with the advent of advanced print technology.

by artist Kannan Chithralaya
Watercolour

However, I refused to let this pull me down. Even though this affected my livelihood and my family, I focused on bettering my work by observing and studying the works of famous artists. I am still in the process of perfecting my techniques,” said the artist.

by artist Kannan Chithralaya
Watercolour

Kannan’s keen love for art and his determination to master it pushed him to widen his skill set. He produces fine works of art across almost every medium, including but not limited to watercolours, oil, acrylic, charcoal and many more.

Watercolour

“I love watercolours, I use round brushes, high-quality watercolour papers, acrylic, Canvas brushes etc for that. For abstract pictures, I use knife, pencil, soft pastel oil colours and charcoal.”

Watercolour

Upon the numerous paintings that the artist has created, he recalls his most favourite piece as the portrait of his grandmother. “If I must name one favourite piece I would say my grandmother’s portrait. She is the one who raised me & supported me throughout my artistic journey,” recalls the artist fondly.

Watercolour

His one stern advice to the aspiring watercolour artists is that they must remain firmly dedicated to the field. “Take art seriously and dedicate yourself.

Watercolour

Do not try to imitate anyone instead try to develop your own style. It is good to study the works of other artists since it will help you develop ideas and inspire you to improve your art.”

Watercolour

Watercolour

To see more of Kannan Chithralaya’s work, check his website and follow him on Instagram.

 

And for coverages of other artists and illustrators from around the world follow Creative Gaga on Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, Pinterest, and LinkedIn.

Acrylic Painting

Acrylic Painting

Buck is a creative conglomerate working towards amplifying brand voices through design and strategy. With this collaboration with Spotify’s in-house team, a series of stills and animated images have been created to showcase and celebrate the musical genres they present. These creations not only work well across country and western music but extend to all the offerings by Spotify.

 

There is immense research that has gone in to curate the graphics on par with the diverse range of artists and styles. For instance, the 70s album covers have been given a modern twist with the render techniques that are used. The poster’s core concept has also been broken down into a secondary layer, which gives a deconstructed, simple version of the same.

 

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Siddhant Jumde weaves a story through with each textured caricature he creates while balancing the reality of his creations with a sense of humour.

by Cartoonist SiddhantJumde
Yogi Adityanath.
Illustration for India Today magazine.

Siddhant is an illustrator and caricature artist who is inspired by his family and what he grew up watching on the telly. Find out more about his creative process as he answers the burning questions regarding his creative process.

by Cartoonist Siddhant Jumde
Mamata Banerjee.
Illustration for India Today magazine.

CG. When compelled you to pursue being an illustrator and cartoonist as a career?

Siddhant. When I was a kid I used to watch Disney cartoons which had a huge influence on me. Even though I still watch cartoons and animated movies. Eventually, I started drawing on the papers and walls of my house. My mother plays an important role in this. She has a good command of Rangoli, which gave me the knowledge of lines and how it works as a structure for any art. When I got admission to Sir JJ Institute of Applied Arts, where I chose illustration as a subject to specialize in, I used to go to events as a caricature artist. This helped me to build my observation skills. I studied the artwork styles from the Mad Magazine itself. That gave me a perspective to draw things differently.

by Cartoonist Siddhant Jumde
Narendra Modi, beard man.

I follow The great Balasaheb Thackeray’s cartoons, Rajsaheb Thackeray’s cartoons. They inspire me a lot. Their work shows me the weight of lines and the character designs of political personalities. I was seeking an opportunity to show my art skills and wanted to establish myself in the market. So that’s the time I got an opportunity to work with Hindustan times as an illustrator and cartoonist. And now I am working in the India Today group as a Chief illustrator. I think these masters have made me jump into this beautiful profession.

by Cartoonist Siddhant Jumde
Tribute to late Balasaheb Thackeray



CG. What does the creative process behind creating a story based character look like?

Siddhant. Well, I do lots of scribbles for a story(like every artist does). First of all, I get the stories from the editorial team and then the fun part begins. It’s an exercise for me to experiment with the characters or the situations. I do options for a story then I get the inputs, suggestions to make the artwork beautiful and appealing. It’s like teamwork that nurtures me to bring out good results.

by Cartoonist Siddhant Jumde
Illustration for a story

Earlier I used to draw on paper then I scanned it, transferred it to photoshop and then with the help of Pentablet the rendering part started. And now I work on an iPad Pro which saves a lot. There are the rough pencil drawings with the rough executions which goes to the approval. Then I have to decide which art style will look perfect with the particular story. So I keep trying and searching for references which motivates me to develop a style for that story.

by Cartoonist Siddhant Jumde
Mahatma Gandhi, tried to capture the calmness

I do ask my colleagues, my seniors, my mentor Nilanjan Das(Group Creative Editor) whether the character, the idea, the visual look okay or not. It’s an interesting part of my journey where I learn the different aspects, like how others see your art. That improves you better according to me. These things help me to develop the character or visual for any story. So once it gets approved then the most exciting part starts i.e. the inking & rendering.

by Cartoonist Siddhant Jumde
Balasaheb Thackeray

CG. What sparked the creation of textured caricatures?

Siddhant. As I said, I am a fan of Disney Animation. And now there are many animation Studios with their unique style, also I search and follow many artists and their art styles. I somehow try to capture their mind, like how they develop these amazing artworks. I started seeing the softness in every charm just. Earlier I was distorting them differently but somehow I felt that the character must attract the audience or the reader, they just adore them at least in caricatures.

by Cartoonist Siddhant Jumde
Nirmala Sitharaman.
Illustration for India Today magazine.

Whenever I develop a political personality I make sure that they look cute and lovable. I don’t want to make them ugly or make them look bad(people don’t like the ugly versions of themselves). So I understood the requirements and mixed all these things to develop these textured characters. Making style is an Accidental part. I was not sure about the style I am working with but once I started creating it, I experimented with it, looking at these Pixar, Disney, DreamWorks movies helps me to develop it. It’s like going with the flow.

by Cartoonist Siddhant Jumde
Illustration for India Today magazine.

CG. What do you hope to communicate through creating caricatures of political leaders for the India Today Magazine?

Siddhant. I believe India Today has allowed me to explore and expand my work in front of readers. My job is to deliver beautiful work with some addition of cuteness and humour in it without disturbing the image of politicians. Whether the story is positive or negative, the character must look cute. As I said, I create caricatures according to the story. It’s like the transformation of words into visuals.

by Cartoonist Siddhant Jumde
Ashok Gehlot. Illustration for India Today magazine.

CG. How does sketching the faces of characters aid in relieving stress?

Siddhant. For me and every artist, it’s a boon. Sometimes you capture the features, sometimes it is difficult. It acts like a stress buster somehow if you captured it quickly or easily. Or you have to keep struggling with the prominent features. But yes, it is an exercise for your brain. It gives you happiness once you get the character perfect while drawing.

by Cartoonist Siddhant Jumde
Prakash Javadekar. Illustration for India Today magazine.

As an artist we(artists) look at the people differently. We are just studying their faces, expressions etc. I keep on thinking about the faces and bone structure etc. And then drawing them on my iPad. It keeps my brain functioning properly.



CG. How do you conceive the idea for a concept for an illustration?

Siddhant. When I get the story I started searching for the words which helps me to draw the small thumbnails of it. Once I got the required thumbnails, I combined them into a single piece of art. And based on more options. Then it goes for approval. After that If my seniors think that there must be some addition to it then they give me the inputs.

Considering all the info and inputs I get, I started modifying the visual to look appealing to the readers. As I said to get the best result, we must discuss our visions with seniors or colleagues. And keep them asking until they get bored. For any creative mind, this is mandatory according to me.

by Cartoonist Siddhant Jumde
Sharad Pawar. Illustration for India Today magazine.

CG. How does the process for creating illustration art for a digital Magazine differ from the process of developing art for a newspaper?

Siddhant. Yes, there is a difference in the process for both platforms. In magazines, we usually get time to work. But for a newspaper, there is a limitation of time. Because the stories are fresh and it’s going for printing today for tomorrow, hence we get less time to work minutely on artworks.

SiddhantJumde
Priyanka Gandhi Vadra.
Illustration for India Today magazine.

Magazines are published weekly or monthly, so you get a lot of time yet you can experiment with styles also. Earlier for newspaper, I tried a fixed style just to deliver it on time. It’s like a quick job. Now for the magazine, I get enough time to experiment with the styles also.

SiddhantJumde
Mamata Banerjee.

CG. As you play with textures and styles throughout your artistic creations, how do you ensure the texture and style matches the objective of the outlet you are creating for?

Siddhant. Well, that depends upon the brief. I have to decide which style looks good for that particular story. While doing scribbles I can judge how the final artwork will look. Sometimes it gets tough for me to visualize, so I redo it. It must look convincing to me. If I am getting stuck, I search for inspiration.

SiddhantJumde
Yogi Adityanath. Illustration for India Today magazine.

CG. What do you hope to relay to spectators of your art through the cover illustrations for India Today and Reader’s Digest?

Siddhant. Basically to give the information about the story. Visuals can tell so many things without mentioning any word. I like to tell the base of the story or the scenario in a funny way to the readers. Creating cover illustrations gives me the freedom to put the vision in front of them. At the end of the day, a reader should smile, laugh looking at the visual. My motive is to give a good visual treat to the audience/readers.

SiddhantJumde
Arnab Goswami. An"chor"

CG. What is the difference between geometrical caricatures and textured caricatures?

Siddhant. Geometrical caricatures are flat vector drawings. It includes different shapes like triangles, circles, rectangles etc. Textured caricatures are more like 3D drawings or 2D drawings where you can play with the dimensions(light, shadows, mid-tones).

SiddhantJumde
Time lapse life after lockdown.

CG. How do you imagine the different characters that can be a part of a story before you start illustrating them?

Siddhant. Well as an artist I must say that if you want to develop a character you must see yourself like that character and try to act like it. I have to observe my facial expressions. It helps me to visualize the character. I still follow Disney artists theory. I observe lots of people and their behaviour while travelling. I observe faces around me. Also, the practice makes me sure about the character while drawing.

SiddhantJumde
Illustration for India Today magazine.

I make lots of rough sketches, watch Jim Carrey movies, acts, old animated series, cartoons before going for the final approach. It’s a warm-up for me. There are so many tutorials available which helps to motivate me. That’s how I imagine different characters. All credit goes to these masters and their masterpieces.

SiddhantJumde
Illustration for Business Today magazine.

You can chuckle along with the textured caricatures of Siddhant Jumde on Behance, Instagram, Twitter, Facebook.

 

And for more exciting behind-the-scenes coverage of other artists & illustrators from around the world be sure to follow Creative Gaga on Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, Pinterest, and LinkedIn.

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Sahil Trivedi developed an artistic eye for creating visual worlds for millions of gamers around the world from a very young age. After completing his Master’s in Animation Film Design at IDC IIT Mumbai, he is the illustrator behind the stunning visuals of games like Plants vs Zombies, Bejeweled Blitz, and more to come.

Draw a World of Fantasy with Sahil Trivedi
Draw a World of Fantasy with Sahil Trivedi

Sahil grew up on a diet of cartoons and video games, developing an artistic eye for creating visual worlds for millions of gamers around the world. While some people are trying to make their dreams come true, he became a concept artist to make his dreams so real that millions of people can live in them.

Draw a World of Fantasy with Sahil Trivedi

After getting a call back in 2018, he began working with the Art Director at Electronic Arts Hyderabad (EAH). The Art Director had previously been following his work for five years and created a position based on his portfolio and skills. Since then, he has been working at EA to create the perfect game and relentlessly pushing ahead as he gains more and more creative control over his projects.



If you wonder how creative the dreams he has created are, they are as quirky as the characters in Plants vs. Zombies 2. Sahil was one of only two art team members for that popular video game. “I’ve had the greatest pleasure to work on such a title with contributions of almost more than 25+ characters, environments, and tons of RnD to thrive on,’ he says”. But there is one more project which is his favourite, Bejeweled Blitz. He enjoyed being able to create environments and rare gems for the game, and his creation has today helped to make the game extremely popular.

Draw a World of Fantasy with Sahil Trivedi

To understand his journey, we hit rewind. While his creative calling started from a young age, his journey towards becoming a professional concept artist began after joining as a Fine Arts student in Ahmedabad. Despite his successes, he firmly believes that everyone is capable of great things but only our upbringing and other factors pull us down from touching the sky. ‘For me, fine arts was a place for creative freedom where nobody judges you for who you are. It makes you embrace who you are as an individual,’ he says. In the sea of creative paths, it helped him decide where he could make his dreams come true. Soon after, he joined Masters in Animation Film Design at IDC IIT Mumbai. ‘I got to learn the basics of animation film design to the finished level of filmmaking,’ he says. Since then, there has been no looking back.

Draw a World of Fantasy with Sahil Trivedi
Draw a World of Fantasy with Sahil Trivedi

A professional degree from a college can help you connect to people across many fields, leading to more opportunities for collaboration, learning, and growth. Colleges do put you through a trial by fire to help you figure out who you are and who you want to be. He thinks that they are less about instruction than about giving you vague directions to help you explore.

Draw a World of Fantasy with Sahil Trivedi

Since being a part of a premier gaming organisation, we curiously ask him what motivates him to keep pushing the boundaries of his canvas. `I have had the opportunity to work on the Looney Toons dash runner game, Ice Age match-3 game and the most challenging RnD project from King Studios,’ he says. He is also involved in a feature film project as well which is yet to be announced. He keeps his projects diverse so he can continue to aim high and not be boxed in. He is currently hoping to work as an Art Director for a mobile/iPad game.

sahil-trivedi-tumbleweed-3


So how do you think aspiring concept artists can get paid for being their best selves? He answers by saying it is possible by ‘being a little selfish about work’. He observes that a lot of fresh graduates/students are seeking an online presence. But instead of chasing higher numbers, it is much more important to create a portfolio with an amazing presence of self-value. While chasing numbers on social media can give you a rush of dopamine, when it comes to creativity, it is all about the artist.

sahil-trivedi-woods-final

You can experience the work of Sahil Trivedi on his website and Instagram page.


And for more exciting behind-the-scenes coverage of other artists & illustrators from around the world be sure to follow
Creative Gaga on Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, Pinterest and LinkedIn.

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The enchanting portraits of Anna Dittmann evoke different emotions. It is a right blend of real emotions showcased in a dreamy, whimsical setting using delicate detailing with natural elements. Here, she gives us an insight into her creative process and discusses how one’s passion can be moulded to create striking designs.

Enchanting Natural Portraits
Oil

Enchanting Natural Portraits
Chalice

CG: Your illustrations are mystical portraits with delicate detailing which is heavily influenced by natural elements. What fascinates you to utilise these elements in your illustrations?

AD: I love the beauty and unpredictability of nature – it perfectly complements the human face. Most of my work consists of portraits because I enjoy depicting characters and emotions. I often draw inspiration from movement and organic shapes by fusing abstract natural elements. Environment evokes a sense of mystery which is very appealing. Therefore, I tend to create soft pieces with a combination of graphics and realistic elements.

Enchanting Natural Portraits
Spore

Enchanting Natural Portraits
Ink



CG: As a digital artist, what aspects of the tool attract you the most? Do you like to work in the traditional mediums as well?

AD: Digital art gives you the freedom to make as many studies/mistakes/finished pieces without wasting materials. When it comes to working with traditional mediums, I have recently enjoyed using pastels, watercolours, and oils for personal studies and I try to incorporate the textures of these to bring a spontaneous effect in my art created digitally too.

Enchanting Natural Portraits
Petal

Enchanting Natural Portraits
Camouflage

CG: What are the key points that you take into consideration when developing an idea into a design?

AD: With the portrait as the central aspect of my work, rendering and detailing facial features is the key. I love observing unique features and painting beauty that might not be traditional, but still striking. Through my art, I hope to inspire a sense of otherworldly beauty and mystery. The balance of a realistic figure within decorative surroundings is an aesthetic that I love and often try to apply to my work.

Enchanting Natural Portraits
Myriad

Enchanting Natural Portraits
Orb

CG: Your portraits illustrations are realistic and evoke emotions. How do you manage to do so? Are there any specific tools/ elements that you incorporate?

AD: Many of my portraits deal with liberation, release, and the search for a dream state. Perhaps because that’s what art is to me. Painting is therapeutic. I create my works digitally using Adobe Photoshop CS6 and my trusty Wacom Intuos 3 tablet. Mainly use a chalky brush throughout my process, as well as various watercolour textures that I’ve found and made for a traditional feel. Normally, I start with a vague concept in mind and sketch out my idea in black and white. After tweaking the composition, values, and being generally nitpicky, I start seeking out references and refining my sketch. Next, I start throwing in textures and add colour using layer modes. Toward the end, I detail the piece and call it a day.

Enchanting Natural Portraits
Dawn



Enchanting Natural Portraits
Bauhinia

CG: How has formal education in Art and Design helped your process or creations?

AD: I attended the Savannah College of Art and Design in Georgia and received my Illustration BFA in 2015. I loved being surrounded by creative people with a similar passion for art, who pushed, taught, and inspired me on a daily basis. I think the greatest benefit was learning more about the business side of illustration through my professors who had practical experience and making connections with other artists. However, I find that art school is really what you make of it and not entirely necessary for an artistic career (aside from those majors that require a degree). In the end, I feel that most growth occurs by the time and effort you’re willing to put in for improvement, as well as being driven by self-initiated projects.

Enchanting Natural Portraits
Tigress

Enchanting Natural Portraits
Duo

CG: How important is a colour palette in design?

AD: Over the years, my style has become more muted and monochromatic. I’m drawn to works that have colour restraints and which emphasises the atmosphere. Muted hues can often lead to greater balance and provide cohesion throughout a piece. There’s a delicate vintage quality that can result in limiting a colour palette. The colours I choose are inspired by flora, fauna (particularly insects), and other artworks. Even though I tend to start in black and white and prefer limited palettes, adding hue is my favourite step. After seeing an inspiring colour scheme, there’s nothing I want to do more than paint.

Enchanting Natural Portraits
The-Forgotten-Tale-of-Larsa

Enchanting Natural Portraits
Felis

CG: What aspect of illustrating excites you the most?

AD: I love everything about art and get very excited about every project I undertake. I love all the emotions that art evokes in me; it could be the rush when something is going well or the frustration of working for hours with no fruitful outcome. It is the thrill when I find beautiful artwork, the overwhelming feeling that turns my frustration into inspiration. I consider myself so lucky that people have given me opportunities to create art both personally and professionally.

Enchanting Natural Portraits
Flood

Enchanting Natural Portraits
Fragment



CG: What is your advice to budding artists?

AD: When you love what you do, the process involved and the experience, it will definitely show in your work! Be disciplined; draw every day even if it is just a little sketch. Introspect and understand the elements that attract you the most and what you personally enjoy creating. By doing so, your own voice will emerge. Look for possibilities and gain an online presence to showcase your work; never stop making lots of wonderful things (whatever that may mean to you).

Enchanting Natural Portraits
Soul Breather

Enchanting Natural Portraits
Beverley

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We go through many interesting design projects each day and find them inspiring enough to be shared further. Projects which have the potential to inspire and spark multiple ideas. So, here are few selected one for this week’s illustration inspiration, enjoy!

Illustration Inspiration by Nitin Nigde
Illustration Inspiration by Nitin Nigde
Illustration Inspiration by Nitin Nigde
Illustration Inspiration by Nitin Nigde
Illustration Inspiration by Nitin Nigde

Illustrations by Nitin Nigde

Illustration Inspiration by Ramya Hegde
Illustration Inspiration by Ramya Hegde
Illustration Inspiration by Ramya Hegde

Illustrations by Ramya Hegde

Illustration Inspiration by Aurelien Predal
Illustration Inspiration by Aurelien Predal
Illustration Inspiration by Aurelien Predal
Illustration Inspiration by Aurelien Predal
Illustration Inspiration by Aurelien Predal

Illustrations by Aurelien Predal

Illustrations by Roshan Kurichiyanil



Illustrations by Vibhav Singh

Illustrations by Aaron Blaise

If you have any of your design/ illustration project or someone else’s, which is equally inspiring for fellow creatives, then share it with us at contribute@creativegaga.com

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A Pop art artist with bold choices in patterns and lines, the captivating art of Dhiman Gupta.

Pop art by Dhiman Gupta

With a keen interest in English Literature and Cinema, Dhiman Gupta channels his vibrant colours and lines in his pop art. Along with a unique sense of style, he captures the audience with his digital pop art creations. Dhiman Gupta gives a sneak peek into his creative process.

Pop art by Dhiman Gupta

CG. How do you choose the bold and vibrant colour scheme that is a distinctive quality in your illustrations?

Dhiman. Creativity for me is all about courage and audacity. I guess the bold and vibrant colour scheme of my illustrations reflects the same spirit. I call it “a collage of geometric shapes in bold colours”.

Pop art by Dhiman Gupta

CG. Upon observations, there is a definite keen interest in Hollywood that comes through in your art, where does this stem from?

Dhiman. I guess this stems from my interest in English literature and world cinema.

Pop art by Dhiman Gupta

CG. What do you want to communicate to the comic book reader community through the “DaBong Diaries”?

Dhiman. I have created ‘DaBong Diaries’ mixing many strange potions from across India. I want to tell stories mixing science and art again keeping India in mind.

Pop art by Dhiman Gupta

CG. How did it feel to be the only Indian artist shortlisted for the FIDA Fashion Illustration 2020 Awards? Does this create additional pressure to create more innovative illustrations?

Dhiman. I was ecstatic. Yes, it creates additional pressure to match international standards. But then I strongly feel that art dissolves all boundaries and I perform best under deadlines and pressure. So the pressure is quite a good thing for me.

Pop art by Dhiman Gupta


CG. With a diverse variety of powerhouse actresses and models featured in your illustrations, which is your favourite piece so far?

Dhiman. I feel Bella Hadid has the most drawable and the most photogenic face amongst all the recognisable faces in recent times. I am sure her face is a visual feast for any artist.

CG. How did the concept of playing with curse words and infusing Shakespearean works into that come from?

Dhiman. I love anything written by William Shakespeare. It has been a lifelong passion. I feel his texts should be made more accessible for the general audience. Curse words seemed to be the easiest thing to start with.

CG. How do you choose which personalities should be the focal point in your illustrations?

Dhiman. It can be anyone. I always have tried to capture a fleeting expression in my illustrations that will live forever

Pop art by Dhiman Gupta

CG. Which rendering techniques and software do you use to create bold digital art?

Dhiman. I have been using Adobe Animate Pro (previously Macromedia Flash) for the last 20 years. I have such a great relationship with the software that I can almost draw with my eyes closed 🙂 I am planning to switch to iPad Pro soon to use ProCreate.

CG. Will there be a fourth title to the “DaBong Dairies”?

Dhiman. Oh yes! In my mind, I am ready with at least the next three stories. I will be through with the fourth one by next year.

CG. What kind of work do you want to create next?

Dhiman. I want to establish DaBong as a super detective (he has tremendous potential) and keep communicating ideas/stories through my art.

Pop art by Dhiman Gupta

CG. What words of wisdom would you like to impart to the illustrators just starting their creative journey?

Dhiman. As the famous saying goes “good artists copy, great artists steal”. It is very important to get inspired by the works of various artists from across the world. Only then will we be able to find our style. And that’s the ultimate objective, to have our unique style.

You can discover the diverse portfolio of Dhiman Gupta on his website and follow him along on his creative endeavours on Instagram.

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